Lidl continues with ISB roll-out

first_imgLidl has confirmed its intentions to roll out in-store bakeries to all its UK outlets, should the success it has seen so far continue.The discount retailer has reportedly already rolled the concept out to around 340 of its 600 UK stores.A spokesperson for Lidl said that, in response to customers’ increasing focus on fresh food, it had been trialling in-store bakeries in several UK regions over the past 12 months to gauge customer feedback.“So far, the in-store bakeries have been a huge hit with customers and, if the next batch of in-store bakeries proves to be just as successful this year, then we will roll them out nationwide.”In August 2011, British Baker reported that the German retailer had installed ISBs in 75 stores in its north-east sales region, bringing its total number of outlets with ISBs in the UK to 90.last_img read more

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Notre Dame to host first 2020 presidential debate

first_imgNotre Dame will host the first presidential debate of the 2020 election campaign on Sept. 29, 2020, University President Fr. John Jenkins announced at a Friday press conference. It will be the first presidential debate hosted at the University.“Notre Dame — throughout its history — has hosted presidents and world leaders, national figures,” Jenkins said. “But this will be its first presidential debate, hosted here on campus. The world’s attention during that time will be on us, and will be on this region as journalists and many others descend for that period to report on and witness that debate.” Mary Bernard | The Observer University President Fr. John Jenkins announced Friday that Notre Dame will host the first presidential debate in 2020.Jenkins said he thinks presidential debates hold a “sacred moment” in the democratic process.“There is — as we all know — so much noise and spin and presentation with campaigns,” he said. “But that’s a time when candidates are asked to engage one another in serious debate about serious topics so that we can inform voters. And that’s why we’re so excited to host this event at Notre Dame because it is that sacred moment in our democracy when we have that discussion.”Though details have yet to be worked out, Jenkins said the debate will take place in the Joyce Center and will involve “elaborate” security preparations. Tickets will be “very limited,” he said, though a specific manner of distributing tickets has not been discerned.The Commission on Presidential Debates, the body that organizes debates and of which Jenkins is a member, considers a variety of topics when selecting a venue. Jenkins said the group tends to favor universities because of their educational mission. In addition to the event at Notre Dame, the vice presidential debate will take place at the University of Utah. The other two presidential debates will take place at the University of Michigan and Belmont University in Nashville.“It’s a public process in which various venues can submit applications,” Jenkins said. “The Commission on Presidential Debates has favored universities because they feel it’s part of the education of young citizens to be part of these debates and to witness them. You’re asked to submit an application — a number of institutions did so. They come and visit your institution, and then they make a decision among their candidates. It has to do with a number of different considerations.”Jenkins praised his team for their work in bringing the event to Notre Dame. He said the school’s experience with major events likely helped its application.“I have to give a compliment to my team … it’s a very complicated logistical enterprise. My team did such a good job in presenting this,” Jenkins said. “We have the advantage of [hosting] 85,000 — 100,000 people, probably — seven times a year for football games, so we know how to do big events. I think the University presented itself very well through my colleagues. … I think that had an influence on the decision.”Jenkins said the debate fits with past Notre Dame efforts to bring in high-level political leaders to campus from various different political backgrounds. According to press literature distributed at the conference, Presidents Franklin Roosevelt, Dwight Eisenhower, Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush and Barack Obama have previously spoken on campus. President John F. Kennedy was awarded an honorary degree when he was a congressman.“I think our democracy so badly needs a place where we can have serious conversations,” Jenkins said. “Our politics have been taken over by tweets and by slogans. We need to engage seriously about serious topics from across the political spectrum, the whole political spectrum. That has always been the case. We’ve always [brought] leaders from various parties, various figures to talk seriously about issues. I see these debates as a particularly powerful expression of that effort to provide a forum where we can have serious conversations in our democracy about challenges facing us.”Tags: 2020 election, presidential debate, University President Fr. John Jenkinslast_img read more

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Protecting Workers

first_imgAs the spring harvest approached, members of the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association knew they would need assistance to provide important information about COVID-19 safety measures and food handling protocols to workers who make up the majority of the seasonal agricultural workforce, many of whom are native Spanish speakers.University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and Cooperative Extension faculty responded quickly by producing a COVID-19 safety video in Spanish that could be incorporated into farm employee trainings. UGA Extension Southwest District Director Andrea Scarrow, Tift County Extension Agent Justin Hand, and Assistant Professor Laurel Dunn in the UGA Department of Food Science and Technology were a part of the group that spearheaded the effort to quickly produce and distribute the video resources to producers throughout the state.Bill Brim, CEO of Lewis Taylor Farms in Tift County, previously worked with UGA Extension to develop financial education materials in Spanish for temporary workers at the farm, so he knew who to ask when the need for COVID-19 educational materials arose, Scarrow said.“Our growers, both small and large, depend on Extension to get immediate answers and help for all kinds of issues. Mr. Brim knew we had that capacity to develop resources in Spanish so he contacted us for that reason,” Scarrow said. “Our producers are in constant communication with our agriculture agents, they depend on us quite a bit. Our agents are very sensitive to the needs of farmworkers and the large Hispanic population we have in the area that supports farming, so we moved on it as fast as we could.”Working with Beth Oleson, a director of education and food safety for Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association, UGA Extension recruited the help of UGA Professor Francisco Diez, director of the UGA Center for Food Safety, and his wife, Claudia Buzo, a ServSafe consultant who trains Hispanic restaurant workers, to translate the video scripts and record the video in Spanish.“Dr. Dunn and I work together frequently on food safety issues. Crafting employee safety language was easy, but making sure we included CDC recommendations that seemed to be changing frequently was a challenge,” said Oleson. “Working with Dr. Diez and Buzo really made the video a success. Buzo’s experience with Hispanic employees helped guide the language and examples to make it approachable to the Spanish-speaking audience.”During the COVID-19 crisis, UGA Extension has been actively involved in getting research-based materials from faculty out to farms, packing houses, u-pick farms and other agricultural producers.“We enlisted the help of NC State Extension, which shared a lot of materials they had already translated into Spanish,” Dunn said. “This was great, but we felt we needed audio-visual resources to reach a greater number of Spanish-speaking workers.”Working with Oleson, Dunn developed a general script explaining what the COVID-19 disease is, where it came from, why it is different from other illnesses and why employers would have new safety rules this year.“It also showed workers how to protect themselves, explained why social distancing is important and outlined what modifications employers can and cannot require,” Dunn said.Diez and Buzo, who translated the script into Spanish, said they were happy to help communicate this important message to Spanish-speaking agricultural workers through the video, titled “Lo que necesita saber sobre el coronavirus” (“What you need to know about coronavirus”) available at www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugddqd8N0S4.“My wife and I are originally from Mexico and we are native Spanish speakers. In an urgent situation, such as the one we are in, information like this could make the difference between someone getting sick or not,” Diez said. “We are committed to helping the Hispanic community as much as we can, and many of the migrant workers who come to work on these farms are individuals with only a grade school or middle school education. We wanted to make sure to use simple language and messages so it would be useful and understandable.”The 24-minute video was distributed through the network of UGA Extension offices around the state and shared directly with producers. “This is most of what I do really, it is just the subject matter that changed,” said Dunn, a food microbiologist and Extension specialist. “Producers are used to hearing from me about salmonella and E. coli, so we just switched the message to keeping workers healthy.”The request for the video came in the day before a worker safety production training was to be held at Lewis Taylor Farms, a major agricultural producer in Tift County, so Hand said the UGA team worked throughout the night to get the video ready to show the next morning.“Jessica Kirk, director of food safety and marketing at Lewis Taylor Farms, talked to several of her crew leaders and some of the workers who said the video really helped the workers to understand the situation a lot better,” Hand said. “These workers came into the U.S. from Mexico and they didn’t know how much this had spread or how important safety is to stop the spread of this virus. They said it was easy to understand the video and they appreciated the message.”UGA Extension’s COVID-19  resources in English and Spanish are available at extension.uga.edu/emergencies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also has print resources in multiple languages, including posters that describe how to stay healthy during this time, how to protect members of your household, proper hygiene and many other topics, available at www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/communication/index.html.last_img read more

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Community bankers blast proposal to allow JPMorgan Chase to provide services in post offices

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » Charging that any postal banking deal between the U.S. Postal Service and JPMorgan Chase would be an invitation for corruption, the trade group representing the nation’s community banks on Monday asked the Postal Regulatory Commission to investigate reports of such a deal.“Any exclusive arrangement, negotiated behind closed doors, to allow a profit-driven entity to leverage the USPS branch network is a formula for corruption and should be a serious concern to all Americans who care about the integrity of our public institutions,” Rebeca Romero Rainey, president/CEO of the Independent Community Bankers of America wrote in a letter to Robert Taub, chairman of the regulatory commission.A Postal Service spokeswoman last week confirmed that there have been discussions of allowing JPMorgan Chase to provide limited banking services in post offices.“To clarify, we had early conversations a while ago about what it might look like to lease space on property for a small handful of ATMs,” the spokeswoman said. “There’s no agreement in place to do so and no imminent plans.” She said those discussions took place before the coronavirus crisis developed.last_img read more

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Thinking About Veterans Day, D-Day & The Liberation Of France Today

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Standing barefoot on Omaha Beach, the sand silky soft, the warm waters of the English Channel lapping gently against me, I thought it was a perfect summer day. The sun shone brightly in a clear blue sky. The tide was low, leaving a wide expanse between the sparkling surf and the dark green bluffs past the dunes where a path led to the stairs that would take us back to the American Normandy Cemetery.It’s so hard to imagine that here was where “all hell broke loose” on that bloody gray dawn of D-Day, June 6, 1944. Officially known as Operation Overlord, the Allied invasion of Normandy would be the largest amphibious assault in history. There’d be 5,000 ships of all sizes; 11,000 aircraft and some 156,000 American, British and Canadian soldiers, hitting five beaches along a 50-mile front. Omaha was the bloodiest.In the heat of battle, Col. George Taylor reportedly told his men, “There are two kinds of people who are staying on this beach: those who are dead and those who are going to die. Now let’s get the hell out of here.”My earliest memories of the D-Day invasion were in black and white, because I’d seen the images taken by famed photographer Robert Capa for Life Magazine. What I’ve since learned is that he shot 108 frames when he landed with the soldiers at Omaha Beach, but a lab technician had ruined all but 11 of them in his haste to process them in time for a flight across the Atlantic to the editors in New York. That explains why the surviving ones are slightly out of focus, too.In 1962, Hollywood released its black and white movie about Normandy called The Longest Day, which had a cast that included Sean Connery, Henry Fonda, Robert Mitchum, John Wayne and Richard Burton, to name a few box-office stars. Today’s millennials could re-experience the landing by watching the terrifying opening minutes of Saving Private Ryan, starring Tom Hanks, which came out in 1998.Omaha and Utah were the codenames for the American landings to the west; the British had Gold, Juno and Sword beaches to the east. One of the military goals was to seal off Normandy’s Cotentin peninsula and eventually seize its port, Cherbourg, but by the time the Allies finally captured that city, the Germans had left the harbor in ruins.These days, Normandy thrives on a tourist industry catering to veterans and others who want to remember the war. Today, driving from Omaha Beach to Utah Beach takes about a half hour, but traversing those 47 kilometers through the impenetrable hedgerows of the Bocage region took days of bloody fighting in 1944.In Saint Mere Eglise, you can see a dummy dangling from the church tower high above the central square. Back on D-Day, the GI named John Steele was less conspicuous—and therefore survived—because this paratrooper from the 82nd Airborne Division had gotten his parachute stuck on the tower’s other side when he landed as part of the pre-dawn aerial assault behind enemy lines. In The Longest Day, Steele was played by Red Buttons, a carrot-topped American comic actor born in the Lower East Side who became a top star in the early days of television. His scene is one of the few comedic moments in that very long war movie.Before the Normandy invasion, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, the supreme commander, was a nervous wreck, smoking up to five packs of cigarettes a day and consuming bottomless cups of coffee. The first week of June the weather had turned bad. A huge storm barreled into the English Channel, churning up the seas with high winds and complicating the coordination plans. He knew there was only a small window when the tidal conditions would be right for the kind of amphibious assault the Allies intended: a low tide rising at daybreak.The remains of Nazi bunkers built by the Germans in Brittany as part of the Atlantic Wall defenses in the years before the Normandy invasion (Long Island Press photo).It was no secret the Allies were coming by sea. Germany’s Nazi ruler, Adolf Hitler, had put Field Marshall Erwin Rommel in charge of stopping the invasion, authorizing him to build the Atlantic Wall, a 2,400-mile fortification of cement bunkers, long-range guns, landmines on telephone poles jutting out of the sand, booby traps underwater, spiked iron staves designed to rip open the hulls of incoming boats, and other metal obstacles that would pin down our men in high or low tide.Rommel knew the invasion was coming but he didn’t know where, or when. The Allies had created a deception, complete with Hollywood-concocted fake tanks and bogus planes, codenamed Operation Fortitude, to make the Germans think Gen. George Patton, whom they regarded as the Allies’ smartest general—a perception he also shared—would cut across between Portsmouth and Calais, the shortest distance between England and France. They wouldn’t dare crossing the widest part of the English Channel, would they? When the storm rolled in, Rommel convinced himself that he could leave his elegant chateau estate near Bayeux and celebrate his wife’s birthday back home in Germany. Today the chateau still stands but it’s in private hands.By June 5, 1944, Gen. Eisenhower had already held back the invasion 24 hours and he didn’t want to delay another day. Many men were already on their ships and landing crafts, getting cold and seasick. He feared that one German surveillance aircraft flying over the Channel might eliminate the element of surprise, which really was one of the only advantages the Allies had. Fortunately, even the Germans had grounded their planes that day because of the weather.Before the troops boarded, each soldier, sailor and airman of the Allied Expeditionary Force had been given a copy of the “Orders of the Day,” a letter Eisenhower had drafted:“You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty-loving people everywhere march with you. In company with our brave Allies and brother-in-arms on other Fronts, you will bring about the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world.”The plan was to start the invasion at 6:30 a.m. And so it went. Relatively speaking, Utah Beach was a cakewalk, even though Gen. Teddy Roosevelt, Jr., the president’s 57-year-old son, had landed 2,000 yards off target because of the strong currents and the stiff winds. He turned to his men and said, “We’re going to start the war from here.” He faced minimal opposition, as did the Brits and Canadians on their beaches.At Omaha Beach, the Americans ran into a shit storm. The naval bombardment had been cut too short to do any damage to the defenses, and the Allied aircraft had flown too far inland where their bombs did nothing but kill cows and horses. The tanks and bulldozers intended to provide cover on the beach had been released too far from shore and many sank immediately. The first wave of soldiers were too loaded down with heavy packs that impeded their maneuverability. Yet, ahead of them lay hundreds of yards, all under unrelenting enemy fire from crack reinforcements from a German division that had recently been on the Eastern Front fighting the Soviets. Not at all the level of resistance the brass had led them to expect.“The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty-loving people everywhere march with you.”– Gen. EisenhowerWhen the doors of the landing craft opened, the embarking soldiers were exposed to the dark bluffs where the Germans were entrenched in concrete bunkers. It was like shooting ducks in a barrel. Our troops had to wade waist-deep past the dead bodies floating in the incoming water. They had been trained to ignore the cries of the wounded and head straight to the dunes where the Germans held the high ground with their protected artillery. Casualties reached the thousands.By 10:30 a.m., the invasion was going so badly that Gen. Omar Bradley, watching from a ship off shore, wanted to call it off and rescue the remaining men. His German counterpart, looking at the carnage on the beach from his protected bunker on the bluff, came to the same conclusion, sending a message to his commander that the Germans had turned the tide.Both officers were wrong.Today you can walk freely around the most strategic part of Omaha Beach, Pointe du Hoc, where the Germans had their artillery emplacement that enabled them to blow ships out of the Channel and rake our troops on the wide stretch of sandy beach. You can stand at the edge of a 130-foot cliff that our Army Rangers had to climb rapidly in order to knock it out of commission. You don’t hear the machine gun fire, the bombs blasting, just the wind and the sea below, as you try to put yourself in their shoes.  When my wife and I were in France this summer, two off-duty U.S. military members and their friend had tackled and subdued a heavily armed man on a high-speed train bound for Paris, reportedly “breaking up what could have been a deadly terrorist attack.”Childhood friends from Sacramento, Calif., the three Americans were enjoying the ride through Belgium when they heard a gunshot. Twenty-three-year-old Airman First Class Spencer Stone—a great name if I do say so myself—ran and tackled the gunman. His pal Army Spc. Alek Skarlatos, 22, a member of the Oregon National Guard, who had been deployed in Afghanistan, grabbed the assailant’s AK-47 rifle while their friend Anthony Sadler, 23, a student at Sacramento State University, assisted them.The gunman was a 25-year-old Moroccan man named Ayoub El-Khazzani, whom French intelligence officials said belonged to “the radical Islamist movement.” He’d emerged from an onboard restroom heavily armed when an unnamed French man trying to enter confronted him. That’s when the first shot rang out and the Americans sprang into action.French President Francois Hollande wanted to personally thank them for their bravery in an official ceremony at the Elysee Palace. When they later met President Obama in the Oval Office, he said they represented “the very best of America and the American character.”“They were thinking they were just going to have a fun reunion in Paris and ended up engaging in a potentially cataclysmic situation,” Obama said at the White House. “Because of their courage, because of their quick thinking, because of their teamwork, it’s fair to say a lot of people were saved, and a real calamity was averted.”The news of their courage made me think of my sons back home who are around their age. Then I got to thinking of the brave soldiers landing on Normandy Beach who once were their age as well. When I was in my early 20s, I was protesting the Vietnam War because I was draft age. Years later, my ex-brother-in-law, who fought in the dense jungles around Da Nang, forgave me. I don’t know what I would have done in the heat of battle, and I hope I never find out.But I do know that this summer was a good time to be an American in Paris.An angry Donald Trump glaring from the front page of France’s Liberation newspaper with the tagline: “The American Nightmare.”The Allies had liberated the City of Light in August, 1945. My wife and I arrived 70 years later. As we got off the train from Nice, the beautiful city overlooking the French Riviera, the first newsstand I saw had a rack of angry Donald Trumps glaring from the front page of France’s Liberation newspaper. It was the quintessential “ugly American,” and I was taken aback because I hadn’t thought about his presidential campaign for weeks.But he wasn’t the only Yankee the French seemed to be thinking about in August. Plastered on walls all around Paris were posters of JFK and Jackie. It turned out to be a promotional campaign for a photo exhibit devoted to the Kennedys. When we saw the show on a Sunday afternoon, about two dozen people were packed into the gallery’s upstairs room watching a French documentary recounting the president’s assassination.From left to right: The view from Pointe du Hoc overlooking Omaha Beach in Normandy, France; a sign at the U-Boat Memorial in Camaret-sur-Mer and one of the remaining Nazi artillery canons.In January, the big news in France was about Charlie Hebdo, the satirical weekly, whose offices had been attacked by armed gunmen allegedly angered over the publication’s depiction of the Prophet Mohammad. Twelve staffers had been slain, including the editor. As offensive as the publication deliberately was, it was a bastion of free speech.We didn’t plan to visit the site of the massacre but we did come upon a packed opening one night for the Galerie Glenat in the Marais district featuring renderings of Titeuf, a well-known French cartoon character of a kid with a bright yellow tuft of hair sticking out of his head. On the wall was a Charlie Hebdo magazine cover by an illustrator named Luz, which showed an adolescent Titeuf wearing a backpack facing his mirror image with a yellow beard who had an AK-47 on his back. The latter one says, “I have jihad tomorrow.” His schoolboy friend replies, “You have it good. I have math.” For the exhibit, Luz had dropped red ink on one corner of the cover. It was a subtle reminder of the blood shed that day.When we went to Notre Dame, like so many tourists before us, we learned there’d been a ceremony honoring surviving American veterans of WW II that very morning. They were long gone from the cathedral by then. But knowing they had been welcomed for their service decades ago still resonated in the air.And on this Veterans Day, 70 years after the end of the Great War, it’s the right time to pay tribute to all the soldiers who’ve gone before and honor the ones who survive.On the eve of D-Day, just as he was about to board his ship, Keith Douglas, a 24-year-old British poet, started a poem he called “Actors in the Wings,” and it had this stanza: “Everyone, I suppose, will use these minutes to look back, to hear music and to recall what we were doing and saying that year during our last few months as people, near the sucking mouth of the day that swallowed us all into the stomach of war.”He never wrote another line. He was killed by a mortar round a few days after landing in Normandy.last_img read more

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City fringe offices: Fringed with sadness

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Works set to begin on Scottish offshore decommissioning yard

first_imgWorks on the construction of offshore facilities dismantlement area at what will be the Decommissioning Facility at the Energy Park Fife in Methil, Scotland, are set to begin by the end of the year.According to the Decom North Sea, the planning and development of the Decommissioning Facility at the Energy Park Fife by CessCon Decom in conjunction with Scottish Enterprise and Fife Council has progressed at good pace.Decom North Sea has said that a multi-million-pound sum is being invested to develop “the UK’s most advanced, purpose-built facility with a substantial hard-standing laydown and dismantlement area with an impermeable concrete surface and water collection and treatment facilities, specifically designed for decommissioning and dismantlement operations.”Per the organization, the groundworks and construction of the new dismantlement and processing area is planned to start prior to the end of the year, and the facility is on schedule to accept large topsides, jackets and subsea infrastructure from Q2 2020, creating new employment opportunities in the Fife area.Lee Hanlon, CessCon Group CEO said: ‘The Oil & Gas Authority estimates that 48% of decommissioning spending will take place in the Central North Sea over the next decade. With the Energy Park Fife facility being located on the east coast of Scotland, access to a skilled and experienced workforce, and excellent links to the Fife and central Scotland supply chain, we are in a prime location to service this growing market. Our goal is to decommission and recycle assets at the very same yard at which they were once constructed some 20 or 30 years ago, creating a true circular economy.Hanlon said that the company has been working to expand its services to provide a full turnkey solution from offshore preparation to onshore dismantlement and recycling. CessCon’s in-house services now include all onshore and offshore engineering, welding, burning, fabrication, construction, barge fit-out, seafastening, onshore dismantlement, and recycling.Spotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product or technology on Offshore Energy Today please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

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DILG: There’s more room for improvement

first_imgThe DILG validators’ criteria were: * related city ordinances, roadinventory, displacement plan for those affected, rehabilitation plan of roads,among others – 50 percent The other day, the Public Safety andTransportation Management Office (PSTMO) claimed having cleared 95 percent ofthe city’s roads and sidewalks. In September, Treñas appealed for thecooperation most especially of sidewalk vendors. This rating is higher than the passingrate set by the DILG itself, 70 percent. Hosenilla also identified some barangaysthat his team would revisit for further road-clearing such as Tabuc  Suba,Cubay, Benedicto, Fatima, and Montinola in Jaro district and Monica-Blumentrittand Muelley Loney in the City Proper, among others. ILOILO City – There is more room forimprovement. Bacolod City DILG director Ma. JoyMaredith Madayag led the validating team that inspected Iloilo City on Mondayand Tuesday. “This road and sidewalk clearing ishappening all over the country as a result of President (Rodrigo) Duterte’sdirective. We cannot do otherwise but follow,” he stressed./PNcenter_img While the rating that DILG evaluatorsgave was lower than PSTMO’s self-rating, the city government still claimedsuccess. Love Joy Hosenilla, head of PSTMO’s Task Force onAnti-Squatting and Illegal Structures that led the clearing operations, saidthe difference may be due to varying parameters. He acknowledged that there areobstructions still to be removed from a few roads and sidewalk, most especiallyillegally parked vehicles. “Sige-sigehonta ini kay it has done so much good to the city,especially to the public nganagalakat-lakat sa Calle Real,” said Treñas. Mayor Jerry Treñas agreed there are stillpublic roads and sidewalks in barangays yet to be cleared. He said he won’t bedisbanding the team tasked to do the clearing. There is still room for improvement,Madayag told DILG Iloilo City director Roy Defiño. The Department of Interior and LocalGovernment’s (DILG) validating team gave the city government a rating of 83percent in road clearing operations. * road-clearing accomplishments – 50percentlast_img read more

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Kansas clippers Gemmill, Sellard score IMCA Modified feature wins at Red River Invasion

first_imgWICHITA FALLS, Texas (Feb. 13-14) – Two drivers from Kansas traveled to Red River Speedway for their first IMCA Xtreme Motor Sports Modified feature wins of the season. Brendon Gemmill topped Friday’s opening night Red River Invasion feature for his career 39th victory in the division. Clay Sellard showed more of the speed that netted him Jet Racing Central Region rookie of the year honors in winning the Saturday show. Tommy Fain and another sophomore speedster, 2014 national ROY Dean Abbey, rounded out Friday’s top three. William Gould, the 2013 national champ and two-time defending Razor Chassis Southern Region king, was runner-up and Gemmill ran third on Saturday. Chad Wilson was the opening night IMCA Eagle Motorsports RaceSaver Sprint Car winner, ahead of Logan Scherb and John Carney II. Carney took the Saturday checkers. Scherb repeated in second and T.J. Michael was third. Modified and Sprint Car features all paid $700 to win.Former national champion Gabe Tucker racked up Scoggin-Dickey Parts Center Southern SportMod career win number 74 on Friday. John Webb and Levy Galmor rounded out the top three in the big field.Randy Timms outran 23 other Southern SportMods and matched his win total from his first IMCA season in 2014 on Saturday. Second was Justin Long and Robert Crabtree took third. Kirk Martin notched the Friday IMCA Sunoco Stock Car victory. Jody York was second and Damon Hammond rounded out the top three.Career win number 79 came in Saturday’s Stock Car feature for two-time defending EQ Cylinder Heads Southern Region champion Matt Guillaume. Martin and Cary White were scored second and third, respectively.Southern SportMods chased $600 top checks while both Stock Car features paid $500 to win.Feb. 13 Feature ResultsModifieds – 1. Brendon Gemmill; 2. Tommy Fain; 3. Dean Abbey; 4. Clay Sellard; 5. Jason Schoenberger; 6. Mark Patterson; 7. Jeremy Montgomery; 8. Richard Walp; 9. William Gould; 10. Neal DeBord; 11. Jack Baggerly; 12. Kenneth Graves; 13. Sam Cox. Sprint Cars – 1. Chad Wilson; 2. Logan Scherb; 3. John Carney II; 4. Brandon Long; 5. T.J. Michael; 6. Brandon Williams; 7. Marcus Thomas; 8. Michelle Melton; 9. Bryson Oeschger; 10. Cody Cothman; 11. Mackenzie Ramey; 12. T.J. Honkomp; 13. Chip Graham. Southern SportMods – 1. Gabe Tucker; 2. John Webb; 3. Levy Galmor; 4. Terry Baker; 5. Robert Crabtree; 6. Justin Long; 7. David Tanner; 8. Jeff Autry; 9. Damon Hammond; 10. Dustin Robinson; 11. Robert Elliott; 12. Tommy Freeman; 13. Kody McDowell; 14. Trevor Foley; 15. Gene Yates; 16. Raymond Wright; 17. Matt Mueller; 18. Randy Timms; 19. Billy Burt; 20. Kirk Cox; 21. Creed Sherle; 22. Cory Williams; 23. Tanner Stansell; 24. Gene Bryce. Stock Cars – 1. Kirk Martin; 2. Jody York; 3. Damon Hammond; 4. Cary White; 5. Dustin White; 6. Duain Pritchett; 7. Jason Purvis; 8. Jason Batt; 9. Ronnie Christopher; 10. John Menetz; 11. Trevor Geter; 12. Randy Martin; 13. Calton Pritchett; 14. Robert Barnett. Feb. 14 Feature Results Modifieds – 1. Sellard; 2. William Gould; 3. Gemmill; 4. Abbey; 5. Schoenberger; 6. Montgomery; 7. Patterson; 8. Kevin Rutherford; 9. DeBord; 10. Graves; 11. Eric Miles; 12. Aaron Benedict; 13. Fain; 14. Jack Sartain; 15. Ronny Gould; 16. John Gray; 17. Cox. Sprint Cars – 1. Carney; 2. Scherb; 3. Michael; 4. Thomas; 5. Melton; 6. Ramey; 7. Long; 8. Honkomp; 9. Oeschger; 10. Williams; 11. Cody Whitworth; 12. Wilson; 13. Graham.Southern SportMods – 1. Timms; 2. Long; 3. Crabtree; 4. Tucker; 5. Mueller; 6. Hammond; 7. Galmor; 8. Williams; 9. Glen Gordy; 10. Webb; 11. Foley; 12. Robinson; 13. McDowell; 14. Shawn Jorski; 15. Sherle; 16. Bryce; 17. Stansell; 18. Baker; 19. Tanner; 20. Yates; 21. Burt; 22. Cox; 23. Autry; 24. Freeman.Stock Cars – 1. Matt Guillaume; 2. Martin; 3. Cary White; 4. Brandon Hopper; 5. York; 6. Christopher; 7. Dustin White; 8. Purvis; 9. Calton Pritchett; 10. Barnett; 11. Steven Orebaugh; 12. Geter; 13. Batt; 14. Nemetz; 15. Duain Pritchett.last_img read more

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AVB loath to make Bale comparisons

first_img Spurs sold Bale to Real Madrid in a world-record £86million deal in August, and despite them spending more than £100million on new players, former trainee Townsend has looked equally likely to fill the void. Villas-Boas said: “It is early beginnings for Andros with his life at the club. “Gareth’s influence grew to be immense in the last season. It is early days for Andros. “But I think it was a great performance. Alongside the team, it grew in the second half, and he really improved his performance. “He gives us so many attacking options because he is able to take the team forward with his driving ability and link-up play, crossing, assisting. “It was another great performance, like we saw for his country. It was great to see.” Townsend’s performances in this month’s World Cup qualifiers against Montenegro and Poland have seen his profile soar. Villas-Boas said: “He has to cope with the amount of attention he gets but he is very grounded and down to earth. Press Association “I don’t suppose he will have any problems. Before he went to England his confidence was high. “What he has been doing for Spurs he did for England and now he is continuing for his club.” Townsend spent the second half of last season on loan at QPR, one of nine such temporary moves in his career. Villas-Boas said: “I think the loan really worked for him. He came with the right frame of mind to grab the opportunity. “I think he has shown all his drive and motivation to stay at Spurs this season and we are glad to have him.” Spurs completed victory with a second goal from Roberto Soldado in the 69th minute. The result lifted the north Londoners to fifth in the Barclays Premier League and was the perfect response after a shock 3-0 loss to West Ham last time out. Villas-Boas said: “It was difficult in the first minutes to get hold of the ball because Villa kept putting long balls behind us. “When we managed to get more control, from the 20th minute onwards, we managed to score and the goal gave us the confidence to play our game. “In the second half that really showed, in a better way. We started playing much better, lots of attacking options. “I think 2-0 is what we deserved.” Villa boss Paul Lambert felt the result was harsh on his team. The hosts had the better chances before Townsend struck and had been threatening an equaliser when Spurs broke to claim their second. Lambert said: “I didn’t think there was much in that. “The last couple of times Spurs have come here they have left pretty convincing winners. Today was a different game. “There wasn’t much in it in the first half and then we lost a goal. I think it is a cross and everyone has missed it and it went in. “In the second half I thought we were in the ascendancy. “I thought we looked like the team that was going to get it back. “Sometimes you can come away from a game thinking you haven’t given it a go, but I can’t fault the lads for the way they went about it.” Villa’s threatened second-half revival was prompted by the introduction of Christian Benteke from the bench on the hour. The Belgian had missed the previous two games through injury and he had two good chances before Soldado killed the Villa challenge. Lambert claimed he had never considered starting with Benteke. He said: “Christian has only trained four days in a month. It is unfair on him to ask him to go straight in. “He has trained with us a couple of days and a couple with Belgium. “That wasn’t enough to throw him into a game of that magnitude. It was never an option.” Tottenham manager Andre Villas-Boas claimed it was too early to start comparing Andros Townsend to Gareth Bale despite another superb performance from the winger. Townsend, the recent hero of England’s World Cup qualification, shone again with an inspirational goalscoring performance in a 2-0 win for Spurs at Aston Villa. The 22-year-old, rewarded with a new contract this week, opened the scoring – albeit with a cross-cum-shot – in the 31st minute and tormented Villa thereafter in a rampant display. last_img read more

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