Aqueous Sets Their Sights On Night Lights Music Festival Next Weekend

first_imgThe Night Lights Music Festival is ramping up for its seventh year with a stacked line-up featuring space rock innovators Papadosio and electronic funk masters Dopapod. The three-day event runs August 24th through 26th at the Heron in Sherman, NY. Night Lights will include three stages, over 30 acts, and miles of LED light installations. The festival combines music, art, and community to close the festival season in western New York with a blend of national acts, touring regional artists, and a variety of local musicians to celebrate the close of summer festival season.Colorado-based trio Sunsquabi, Austin psych rockers The Bright Light Social Hour, and Chicago-based quartet Mungion are all slated to make their western New York festival debuts. Despite being a platform for many budding artists from across the United States, the Night Lights Music Festival is anchored by a vast majority of growing regional and local talent. Over half of the artists featured at this year’s event are from within a 60-mile radius of the venue, with more than three-quarters of this year’s line-up hailing from New York state.This year, Buffalo groove rockers Aqueous will return for their fifth appearance at Night Lights, with the group scheduled to play three sets over two days. The band was formed in 2007 by high school friends Mike Gantzer (Guitar/Vocals), David Loss (Guitar/Keys/Vocals) and Evan McPhaden (Bass). Rob Houk (Drums/Vocals) joined the band last spring after Aqueous launched a nationwide search for a new drummer. Although native to western New York, the band has developed an ardent cross-country fan base that has them heading out on their own headlining tours and landing high-profile supporting slots with bands like Umphrey’s McGee. This fall, the band will hit the road, with dates already announced in Madison, Charleston, Nashville, Cleveland, and Chicago.Aqueous has spent the summer touring at festivals across the United States. However, no matter how far from home the band travels, Loss admits that there is always something magical about playing Night Lights. “It’s close to home for us so a lot of the hometown crowd will be there, which always leads to some special moments,” said Loss. “Seeing faces in the crowd that you’ve been seeing for years is always a great feeling.”Many fans anticipate the weekend’s sets will showcase new music while also digging deep into Aqueous’s catalog, though Loss is staying tight lipped on revealing any specific details, “We always like to keep things fresh and new, especially in the hometown area. So, you can certainly expect some things you haven’t heard live from us before.”“For me, since I was the ‘new guy’ to the band and this region of the country, it was like a new kid coming to a new school,” Houk said, commenting on playing the festival with Aqueous for the first-time last year. “As the 5th drummer, I think a lot of people were worried that I wouldn’t stay, or I would spontaneously combust, choke on someone else’s vomit, or die in a gardening accident,” he joked while referencing the cult classic mockumentary This is Spinal Tap. “Now they are realizing that I’m not going anywhere, and the familiar faces from the crowd in the beginning have now become friends. I think that kind of love, friendship, and good energy brings a lot of comfort to our playing.”Loss agreed. “I think right from the get-go, the energy and vibe are right. I think it puts us in the right place, and there’s a very nice shared excitement that allows us to be loose and comfortable, too. We can take more chances, I feel, both in the songs we choose to play and with how we play them. We know the crowd will be along for the ride!”It’s that level of familiarity and comfort that many in the band’s fan base are traveling to see. The weekend will also be a haven for the band’s growing fan base, known as AQuaintences, many of whom are excited to the see “AQ” so close to Buffalo.Andrew Pirrone of Rockaway, NY will be making the seven-hour trip from his home to WNY for his first Night Lights. “AQ is a big reason why my girlfriend and I are heading to Night Lights,” he explained. “When I saw them recently play in Rochester, it was a totally different show. Being closer to their friends just made them explode. I could see the joy in their faces, and the music responded. I’ve heard some amazing things about Nights Lights and AQ playing there, so it just feels right to see what the story is about.”Daniel Hardin of Rochester, New Hampshire is also making the trip to Night Lights to catch Aqueous closer to home. He notes, “I want to see a comfortable AQ. I want to see them take chances because they feel safe at home.” Hardin also noted that getting to see three sets from the band expands the variety and exploration as a fan: “I’m expecting some more diversity and for them to take advantage of the time. I’ll definitely be eager to see what the setlists look like.”On Friday afternoon, Aqueous will perform an acoustic set, dubbed AQoustic, on the venue’s intimate stage. Although Loss and Gantzer often play acoustic shows locally under the moniker The Wonder Emporium, Loss noted that this will be the first time the band has played an acoustic set as a four-piece in recent memory: “It’s been a while, for sure. It will be nice to approach our tunes from a slightly different angle and be able to do some different things with them. I think we’ll just try and have fun with it!”Houk added, “I’ve had a really good feeling about the acoustic set since we announced it. I think that the set is going to yield some interesting jams, cool versions of originals and of course, a few covers.”Aqueous has shared billing points with many of the festival’s artists, including Papadosio, Dopapod, Jimkata, Mungion, and Mihali Savoulidis of Twiddle. “I’m looking forward to hanging with all the other great musicians that will be there. It’s a fantastic lineup with a lot of good friends!” Loss said. “We’ve had the opportunity to tour with many of these bands, too, so it’s always great when we can all come together.”Beyond their point of view as performing artists, the members of Aqueous also look forward to enjoying the music as fans. “The folks who curated this lineup must have been in my head while they made it. I have been excited all summer,” mused Houk. “The grounds at The Heron are some of my favorite that I’ve been to. I’m looking forward to walking around the grounds, watching some of my favorite bands, and enjoying the tranquility of The Heron.”Tickets for Night Lights Music Festival are $125 in advance and include camping. Single Day passes are also available. While attendees are encouraged to camp in the beautifully lit and enchanted woods camping, limited car and RV parking is available. Parking fees apply and carpooling is encouraged. Get tickets and more info here!Enter to win a pair of weekend passes below!last_img read more

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Kissinger looks back

first_imgAt Harvard and in Washington, as a statesman, professor, and author, Henry Kissinger ’50, A.M. ’52, Ph.D. ’54, has spent more than half a century thinking about and shaping foreign policy. At Sanders Theatre on Wednesday, the former secretary of state reflected on the art of statecraft — what he called the “hobby that became my profession.”“I’ve spent all my life thinking about these problems,” said Kissinger, who served during the Nixon and Ford administrations and who oversaw the end of the Vietnam War, the opening up of China, and America’s Cold War policy of détente with the Soviet Union.But that doesn’t mean he has all the answers now, as he told the audience in a discussion of his life’s work.“I know more now, and I probably have a more balanced and slightly less self-confident view,” he said. But “when you are in office, you have to act under pressure, you have to act as if you’re sure of what you’re doing, because you don’t get rewarded for your doubts.”The event was one of several held this academic year to highlight the experiences of prominent alumni during Harvard’s 375th anniversary celebration. As one of Harvard’s “most legendary graduates,” Kissinger was a natural choice for inclusion, said Harvard President Drew Faust.“Dr. Kissinger remains an adviser to leaders around the world, a distinctive voice engaged in the profound challenges facing the United States and the world today,” she said.The talk was moderated by Graham Allison, the Douglas Dillon Professor of Government and director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, who was joined on stage by Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor Joseph Nye and Jessica Blankshain, a doctoral student in political economy and government at the Harvard Kennedy School.Kissinger also took questions from the audience, graciously responding even to those that were critical of his record. (“No one had a bigger interest in ending the war [in Vietnam] than the people who were in office”) and advising one undergraduate on an ongoing feud between Adams and Kirkland Houses. (“I support Adams House,” said the former Adams House resident.) The liveliness of the discussion belied Kissinger’s 88 years; he hardly seemed ready to retire from the debate.The event was one of several held this academic year to highlight the experiences of prominent alumni during Harvard’s 375th anniversary celebration. As one of Harvard’s “most legendary graduates,” Henry Kissinger was a natural choice for inclusion, said Harvard President Drew Faust.“A fellow student once called Henry Kissinger’s work here ‘a conversation with himself on some of humanity’s deepest questions,’” Faust told the crowd. “Harvard was fortunate to have been a formative part of that conversation, and we are very fortunate to continue that conversation today.”Kissinger’s thinking on issues of war and peace dates to his time at Harvard, where he arrived in the fall of 1947 as a transfer sophomore, fresh from military service and propelled by the GI Bill.“Coming back to this country in 1947 was a second immigration,” said Kissinger, a German who had lived in the United States for only five years before being drafted during World War II.Though he had applied late and soon tested the dean’s tolerance by keeping his cocker spaniel in his dorm room (“an early testament to the new student’s talent for diplomacy,” Faust joked), Kissinger quickly stood out at the College.His senior thesis, which tackled questions of statesmanship and philosophy, won him honors — and at 388 pages, inspired a new 150-page limit for all government concentrators.After earning his doctorate at Harvard, Kissinger stayed on as a faculty member, with appointments in the Government Department and the Center for International Affairs. He left for Washington in 1969 to serve as assistant to President Nixon for national security affairs, and soon discovered that his role in government would be quite different from that of a scholar or observer.“The outsider can pick his topic,” Kissinger said. “He can work on it for as long as he wants. He can choose the best possible vision of it, and he has the option of changing his mind.Kissinger, who took questions from the audience, also signed books as people flocked to the stage at Sanders Theatre.“None of these options exist for the statesman,” he continued. “Issues present themselves, and they have to be dealt with in a finite period of time. … For a statesman, the choices are irrevocable.”For a secretary of state, the desire to make a contribution to peace “is inherent to the job,” said Kissinger, who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1973. But that desire must be balanced with a reasoned discussion of how to end wars responsibly, a hard task in Vietnam mirrored by more recent challenges in Iraq and Afghanistan.Kissinger also touched on U.S.-China relations, a topic he dissected in his most recent book, “On China,” published last year. Thanks to America’s geographic isolation and China’s dominance in its region for hundreds of years, neither country has a strong tradition of international negotiation, he said. But cooperation between the “status-quo power” and the “rising power” will be necessary on a range of issues, from nuclear proliferation to the environment.“The state leaders on both sides have to make a decision [to work together] before they get into this crisis,” Kissinger said. “That is one of the biggest challenges of our time.”last_img read more

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Sing a song

first_imgIt’s both a dream and a nightmare scenario for anyone seeking a career on the musical stage: Stand alone in front of an acclaimed Broadway star, sing your heart out, and then await the critique.That’s exactly what Harvard College students Joshuah Campbell ’16, Mark Heath ’14, and Amy Sparrow ’15 got the rare chance to do when Tony Award-winning vocalist and actor Brian Stokes Mitchell stopped by Agassiz House Thursday to lead a master class for singers as part of Wintersession 2014.Stokes Mitchell is best known for his dramatic roles and leading-man turns in Broadway musicals such as “Ragtime,” “Kiss Me Kate,” and “Man of La Mancha.” An accomplished film and television actor, he is also a noted recording artist and concert recitalist who has performed with the nation’s top orchestras at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, the Kennedy Center, and the White House.Although gifted with a lush baritone that can move deftly between the Great American Songbook and show tunes, Stokes Mitchell, who was on campus for a concert at Sanders Theatre that evening, offered students his insights on vocal interpretation, not technique.“I try to understand the song from the writer’s point of view,” Mitchell said of his approach, adding that he finds it easier to interpret a song if he gets inside the construction and ideas behind a piece before playing creatively with it.To illustrate how singers can put their own imprint on even the most shopworn numbers with some smart preparation, Stokes Mitchell performed “The Impossible Dream” from “Man of La Mancha.”Along with his accompanist, Tedd Firth, Stokes Mitchell sang the showstopper in the familiar, heroic style of Richard Kiley’s original 1965 recording, and riffed on the Stephen Sondheim torch song “Losing My Mind” from “Follies.”Then, deconstructing the lyrics line by line, he analyzed the words and ideas, as well as the musical prosody — the way a song’s syllables and melody inform and support each other to tell a story — and toyed with different phrasings and transitions to show how the song’s emotional power is directly influenced by a singer’s musical and expressive choices.“When you personalize songs, the better your performance is going to be and the more individual your performance is going to be,” he said. “Because nobody’s ever seen your version of it, and nobody knows what you’ve been through in your life, and nobody’s heard your phrasing of it and the way your experience affects your phrasing and the way you choose your notes. Make it as personal as you can, and that will guide you.”Bringing one’s own history and feelings to a work helps unite the singer to the song, which, in turn, brings it alive for an audience, he told students.“If you find in your life really specific things about every single line, people in the audience aren’t going to know exactly who you’re talking about or what you’re talking about, but what they’re going to feel is the experience that came from you, and that’s what makes them” identify and feel the song, he said. “That’s how you connect with an audience.”Stokes Mitchell’s visit was part of an ongoing effort to bring more celebrated working artists to Harvard to help guide young performers, said Thomas Lee, executive director of Learning From Performers, the program that runs the master classes under the umbrella of the Office for the Arts at Harvard. Past master talents have included lyric soprano Renée Fleming and stage actress and singer Christine Ebersole.“It’s just absolutely so necessary for students who are interested in singing and acting to work with people who are really doing it, with professionals,” Lee said just before the class. “The students who are performing … they all work with vocal teachers, and they’ve done productions here at Harvard. But to get the chance to meet and work with a professional who’s been doing it for so long is just invaluable.”Lee said because students at the College don’t concentrate on the performing arts, the Learning From Performers program “tries to fill that gap.”“It’s just a wonderful experience … there’s just a real spark of learning. They just gain so much,” he said.Stokes Mitchell and Firth provided the student singers, who were accompanied on piano by Dylan Marcaurele ’16 and Jessica Rucinski ’13, with spot-on feedback and coaching about their individual performances. They also offered some keen advice about the importance of body language and the need to research different arrangements and recordings to understand how a song has evolved over the years before putting their own spin on it. Like any discipline worth studying, it’s a process that never ends, Stokes Mitchell said.“The cool thing about being an artist of any type is that it’s a constant exploration,” he said. “You’re trying to reach this thing that’s impossible to reach, this perfection, this full understanding of something that you’re doing. And the more you study it and get into it … the more you start seeing more spaces, and you start seeing more depth in it, and you realize more places you can go.”last_img read more

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Revision Eyewear Announces Two Major Contracts With The US Army

first_img·        September2003 Revision announces contract to provide Sawfly® eyewear to all members ofthe Canadian Land Force.·        October 2004 Revision opens operations in Williston, Vermont.·        February2005 Revision announces contract to provide Sawfly® eyewear and Bullet Ant® goggles to units of theBritish Army.·        August 2005 Revisionannounces contract to provide Sawfly® eyewear to Infantry forces of Singapores Army. Note to Editors: To readactual unsolicited e-mail testimonials from the field, please see attached documentMultiple Shrapnel Stories. ·        September2005 Revision launches Bullet Ant® ballistic goggles to NorthAmerican market.·        April 2006 Revisionannounces contract to provide Sawfly® eyewear to units of the Belgian Army.·        May 2006 Revisionlaunches Desert Locust” ballistic goggles.·        August 2006 Revisionannounces contract to provide 104,000 Sawfly® eyewear to units of the US Army.·        October 2006 Revision wins contract to develop new ballistic goggle for USDepartment of Defense.·        December2006 Revision completes development work on a ballisticprotective visor for the Canadian Department of National Defence.·        February 2007 Revision announces contracts toprovide an additional 178,000 sets of Sawfly® eyewear and 85,000 setsof Desert Locust” ballistic goggles to units of the US Army. REVISIONEYEWEAR MARKS FIFTH ANNIVERSARY BY ANNOUCING TWO MAJOR CONTRACTS WITH THE US ARMY Weare delighted to be marking our fifth anniversary with contracts ofunprecedented size with our largest client the US Army, said JonathanBlanshay, President, Revision Eyewear. The continued adoption of our productsas the industry standard for ballistic eyewear systems is the ultimateendorsement of our business plan and growth strategies. As Revision Eyewearcontinues to build its relationship with units of the US Armed Forces and othermilitary and law enforcement clients worldwide, we will continue to grow at an increasingrate. Looking back at 2006 over 2002, we report revenue growth in excess of1500%. Furthermore, based on our current pipeline of new business, weanticipate a banner year in 2007. Beyond our success, it is important toremember our true objective to provide the best eye protection to men andwomen in dangerous situations. We have received tremendous feedback from troopsserving in the Middle East. To be acknowledged in thismanner directly by the people using our products on Inthe last three years, Revision has focused exclusively on ballistic protectiveeyewear systems. To date, Revision has sold more than 500,000 sets of Sawfly® eyewear.With a team of 41 full-time employees (26 in Williston and 15 in Montreal), Revisionoperates one of the most advanced testing facilities in the industry. With anongoing commitment to reinvest a significant portion of revenues in researchand development, Revision will continue to market industry-leading ballisticprotective eyewear systems for military, law enforcement and tactical clientsworldwide. Contractsrepresent product orders of unprecedented sizecenter_img thefront line is what inspires us to keep working even harder, Mr. Blanshayconcluded. Thefollowing is a brief timeline of key milestones in Revision Eyewears growth: ____________________________________________________________________ Linda NEWS_RELEASE_LTR_PG1.dot Mark Lowe 6 1 2007-02-14T21:26:00Z 2007-02-15T17:55:00Z 2007-02-27T19:11:00Z 1 626 3571 Revision Eyewear Inc. 29 8 4189 10.2625 -1874820067 REVISION EYEWEAR MARKS FIFTH ANNIVERSARY BY ANNOUNCING TWO MAJOR CONTRACTS WITH THE US [email protected](link sends e-mail) Mark Lowe Print MicrosoftInternetExplorer4st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”;} WILLISTON, VT, February 27, 2007 Revision Eyewear, developers of purpose-built military eyewear,today marked its fifth anniversary by announcing contracts to provide 178,000 sets of Sawfly®eyewear and 85,000 sets of Desert Locust” ballistic goggles to units ofthe US Army. ABOUT REVISIONRevisionEyewear develops purpose-built eyewear for military, law enforcement, andtactical clients worldwide. Revision products deliver the highest standards ofprotection,opticalclarity, durability, compatibility and comfort. Clients include the US Army,the Belgian Ministry of Defence, UK Ministry ofDefence, Singapore SpecialForces, and the Canadian Department of National Defence. Privately owned andISO 9001:2000 certified, Revision is co-located in Williston, Vermont andMontreal, Canada with offices in London, UK. For more information, please visitwww.revisioneyewear.com(link is external).last_img read more

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10 steps credit unions should take to keep member data safe

first_imgTaken at face value, mobile payments are considered more secure than credit cards, even more secure than EMV chip cards. Unlike chip cards, the payment credentials stored on the phone or watch are tokenized, whereas the chip card has the actual card number on the chip. Also, the phone requires an additional authentication (a fingerprint or a passcode) which the card does not require. This is the current case with Apple/Samsung/Android Pay. But there are other forms of payments both in the market and in start-ups whose focus is not on security. These start-ups are working on merchant-specific payment and loyalty apps, on-demand service apps, pay-at-the-table apps, and the vulnerability of these new forms of payments are driving increased security concerns.In a survey of 3,700 IT security practitioners conducted by the Ponemon Institute on behalf of Gemalto, 54% of the companies represented have had their payments data breached four times in the last two years. This number is expected to rise as new payment forms are introduced and new payment disruptors enter the industry. The two most common problems cited are not being PCI DSS compliant, and lack of encryption.If demonstrations at trade shows are any prediction of the near future of payments, then there will be many new forms of payments going on. The Amazon commercial shown at the end of the Super Bowl where Alec Baldwin asks his Amazon Echo to order replacement socks; a Tesla performing self-diagnosis, and ordering parts and scheduling service; and the Samsung smart refrigerator that has a camera inside to monitor food, and order groceries for delivery, are all harbingers of the future of “things” that will be making payments on our behalf. continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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After Split, the first study of gastronomy was opened in Zagreb

first_imgDue to the growing needs of the labor market for this staff in continental Croatia, Aspira College decided to start after Split with its, already extremely successful, study of Gastronomy in Zagreb. The need arose due to the growing tourist expansion, but also more and more demanding guests and employers.It is a well-established program with top domestic and foreign lecturers, all well-known names such as Andrej Barbieri, Tonči Drlja, Denis Galić, Dino Galvagn, Vincenzo Guarin (Michelin star holder), Antun Nišević, Michael Noss, Branko Ognjenović, Ivan Pažanin, Brothers Sanjin, Hrvoje Zirojevic and others. “What Aspira does is proof of the planned education for tourism and gastronomy, which is why more and more tourists come to us, so for example they come to Istria on weekends in autumn to enjoy food, but it would be good if restaurants in Adriatic destinations were open in winter. not to close the door when summer is over”Cappelli pointed out at the opening of the studio in Zagreb.The study of Gastronomy is designed to teach students the importance of gastronomy and oenology in creating a complete tourist experience, introduce them to the techniques and history of cooking different world cuisines and ways to design a top gastronomic product, world culinary trends and how to apply everything learned in practice. Upon completion of their studies, our students become managers in gastronomy because, in addition to culinary skills, they also acquire knowledge in the field of marketing, financial management, human resource management and are fully qualified to create a business plan. All this is a great base for those who want to open and run their own restaurant.The most modern kitchen practicum at the Aspira High School in Split provides students with quality practical classes. Namely, each student works on a fully equipped, separate work unit, while they can follow the lecturer’s mentor through a monitor, in order to make their learning as interesting, simple and high-quality as possible. Also, with the opening of studies in Zagreb, students who enroll at the faculty in Split will have the opportunity to spend one semester in Zagreb and vice versa.The importance of dual education A large part of the student internship consists of study trips, in which students have had the opportunity to visit, among other things, the Monte restaurant Đekić family, restaurant Pelegrini where they were hosted by Rudolf Štefan, winery Kozlović, restaurant Zigante and chef Damir Modrušan and participate in interesting workshops in AZRRI (Agency for Rural Development of Istria).last_img read more

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Mikel Arteta explains how he will turn Arsenal’s draws into wins

first_img Metro Sport ReporterSunday 16 Feb 2020 1:38 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link2.6kShares Comment Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img Mikel Arteta explains how he will turn Arsenal’s draws into wins Two of Arteta’s three wins have come in the FA Cup (Picture: Getty Images)Arsenal head coach Mikel Arteta has revealed how he plans to ‘accelerate’ the progress of his squad to start winning more games.Since taking over from former manager Unai Emery in December, the 37-year-old has won just three from nine matches in all competitions.The Gunners find themselves languishing down in 11th place in the Premier League table following frustrating draws with Crystal Palace, Sheffield United and Burnley.Speaking to Sky Sports ahead of Sunday’s game against Newcastle, Arteta said: ‘There have been a lot of positives, I have tried to convince the players that if we work on certain things in training, they will happen in games and we will score goals from them.ADVERTISEMENT Arsenal v Newcastle: Mikel Arteta press conferenceTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 7:14FullscreenArsenal v Newcastle: Mikel Arteta press conferencehttps://metro.co.uk/video/arsenal-v-newcastle-mikel-arteta-press-conference-2110832/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.‘There have been some really good moments like that with things I have asked them to do.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘As well, some of the counter-pressing we have done has been very good. Some of the behaviours of the players weren’t there before, particularly the top players tracking back.‘The distances between us and how compact we are is much better, and so is our body language during games.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing ArsenalSeveral Arsenal players were full of praise for their new coach during the winter break, with Brazilian defender David Luiz saying Arteta has put the fun back into playing at the club.When asked about this shift in mentality and ethos, Arteta said: ‘I am convinced that we are going to do some great things together.‘We have every element that we need to be successful and take the club forward – and to do it in the way we want as well. It’s great to feel that the players are enjoying it, and that they believe in what we are trying to do.‘Now it’s down to us to accelerate the process as much as possible, without killing the process but by winning as many games as we can.’MORE: Alexandre Lacazette promises a big improvement at Arsenal under MIkel ArtetaMORE: Mikel Arteta warns Arsenal sensation Gabriel Martinelli ahead of Newcastle clashlast_img read more

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Odion Ighalo tipped to replace Manchester United striker Romelu Lukaku by Arsenal legend Kanu

first_imgAdvertisement Metro Sport ReporterMonday 17 Feb 2020 10:15 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.8kShares Kanu has hailed new Manchester United striker Odion Ighalo (Picture: Getty)Kanu has backed Odion Ighalo to replace Romelu Lukaku as the Nigerian forward prepares to make his Manchester United debut.Red Devils fan Ighalo joined the Premier League giants on transfer deadline day on a loan deal until the end of the season.The 30-year-old, who played for Watford between 2014 and 2017, could make his Manchester United debut on Monday evening against Chelsea.A number of United fans were left underwhelmed by the Ighalo signing but Arsenal hero Kanu says he can replace Lukaku, who left Old Trafford last summer.ADVERTISEMENT‘Yes he can replace him [Lukaku],’ Kanu told Goal. ‘If you watch him play, you’d find out that he is strong and can score goals.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘What he needs is the service. In this team, I am sure his game will improve because the team has great players.‘Despite playing in the Chinese league, Ighalo is not a player you would look down on and say he is not a good player. Comment Arsenal legend Kanu (Picture: Getty)‘I think he’s probably pinching himself at times, because he’s now at his favourite club at the age of 30.‘Hopefully he’ll prove to you what I think he will. He’s a proven goalscorer, so he’ll do all right.’Manchester United will close the gap on fourth-placed Chelsea to four points with victory at Stamford Bridge on Monday.MORE: Luis Figo rates Manchester United’s £67m transfer move for Bruno FernandesMORE: Arsenal eyeing shock move for former Manchester United star Daley Blindcenter_img Ighalo has been tipped to replace Romelu Lukaku at Old Trafford (Picture: Getty)‘I believe in him and I know he can deliver if given the chance. Bringing him to Old Trafford means that those in the club believe in his ability, and we have to respect that.‘I don’t think he will not disappoint because he will give them value for their money.’Ole Gunnar Solskjaer defended Manchester United’s controversial move for Ighalo and said this week that he could sign a permanent deal with the club in the summer.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘It’s a loan, but when you’re in the door and if you impress it gives you a chance,’ Solskjaer said. ‘That’s exactly the same for everyone who signs if it’s permanent or it’s a loan.‘If you impress as a player, if you impress as a person, if you can help this group improve, then of course there’s a chance that we’ll look at extending things.‘That doesn’t just go for Odion, but since you asked, yes, of course his incentive is to play as well as he can. And it’s up to us to make sure that he’d want to stay if we wanted him. Odion Ighalo tipped to replace Manchester United striker Romelu Lukaku by Arsenal legend Kanu Advertisementlast_img read more

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Multi-million dollar sales have put this tightly-held street of rich listers back on top

first_imgSold for $9 million – 75 Monaco St, Broadbeach Waters.MONACO St in Broadbeach Waters is back on top following several multi-million dollar sales.The tightly-held street has some of the largest residences on the Gold Coast and is home to a swag of rich listers, corporate high-flyers and celebrities.The latest sale is a mega mansion at No. 75-77, which changed hands for $9 million.Mermaid Beach couple Glenn and Victoria Hargraves, part owners of directory and online search company Local Search, bought the property and plan to make the move from the beach.The pair said the home sparked their interest with its architecture, northerly aspect, skyline views and land size. The resort-style terrace has an infinity pool, flanked by twin dining pavilions.“We have outgrown our existing Mermaid Beach residence and always had plans to settle on the river, with Monaco St always our first choice,” Mr Hargraves said.“We were previously focused on the other part of Monaco St opposite the park and had actually never considered this location until we saw it. More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North9 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day ago“Once we inspected the property we felt that it was far superior with its northerly aspect and views of the Surfers Paradise skyline.”The 987sq m home is built on a 2,337sq block with 28m of river frontage.Designed by architect Bayden Goddard, the five-bedroom residence has a dramatic entry onto a broad marble catwalk surrounded by tiled reflection pools leading to a glass foyer. The property has 28m of river frontage.The home has large open-plan living areas that flow out to a resort-style infinity pool terrace which is flanked with twin dining pavilions.The vendor was former BRW rich-lister James Rice, boss of South Australian property development company Urban Construct.Mr Rice, the developer of Carrara’s Emerald Lakes, now lives in New Farm with his wife and two children.Kollosche Prestige Agents principals Michael Kollosche and Jordan Williams handled the sale.“The sale is further confirmation that local buyers have renewed confidence in the prestige sector of the Gold Coast property market,” Mr Kollosche said.Other recent sales on Monaco St include No. 255, which sold off-market in December for $11 million and No. 201-205, which went for $9.5 million earlier this month. Another residence at No. 171 sold for $4.6 million last month.Before the recent rush of sales, there had only been two sales above $6 million recorded on the street.last_img read more

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A property part owned by founding member of the Seekers, Bruce Woodley has sold

first_imgBruce Woodley has sold off a Sunshine Coast property which he had a part share in.A SUNSHINE Coast hinterland property part-owned by a founding member of theAustralian band The Seekers has found a new owner.Bruce Woodley was one of the owners of the home 82 Upper Rambert Rd, Eudlo, onthe Sunshine Coast.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home2 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor2 hours agoProperty records reveal now it has sold for $949,000.According to CoreLogic it was most recently listed for sale through Amber Werchon Property Mooloolaba.Mr Woodley is probably best known as a member of The Seekers and as the co-writer of the well known classic, I Am Australian. There are four bungalows on the property, three are bedrooms with ensuites and the fourth is a living area with kitchen and other facilities. All are connected by covered walkways.It has unobstructed views to the Pacific Ocean, from Mount Coolum to Caloundra.last_img read more

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