Northrop Grumman Participates in Pacific 2012 International Maritime Conference in Australia

first_img Northrop Grumman Participates in Pacific 2012 International Maritime Conference in Australia Back to overview,Home naval-today Northrop Grumman Participates in Pacific 2012 International Maritime Conference in Australia Northrop Grumman Corporation is participating in the Pacific 2012 International Maritime Conference in Sydney, Australia, where it will highlight its maritime security capabilities and programmes, including marine navigation and ship control technology, and unmanned aircraft systems for maritime and coastal surveillance.The Pacific 2012 show is the commercial maritime and naval defence showcase for the Asia-Pacific region and will take place at the Sydney Exhibition and Convention Centre from 31 Jan. – 3 Feb. 2012.“We have strong, well-established business relationships in Australia and across the Asia-Pacific region, and we have considerable capabilities to offer,” said David T. Perry, vice president and general manager, Northrop Grumman’s Naval and Marine Systems Division. “We are committed to working closely with our customers to provide long-term solutions and help enhance defence and maritime security across the region.”Among the capabilities being highlighted by Northrop Grumman are the company’s multirole electronically scanned array radar which has been integrated into Australia’s Wedgetail airborne early warning and control aircraft. Northrop Grumman’s airborne surveillance capability will also be highlighted with models on display of the MQ-4C Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Unmanned Aircraft System (BAMS UAS) based on a maritime derivative of the combat-proven RQ-4 Global Hawk unmanned aircraft.“Our core competencies are strongly aligned with the current and evolving global security priorities of our customers, including intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance,” said J.J. Quinn, vice president, unmanned systems business development, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems. “Northrop Grumman provides unmatched surveillance capabilities, with clear strengths in unmanned and airborne early warning technologies. Our customers in the Pacific Rim demand the best, and it’s our priority to continue to meet and exceed their expectations.”Highlighted also will be the company’s latest generation of marine navigation technology, the MK39 Mod 4 inertial navigation system, the AQS-24A and AN/AES-1 airborne mine-hunting systems, and the Littoral Combat Ship Mission Package Integrator programme.The company is a world leader in the manufacturing of naval gyrocompasses and inertial navigation systems. Its latest Mod 4 version of the MK 39 inertial navigation solution provides both high accuracy geographic position information, with or without GPS, and precise attitude and heading data for fire control stabilization and weapons initialization. The MK39 Mod 4 system forms part of the suite of navigation systems and sensors being supplied currently by Northrop Grumman for the Royal Australian Navy’s new Canberra-class landing helicopter dock.The AQS-24A airborne mine-hunting system and its predecessors have been the only operational airborne mine-hunting search systems used by the U.S. Navy for the past 27 years. The AQS-24A is a high-speed mine-hunting system that is primarily towed from the MH-53E helicopter but can be adapted to smaller aircraft.The AN/AES-1 Airborne Laser Mine Detection System is designed to detect, classify and localize floating and near-surface moored mines and is being integrated into the MH-60S helicopter as part of the mine countermeasures mission package on the U.S. Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship.Northrop Grumman is a leading global security company providing innovative systems, products and solutions in aerospace, electronics, information systems, and technical services to government and commercial customers worldwide.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , January 27, 2012; Image:  ausmepa View post tag: Sydney View post tag: Northrop January 27, 2012 View post tag: Australia View post tag: Grumman Training & Educationcenter_img View post tag: 2012 View post tag: Maritime View post tag: Participates View post tag: Pacific View post tag: International View post tag: conference Share this articlelast_img read more

See More

U.S. Coast Guard Ends Search for 42-Year-Old Man

first_img View post tag: man View post tag: Naval Authorities View post tag: Ends Share this article Back to overview,Home naval-today U.S. Coast Guard Ends Search for 42-Year-Old Man View post tag: search View post tag: News by topic U.S. Coast Guard Ends Search for 42-Year-Old Man View post tag: Guard View post tag: 42-Year-Old View post tag: Navy The Coast Guard ended its search at 10:25 a.m. Monday for a 42-year-old man after the 21-foot boat he was aboard allided with a jetty in Kent Narrows, Md., Sunday.A crew from the Maryland Natural Resources Police recovered the man 10 yards away from the scene of the allision.A member of the Queen Anne’s County Fire Rescue contacted watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Baltimore at approximately 11:30 p.m. reporting a boat with four people aboard had struck a jetty in Kent Narrows.A 50-year-old man and a 46-year-old woman with injuries were medevaced by a crew aboard a Maryland State Police helicopter and transported to a hospital. The remaining person was uninjured.A crew aboard a 45-foot Response Boat – Medium from Coast Guard Station Annapolis, Md., a crew aboard an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter from Coast Guard Air Station Atlantic City, N.J., crews aboard Maryland State Police helicopters, Maryland Natural Resources Police boatcrews and Queen Anne’s County Fire Rescue boatcrews responded to search for the man.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , May 29, 2012 View post tag: coast May 29, 2012 View post tag: U.S. View post tag: Forlast_img read more

See More

Diabetes, Obesity and Nutrition Physician Scientist (3-309-992/993)

first_imgThe Department of Medicine’s Endocrinology, Diabetes &Nutrition Division at the University of Maryland School of Medicineis recruiting for full-time Associate/fullProfessor-basic/clinical/translational scientist-investigators witha focus on diabetes, obesity and nutrition.Clinical care responsibilities are not required, however, can beincorporated for the right candidate, provided the candidate isBE/BC in Endocrinology and is eligible for an independent Marylandmedical license. Expected faculty rank for this position isAssistant Professor or higher, however, final rank, tenure statusand salary will be commensurate with selected candidate’squalifications and experience.For immediate consideration, please send a cover letter and arecent CV, including names and contact information of threereferences.For additional questions after application, please [email protected] :Successful candidates will be accomplished, federally fundedinvestigators, with a strong record of publications and documentedexperience in teaching, mentoring and leadership. Qualifiedcandidates are expected to contribute to the research, teachingand/or clinical missions of the University, sustain an externallyfunded individual research program consistent with the Departmentand School of Medicine’s vision, assist in the recruitment offunded investigators, and enhance research opportunities for thedivision. Ample time will be protected for research.last_img read more

See More

Brasenose grad’s attempt to sue Oxford dismissed

first_imgThe High Court has dismissed Oxford graduate Faiz Siddiqui’s case against Oxford University. Siddiqui had sought damages of £1m after receiving a low 2:1 instead of the first he expected.The History student, who graduated from Brasenose College in 2000, claimed his academic disappointment had been due to poor teaching in his Indian Special Subject.The University said in a statement: “History has been studied and taught with distinction at Oxford for longer than at almost any other university and the quality and range of its History teaching and examining across the collegiate University has long been widely recognised.”According to the court summary, Siddiqui claimed his exam performance had prevented him from gaining a position at a top American Law college and had given him a “shattering blow” that had precipitated serious mental health issues.Siddiqui achieved his poorest marks in the History ‘gobbets’ paper.Siddiqui claimed that he had only been taught enough material to answer “5% of the gobbets”.However, it was suggested that Siddiqui’s poor performance could have been explained by a number of factors, including “a severe episode of hay fever.”A subject ambassador for History at Corpus Christi College, Emily Foster, said: “It is definitely possible to do all the work in the world and still have a terrible paper – not everything comes up every year.“Generally the teaching can vary a lot depending on the tutor’s interests but we have so few contact hours (typically no more than 3-4 a week) that I really couldn’t see that affecting his degree substantially.“Most of our work is pretty self-guided. As you can probably tell whilst I sympathise with Siddiqui I can’t really imagine any degree of bad teaching setting him that far back given how much work we do ourselves.”The court concluded: “When students are incurring substantial debts to pursue their university education, the quality of the education delivered will undoubtedly come under even greater scrutiny than it did in the past.“There may be some rare cases where some claim for compensation for the inadequacy of the tuition provided may succeed, but it is hardly the ideal way of achieving redress.“Litigation is costly, time and emotion consuming and runs the significant risk of failure, particularly in this area where establishing a causative link between the quality of teaching and any alleged “injury” is fraught with difficulty.“There must be a better way of dealing with this kind of issue if it cannot be resolved by the individual concerned simply accepting what has happened and finding a positive way forward.”last_img read more

See More

Indiana Supreme Court responds to Holcomb request regarding Hill status

first_img Pinterest WhatsApp By Tommie Lee – May 18, 2020 1 352 Indiana Supreme Court responds to Holcomb request regarding Hill status Twitter Facebook Google+ WhatsApp IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market (Photo supplied/Indiana A.G. Curtis Hill) Indiana’s Supreme Court has responded to the governor’s request regarding the status of Attorney General Curtis Hill.The Court denied Governor Holcomb’s request to determine whether Curtis Hill can remain the state’s Attorney General.If the Court had clarified the vacancy question, it would have allowed Holcomb to name a new person to the post.In their summary the Court ruled that they should not offer up advisory opinions and said it would be inappropriate for them to rule on the status of the current vacancy in the office.It seems likely that Hill return to the office after his suspension expires. Pinterest Twitter Google+ Facebook Previous articlePortage woman arrested after allegedly throwing joint at officerNext articleNotre Dame classes to resume in August Tommie Leelast_img read more

See More

Detailed guide: Local COVID alert level: very high (Greater Manchester)

first_imgNorth East South West Yorkshire and The Humber North West replaced by National lockdown – Stay at Home,Decisions on which area goes into which tier are primarily based on 5 key epidemiological indicators: Cumbria Greater Manchester Lancashire, Blackburn with Darwen, and Blackpool Warrington and Cheshire Region Herefordshire Shropshire, and Telford and Wrekin Worcestershire Bath and North East Somerset Bristol Cornwall Devon, Plymouth and Torbay Dorset North Somerset South Gloucestershire Wiltshire City of York and North Yorkshire The Humber: East Riding of Yorkshire, Kingston upon Hull/Hull, North East Lincolnshire and North Lincolnshire South Yorkshire (Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotheram, Sheffield) West Yorkshire (Bradford, Calderdale, Kirklees, Leeds, Wakefield) West Midlands East of England Derby and Derbyshire Leicester City and Leicestershire Lincolnshire Northamptonshire Nottingham and Nottinghamshire Liverpool City Region Tier 4: Stay at HomeEast Midlands Rutland North Westcenter_img West Midlands North East Combined Authority (this area includes the local authorities of County Durham, Gateshead, South Tyneside and Sunderland) North of Tyne Combined Authority (this area includes the local authorities of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, North Tyneside and Northumberland) Tees Valley Combined Authority (this area includes the local authorities of Darlington, Hartlepool, Middlesbrough, Redcar and Cleveland, and Stockton-on-Tees) London case detection rates in all age groups case detection rates in the over-60s the rate at which cases are rising or falling positivity rate (the number of positive cases detected as a percentage of tests taken) pressure on the NHS Berkshire Brighton and Hove, East Sussex and West Sussex Buckinghamshire Hampshire, Southampton and Portsmouth Isle of Wight Kent and Medway Oxfordshire Surrey Bedford, Central Bedfordshire, Luton and Milton Keynes Cambridgeshire Essex, Southend-on-Sea and Thurrock Hertfordshire Norfolk Peterborough Suffolk All 32 London boroughs plus City of London Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole Gloucestershire (Cheltenham, Cotswold, Forest of Dean, Gloucester City, Stroud and Tewkesbury) Somerset (Mendip, Sedgemoor, Somerset West and Taunton, and South Somerset) Swindon South East Tier 2: High alertNo areas are currently in Tier 2.Tier 3: Very High alertEast Midlands Isles of Scilly South West Birmingham, Dudley, Sandwell, Walsall and Wolverhampton Coventry Solihull Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Warwickshire The indicators are designed to provide a full picture of what is happening with the virus in any area so that suitable action can be taken.Each bullet point on this list constitutes an ‘area’ for the purposes of guidance.Find out more information on tiers, including what you can and cannot do in each tier.Tier 1: Medium alertSouth Westlast_img read more

See More

Theater Reimagined – Innovation at Harvard

first_imgUnder the leadership of Artistic Director Diane Paulus, the American Repertory Theater (A.R.T.) is seeking new ways to redefine and reimagine theater for the Harvard community and beyond. As professor of the practice of theatre in the Faculty of Arts and Science’s Department of English, she pursues a goal of giving every Harvard student a truly transformative experience of theater.last_img

See More

Hostas

first_imgVersatile and hardy, hostas are quickly becoming one of the most popular perennial plants grown in Georgia landscapes. Sometimes referred to as plantain lilies, hostas can thrive in both shade and partial sun. Besides having wonderful foliage, many cultivars produce fragrant flowers from early summer to fall. Available in several leaf and flower colorsHosta’s flowers are trumpet-like in shape and may be white, lavender, light blue or bicolored. Host’s foliage can also be colorful, ranging from shades of yellow, green, gold to white. Some even have a blueish tint to their leaves. Variegated forms also exist. There are hundreds of hosta varieties available to homeowners today, and more varieties become available each year. Diversity in leaf color, plant shape and form make hostas excellent candidates for a wide variety of landscape situations. Their size can range from a few inches in diameter to several feet across. They grow and spread using underground stems called rhizomes. They prefer well-drained soils amended with organic matter, such as compost or manure, and do best in raised beds. They will not tolerate soggy conditions, especially during the winter months. To plant hostas, dig a hole as deep as the root ball and at least twice as wide as its diameter. Then backfill and water well. Space hosta plants according to their spread at maturity. Divide in the springMarch and early spring, when a hosta’s new leaves start to emerge, are the perfect times to divide hostas, transplant them or add new hostas to your landscape. Dividing can be done either by cutting away a section of a clump with a sharp shovel or by lifting the root mass and separating it by hand. Separate the plant so that an “eye” is present in each division. Very small divisions tend to establish slowly. Most hostas can be divided in four to five years, depending on the vigor of the clumps. Hostas are known for thriving jn the shade, but it is important to know the specific needs of each hosta variety selected. Some need more sun, while others experience leaf discoloration or leaf scorching when they don’t have enough shade. Hostas respond best to light fertilization. Soil testing will help determine lime and fertilizer requirements. Without the benefit of a soil test, apply one-half pound of 10-10-10 fertilizer per 100 sq. ft. at planting or when growth emerges in the spring. Slow release fertilizers can also be used to meet nutrition needs throughout the growing season. Gardeners should place mulch around hostas to help conserve moisture. Keep them moist but not wet by applying supplemental irrigation only when necessary. Hot summer days may require additional irrigation. Avoid planting hostas in areas that receive direct afternoon sun. Pests include slugs, snails and deerHostas are tough plants and are otherwise healthy. Insects and diseases are seldom a problem. However, slugs and snails will devour hostas if given the opportunity. Organic controls or applications of registered insecticides are sometimes needed to control slugs and snails. In many areas, deer may be a problem. Deer often eat hosta foliage when other food is scarce. Deer repellants may give temporary control, however, fencing or the watchful eye of the pet dog may be the only sure way to keep deer away. For more information on growing hostas, see the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension publication “Growing Hostas” at www.caes.uga.edu/publications.last_img read more

See More

Big Beasts of the Blue Ridge

first_imgThe 8 Toughest Ultras in the SouthAt one time, ultramarathons were a niche sport. They were ridiculously long distance races that only the craziest endurance athletes were willing to attempt.Today, several hundred ultramarathons occur around the United States every year. Although an ultramarathon is technically anything longer that 26.2 miles, the most extreme races push the boundaries of humans can endure.Karl Meltzer, former holder of the fastest known time on the Appalachian Trail, has completed more than 100 ultramarathons since 1996. For him, these long-distance races are less cutthroat than other sports and are about more than the physical challenge.“The mental part is can I actually suck it up for 20 hours, 30 hours, 40 hours, or whatever,” he said. “That’s the fun part—well sort of the fun part—when you cross the finish line.  It doesn’t even matter what your time is. It’s just a matter of you got it done. That’s the real addiction.”Southern Appalachia is home to some of the country’s toughest ultras. If you’re looking to test your mettle, these events will take you to the edge.Pinhoti 100 (Ala.)November 2-3, 2019Starting from Pine Glen Campground, runners have to contend with rocky trails and more than 28,000 feet of elevation change over this 100-mile course. Through the Talladega National Forest in Alabama, competitors climb and descend Mount Cheaha, the highest point in the state.Meltzer, a three-time Pinhoti winner, lives in the mountains of Utah but said he enjoys running the trails back east among the trees.“I like to run in the woods,” he said. “Having done the A.T. three times, that’s a pretty good example of what I like to do. So Pinhoti was really a great fit. The beauty is being actually in the woods and being away from everything else.”Over the years, more races have begun using lotteries for race entries as they become more popular. In most cases, the trail can only handle so many runners meaning race directors are limited in how much they can grow. That’s why Meltzer enjoys the lesser known races that still challenge his endurance.“I don’t care who is there, how competitive it is, I really just want a good course where I enjoy myself instead of doing what other people think I should do or trying to run the Western States as fast as I can,” he said. “I mean those races are great too, don’t get me wrong, but there’s so much hype and media around a few certain races. I think the low-key race, like Pinhoti, is what I like the best.”Mount Mitchell Challenge (N.C.)February 23, 2019Jay Curwen won the first Mount Mitchell Challenge in 1999, a 40-mile race to the top of the highest peak on the East Coast and back to the town of Black Mountain. Two decades later, Curwen has taken over for his father as race director of the challenge and accompanying marathon.“At the end of the day, you only run one hill,” Guido Ferrari said. “But it’s one hill that is 20 miles long. There are not that many races that can claim that kind of consistent ascent. Then you have to come all the way down.”Ferrari was friends with Curwen’s father and was the first one to sign up for the original marathon. He has now run the challenge every single year since.“It has become a streak,” he said. “Once you run the first 10 in a row, even if you’re not winning, you’re supposed to go back to keep the streak alive. It’s a good measurement of how I age, slowly.”In addition to all the elevation change, runners have to contend with mountainous weather conditions at the end of February.“We have had sub 10 degrees and blizzards and we have had 65 degrees and sun,” Curwen said. “Depending on how deep the snow is or how tough the winter is, we’ve had to modify the scope and a couple of different things. Every year we have to let the fire rescue and support teams dictate to us where we can go and how they comfortable they feel to be able to cover the runners and make everybody safe.”Over the years, the challenge has become a staple event in the town.“We’ve sold it out every year for 21 years,” Curwen said. “We’ll have anywhere from 1,500 to as many as 2,500 or so trying to get in for only 200 spots.”Ferrari says Mount Mitchell is the one race he’ll run until he can’t move his legs.“It’s one of those things that, at this point it becomes, okay it’s February, I need to go up to the top of Mount Mitchell,” he said.West Virginia Trilogy (W. Va.)October 11-13, 2019runners at the West Virginia trilogy / photo by Lars LehmannThree days, three different events, back to back to back. The West Virginia Trilogy consists of a 50K on Friday, a 50 miler on Saturday, and a half marathon on Sunday. Most runners choose to spend each night at the basecamp before hitting the trails again the following day.Adam Casseday, one of the race directors and founders of the event, originally wanted to put together a 100-mile race in West Virginia. But he couldn’t find a location worthy of an event of that magnitude and the logistics of putting on that kind of event were intimidating.“We wanted to create an event that was as much about the camaraderie and the challenge as it was the pure race,” he said. “It’s not truly as much about competition as much as the fellowship of runners enjoying nature and the outdoors together instead of trying to outrun your competitors. By Saturday, you lose a lot of the type A, stressful runner aura. It’s more a brotherhood and sisterhood. People trying to help each other out, running together rather than trying to beat each other.”The course takes runners through the West Virginia Mountains during peak fall foliage season, including a summit of Spruce Knob during the 50 miler.“Most trails in West Virginia as a whole are pretty wild and rugged because we just don’t have the trail users that you see in Virginia and North Carolina,” Casseday said. “By default, these trails are more wet and rocky and rugged.”Kelly MacDonald kept hearing about how special the event was from runners at other events. She put it on her bucket list of races and got the chance to compete in 2018. She said being out on the trail wasn’t the most challenging part of the event. It was the downtime when her legs were tired, and she knew there were still more miles to run.“The most daunting part was each evening,” she said. “I’m in this big yurt eating my dinner and thinking about the distance I’d have to run the next day, not sure I could do it.”Georgia Death Race (Ga.)March 30-31, 2019With the Georgia Death Race, Sean Blanton’s goal is to discourage competitors from finishing. He’s even hired someone to play the grim reaper and heckle runners on the trail.“Sometimes I have people out there in the woods that are playing wild boar noises on CD players,” Blanton said. “We have signs out there that really just get into your head. The point of this race is to make people extremely uncomfortable in the sense of you’ve lost everything and the only thing you have left is just moving forward. This race is meant for you to question why do I run? Why did I sign up for this?”The 70ish mile race from Vogel State Park to Amicalola Falls State Park takes runners to the summit of Brasstown Bald, the highest point in Georgia.“You get within 100 feet of the finish line and then you have to go 1,100 feet upstairs, up the waterfall, and then come back down on a really shitty, technical trail,” Blanton said. “The end’s almost the worst part.”He also requires each entrant to complete eight hours of trail maintenance or other community service to give back to the trails. Blanton, who has run 150 ultramarathons around the world, has to turn away runners when the 400 spots fill up.“Why do people run these challenges? Why would somebody want to run one of these things?” he said. “When people ask why do you do that, I answer the same way every time. If you have to ask me that question, you will never understand the answer. Unless you go out there and are experiencing these things, it’s just going to be crazy.”Ozone Endurance Challenge (Tenn.)May 29- June 2, 2019The Ozone Endurance Challenge asks how long do you want to be on the trail? Runners choose to compete from six to 96 hours, attempting to complete as many loops of the two-mile track as possible before time is up.“It’s a way of testing yourself,” Laura Eriks said. “People say, ‘Well I can’t run any further than a marathon.’ You set those standards. But you get involved with these events and you can really see what your limits are and then push those back. It’s always exciting when you take those first few steps past any mileage that you’ve ever completed.”Eriks, who was coming off an injury when she ran the 96-hour event in 2018, said this was a way to start running again on a relatively flat course.“In ultrarunning, it’s not just putting one foot in front of the other,” she said. “There’s the mental aspect of keeping going, especially when you’re racing through the night or two nights or three nights. Trying to manage your food and different things like that. It’s a challenge but there’s such a community.”In running for such a long time, competitors have to strategize when they will sleep, what they will eat, and how to manage the Tennessee heat.“I went through probably six pairs of shoes and a dozen pairs of socks during the race, constantly changing socks and shoes,” said Jeff Woody.Woody ran the 48-hour event the first year the event was held in 2016. Race director Will Jorgensen added a longer option each year, with 72 hours in 2017 and 96 hours in 2018, to challenge how long runners would be willing to run around in a loop. Each year, Woody kept going for the longest time.“You have to disconnect, to some degree, from time,” he said. “You have to take yourself out and focus on what you’re doing there. The neat thing about it is, it’s not just about who is the youngest and the strongest. A lot of strategy comes into play.”Hellgate 100K (Va.)December 14, 2019The Hellgate 100K is a winter race so intense, it comes with its own medical condition.“The cold dry air, the wind blowing, and runners running at night a lot, they get Hellgate eyes,” said race director David Horton. “They need to wear glasses and keep blinking their eyes or put liquid in. It’s like seeing through cellophane or something.”Jordan Chang first ran the race as a sophomore in college and didn’t think he was going to finish that year. But he has now run the 66.6-mile race every year for the last twelve years and has avoided Hellgate eyes so far.“People react very differently to it,” he said. “Some people are like, well, it’s happening, and other people are freaking out.”The race starts at 12:01 a.m. on Saturday morning so that most runners are finished by sunset.“I just love how everyone runs the same amount of time at night,” Chang said. “It’s very unique in ultrarunning. Most of the time, the faster people will run less in the night than the slower people. But this, everyone runs the same amount. Everyone’s got seven hours of it no matter what.”In addition to the unusual start time, runners have to contend with the whims of Virginia in December.“I’ve done it where I finished without a shirt on because it was 80 degrees,” Chang said. “I’ve done it where there was snow and ice and temperatures in the negatives. You never know what’s going to happen until race day.”Although he’s only in his 30s, Chang said the sport of ultrarunning has exploded since he ran his first race in college.“I’ve been in this sport longer than most people and just seeing that change from this group of weirdos running in the woods to fairly mainstream,” he said. “Running 100 miles is not unheard of anymore.”The popularity of the Hellgate 100K has also exploded.“It’s really grown, not necessarily in size,” Chang said. “Dr. Horton’s kept it pretty small to keep it intimate. But there’s a lot of hype around it, a lot of people trying to get in… It’s a good thing. It’s very exciting to see this kind of energy around the sport and these kinds of races. Over the years, it’s gotten much more competitive and times are getting so much faster. Every year, people are throwing down times that just a year before we thought were impossible.”Ultimately, Chang said he enjoys trail running for more than the competition because it gives him the opportunity to see “stuff that you’ll never see unless you did it on foot. Being able to see nature on foot in places where you can’t take a bike, you can’t take a car, you can’t paddle to.”Big Backyard Ultra (Tenn.)October 19, 2019If you follow the ultrarunning world, chances are you have heard of the Barkley Marathon. Runners have 60 hours to complete the brutal 100-mile course designed by Gary “Lazarus Lake” Cantrell. Since 1986, only 15 runners have completed all five laps in the allotted time.The Barkley Fall Classic, a 50K, gives runners a taste of what the Barkley Marathon is like with winners automatically receiving a spot in the Big Barkley.“He’s [Cantrell] a really great person to have in the sport, coming up with all these ways to push us harder and farther than we’ve ever been,” ultrarunner Courtney Dauwalter said.In addition to the marathons, Cantrell puts on another, an equally challenging event where there is no time limit or distance limit. At the Big Backyard Ultra, runners simply run until they can’t run anymore.At 6:40 on Saturday morning, runners head out on the 4.166667-mile course. They have an hour to complete the route before they have to head out for another lap. This continues every hour until only one runner remains.Courtney Dauwalter, a dominant force in the ultrarunning community, ran 279.1 miles. After lap 67, she said she had nothing left in her. She plans to return to the backyard one day to see if she can push herself even further.“I think the atmosphere of it is really special,” she said. “When people drop out, they stick around and get basically incorporated into other people who are still in the race and their crew. So, you end up gaining friends and crew members and all this assistance throughout the race because people stay and are just a part of it.”(Read more about Dauwalter and the Big Backyard Ultra on page 18).War Hammer 100 (Ky.)June 8, 2019Look out for the War Hammer 100. In 2018, only a third of runners finished the 100-mile race in its inaugural year.“We created it to kind of be this big journey,” Mike Whisman said. “You start in one part of Kentucky and by the end of the weekend, you’ll be in a different part of the state. We pitched the race as true Kentucky, the good, the bad, and the ugly.”Whisman helps his wife, Brandy, put on a series of races in Kentucky. The pair wanted to create a longer event that highlighted many of the sights and sounds of the state. Since the race was new, runners weren’t quite sure what to expect from the course that starts at Red River Gorge.“There’s not a lot of climbing, it’s not technical,” Whisman said. “But these things that you don’t really anticipate really took a toll on people.”Unlike other trail races on the East Coast where trees provide a good bit of cover, the War Hammer twists along backcountry roads where runners find it hard to escape from the sun.“There are some long stretches of road, be it gravel road and even some paved road, in the middle of the race,” Whisman said. “So that means a lot of people were running through some pretty exposed areas with no shade in the middle of the afternoon in June. And they were just getting baked.”Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine Takes on RagnarApril 26-27, 2019The Ragnar Relay Series started 16 years ago as the Ragnar Wasatch Back in Utah. Today, there are more than 40 road and trail relay races in the series across the U.S. and internationally.In April, several members of the BRO family will take on the Ragnar Trail Relay at Pocahontas State Park in Richmond, Va. Over the course of the weekend, each person will run three loops for a total 15.4 miles.Rachel Fitzgerald, director of market development for Ragnar, said the majority of the Richmond course is mountain bike singletrack trails with some paved surfaces.“It is true trails,” she said. “A lot of events will be on some of the rail trails in the area, but these are true woodland, rocks and roots type trails.”In between loops, runners rest and hang out with friends at the centralized base camp before gearing up for another round.“It’s a challenging achievement and certainly something to brag about, but it is a really unique and special community that’s so welcoming of everyone,” Fitzgerald said.BRO Account Executive Hannah Cooper runs a half marathon and a few other races every year but said this trail race will be a new challenge since it’s longer than anything else she has done.“It’s a lot harder than a typical street race mentally and physically,” Cooper said. “On a street race, there are all these people around and support. It’s super easy to bail if you needed to. Whereas out on the trail, you’re out there alone. You have to be really focused on the footsteps, especially when we’re running through the night.”Check back in a few months to see how the BRO team fared out on the trail.last_img read more

See More

Winter Storm Warning For WRBI Area

first_imgA Winter Storm Warning for heavy snow and ice  has been issued by The National Weather Service for The WRBI Listening Area.It is in effect for Decatur County 7 PM Saturday Night through 7 AM Monday Morning and for Ripley, Franklin, and Dearborn Counties 1 AM Sunday through 1 PM Monday.Look for heavy snow, sleet, and freezing rain to occur.  Snow accumulations of up to 5-8 inches along with around a tenth of an inch of ice.A mix of snow, sleet, and freezing rain is expected for Saturday Night into Sunday before changing to all snow on Sunday Night.Significant amounts of snow and ice along with a layer of ice will result in hazardous roads and reduced visibilities. Travel for Saturday Night through Monday will be impacted.A Winter Storm Warning means that severe winter weather conditions are imminent or highly likely.  Be sure to listen to Country 103.9 WRBI and log onto www.wrbiradio.com for severe weather updates and for Closings, Cancellations, and Delays.Courtesy of The National Weather Service/NOAA.last_img read more

See More