Hozier Announces 10 New 2019 North American Tour Dates

first_imgOn Monday, Irish singer-songwriter Hozier announced the addition of ten new dates to his already extensive 2019 North American touring schedule. The new tour date announcement comes in the wake of his critically and commercially successful new album, Wasteland, Baby!, which premiered at #1 on the Billboard 200.The new stretch of October tour dates featuring special guest Freya will begin in Portland, OR on October 17th before heading to Vancouver, BC on the 18th and Seattle, WA on the 19th. From there, Hozier will head to Sacramento, CA (10/21); Santa Barbara, CA (10/24); Los Angeles, CA (10/25); San Diego, CA (10/26); Phoenix, AZ (10/29); Albuquerque, NM (10/30); and El Paso, TX (10/31).Related: Love Rocks NYC Brings Robert Plant, Sheryl Crow, Ann & Nancy Wilson, Buddy Guy, Hozier, & Many More Together For A Cause [Videos]The newly added fall dates will come on the heels of a lengthy tour of North America throughout this spring and summer. See below for a list of the newly added dates. For a full list of Hozier’s upcoming tour dates, head over to his website here.Hozier 2019 Fall Tour DatesOctober 17 – Portland, OR – Rose Garden – Theater of the CloudsOctober 18 – Vancouver, BC – Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports CentreOctober 19 – Seattle, WA – WAMU TheaterOctober 21 – Sacramento, CA – Memorial AuditoriumOctober 24 – Santa Barbara, CA – Santa Barbara BowlOctober 25 – Los Angeles, CA – Greek TheatreOctober 26 – San Diego, CA – Cal Coast Credit Union Open Air TheatreOctober 29 – Phoenix, AZ – Comerica TheareOctober 30 – Albuquerque, NM – Kiva AuditoriumOctober 31 – El Paso, TX – Abraham Chavez TheatreView New Tour Dateslast_img read more

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The Dell Tech Behind Kickass Storytelling

first_img“Our goal for 30 Ninjas is to build new media through kickass storytelling and creative technology,” says Julina Tatlock, chief executive officer of the digital entertainment company that creates 360° virtual reality (VR) content for film and television.If winning “Best 360 Series” at this week’s 2017 edition of The Lumiere Awards by Advanced Imaging Society and the VR Society is any indication, 30 Ninjas seems to be well on their way to reaching that goal.Their scripted series Invisible, which won the award, employed an episodic approach and leveraged a number of editing techniques to cut between different locations. Pulp Lab reported that the entire crew, spent 8-12 hours a day in and out of VR headsets to develop the mini-series, creating and editing entirely in context of the 360 VR experience.It’s great to see that our Dell Precision workstations played an important part in enabling them to do that.“We got the Dell Precision 7910 and all of a sudden I’m watching full-res and we’re seeing stuff where it’s like ‘oh dude there’s a guy in this shot’ and we restructured everything because there’s all this stuff you never see,” said Lewis Smithingham, president and head of VR at 30 Ninjas.In addition to film, 30 Ninjas is moving television into more immersive territory. In the video below, Tatlock tells the story of shooting four episodes of Conan O’Brien’s show live from Comic Con.She says it was a very stressful project because television shows are used to their own technology and are not forgiving about any technical glitches. But there were no problems with the Dell technology that 30 Ninjas leverages.“There were emotional breakdowns, but there were no machine breakdowns,” Tatlock noted.&nbsp;</p><p>last_img read more

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Sarah Jones’ Sell/Buy/Date & Qui Nguyen’s Vietgone Set for Off-B’way

first_img View Comments Tony winner Sarah Jones’ new play Sell/Buy/Date, which explores the commercial sex industry, will bow in the Big Apple next fall. Also added to the slate for Manhattan Theatre Club’s off-Broadway spaces at New York City Center 2016-2017 season will be Qui Nguyen’s Vietgone.Penned and performed by Jones, Sell/Buy/Date will be helmed by Carolyn Cantor and is scheduled to start previews on September 27, 2016, with opening night set for October 18 at the Studio at Stage II. Jones will appear as a medley of characters in Sell/Buy/Date, which is inspired by the real-life experiences of people affected by the commercial sex industry.Directed by May Adrales, Nguyen’s Vietgone will begin previews on October 4, 2016 and officially open at New York City Center—Stage 1. The New York premiere is the classic story of boy meets girl—except this boy and girl are refugees from the Vietnam War newly settled in a relocation camp inside Middle America. Casting and creative team will be announced later.last_img read more

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CAES Recognition

first_imgThe National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named a University of Georgia faculty member who is a leading researcher in regenerative medicine to the 2017 class of NAI Fellows.Steven Stice, Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar and director of the UGA Regenerative Bioscience Center, joins an elite group of 912 innovators who represent more than 250 prestigious research universities and governmental and nonprofit research institutions.Election to NAI Fellow status is a professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society. Six UGA faculty members have been named NAI Fellows since the honor was established in 2013, and an additional Fellow joined the faculty last year.“The election of Steven Stice as an NAI Fellow highlights the innovative research conducted at UGA,” said Vice President for Research David Lee. “We join NAI in celebrating his contributions to science and society.”Stice, the D.W. Brooks Distinguished Professor in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, has led industry and academic research teams in the area of pluripotent stem cells for over 25 years. At UGA he has conducted pioneering work in developmental biology and genetics to advance animal and human medicine. His group derived some of the original human pluripotent stem cell lines placed on the first National Institutes of Health (NIH) human embryonic stem cell registry. Stice was a key member of the team that produced the first cloned rabbit in 1989 and the first cloned transgenic calves in 1998 (George and Charlie), for which he was granted the first U.S. patent in cloning animals. He has produced the first genetically modified pluripotent stem cells derived from pigs and cattle and, more recently, in avian species.His research has led to 16 U.S. patents in stem cells, cloning and regenerative medicine, including the first U.S. patent on animal cloning and therapeutic cloning from adult animal cells. Multiple startup companies have been based on his technologies. ArunA Biomedical, the first company to commercialize a product derived from human pluripotent stem cells, is now using this original stem cell technology as a basis for preclinical human therapeutics and drug delivery.Currently, the Stice lab is collaborating with ArunA Biomedical to develop proprietary exosomes for the treatment of central nervous system injury and neurodegenerative disorders, with an initial focus in stroke. Exosomes — tiny structures shed from cells — are cargo carriers that independently, or when packaged with therapeutics, change the behavior, improve the survival and repair of injured cells, reduce inflammation and attack tumor cells while remaining invisible to the body’s own defenses. Their proprietary manufacturing process will have the ability to noninvasively reach the site of injury without adverse responses while reducing inflammation of the brain and improving neural function.“Steve’s innovative research and entrepreneurial spirit exemplify UGA’s emphasis on translating research discoveries into products that benefit the public,” said Derek Eberhart, director of UGA’s Innovation Gateway. “He has been an integral contributor to the university’s innovation ecosystem, which has generated more than 675 products and 160 companies based on UGA research.”Stice’s longstanding commitment to growing the life science industry, as well as the advancement of regenerative medicine research and commercialization, was recognized in 2017 when he received the Industry Growth Award from Georgia Bio. He has founded five biotech companies, including four startups in Georgia that have generated more than 100 jobs.Stice has published more than 125 peer-reviewed manuscripts and has been an invited speaker at over 200 research conferences, symposia and industry events. In 2016, Stice was invited to serve as a member of the Science Advisory Board to the National Center for Toxicological Research of the Food and Drug Administration. Recently, he led UGA’s participation in a successful bid for $20 million in funding from the National Science Foundation to establish an Engineering Research Center for Cell Manufacturing Technologies in collaboration with the Georgia Institute of Technology and other partner institutions.UGA’s other NAI Fellows are Michael Doyle, retired Regents Professor of Food Microbiology and former director of UGA’s Center for Food Safety; Michael A. Dirr, emeritus professor of horticulture; Robert Ivarie, emeritus professor of genetics; David Chu, Distinguished Research Professor emeritus of pharmacy; and Wayne Hanna, professor of crop and soil sciences. Karen Burg, who joined UGA in 2016 as the Harbor Lights Chair in Small Animal Studies, was named a Fellow in 2014.The university’s innovation programs rank highly, placing top five among all U.S. universities for new products reaching the marketplace for the fourth consecutive year. During the past two years, UGA’s efforts to facilitate industry engagement and catalyze economic development resulted in a 30 percent increase in the number of new inventions and licensing revenue, a 40 percent increase in the pipeline of startup projects, and more than 140 new products reaching the market. Innovation Gateway, formed in 2015 to streamline the path from laboratory or field to marketplace, also brought in $1 million in new grants. The UGA I-Corps Site, a STEM-focused accelerator program funded by a $500,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, launched this fall and helps teams from across the university transition their research discoveries to market-ready products and services.last_img read more

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A Pisgah Forest Entrance Shake-Up Excites the Outdoor Community

first_imgPromising to be the premier mountain biking outfitter in the Southeast, the Hub and Pisgah Tavern will open the doors to its newly constructed shop on Friday, February 12 in Brevard, North Carolina.The bike shop has big plans for its state-of-the-art, 9,000 square-foot building at the entrance of the Pisgah Ranger District.The Hub will offer clothing, multi-sport gear, guides, mechanics, a Carmichael Systems training center, and a bar, stocked with local brews like Oskar Blues and Sierra Nevada. Sierra Nevada is currently at work developing a speciality batch dubbed Pinch Flat IPA to commemorate the Hub’s first season in the new shop.Brevard food trucks, including Velvet Cup, Chameleon, and Blue Smoke, will frequent the parking lot, especially when Pisgah Productions begins staging all of their races out of the shop.“We just love people hanging out and having a good time” co-owner Sam Salman said.Salman, who has owned the Hub with his wife Jordan since they graduated from Brevard College in 2008, began looking to expand as he saw more and more customers packing into the shop to chat and sip post-ride beers. A 72-acre parcel was available across the street, and once dividing the land became an option Salman jumped at the opportunity and purchased eight acres.Salman said he has had some critics scrutinize the size of the store and its position at the forest entrance, but he believes his bike shop will have a positive impact on the community and is a good alternative to another dollar store.“Anyone could have bought it,” Salman said. “They could have built a strip mall. People should be thanking us. Not one tree was cut down.”Nearby fly fishing shop Davidson River Outfitters will move into the Hub‘s old store, while Pilot Cove is developing a glamping destination, including cabins, an amphitheater, and trails, directly behind the new Hub.Starting Friday, the Hub will be undergoing a soft-opening phase in preparation for their grand-opening in March.“It should be a pretty hopping place,” Salman said.[divider]about the author[/divider]Since boyhood Phil Morgan has loved maps, adventure, travel, culture, history, and good stories. He studied the liberal arts at Hillsdale College and has since worked as an ocean lifeguard, a staff writer for Eastern Surf Magazine, a newspaper editor, and a raft guide. He currently lives in Hendersonville, North Carolina, where he teaches English, writes, and explores the surrounding wilderness. His favorite authors are Jon Krakauer, Jack London, Mark Twain, Paul Theroux, and William Shakespeare.last_img read more

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Youth from Indigenous Communities Join the Peruvian Army

first_img“We believe it is important for parents to entrust their children to the Army, because we can open a door to opportunities for personal and professional growth,” said Gen. Astudillo, who emphasized the multiple options to study for careers in production and technical vocations, such as carpentry, mechanics, welding, electricity, plumbing, shoemaking, and tailoring. During that time, they’ll receive basic Military training, a combat-related specialization, health insurance, and education through certified production and technical vocation programs that allow Soldiers quick entry into the workforce; they’ll also receive a stipend of $300 per month. The training provides recruits with skills they need to monitor the conservation and preservation of the ecosystem in their respective jurisdictions, said Colonel Iván Rojas Rodríguez, chief of the Peruvian Army Reserves and Mobilization Command (COREMOVE). They’ll also be prepared to combat terrorism, illegal logging, human trafficking, and drug trafficking in the VRAEM, the country’s main illegal coca-producing area. “These new Soldiers will be the representatives of our institution and will work to eradicate the illegal logging, human trafficking, and drug trafficking activities that might occur in their communities,” said General César Astudillo, chief of the VRAEM Special Command and the Commanding General of the Army 4th Division. Pedro Castañeda Vela, mayor for the district of Pangoa, said non-billeted Military service is a valuable opportunity for young people to prevent crime and criminals from gaining a toehold in indigenous communities. “Every two months, the youths return to the barracks for ten days where they acquire new knowledge and learn new Military tactics so they can subsequently return to their communities and apply what they’ve learned,” Col. Rojas said. “But when circumstances so require, personnel can be recalled unexpectedly and for an indefinite period of time.” Months of training “The Government of Peru is providing a magnificent opportunity to don an Army uniform and proudly fight several types of crimes and offenses,” Castañeda said. Months of training Indigenous Troops to fight an array of illegal activities In 2015, a total of 19,000 people were recruited for billeted Military service in Peru. “We believe it is important for parents to entrust their children to the Army, because we can open a door to opportunities for personal and professional growth,” said Gen. Astudillo, who emphasized the multiple options to study for careers in production and technical vocations, such as carpentry, mechanics, welding, electricity, plumbing, shoemaking, and tailoring. In 2015, a total of 19,000 people were recruited for billeted Military service in Peru. Congratulations to all the brave men who joined different military groups, keep it up and follow the footsteps of the heroes who passed on their bravery in the group, place and work they had. Hurrah for the brave men and may God bless you. Call on our God wherever you may be because being a believer does not diminish your manhood. It’s important for indigenous peoples to join in societal, economic and political activities, as a disadvantaged class, to contribute their actions to developing Peru. Something good to improve the country from so much violence. The youth are the future of the country.Let them carry on for the good More or less, it’s not so great Good for the natives. Were they well trained to fight criminals and/or all those involved ILLEGALLY in corruption ?????????? It’s good that the recruitment program includes workforce training. The Army should also learn from their customs and thus achieve better engagement. Since there are duties owed to the country, for them the homeland represents honor and respect for their ancestors, it is not in vain that they are cultures that conserve thousands of years of knowledge which needs to be preserved. It’s good that the Army is becoming integrated into the history of our Peruvian compatriots. Soldiers billeted in barracks may serve for 12, 18, or 24 months, depending primarily on the recruit’s desire to remain in the institution, Col. Rojas said. “These new Soldiers will be the representatives of our institution and will work to eradicate the illegal logging, human trafficking, and drug trafficking activities that might occur in their communities,” said General César Astudillo, chief of the VRAEM Special Command and the Commanding General of the Army 4th Division. By Dialogo June 17, 2015 Indigenous Troops to fight an array of illegal activities “The age for youths in billeted service is from 18 to 25,” said Col. Rojas, specifying that the Soldier stays on base from Monday through Friday but has Saturday afternoon and part of Sunday to visit with family. A total of 130 Peruvian youths between the ages of 18 and 30 who belong to indigenous communities located in the Apurímac, Ene, and Mantaro River Valleys (VRAEM) region have volunteered for 24 months of non-billeted Army service. At the beginning of their service, the indigenous youths are housed in Military barracks – just as billeted service members are – and undergo three months of training. After that, they gather every two months to receive additional training and learn new skills. The non-billeted Military service is rendered in the typical clothing of the indigenous communities. The benefits of military service “Every two months, the youths return to the barracks for ten days where they acquire new knowledge and learn new Military tactics so they can subsequently return to their communities and apply what they’ve learned,” Col. Rojas said. “But when circumstances so require, personnel can be recalled unexpectedly and for an indefinite period of time.” Just like service members billeted in barracks, non-billeted Soldiers receive a series of benefits, such as access to health care for life through a comprehensive insurance plan that ends only if the person acquires a different insurance policy. Most of the Military recruits belong to the indigenous communities of Santo Domingo de Sonomoro, Alto Kiatari, San Ramón de Pangoa, Alto Anapati, Mazaronquiari, Mayni, Cubantia, Santa Clara Chavini, San Jerónimo, Matereni, Nomatsiguenga, and Ashaninka, which are located in the city of Pangoa, province of Satipo, in the region of Junín, some 12 hours by road from Peru’s capital city, Lima. “The Government of Peru is providing a magnificent opportunity to don an Army uniform and proudly fight several types of crimes and offenses,” Castañeda said. Every recruit enlisted in non-billeted Military service will be given a national identification card issued by the National Identification and Vital Statistics Registry, as well as a debit card issued by the National Bank to which their stipends will be credited. A total of 130 Peruvian youths between the ages of 18 and 30 who belong to indigenous communities located in the Apurímac, Ene, and Mantaro River Valleys (VRAEM) region have volunteered for 24 months of non-billeted Army service. Soldiers billeted in barracks may serve for 12, 18, or 24 months, depending primarily on the recruit’s desire to remain in the institution, Col. Rojas said. During that time, they’ll receive basic Military training, a combat-related specialization, health insurance, and education through certified production and technical vocation programs that allow Soldiers quick entry into the workforce; they’ll also receive a stipend of $300 per month. The training provides recruits with skills they need to monitor the conservation and preservation of the ecosystem in their respective jurisdictions, said Colonel Iván Rojas Rodríguez, chief of the Peruvian Army Reserves and Mobilization Command (COREMOVE). They’ll also be prepared to combat terrorism, illegal logging, human trafficking, and drug trafficking in the VRAEM, the country’s main illegal coca-producing area. “The age for youths in billeted service is from 18 to 25,” said Col. Rojas, specifying that the Soldier stays on base from Monday through Friday but has Saturday afternoon and part of Sunday to visit with family. Every recruit enlisted in non-billeted Military service will be given a national identification card issued by the National Identification and Vital Statistics Registry, as well as a debit card issued by the National Bank to which their stipends will be credited. The benefits of military service Pedro Castañeda Vela, mayor for the district of Pangoa, said non-billeted Military service is a valuable opportunity for young people to prevent crime and criminals from gaining a toehold in indigenous communities. Just like service members billeted in barracks, non-billeted Soldiers receive a series of benefits, such as access to health care for life through a comprehensive insurance plan that ends only if the person acquires a different insurance policy. Most of the Military recruits belong to the indigenous communities of Santo Domingo de Sonomoro, Alto Kiatari, San Ramón de Pangoa, Alto Anapati, Mazaronquiari, Mayni, Cubantia, Santa Clara Chavini, San Jerónimo, Matereni, Nomatsiguenga, and Ashaninka, which are located in the city of Pangoa, province of Satipo, in the region of Junín, some 12 hours by road from Peru’s capital city, Lima. At the beginning of their service, the indigenous youths are housed in Military barracks – just as billeted service members are – and undergo three months of training. After that, they gather every two months to receive additional training and learn new skills. The non-billeted Military service is rendered in the typical clothing of the indigenous communities. last_img read more

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Spring Storm Drops 7 Inches of Snow on Long Island

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York That was no way to celebrate the first day of spring. Long Island saw as much as 7 inches of snow in some areas as a winter storm moved into the area Friday and lingered through the night and into the early morning hours, with some flurries still visible after sunrise. Seven inches was recorded in Rocky Point and almost a dozen other communities in Suffolk County measured more than 6 inches, according to unofficial snowfall totals published by the National Weather Service in Upton. There appeared to be less accumulation in Nassau County. Merrick recorded 5.9 inches, and a number of other neighborhoods from the South Shore to the North Shore counted more than 5 inches. Snowfall totals mostly ranged from 4 to 7 inches; forecasters had predicted 3 to 6 inches of accumulation. Here’s how the rest of the weekend is expected to shape out: There’s a slight chance of rain showers after 5 p.m. on Saturday, with the thermometer reaching a high of 41—potentially helping melt most, if not all, of the white stuff that fell. The wind chill will make it feel more like 30 degrees, forecasters said. Strong gusts predicted for the evening will drop the temperature into the low 30s. Sunday is expected to be sunny, with a high near 36—not warm enough for Long Islanders still reeling from the record-breaking winter that just came to an end. Now, let’s all hope that this latest storm was winter’s final hurrah.last_img read more

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No more Morias? EU to unveil long-delayed asylum plan

first_imgAnd this time, the proposed system won’t be voluntary – a tough concession for many member capitals to swallow.”It’s obvious to everybody that ad hoc solidarity or voluntary solidarity is not enough. That has been proven for many years now,” she said.”It has to be mandatory, all member states have to help when there is a situation when a member state is under pressure and a lot of people that need protection.”Alongside a way to distribute would-be refugees away from the coasts of Italy and Greece there will be tougher rules on sending home those whose claims are refused.  But, five years after the 2015 migration crisis and with annual “irregular arrivals” down to 140,000 a year, EU members are still deeply divided on the issue.An emergency EU plan during that crisis to redistribute arrivals, pushed by Germany, was opposed and then ignored by Hungary and Poland, which took in zero asylum-seekers.European Commission chief Ursula von der Leyen said last week the proposal would replace the “Dublin Regulation” with “a new European migration governance system”. “It will have common structures on asylum and return and it will have a new strong solidarity mechanism,” she said, surprising some sceptical capitals.The Dublin Regulation – which governs which member state handles a new arrival’s asylum claim – was established in 1990 and was reformed most recently in 2013.It states migrant asylum claims should be handled in the EU country where the applicant first enters the system, to prevent undocumented migrants flowing around the bloc.Johansson did not give AFP full details of the alternative scheme the Commission will unveil on Wednesday, but stressed that the key would be solidarity.This does not necessarily mean, however, that recalcitrant anti-immigration regimes like that in Hungary would be obliged to resettle refugees.”It’s not only relocation, it could also be other situations like, for example, helping with returns,” she said.This would imply that countries that believe they can cope with welcoming more migrants would take some of the strain off the Greeks and Italians.Europe’s plan has been a long time coming and will be hard to sell to EU leaders, who meet for a summit in Brussels on Thursday focused on foreign affairs.But the fire in Moria, which underlined the dismal state of the system for housing refugees stuck on the Greek islands, has focused minds somewhat.Offers to rehouse the now homeless Moria refugees have come piecemeal, with some states like Austria refusing point blank to take any. Brussels is working with Athens on a pilot project to jointly build and run a new facility, but Johansson was clear there must be “no more Morias”.   Topics : The failure of the European Union’s migration policy could not have been laid out more starkly – an already miserable camp burned and thousands of refugees homeless.On Wednesday, two weeks after the destruction of the Moria camp on the Greek Island of Lesbos, Brussels will launch its latest proposal for EU asylum policy.   Home Affairs Commissioner Ylva Johansson wants the 27 member states to share the burden of handling asylum claims from the migrants arrived on the bloc’s shores.last_img read more

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Dominica’s children at risk of obesity

first_img Share Nurse Helen RoyerCoordinator of Health Promotions Helen Royer has disclosed that the island’s children are at risk of obesity based on statistics derived from a recent health survey.Royer, who addressed a Health Promoting School Initiative workshop on Monday, told primary school principals that there is urgent need for measures to address this issue of obesity among children. She said based on a global school health survey which was conducted in Dominica in 2007 there is a need to address risk factors such as unhealthy diets and physical inactivity among children particularly those of an early age.“The survey indicated that 26.3% students were at risk for becoming overweight, 105 were overweight and only 26.5% ate fruits and vegetables five or more times per day for the past thirty days,” she added.According to Royer, the number of reported cases of non chronic communicable diseases is rising rapidly and is becoming a major challenge for global development. “The World Health Organization 2002 World Health report stated that mortality, disability and morbidity attributed by CNCD accounts for 60% death and 47% of the disease burden. Roughly 60% of the world’s population is estimated not to get enough of physical activity,” she added.Royer believes that the schools can make a difference in the lives of children by imparting knowledge relating to healthy foods and lifestyles.“We are aware that the school can continue to play a pivotal role in transmitting health messages to school children, and a capable of facilitating short term or medium term and long-term effects on audience,” she explained.Royer admonished the principals of the need for the implementation of an aggressive and rigorous approach to health in order to reduce the rate of obesity among students. The workshop is also geared at creating a network and alliance for implementing the concept.Domincia Vibes News Share LocalNews Dominica’s children at risk of obesity by: – March 6, 2012 Sharecenter_img Tweet 21 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring!last_img read more

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Mrs. Darlena Kay (Lock) Smith

first_imgMrs. Darlena Kay (Lock) Smith, age 66, of Madison, Indiana, formerly of Vevay, Indiana, entered this life on July 15, 1950, in Madison, Indiana, the loving daughter of the late, Leonard and Nona Virginia (Darbro) Lock. She was raised in Switzerland County, Indiana where she was a 1968 graduate of the Vevay High School. Kay was united in marriage on November 1, 1969 at the Fredonia Baptist Church on Tapps Ridge in Vevay, Indiana, to Jerry Smith and to this union arrived two sons, Keith and Kevin to bless their home. Kay and Jerry shared nearly 48 years of marriage together until her death. Kay was a former employee for the US Shoe Factory in Vevay, Indiana, for 3 years. She was later employed for Edelweiss Floral for 2 years and for the Vevay IGA for 20 years. Kay was employed as a Clerk for CVS Pharmacy in Madison, Indiana, for 5 years. She was a member of the Bennington Order of the Eastern Star Chapter 407 and the Fredonia Baptist Church. Kay resided the past 11 years in the Madison community. Kay enjoyed drawing, baking and cooking and will be deeply missed by her loving family and friends. Kay passed away at 10:45 am, Sunday, April 23, 2017, at her residence in Madison, Indiana.Kay will be dearly missed by her loving husband of nearly 48 years: Jerry Smith of Madison, IN; her sons: Keith Smith and his wife: Rebecca of Vevay, IN and Kevin Smith and his wife: Valerie of Vevay, IN; her grandchildren: Huxley, Sam and Ben; her step-grandchildren: Zach, Kaylen and Kinsey; her brother: Terry Lock of Vevay, IN and her several nieces and nephews.She was preceded in death by her parents: Leonard Lock, died January 9, 2003 and Nona Virginia (Darbro) Lock, died May 23, 2000 and her brother: Leonard Wayne Lock, died September 9, 2011.Funeral services will be conducted Thursday, April 27, 2017, at 11:00 am, by Rev. Wayne Daugherty, at the Haskell & Morrison Funeral Home, 208 Ferry Street Vevay, Indiana 47043.Interment will follow in the Vevay Cemetery, Vevay, Indiana.Friends may call 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm, Wednesday, April 26, 2017, at the Haskell & Morrison Funeral Home 208 Ferry Street Vevay, Indiana 47043.Memorial contributions may be made to the Fredonia Baptist Church. Cards are available at the funeral home.last_img read more

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