Kenya Airways Limited (KQ.ke) HY2017 Presentation

first_imgKenya Airways Limited (KQ.ke) listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange under the Transport sector has released it’s 2017 presentation results for the half year.For more information about Kenya Airways Limited (KQ.ke) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Kenya Airways Limited (KQ.ke) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Kenya Airways Limited (KQ.ke)  2017 presentation results for the half year.Company ProfileKenya Airways Limited is the flag carrier airline of Kenya operating domestic, regional and international flights to destinations in Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Europe. The company was founded in 1977 after the dissolution of East African Airways and was wholly-owned by the government of Kenya until 1995 after which it was privatised. Kenya Airways is a public-private partnership where the largest shareholder is the government of Kenya (48.9%). Kenya Airways wholly-owns Jambojet, a low-cost carrier which was created in 2013; and African Cargo Handling Limited. Companies partly owned by Kenya Airways include Kenya Airfreight Handling Limited (51%) which handles perishable goods cargo; and Precision Air (41.23%) which is a Tanzanian carrier operation. Kenya Airways head office is in Nairobi, Kenya with its main operations based in Jomo Kenyatta International Airport. Kenya Airways Limited is listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchangelast_img read more

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BBC Children in Need grants open for applications

first_imgBBC Children in Need grants open for applications Tagged with: Funding  24 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 15 March 2013 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.center_img Small grantsThe Small Grants programme is open to charities and not-for-profit organisations applying for any amount up to and including £10,000 for one year.BBC Children in Need advise that in this programme “we are looking for projects where a relatively small amount of money can make a big difference for children and young people. We are unlikely to fund applications which top up funding for salaries or larger projects where a small grant would only make a marginal impact on its success”.The next application deadline is 1 April 2013.Both main and small grants programmes are open to not-for-profit organisations that work with disadvantaged children and young people of 18 years and under who live in the UK, the Isle of Man or the Channel Islands.www.bbc.co.uk/pudsey/grantsPhoto: Dan Taylor on Flickr.com BBC Children in Need’s grant programmes are now open for applications. The criteria and application forms for both the main and small grants have been amended. Main grantsThe Main Grants programme is open to charities and not-for-profit organisations which wish to apply for grants over £10,000 per year for up to three years.The next application deadline is 15 May 2013. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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National Gardens Scheme announces record annual donations

first_imgNational Gardens Scheme announces record annual donations  83 total views,  1 views today Advertisement The National Garden Scheme gave a record £2.7 million to its beneficiary charities as a result of funds raised at its garden openings last year.NGS has also announced a new category in its annual donations to support Gardens and Health, with the first beneficiary Horatio’s Garden, which creates gardens for spinal injuries units.More than £22 million has been donated to the NGS beneficiary charities in the last ten years, with NGS the biggest ever funder of both Macmillan Cancer Support and Marie Curie, having donated £15.75m and £7.8m to each.The beneficiaries of the £2.7 million are:MS Society became the NGS guest charity last year, for the first of two years. Recommendations for guest charities are made by NGS volunteers and MS Society takes over as guest charity from Parkinson’s UK. Parkinson’s UK has now been retained as a beneficiary charity.George Plumptre, NGS chief executive, said:“This year we have made a significant addition to our donations with the addition of a category promoting the links between Gardens and Health. Every year we will now make a donation to a charity whose work is focused on this vital area of public health, and our first beneficiary is Horatio’s Garden. This charity, named after Horatio Chapple, creates gardens for spinal injuries units at hospitals around the country and our funding will help create a garden at Stoke Mandeville Hospital in Buckinghamshire.”The NGS was founded by the Queen’s Nursing Institute in 1927 to raise money to support district nurses in England and Wales. Melanie May | 1 June 2016 | News  84 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis12 Tagged with: Finance fundraising AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis12 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

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Caltech’s Center for Teaching, Learning & Outreach Transforms the Ways the Institute Teaches Students, Future Scientists

first_imgEVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Community News Herbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Trends To Look Like A Bombshell And 6 To Forget AboutHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWhat’s Your Zodiac Flower Sign?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNutritional Strategies To Ease AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeauty Make a comment Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,PCC – EducationVirtual Schools PasadenaDarrell Done EducationHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes More than 85 percent of the Institute’s new and established faculty have participated in at least one CTLO program, and almost half of all faculty now participate in programs annually. Credit: Max Gerber for CaltechSince its inception, the Center for Teaching, Learning, & Outreach has launched dozens of innovative programs Tucked away on the third floor of the Center for Student Services on Holliston Avenue, an office with five full-time employees has quietly transformed the ways Caltech teaches its students and future scientists.Created in 2012, the Center for Teaching, Learning, & Outreach (CTLO) was launched with ambitious goals: to improve the quality of teaching on campus, bolster instructional opportunities for students, and engage K–12 schools in educational outreach. At the time, Caltech lacked a center specifically devoted to those ends.Joseph Shepherd, vice president for student affairs, notes that five years later, though still small, CTLO has amassed a portfolio of several dozen programs that have had an outsized impact on education on campus and established itself “as an integral part of the Institute.”Cindy Weinstein, vice provost of education, notes that “the inaugural team impact award was awarded to the CTLO because it has worked effectively with faculty, students, and postdocs to enhance teaching and learning at Caltech.”The office has played a key role in improving the undergraduate core curriculum by updating teaching methods and seeking regular feedback from faculty and students about the approaches that worked best. The office also brings core and other faculty members together to discuss ways to improve the students’ experience.Several programs focus on training for faculty members and teaching assistants—including the annual fall Teaching Conference, TeachWeek, and the Faculty Summer Short Course. Other programs offer seminars and workshops featuring speakers, such as Caltech Feynman Teaching Prize winners and other guest speakers, to help teachers become more effective.Timothy Liu, a senior in electrical engineering who was the student government’s Academics and Research Committee chair for the 2016–17 academic year, says CTLO “has played a critical role in supporting and improving classroom instruction. Programs like TA training and cross-departmental discussions organized by CTLO have helped improve the classroom experience for students. Undergraduates can definitely see some of these newer ideas in teaching appear in the lecture hall and classroom.”More than 85 percent of the Institute’s new and established faculty have participated in at least one the office’s programs, says Cassandra Horii, who is a scientist by training and has served as director of CTLO since its inception in 2012. Horii adds that almost half of all faculty now participate in programs annually, showing “Caltech’s depth of commitment to discussing meaningful questions about how students learn, something we’re doing along with a lot of other universities in light of emerging research on effective teaching.”Xie Chen, associate professor of theoretical physics, is one of them. In January 2016, she sought help from CTLO to improve her Physics 129 b class.“I was pretty new, and, after teaching the class once, I wanted to get my students more motivated and interested—I didn’t want them to fall asleep,” she jokes.CTLO’s assistant director for instructional practice & technology, Jennifer Weaver, sat in on a class and talked with Chen extensively on which active learning techniques would work for incorporation into her classroom. For example, they decided that Chen would break up her lecture by engaging students with thoughtful questions, allowing them time to consider, confer and respond.Chen credits the experience with boosting her confidence and improving her students’ interest and attendance—and also, in part, for her receiving a graduate student teaching award for her winter 2016–17 course.“When I started, I was never systematically trained as a teacher. But CTLO helped me at a time when I really needed it,” she adds.CTLO’s reach also extends into the community, where its programs cast students in the roles of teachers as part of educational outreach efforts that engaged about 17,500 local K–12 students and teachers last year. These popular programs include Visiting Scientists, which features graduate students and postdoctoral scholars who volunteer in local schools to conduct hands-on science lessons, and Science Night, in which Caltech undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral scholars conduct science demonstrations for students and parents at local schools.As part of the Visiting Scientists program, Cecilia Sanders, a second-year graduate student in geological and planetary sciences, recently coached a second-grade class at Pasadena Unified School District’s Cleveland Elementary School through a hands-on exercise using color-coded paper representing genes to teach how snippets of DNA can determine an animal’s color, size, and shape.Sanders says she gained at least as much from the classroom experience as the children did. “I think it actually makes me a better scientist and thinker,” she says. “You don’t really understand something until you can explain it to a 6-year-old and get them to retain it.”In addition to in-person outreach, CTLO supports digital community outreach as well through massive open online courses (MOOCs) taught by Caltech faculty that have engaged more than 740,000 people all over the world.Antonio Rangel, the Bing Professor of Neuroscience, Behavioral Biology, and Economics, says CTLO has had a significant impact on his teaching and research, and has been instrumental in creating and gradually improving his Ec 11 course, which has been using a flipped classroom model for the last four years and is also offered as an online course for non-Caltech students.Working with the office, he says, gave him insights into “how to teach effectively on different media and led me to completely change the way I teach inside Caltech and online.”On-campus enrollment in Rangel’s course has increased by about 80 percent, he says, and objective measures of learning, such as final test scores, have increased by about 20 percent.Mitch Aiken, associate director for educational outreach, says CTLO’s focus on outreach supports researchers’ efforts to demonstrate the potential societal benefits of their work. Locally, CTLO programs offer assistance ranging from training high school students and teachers in rigorous research and data collection techniques to helping create and staff the 3-D Printing and Fracture Mechanics course for Muir High School’s Engineering & Environmental Science Academy students. Caltech’s Community Science Academy programs and the National Science Foundation-funded Pulsar Search Collaboratory have also prompted local students to seek careers in science—as well as an education at Caltech.In the new year, CTLO will welcome a visit by Physics Nobel Prize winner Carl Wieman in February, who will speak about STEM education research. In April, Shirley Malcom, Caltech trustee and director of education and human resources programs at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, will speak at TeachWeek about national changes in science education.Horii says that, going forward, CTLO aims to deepen its collaboration with academic divisions and work to create more discipline-specific resources and programs: “We’re really excited about partnerships that meet faculty and TAs where they are, and we’re always looking for new ways to empower Caltech’s community of educators.” More Cool Stuff Subscribe Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m.center_img Community News Education Caltech’s Center for Teaching, Learning & Outreach Transforms the Ways the Institute Teaches Students, Future Scientists By JON NALICK Published on Thursday, January 11, 2018 | 7:33 pm 6 recommendedShareShareTweetSharePin it Business News Top of the News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy First Heatwave Expected Next Week Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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Millennials are Heading to Suburbia

first_imgSubscribe Previous: New York AG Announces State Loan Program to Prevent Foreclosures Next: Pending Home Sales Surge in May Millennials are Heading to Suburbia The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Related Articles The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily About Author: Colin Robins Baby Boomers Millennials Population Growth Suburbs Trulia 2014-06-30 Colin Robins Tagged with: Baby Boomers Millennials Population Growth Suburbs Trulia Colin Robins is the online editor for DSNews.com. He holds a Bachelor of Arts from Texas A&M University and a Master of Arts from the University of Texas, Dallas. Additionally, he contributes to the MReport, DS News’ sister site. Home / Daily Dose / Millennials are Heading to Suburbia Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days agocenter_img  Print This Post Share Save June 30, 2014 1,776 Views Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Analyzing data from the United States Census, Trulia’s chief economist Jed Kolko found that the population growth of millennials in big, dense cities was outpaced by big-city suburbs and lower-density cities. Kolko also found that baby boomer growth in big, dense cities fell short of growth in big-city suburbs.To analyze the data, Kolko divvied all U.S. counties into four quartiles based on household density, leaving each quartile with approximately one-fourth of the total population. “Going from the highest to lowest density, the four categories correspond roughly to (1) big, dense cities; (2) big-city suburbs and lower-density cities; (3) lower-density suburbs and small cities; and (4) smaller towns and rural areas,” Kolko said.From 2012 to 2013, the population growth of millennials (20-34 year-olds) was the highest outside of large cities. The fastest growth was in areas with big-city suburbs and lower-density cities. Surprisingly, the data revealed that lower-density suburbs and smaller cities edged out big, dense cities for millennial population growth.While Kolko noted that the differences are far from astronomical, it certainly is true that there is “no mad rush to the cities—despite the shift from homeownership to renting among these young adults.”Metros with the fastest growth in the millennial population were in the South and West. The five metros with the largest growth in millennial population include: Colorado Springs, Colorado (3.2 percent); San Antonio, Texas (3.0 percent); Peabody, Massachusetts (2.9 percent); Honolulu, Hawaii (2.8 percent); and Denver, Colorado (2.5 percent).Conversely, baby boomers are becoming more urban, according to Trulia’s chief economist. While growth for baby boomers in big-city suburbs and lower-density cities was the highest quartile of the four measured, it only barely edged out growth in the top quartile of big, dense cities. Overall, baby boomer population growth skewed more urban than millennials.All of the top ten metros with the fastest growing population of baby boomers were in the South and West. The top five metros for baby boomer population growth include: Austin, Texas (4.4 percent); Raleigh, North Carolina (4.3 percent); Dallas, Texas (3.5 percent); Charlotte, South Carolina (3.4 percent); and Charleston, South Carolina (3.3 percent).Kolko commented, “Here’s what else these boomer-attracting metros have in common: they tend to have relatively young populations. In fact, Austin has the highest share of millennials of any large metro; millennials account for disproportionately high shares of the populations of Charleston, Dallas, and Houston as well … That means that boomers increasingly want to be where millennials live already.”He cautiously summarized his analysis with a few caveats: “The trends that are happening today may not last; they surely reflect current housing and economic conditions, but don’t necessarily reflect a long-term, permanent change in how or where people want to live.” The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Headlines, Market Studies, Newslast_img read more

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Credit Where It’s Due

first_img Alison Rich has a long-time tenure in the writing and editing realm, touting an impressive body of work that has been featured in local and national consumer and trade publications spanning industries and audiences. She has worked for DS News and MReport magazines—both in print and online—since they launched. Tagged with: Consumer Credit Credit Where It’s Due Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Consumer Credit 2017-08-15 Alison Rich Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: Out of Their Reach Next: Condominium Law in Flux Subscribe Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago  Print This Post About Author: Alison Rich Related Articlescenter_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago August 15, 2017 1,273 Views Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Share Save Home / Daily Dose / Credit Where It’s Due If it were a game of limbo, July would be the winner. That month, the composite default rate reached the biggest low it’s experienced in 12 months—down 18 basis points to 3.31 percent—according to the S&P/Experian Consumer Credit Default Indices.The indices show that the composite rate leapt one basis point from the prior month to 0.83 percent. Auto loan defaults, on the other hand, increased by four basis points to 0.86 percent. The first-mortgage default rate gained two basis points from June to 0.62 percent.Default rates tanked in three of the five major cities in July. New York saw the largest decrease, down six basis points from June to 0.82 percent. Los Angeles came in at 0.63 percent for July, losing three basis points from June. Chicago rounded out the trio at 0.9 percent, down one basis point from June. Dallas, however, increased 10 basis points from the previous month to 0.77 percent. Miami totaled 1.23 percent for July, up six basis points from June.Although the national bank card default rate did indeed experience its biggest low in 12 months, the rate remains high. After setting a recent low at 2.49 percent in December 2015, it has zigzagged upward before July’s decline. It’s 3.31 percent now. The composite, auto, and first-mortgage default numbers all sit close to their July 2016 levels.“Default rates for autos and first-mortgage loans are at their lowest points in the last 10 years, while bank card defaults remain modest,” said David M. Blitzer, Managing Director and Chairman of the Index Committee at S&P Dow Jones Indices. “Consumers’ use of credit is growing and the level of consumer credit outstanding is at an all-time high.”In the year ending June 2017, consumer credit outstanding hit 5.7 percent, outstripping most spending categories economy-wide. Conversely, retail sales excluding autos as well as auto sales are down a pinch since April, while home sales haven’t budged much in recent months. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Foreclosure, News Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily last_img read more

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Manafort jury pulled from region that voted heavily against Trump

first_imgMark Wilson/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — A federal judge approved a jury of six men and six women selected to hear Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s case against former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, and the panel that will decide his fate was plucked from a part of Virginia that voted heavily against Trump.On Tuesday, Judge T.S. Ellis, the federal judge overseeing Manafort’s case in Virginia, questioned 65 prospective jurors from Northern Virginia, including the city of Alexandria and Fairfax County, after informing the court he intended to settle on 12 jurors and four replacements for a trial that will start this week.While the special counsel’s mandate is to investigate possible foreign interference in the 2016 elections, Mueller was given latitude to pursue other potential crimes that surface during the course of his investigation, so the case against Manafort is focused solely on allegations that the former Trump adviser had committed a range of financial crimes — from tax evasion to bank fraud — that have no direct tie to his campaign work.Manafort has pleaded not guilty.But politics remains the backdrop for the case, which moves forward after several failed attempts by Manafort’s legal team to change venues. Those efforts, two former federal prosecutors told ABC News, were likely part of a strategic move to escape the area’s perceived hostility to President Trump. Manafort’s lawyers sought to relocate from the courthouse in Alexandria to Roanoke, which is in a more conservative section of the state.“I have no doubt that the defense was trying to find a more sympathetic jury pool in attempting to change venues to Roanoke,” said Mitch Epner, a former federal prosecutor who now practices at the law firm Rottenberg Lipman Rich.In their motion to change venues, Manafort’s attorneys explicitly cited voting data from the 2016 election, calling attention to the fact that voters in Northern Virginia overwhelmingly supported Hillary Clinton.“This split is more balanced in other places in Roanoke, Virginia,” Manafort’s attorneys wrote.Only 32 percent of voters within the jurisdiction of the Alexandria court sided with Trump in 2016, while 62 percent of voters sided with Clinton. In contrast, 60 percent of voters within the Roanoke division in Virginia’s Western District voted for Trump, while 35 percent voted for Clinton.Judge Ellis denied Manafort’s attempt to move to Roanoke earlier this month but wrote that if the court fails to have “reasonable assurance that fair and impartial jurors can be impaneled [in Alexandria] the defendant’s motion to transfer venue will warrant reconsideration.”While the judge voiced confidence in pulling off a trial that will be free from outside political influences, he quickly encountered another potential challenge in mounting a case in the Washington, D.C. suburbs. When Ellis asked if any of the potential jurors knew anyone at the Department of Justice, eight of them raised their hands at the time.“Oh my goodness,” Ellis reacted. “I’m going to stop asking that question!”In addition to the Virginia case against him, Manafort will face an additional trial in Washington, D.C. this fall as part of the special counsel’s probe into Russian meddling during the 2016 campaign. Manafort has pleaded not guilty to those charges as well.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Competencies and skills form basis of redundancy selection

first_imgCompetencies and skills form basis of redundancy selectionOn 27 Jul 2004 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Employeeskills and competencies are more important than the jobs they do when peopleare selected for redundancy, a new report finds.Thereport, released by Personnel Today’s sister publication IRS Employment Review,shows that line managers’ verdicts are crucial during the selection process.Whilethe law on redundancy selection states that the procedure used must be fair andreasonably applied, the survey of 89 private and public sector employers showsthat the factors affecting the decision vary greatly.Mostrespondents (87 per cent) said they had made employees redundant in the pasttwo years. These varied from individual redundancies to large-scale job losses,such as the 1,000 employees who were made redundant by a UK charity, and 800staff made redundant by a major manufacturing company. Two-thirdsof employers surveyed did not report any productivity improvements as a resultof job losses. Almost two-thirds (62 per cent) of employers found that redundancieshad led to lower morale, but one in three believed that the productivity oftheir organisation had improved. A smaller, but still significant number ofemployers also believed that redundancies had led to the loss of organisationalskills and organisational memory in their workplaces. IRSEmployment Review managing editor, Mark Crail, said: “Perhaps becauseredundancy management is an area of some experience for many HR managers, mostemployers in our survey believe they are managing it well. But what employershighlight as an area for improvement in our survey – and what they will need topay more attention to when the Information and Consultation Directive is phasedin from March 2005 – is communication and consultation with employees.”www.irsemploymentreview.comByQuentin readeKeyfindings–Just over half (54 per cent) of the survey respondents who had maderedundancies said that voluntary redundancy was used, while 76 per cent hadmade compulsory redundancies. Of the total, 32 (41 per cent) of organisationshad used both methods –Almost half (46 per cent) of the respondents reported that workforce cuts wereexpected over the coming year –Twenty-one (24 per cent) employers said they used a straightforward ‘last in,first out’ (LIFO) method of selection for redundancy. Fewer than 2 per cent ofemployers used length of service exclusively. More than half (53 per cent) usedlength of service as a factor alongside the job done by the employee or theirlevel of skills and competencies. Others mentioned that it was used ‘as a lastresort’–More than half the employers surveyed thought the forthcoming Information andConsultation Directive would not have any effect on the way they currentlyconsult and provide information to staff in a redundancy situation–For those employers who use attendance as a criterion (60 per cent of thesample), certified absence appears to count against an employee in theselection process almost as much as unauthorised absence. Most employers (81per cent) said that leave covered by a doctor’s certificate would count againsta worker, and 87 per cent said that self-certified leave would do so Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Prep Sports Roundup: 1/21

first_img Written by January 21, 2020 /Sports News – Local Prep Sports Roundup: 1/21 Tags: Roundup FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailBoys BasketballRegion 16COALVILLE, Utah-Quinton Jones amassed 16 points and 15 rebounds and the North Summit Braves bested North Sevier 69-59 in Region 16 boys basketball action Tuesday. Burke Mickelsen’s 16 points led the Wolves in the loss.Non-RegionSALT LAKE CITY-Caleb Koski posted 26 points and Intermountain Christian edged Bryce Valley 59-58 Tuesday in non-region boys basketball action. Sergio Vasquez led the Mustangs in defeat with 19 points.MT. PLEASANT, Utah-Richie Saunders netted 18 points and the Wasatch Academy Tigers pummeled Jordan 86-51 in non-region boys basketball action Tuesday. Micah Ashman’s 14 points led the Beetdiggers in the loss.Girls BasketballRegion 12CASTLE DALE, Utah-Kenzie Jones stepped up with 32 points and the South Sevier Rams dismantled Emery 66-50 in Region 12 girls basketball action Tuesday. Hailey Allred had 18 points in the loss for the Spartans.RICHFIELD, Utah-Passion Reitz netted 22 points and the Richfield Wildcats humbled Carbon 62-56 Tuesday in Region 12 girls basketball action. Abbie Saccomanno had 16 points for the Dinos in defeat.Region 14MANTI, Utah-Allie Bridges led the way with 12 points and the Manti Templars clobbered Maeser Prep 66-21 Tuesday in Region 14 girls basketball action. Becca Linford had 8 points in the loss for the Lions.SPANISH FORK, Utah-Kenadi Morrill posted 11 points and American Leadership downed North Sanpete 46-35 in Region 14 girls basketball action Tuesday. Eryn Briggs had 10 points for the Hawks in defeat.DELTA, Utah-Jadee Dutson netted 12 points and the Delta Rabbits humbled Union 41-32 in Region 14 girls basketball action Tuesday at the Palladium. Sammy Taylor had 16 points to lead the Cougars in defeat.Region 15DRAPER, Utah-Nataly Dunka stepped up with 21 points and the Wasatch Academy Tigers pounded Draper APA 70-32 Tuesday in Region 15 girls basketball action. Riley Bluth had 15 points in defeat for the Eagles.Region 16COALVILLE, Utah-Kennady McQueen netted 25 points, 8 rebounds and 6 assists as the North Summit Braves clobbered North Sevier 69-31 in Region 16 girls basketball action Tuesday. Kamree Brunson led the Wolves in the loss with 12 points.GUNNISON, Utah-Rian Christiansen led the way with 16 points and the Gunnison Valley Bulldogs got past Monticello 47-38 Tuesday in Region 16 girls basketball action. Megan Black’s 16 points led the Buckaroos in defeat.Region 18KANAB, Utah-Rylee Miller amassed 16 points as the Millard Eagles downed Kanab 47-41 in Region 18 girls basketball action Tuesday. Brinley Cornell paced Kanab in defeat with 13 points.BEAVER, Utah-Halle Hutchings netted 19 points and 9 rebounds as the Beaver Beavers waxed Parowan 42-36 Tuesday in Region 18 girls basketball action. Danika Jones had 8 points and 8 rebounds for the Rams in the loss. Brad Jameslast_img read more

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Guild endorses Boomin after founder makes data and industry promises

first_imgBoomin has been endorsed by The Guild of Property Professionals after the Bruce brothers gave undertakings to its 800 members that they are not planning to cut out agents and go direct to consumers to sell their homes, and that agents’ data would not be ‘stolen’.The Guild says it has been in discussion with its members about the platform since November in a bid to overcome agent worries about the platform, which was due to launch last year but has yet to set a date for its delayed ‘go live’.“Like the broader industry it represents, opinion on Boomin has been divided, though the need for fresh competition in the portal space is absolutely clear,” a Guild statement says.“The team at Boomin have made themselves available to The Guild and the membership as and when we have called upon them and have been open, transparent, and flexible in their response.”Voice concerns“At the time there was a polarisation within the Membership regarding the new portal, and we wanted the network to be able to voice their concerns so that we could address them directly with Boomin,” adds Iain McKenzie (above, right), CEO of The Guild of Property Professionals says.To allay fears, McKenzie has struck a deal with Boomin that mean his members will access Boomin through the Guild’s platform rather than directly in order to protect their data.Michael Bruce, co-founder of Boomin (above, left), says: “We are proud to have entered into an agreement with The Guild that reinforces beyond any doubt our commitment to an agent and customer relationship and puts pay to any concerns of a data play.“To be very clear Boomin has not, and will not, ever look to move to a direct model, something this agreement guarantees.”Read more about the Guild and portals.Boomin Iain McKenzie Michael Bruce The Guild of Property Professionals January 29, 2021Nigel LewisOne commentMichael Gilders, Carters of Bedworth Carters of Bedworth 29th January 2021 at 9:18 amAnother Job for the boys!This was the guy that was supposed to be negotiating a Right move discount for Independent Agents and now wants to line the pockets of the Gentleman that tried to ruin high street agents I.E Purple Bricks! Tread carefully folks.Log in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Associations & Bodies » Guild endorses Boomin after founder makes data and industry promises previous nextAssociations & BodiesGuild endorses Boomin after founder makes data and industry promisesMichael Bruce confirms agents’ data will not be ‘stolen’ and that platform will never go direct to consumers.Nigel Lewis29th January 20211 Comment989 Viewslast_img read more

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