Pladis and IPP form sustainable partnership

first_imgMcVitie’s owner Pladis UK & Ireland and pallets supplier IPP have teamed up in a bid to reduce environmental impact across the supply chain.Pladis is working with IPP, part of Pooling Partners, to help reduce carbon emissions caused by empty trucks running on UK roads, with empty Pladis trucks being used to return or redistribute Pooling Partners’ pallets.The collaboration is said to be working well, with an estimated reduction of almost 30,000km in unnecessary journeys and a 200 metric tonnes cut in carbon emissions.“Empty running is one the greatest challenges in every supply chain and impacts negatively on both carbon emissions and congestion” said Alistair Leckie, transport operations controller at Pladis UK&I.“As a business, we know that we have a responsibility to reduce our impact on the environment and that’s why we are so encouraged by our partnership with Pooling Partners.”IPP said it shares the same philosophy, with Shelley Harris, head of commercial at IPP, adding: “We are delighted to have teamed up with Pladis to create a partnership that is already delivering tangible results for us both and for the environment. We’ve removed 28,200km of trips from the roads, which equates to saving 74.5 tonnes of carbon emissions to date.”The news follows the announcement that Pladis hired Kerry Foods’ Lindsey Roberts in a vice-president role.last_img read more

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Neon Desert Announces 2019 Lineup: Miguel, Wiz Khalifa, Kali Uchis, Chicano Batman, More

first_imgNeon Desert will return for its eighth year this spring when the two-day music festival takes place in downtown El Paso, TX on May 25th-26th. On Friday, the festival’s organizers revealed the lineup of artists who will perform at this year’s event, including headliners including Rezz, Miguel, Steve Aoki, Wiz Khalifa, Young Thug, and Kali Uchis.Other artists who were included on the 2019 lineup poster shared on Friday include Tory Lanez, Chicano Batman, Tchami, Dashboard Confessional, Tyga, A R I Z O N A, Paul Wall, Bane’s World, Lovely The Band, Inner Wave, Holy Wave, Midnight Generation, Juice and the Suds, and Jordan Taylor, just to name a few.Glastonbury Announces First Round Of 2019 Performers: The Cure, Tame Impala, Lauryn Hill, Wu-Tang Clan, MoreSince 2011, Neon Desert has continued to thrive as a regional music festival thanks to its mission of producing “an annual music festival for El Paso by El Pasoans, while providing the local artistic community an outlet to showcase their talents.” The Memorial Day Weekend event features performances across multiple stages, as produced by Splendid Sun Productions, a Texas-born organization based out of both Austin and El Paso.Fans can check out the 2018 recap video below for a look into one of Texas’ premiere summer music events.Neon Desert Music Festival 2018 Recap Video[Video: JandKpresent]Both two-day, and single-day passes are now available for purchase here.last_img read more

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In poor countries, taller moms’ kids are healthier

first_imgNEW YORK (Reuters Health) – In developing countries, taller moms tend to give birth to healthier kids who are less likely to die in infancy, be underweight or have stunted growth, a new study finds. At the same time, good nutrition in adolescence and delaying marriage and childbirth appear to lead to taller adults.“This is the first time we’re seeing an effect of the mother’s health — as captured through her attained height — being transferred well into the childhood of her offspring,” study author Dr. S. V. Subramanian of the Harvard School of Public Health told Reuters Health…Read more herelast_img read more

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For life expectancy, money matters

first_imgBeing poor in the United States is so hazardous to your health, a new study shows, that the average life expectancy of the lowest-income classes in America is now equal to that in Sudan or Pakistan.A Harvard analysis of 1.4 billion Internal Revenue Service records on income and life expectancy that showed staggering differences in life expectancy between the richest and poorest also found evidence that low-income residents in wealthy areas, such as New York City and San Francisco, have life expectancies significantly longer than those in poorer regions.While those differences can be chalked up, in part, to healthy behaviors — low-income residents in New York City smoke and drink less, exercise more, and have lower rates of obesity than the poor in other cities — it’s unclear what other factors might contribute to the difference, said David Cutler, the Otto Eckstein Professor of Applied Economics and a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Federal insurance has helped many, but system’s holes limit gains, Harvard analysts say Related The costs of inequality: Money = quality health care = longer life “It’s not an overwhelming correlation with medical care or insurance coverage,” he said. “It’s not that the labor market is getting better — it’s not correlated with unemployment, or the expansion or contraction of the labor force, or how socially connected people feel. The only thing it seems to be correlated with is how educated and affluent the area is, so low-income people live longer in New York or San Francisco, and they live shorter in the industrial Midwest.”Among men, that gap is 15 years, roughly equivalent to the life expectancy difference between the United States and Sudan. For women, the 10-year difference between richest and poorest is equivalent to the health effects from a lifetime of smoking. The study is described in a paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association online on April 11.“This paper really has two missions,” said Cutler. “One is to present this data, but the other is to create this data set so it can then be used by policymakers and researchers everywhere. This data has never been looked at with this level of granularity before.The richest American men live 15 years longer than the poorest men, while the richest American women live 10 years longer than the poorest women, according to the Health Inequality Project. Graphic courtesy of David Cutler“Previously, we could say what life expectancy was like in Massachusetts as compared to Michigan, but the problem is that Massachusetts is much richer than Michigan, and we know mortality varies with income,” he continued. “What we wanted to do was compare the same people in both cities — a shopkeeper in Detroit with a shopkeeper in Boston, not a biotech executive. That’s what we can do with this data that people haven’t been able to do previously.”Cutler and his co-authors, including former Harvard Economics Professor Raj Chetty, now at Stanford University, collected federal tax records from 1999 through 2014, and sorted people into 100 percentiles according to income. By matching that income data with death records, the researchers were able to calculate the mortality rate and subsequent life expectancy at age 40 for each income level.While researchers have long known that life expectancy increases with income, Cutler and others were surprised to find that trend never plateaued.“There’s no income [above] which higher income is not associated with greater longevity, and there’s no income below which less income is not associated with lower survival,” he said. “It was already known that life expectancy increased with income, so we’re not the first to show that, but … everyone thought you had to hit a plateau at some point, or that it would plateau at the bottom, but that’s not the case.”Cutler and Chetty then examined how life expectancy changed over time, and found that while life expectancy has increased for the wealthiest, it has edged up only slightly for low-income Americans.“The increase has been approximately three years at the high end, versus zero for the lowest incomes,” Cutler said. “This is important, because it has major implications for Social Security policy. People say, ‘Americans are living longer, so we ought to delay the age of retirement,’ but … it’s a little bit unfair to say to low-income people that they’re going to get Social Security and Medicare for fewer years because investment bankers are living longer.”When they laid the data over maps of the United States, Cutler and Chetty again found unexpected results, with low life expectancy concentrated not in the Deep South, but across the Midwest Rust Belt.“What emerges strongly is that there is a belt from West Virginia, Kentucky, and down through parts of southern Ohio, through Oklahoma and into Texas — it’s not a story of the Deep South,” Cutler said. “The variability in where high-income people live longest is not as large and is much less geographically concentrated. You don’t see this same type of belt — it’s scattered all over.”Going forward, Cutler, Chetty, and their co-authors have made the data publicly available in the hope it will spur further research into whether certain public policies or other economic indicators are associated with longer life expectancy. Cutler believes it also underscores some worrying truths about economic disparity in the United States.“These differences are very, very troubling,” Cutler said. “The magnitude is startling. You might expect two or three years of life differential — which is roughly what we would get by curing cancer — but 10 or 15 years … it’s an immense difference. We don’t know exactly why or what to do about it, but now we have the tools to ask those questions.”The research was supported by the U.S. Social Security Administration by a grant to the National Bureau of Economic Research as part of the SSA Retirement Research Consortium, the National Institutes of Health, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Smith Richardson Foundation, and the Laura and John Arnold Foundation.last_img read more

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Committee to unveil The Shirt 2014

first_imgThe Notre Dame community will celebrate The Shirt’s 25th anniversary with free food, entertainment and student discounts at the unveiling ceremony at the Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore beginning at 4:30 p.m. Friday.  Wei Lin | The Observer Junior John Wetzel, president of The Shirt Project, said the ceremony would spotlight members of the Notre Dame community with performances from student groups.“The unveiling ceremony has been around since 2002, and it is always a great time for the community to come together,” Wetzel said. “The event will feature fantastic performers including AcoustiCafe, P-Fresh, the Bagpipe Band, Irish dancers, pom squad, Glee Club, Leprechaun Legion, the Notre Dame cheerleaders and the [marching] band.”Wetzel said he expects a large turnout at the unveiling ceremony due to favorable weather and student discounts.“We’re expecting a couple thousand students, alumni, faculty, staff and community members to show up for the unveiling this year, especially if the weather is as nice as predicted,” Wetzel said. “Students will also receive 15 percent off up to two shirts that they purchase at the unveiling ceremony.”Marketing manager and senior Catherine Simonson said the local frozen yogurt shop Let’s Spoon and Barnaby’s pizzeria would provide catering.In addition to the entertainment lineup and free food, Simonson said attendees could participate in multiple other activities before Irish coach Brian Kelly officially unveils the new Shirt at 6 p.m.“We’re offering a couple different interactive booths, such as face painting, a guessing station allowing people to predict the color before it’s unveiled — which is all polled through Twitter, a photo booth where we’ll be bringing out all the previous Shirts and allowing people to try them on or hold them up and take pictures with their favorites — a really rare opportunity to see the whole collection — and a color stations allowing guests to design their own shirt templates.”Along with expansions to the unveiling ceremony, The Shirt committee has broadened its media presence for the 25th anniversary, Simonson said.“We’ve really bolstered our social media,” Simonson said. “We created an Instagram account over the summer and have used that as a central platform for growth. Right now, we’re finishing up a scavenger hunt we’ve been running for several weeks now via all of our social media platforms, including a newly designed website.”According to freshman committee member Mackenzie Smith, the social media outreach aims to highlight the charitable impact of The Shirt, which helps to fund student activities.“One of our goals for the year was to promote what exactly The Shirt Project is and where the money goes,” Smith said. “Most people don’t know that the proceeds from buying The Shirt go straight back to the students and to campus through our The Shirt Charity Fund and the Rector Fund.”Simonson said she hopes the 25th anniversary edition of The Shirt will excite Notre Dame fans and sell in record numbers.“This year’s Shirt takes on a whole different vibe than any of the previous years’ and we’re really looking forward to showing it off,” she said. “I’m predicting significantly higher sales than last year, which sold 156,000. I’d love to hit 160,000 or higher.”Tags: The Shirt, The Shirt 2014, The Shirt Project, unveiling ceremonylast_img read more

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Winter pipes

first_imgBy Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaPleasantly warm weather has returned to much of Georgia this week. But it’s still winter, and freezing temperatures will be back. Don’t forget to keep outdoor pipes and hoses protected.Freezing temperatures can cause the water in an exposed pipe or hose to expand. If the water expands too much, the pipe or hose bursts. It’s that simple.”With home irrigation systems, you probably wouldn’t know you had any pipe damage until you turned it on for the first spring watering,” said Kerry Harrison, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension irrigation specialist.Most in-ground sprinkler pipes will be OK. Only the top 2 inches of the ground will freeze in most of Georgia. Pipes should be well below this level. Other irrigation components, such as backflow-prevention valves, are at ground level, though, and could be in danger.If there are any exposed valves or pipes around your home, tape them up or “use a good old sack to wrap them,” Harrison said. Home-improvement stores have many tapes, foams and gadgets to keep these pipes warm on cold, winter nights.The tips of sprinkler heads can hold water. When frozen, they can rupture. The whole sprinkler system holds water, too, even when it isn’t being used. Don’t forget to drain the system, Harrison said. If you don’t drain it properly in the winter, your sprinkler could be a geyser when you turn it on next spring.If you’ve bought a home with an installed irrigation system, find this drain valve. Some systems are equipped with automatic drain valves.Don’t forget about outside water hoses. You can do two things:* Leave the hoses hanging outside. But disconnect them from faucets.* Disconnect, drain and store hoses someplace with a constant temperature. This will prolong the life of hoses.If you leave hoses undrained outside in the winter, don’t move them or touch them in freezing weather. You could break them as frozen hoses are fragile.Private water users and rural residents with wells should check out their main water pump. Usually a quarter-inch pipe connects to the pressure switch. If it’s metal, it likely won’t freeze. But if it’s plastic, it might freeze and burst. This could cause the water pump to fail or continue to run and cause some major winter repairs.If all these precautions fail and a pipe bursts, there’s still one thing to remember: “Know where your main water cutoff is,” Harrison said.last_img read more

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Are you missing out on the benefits of a strategic financial plan?

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr If you’ve ever wondered if you’re doing enough in your strategic process, there is a highly beneficial piece that is often overlooked. Strategic plans commonly look out three to five years, yet financial plans are much shorter term. That means that long-term strategies are created without connecting them to potential long-term financial effects, which is a missed opportunity.Looking out short-term doesn’t cover most of the impacts of a longer-term strategy, such as expected increases in membership resulting from more sophisticated usage of data or additional loan growth from planned geofencing capabilities. To be clear, this is not a long-term budget. It’s the result of a non-siloed, collaborative effort where management thinks through what implementing the strategic directions and initiatives could cost over time as well as what they could produce, be it member growth, loan growth or just remaining relevant without any expected boost in revenue. While finance is typically involved in modeling the numbers, this should not be thought of as a finance function; it’s a collaboration.The question to answer is, Does the strategic plan result in our desired financial performance?Let’s take the method for answering this question in phases: continue reading »last_img read more

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Covid: Michigan and Washington State clamp down as US cases pass 11 million mark

first_imgCovid cases have now topped 11 million in the US, with daily cases rising by more than 100,000. – Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img

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Nine killed in Indonesia mining accident

first_img“Eight men and one woman went in to dig and were buried by a landslide. We evacuated their bodies early this morning,” district spokesman Firdaus Firman told AFP. Three people keeping watch reported the accident to local officials when the group failed to emerge from the mine. The victims were local farmers digging the gold without proper equipment or protective gear. The location and the rainy weather also hampered rescue efforts. “All victims are accounted for and there’s no more missing,” Firman said, adding that police and the local disaster agency are investigating. Illegal and unlicensed mines are prevalent across mineral-rich Indonesia and the scene of frequent accidents. In early 2019 at least 16 people were buried alive when a mine collapsed in the Bolaang Mongondow region of North Sulawesi, where five miners were killed a few months earlier in a similar accident.Topics : Nine people were killed by a landslide at an illegal gold mine in Sumatra, an Indonesian official said Sunday. The accident happened Saturday in South Solok in West Sumatra province when a group of 12 people were digging for gold at an abandoned mine. The area has several abandoned mines from the colonial era. last_img read more

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Governor Wolf Visits Philips Ultrasound, Hosts Roundtable with Pennsylvania Med Tech Businesses

first_imgGovernor Wolf Visits Philips Ultrasound, Hosts Roundtable with Pennsylvania Med Tech Businesses SHARE Email Facebook Twitter January 04, 2018center_img Economy,  Innovation,  Press Release,  Public Health Reedsville, PA –  Today, Governor Tom Wolf joined state officials, executives, and community leaders at Philips Ultrasound to discuss the importance of medical technology innovation in Pennsylvania and the positive impacts it has on Pennsylvania’s economy.“Pennsylvania is lucky to be the home of so many businesses in this dynamic and growing industry,” said Governor Wolf. “It is critically important to the commonwealth that life science and medical technology businesses are succeeding, and I am deeply committed to ensuring that Pennsylvania continues to be a business-friendly state, so that our industries have the tools needed to do just that.”The administration actively supports the development of biomedical devices, and other components of the life sciences industry by bringing together resources and programs like the Life Sciences Greenhouses and the Ben Franklin Technology Partners, to support life science and medical technology companies looking for opportunities in Pennsylvania.Pennsylvania is home to more than 2,300 life science establishments and more than 1,100 research, testing and medical labs statewide. The medical technology industry employs nearly 80,000 people and contributes more than $13 billion dollars to Pennsylvania’s economy annually.“Our Reedsville location designs and manufactures some of the most innovative ultrasound solutions on the market, helping to improve the patient and staff experience, while enabling healthcare providers to make clinical decisions,” said Vitor Rocha, Ultrasound Business Leader for Philips. “As a health technology leader with a strong and growing presence in Pennsylvania, including our Sleep and Respiratory Care division, Philips wants to help lead the conversation around the innovations needed to achieve seamless care. Only through public-private partnerships, working with Governor Wolf, and local healthcare industry leaders, can we have an open dialogue on how Pennsylvania can be instrumental in advancing healthcare.”“Life Sciences Pennsylvania is pleased to discuss with Governor Wolf the diverse and vibrant life sciences community that spans the commonwealth,” said Christopher P. Molineaux, President and CEO, Life Sciences Pennsylvania. “Within our membership of 755-member companies we count more than 80 medical device companies. These companies have or are developing world-class devices that impact the delivery of healthcare here in PA and around the world.”“We appreciate the opportunity to discuss with Governor Wolf how Pennsylvania’s vibrant medical device manufacturing cluster contributes to patients’ health and the economic health of the commonwealth,” said Advanced Medical Technology Association’s (AdvaMed) President and CEO Scott Whitaker. “We look forward to continuing this discussion in September when The MedTech Conference, the global event for medical technology, comes to Philadelphia.”last_img read more

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