Significant minority experiencing ‘long Covid’ symptoms, warns ONS

first_imgAfter coronavirus, we must ‘build back better’ on workplace healthAs we rebuild our economy post pandemic, employers must not leave behind their renewed focus on employee health and wellbeing,… Could ‘long Covid’ become the biggest return-to-work challenge yet for OH?Covid-19 is not just a discussion about those who recover from the virus and those, sadly, who do not. A… Shutterstock A fifth of people who have tested positive for Covid-19 are still exhibiting symptoms five weeks or more after being infected with the virus, with a tenth suffering from “long Covid” for three months or longer, official figures have suggested.The research from the Office for National Statistics concluded around 186,000 people in private households in England in the week beginning November 22 were living with Covid-19 symptoms that had persisted for between five and 12 weeks.These symptoms included fatigue (11.5%), a lingering cough (11.4%) and headaches (10.1%). A lower proportion (8.2%) were still experiencing a loss of taste, while 7.9% still had no sense of smell.Occupational health practitioners have expressed concern that long Covid could in time become a significant return-to-work challenge for the profession and employers.The ONS has said that early next year it will add a long Covid question to its regular Covid-19 Infection Survey. This will allow respondents to state the impact long Covid has had on their day-to-day activities, and will include an expanded list of symptoms.“This new data will allow us to enrich our analysis, for example by estimating the proportion of people with long COVID symptoms who are burdened by the condition,” it said.The ONS findings add to our growing understanding of the virus, and has followed a study that concluded people’s genetic make-up could also be an important factor in how severely ill they become after being infected, or how they long are affected for.The study of intensive care patients, published in the journal Nature, concluded five genes were associated with the most severe form of Covid-19.Key differences in these five genes – known as IFNAR2, TYK2, OAS1, DPP9 and CCR2 – partially explained why some people became severely sick with Covid-19, while others are not affected, the researchers argued.The hope is that this knowledge will now allow doctors to use existing drug treatments on patients with these gene variations to reduce their symptoms, or help in the development of new therapies to treat the virus.Dr Kenneth Baillie, chief investigator of the project and academic consultant in critical care medicine at the Roslin Institute, said: “This is a stunning realisation of the promise of human genetics to help understand critical illness.“Our results immediately highlight which drugs should be at the top of the list for clinical testing. We can only test a few drugs at a time, so making the right choices will save thousands of lives.” Significant minority experiencing ‘long Covid’ symptoms, warns ONSBy Nic Paton on 17 Dec 2020 in Testing, Coronavirus, OH service delivery, Return to work and rehabilitation, Sickness absence management, Occupational Health, Personnel Today Related posts:center_img Previous Article Next Article No comments yet. Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply.Comment Name (required) Email (will not be published) (required) Website Unpicking risk, occupational health and Covid-19SOM (The Society of Occupational Medicine), The Faculty of Occupational Medicine (FOM) and the University of Glasgow held a summit…last_img read more

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British Antarctic Survey, 1974-75

first_imgSeven British Antarctic Survey stations were operational during the year. However, in March 19755 Stonington Island was closed after 21 years of occupation. A number of senior Survey staff visited the bases this season, including Dr R. J. Adie (Deputy Director), Dr C. Swithinbank (Head of Earth Sciences), Mr W. N. Bonner (Head of Life Sciences), Dr J. Dudeney (Leader of the Ionospherics Section), and Mr W. Sloman (Head of Administration).last_img

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OUSU in financial meltdown

first_imgOne third year Classics student said, “It would be nice if OUSU were more relevant than it is but it’s inevitable that it won’t be because of JCRs. People don’t know where their money is going and perhaps the University should split up these funds amongst JCRs.”The finances for OSSL, a subsidiary of OUSU that is responsible for running Freshers’ Fair, Oxide Radio and various publications including The Oxford Student and the Oxford Handbook look much healthier. The OSSL report, however, doesn’t provide any running costs and only shows estimated costs for 2009/10 and next year’s budget.The OxStu’s projected income for this year is £9,000 and OSSL predict it will almost double next year to £17,000. OSSL have cut printing costs for their publications and seen improvements in advertising, which they consider to be a direct result of employing a long-term Advertising Co-ordinator.However Oxide has a deficit of £1,500, and next year the station is expected to cost a further £1,000. Oxide has faced financial difficulties for years and in 2006 OUSU cut Oxide’s budget of £5,700 completely. This resulted in presenters being forced to pay for their own shows.One third year St. Hilda’s student said, “Sadly, I don’t think anyone would really notice that much if they got rid of Oxide”.In an e-mail to fellow MCR presidents, St. Catz MCR co-president Ben Britton described the OUSU budget as “an improvement on last years offering” but “still substantially lacking and fundamentally flawed”.He continued, “The current income streams are not sufficient to cover costs, which will compound OUSU’s perilous financial situation. This will only force OUSU to rock up, bowl in hand, and ask our University for a vast grant or loan, no doubt sourced from our University fees, with many potential strings attached”. Oxford University Students’ Union stands to make a loss of about £61,000 this year despite budgeting for a £110 profit. 2008/9 saw the organisation lose £57,000 and OUSU predicts a loss of about £66,000 for 2010/11.Stefan Baskerville, OUSU President argues, “OUSU is not funded to support its current operational structure”.OUSU’s income this year was £366,101, sourced mainly from grants. Its total expenditure is increasing year on year.To make up this deficit it has been proposed that OUSU ask the University for an increased grant of £390,000 for the year 2010-11, as the current grant of £233,000 is not sufficient.When questioned at OUSU Council on the issue of autonomy when asking the University for a block grant, Baskerville stated, “How much autonomy do we really have when we’re predicting 66k deficits for the next year?”The main sources of expenditure are elected officers (£121,182 per year) and buildings costs, which amount to £129,095. Baskerville admitted, “OUSU spends an excessive portion of its income on costs associated with its premises.”He added, “OUSU would place a higher priority on maintaining services to students than on services costs.”Some of OUSU’s costs are soaring – in 2008/9 OUSU publications only cost the organisation £120. This year OUSU estimates it will have spent £12,000 on its publications.Elections are also costly, with £2,650 spent on them this year, £1000 more than estimated. These costs are generated from OUSU’s decision to use mi-voice software. Despite the introduction of this software and OUSU’s “Get Involved” campaign, voter turnout continues to be disappointing. The software is also used by several common rooms.Officer training this year is set to cost £180, while next year OUSU will spend £3,710 on training. Conference attendance has set OUSU back £905 in 2009/10 and looks set to cost £1,235 next year. Lack of funding has prevented OUSU officers from attending conferences in the past and OUSU claim in their guide to the 2010/11 budget, “This means that we simply don’t find out about developments in other SUs and don’t therefore take advantage of initiatives which are being launched elsewhere.”last_img read more

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Evans Assistant Receives April Cause for Applause

first_imgEvans Assistant Receives April Cause for ApplauseLinda Carlisle, kindergarten assistant at Evans School, is the recipient of the Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation’s April Cause for Applause award. The award seeks to recognize individuals who go above and beyond their normal job responsibilities.According to coworker Rachel Davidson, Carlisle goes above and beyond everyday, donating her time and energy to the school. For example, Carlisle created an afterschool group for girls at Evans called Girls of Grace. The goal of the group is to help the girls become outstanding young women. Through the program, Carlisle invites guest speakers, takes the girls to restaurants, shows them how to sew and much more. Carlisle also tirelessly works to get donations for the school and works with the school’s PTA, even volunteering to serve as PTA president.“Her title of support staff is incredibly fitting because she is so supportive year round,” wrote Davidson in her nomination.Anyone can nominate an employee of the EVSC for the award. Deadline for nominations is the third Friday of each month. To nominate an EVSC employee, go to www.evscschools.com and click on About Us and see Cause for Applause under Community. Paper forms are available at the schools for those without access to the Internet.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Cape May County Reports Two New Coronavirus Deaths

first_img111 MUNICIPALITYACTIVE CASESREPORTED TODAYOFF QUARANTINEDEATHSLONG TERM CARE ACTIVE CASESLONG TERM CARE OFF QUARANTINELONG TERM CARE CENTER DEATHS WOODBINE6292307 WILDWOOD CREST49 CAPE MAY POINT0 TOTAL DECEASED 10 WEST WILDWOOD13 WEST CAPE MAY12 CAPE MAY CITY24 OCEAN CITY825111 UPPER TOWNSHIP23352 MIDDLE TOWNSHIP26163214 AVALON07 SEA ISLE CITY02 WILDWOOD2130 The Cape May County Health Department reported Friday that an 85-year-old woman from Ocean City and a 92-year-old Woodbine man died from COVID-19.The total number of COVID-19 cases countywide is now 562, including 47 deaths.“With deepest sympathy as we remember these Cape May County residents,” said Cape May County Freeholder Jeff Pierson. “Please know that our thoughts are with the families and friends during this time of healing.”The following is a breakdown of cases and deaths for each municipality in the county: STONE HARBOR1 TOTAL ACTIVE103 TOTAL RECOVERED 276 NORTH WILDWOOD39 25 DENNIS TOWNSHIP71151263 LOWER TOWNSHIP193633532026 37 TOTAL CASES IN CAPE MAY COUNTY562last_img read more

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Scotch Pie Championship attracts record entries

first_imgA record number of Scotland’s bakers have entered their best pies into the 16th World Scotch Pie Championships.Judges considered more than 600 pies from 100 of the country’s butchers and bakers, and will announce the winner of the title this coming January.Contestants also entered sausage rolls, speciality savouries, Scottish football pie, apple pie and savouries.Les McKeown, original lead singer of The Bay City Rollers and the competition’s guest pie taster, said: “I was honoured to be asked to join the panel of judges again for this iconic competition. The contest is a hard-fought one and in each category we are looking for something really special that stands out from the crowd.” Last year the 2014 title was taken by Stephen McAllister from The Kandy Bar of Saltcoats.last_img read more

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U.S. needs upgrade against cyber threats, commander says

first_imgThe United States will need a combination of strategies to combat the growing risk of foreign attacks on computer networks, the chief of the nation’s cyber operations told a packed room at the Kennedy School on Wednesday.“When it comes to cyber defense, there is no one single strategy, there is no one single tool or capability,” said Adm. Michael Rogers, commander of U.S. Cyber Command and director of the National Security Agency.Appearing at the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum, Rogers outlined the daunting challenge of defending against cyber threats posed by both foreign nations and independent actors.“I think it’s fair to say that right now the odds favor the offensive side. That’s in no small part because the reality is today we are dealing with network structures that were designed and built in a totally different environment” that did not anticipate cyber attacks, said Rogers.Confronting the cyber threat, he said, will require better network protection, altering normal protocols, and changing “the risk calculations for actors so they stop and say to themselves, ‘Even if I could technically do this, would the benefits outweighs the risks and costs?’”“When it comes to cyber defense, there is no one single strategy,” Adm. Michael Rogers (right) told Belfer Center Director Graham Allison. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerRogers’ visit came amid reports that the FBI secretly arrested and is now investigating a former NSA contractor in connection with stolen computer code. Asked at the forum about the report, Rogers acknowledged the arrest but declined to comment further.The admiral touched on foreign cyber hacking cases that have made news in recent years, including North Korea’s infiltration of Sony Pictures’ computers, the Chinese military’s alleged hacking into the networks of U.S. firms to steal industry secrets, and the recent hacking of the Democratic National Committee. Such cases reflect how cybersecurity is now a society-wide concern, affecting individuals, businesses, and government, Rogers said.“I don’t think any of us are comfortable with the status quo.”The growing scope of the problem, Rogers said, requires rethinking what defines critical infrastructure in the digital age.“The power of big-data analytic tools is now making large data concentrations … very attractive and of increased importance to a whole lot of actors out there,” he said, suggesting that systems given little attention in the past, such as those used in voting, have become more likely targets.A Conversation with Admiral Michael Rogers <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdA–RDf8hQ” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/HdA–RDf8hQ/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> Asked about privacy concerns over the NSA’s enhanced ability to collect data, Rogers acknowledged that “technology is driving us [to] a point that the ability to rapidly assimilate a wide range” of information is improving.“I would also remind people that just because you see something on television or in a film doesn’t mean it is really happening or technically capable,” he said.At the NSA, he added, “We don’t set the law; we don’t write the law. Our job is to execute the mission we are assigned within that legal and policy framework.” Still, Rogers said, attempts to strike a balance between security and privacy merit a broad policy discussion.“I think we’ve all got to acknowledge we are in a place now where the current state of technology has outstripped our legal and policy frameworks. One of the challenges for all of us is how we realign those.”The event was co-sponsored by the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.SaveSaveSaveSavelast_img read more

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Revival of Alan Ayckbourn’s How The Other Half Loves Sets West End Dates

first_img View Comments Alan Ayckbourn Alan Ayckbourn’s farcical tale of matrimonial mishaps, How The Other Half Loves, is heading back to the West End this spring. The 1969 classic—the first of Ayckbourn’s plays to be staged on Broadway—returns to London to play the Theatre Royal Haymarket for a limited engagement March 23 through June 25. Directed by Alan Strachan, opening night is scheduled for March 31.As Bob and Fiona clumsily try to cover up their affair, their spouses’ intervention only adds to the confusion. William and Mary Featherstone become stuck in the middle, falsely accused of adultery and with no idea as to how they’ve become involved. The plot culminates in two disastrous dinner parties on successive nights, shown at the same time, after which the future of all three couples seems in jeopardy…2016 marks Alan Ayckbourn’s 55th year as a theater director and his 57th as a playwright. To date he has written 80 plays and his work has been translated into over 35 languages, is performed on stage and television throughout the world and has won countless awards. He became the first British playwright to receive both Olivier and Tony Special Lifetime Achievement Awards. He was knighted in 1997 for services to theater.The production will feature sets and costumes by Julie Godfrey. Casting will be announced later.last_img read more

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CNTB launched the first pre-season campaign this year in 12 markets

first_img“This year we continue to implement activities that significantly contribute to the further positioning of Croatia as a year-round tourist destination. In this sense, we are conducting this marketing campaign to promote the pre-season in 12 key markets by promoting nautical, active tourism, culture, eno-gastronomy and natural beauty. Namely, these are products that are the main motive for the arrival of tourists in the pre-season periods”, Said Kristjan Staničić, director of the Croatian National Tourist Board. The Croatian National Tourist Board has launched the first marketing campaign to promote the pre-season this year in twelve European markets. Photo: HTZ The target countries of this campaign are Germany, the United Kingdom and Ireland, Slovenia, Austria, Poland, the Czech Republic, Italy, France, Hungary, the Netherlands, Sweden and Switzerland. The campaign will run on Facebook, Instagram and YouTube, as well as in the form of display advertising, until April 15th.center_img During 2019, the Croatian National Tourist Board will conduct four main promotional campaigns, as well as two pre- and post-season promotion campaigns and two brand campaigns. The main goal of these promotional campaigns is, among other things, a positive impact on tourist traffic, which so far this year has more than 525.000 arrivals and 1,4 million overnight stays, ie an increase of 11 percent in arrivals and 6 percent in overnight stays compared to the same period last year. As they point out from the CNTB, the first brand campaign of this year of the Croatian National Tourist Board, which was conducted in five emitting markets – Germany, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Sweden and Spain, recently ended. The primary goal of the campaign was to raise the profile of Croatia as an attractive tourist destination, but also to strengthen the strength of the national tourist brand.last_img read more

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Irish DB schemes strengthen funding as reform looms

first_imgSource: The Pensions AuthorityWhile the data was only correct to last year, and much of it was more than 12 months old according the Pensions Authority, the overall picture was a positive one.The Irish DB sector has been in the spotlight in recent months as politicians have sought to improve regulatory protections for savers to stop sponsors walking away from schemes and leaving them underfunded.Politicians are set to debate reforms later this year. Across 628 pension funds that submitted an annual actuarial data return (AADR), the regulator reported an 11% decline in the number of DB schemes with active members still accruing benefits, from 503 to 447.On aggregate, Ireland’s DB system was 104.6% funded, with €60.8bn of assets and €58.1bn of liabilities, according to data submitted to the regulator by 31 March.There were 163 schemes not meeting with the country’s funding standard, The Pensions Authority said.While the “vast majority” had proposals in place to meet the funding standards, the regulator said there were three schemes with no funding proposal. These ran the risk of regulatory action, the authority said, which could include an enforced wind-up or benefit cuts.Liability analysis showed that pensioners accounted for 58.5% of total liabilities, despite only making up 16.2% of DB scheme membership. Actively contributing members accounted for 17.7% of the total, the regulator reported.Aggregate asset allocation data showed a shift away from equities and government bonds towards alternative assets such as property, absolute return funds, and hedge funds.Allocation to equities fell to 32.5%, the regulator said, compared to 35.8% in 2015 and 41.7% in a year earlier.Asset allocation of Irish DB funds, 2015-16 Roughly three-quarters of Ireland’s defined benefit (DB) schemes meet the minimum funding level, according to data collected by The Pensions Authority.The 74% of schemes meeting the standard marked an improvement on last year’s figure of 70%, the Irish regulator reported.However, larger schemes were less likely to meet the requirement, the authority said. Of the top 50 biggest DB schemes, 28 of them (56%) met the funding standard.Irish pensions law requires DB schemes to hold sufficient assets to meet transfer values for all members along with the estimated costs of winding up.last_img read more

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