Potential interactions between wandering albatrosses and longline fisheries for Patagonian toothfish at South Georgia

first_imgWe examine the extent of overlap between South Georgia wandering albatrosses (Diomedea exulans) and local longline fishing for Patagonian toothfish (Dissostichus eleginoides), using satellite-tracking data and precise haul locations, respectively. We conclude that D. exulans breeding at South Georgia have a relatively low potential risk of interaction with longline fisheries around South Georgia between December and February (incubation period) and between late May and October (main chick-rearing period). However during the chick-brooding period, from March through mid-May, adult birds of both sexes spend most of their time at sea over the South Georgia continental shelf in areas very similar to where the longline fishery operates and are therefore at serious risk from these fisheries at this time. Until fishing methods which do not catch albatrosses are in comprehensive use, we recommend that the South Georgia longline fishery for D. eleginoides should be managed in such a way as to avoid fishing between the end of February and mid-May.last_img read more

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CGG completes multi-client OBN Cornerstone 2020 survey

first_img CGG completes multi-client OBN Cornerstone 2020 survey. (Credit: Gerd Altmann from Pixabay.) CGG and Magseis Fairfield announced their completion of the 2020 acquisition of the largest OBN survey ever acquired in the North Sea. The OBN Cornerstone 2020 multi-client survey in the UK Central North Sea commenced in March 2020 and has already received significant industry interest and prefunding. Approximately 1,650 km² of long-offset, full-azimuth data have been acquired, with first images being made available in early 2021 and final PSDM data planned for release in Q4 2021. Further extensions of the OBN Cornerstone survey are being considered for 2021.Covering two highly prospective areas of the UK Continental Shelf, the OBN Cornerstone 2020 survey project represented a total of 813,000 man-hours with zero Lost Time Incidents (LTIs). Survey deliverables will benefit from CGG’s best-in-class OBN processing and advanced imaging technologies, providing a step-change in seismic imaging quality and reservoir characterization detail and bringing new insight to aid continued development of plays and existing fields in the Central North Sea region.This survey is specifically designed to address the challenges associated with deeper, higher-risk Jurassic and Triassic plays, typically under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions, and the presence of complex structural processes associated with Permian salt movement. The combination of full-azimuth imaging, additional fold and near-offset data will result in significant improvement of deep illumination and noise removal, while helping to illuminate and image the steep flanks and complex architecture created by salt diapirism.Sophie Zurquiyah, CEO, CGG, said: “We are pleased to announce completion of the acquisition of our OBN Cornerstone 2020 survey and would like to congratulate both the CGG and Magseis Fairfield teams for the excellent operational and HSE performance, especially within the current Covid-19 context. The new high technology data set will complement CGG’s extensive high-quality Cornerstone towed-streamer data library, providing our clients with the best available information to de-risk the awarded blocks from the UK 32nd License Round and support the UK Oil & Gas Authority’s strategy for Maximizing Economic Recovery.” Source: Company Press Release OBN Cornerstone 2020 survey project represented a total of 813,000 man-hours with zero Lost Time Incidents (LTIs)last_img read more

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Oxford Union under scrutiny for extravagant spending

first_imgThe Oxford Student used Rule 63(b) to request access to the full 2008-09 income and expenditure records in 2010, after initially being refused access to the full receipts.At the time, Simon McIntosh of consultancy firm Grant Thornton said: “Bluntly, records of expenditure do include expenses claims and all that goes with them.”The Union later backed down in the face of growing student pressure, giving members access to expenditure records including receipts.When contacted by Cherwell, the Union refused to comment on why their understanding of “income and expenditure records” has changed since 2010 to not include receipts.The 2008-09 accounts seen by The Oxford Student are considerably more detailed than those available today. For example, they list the amount of money spent on miscellaneous expenses by individual positions, such as the President, Treasurer and Librarian.The accounts are now itemised so that assessing the expenses of individuals is impossible. Instead, the Standing Committee account has a ‘Miscellaneous’ category.The old accounts also revealed how much was spent specifically on dinners and drinks by the Committee. Now it is grouped under ‘debate costs’. Finally, the 2008-09 accounts were termly, meaning one could attribute their numbers to a particular administration. The audited accounts given to Cherwell were only annual figures.This is in contravention to Rule 63(a), which states that all termly budgets and accounts must be kept on file in order that members may view them at any time during office hours.The Oxford Union’s Bursar stated that she could not recall when these changes occurred.Zabilowicz told Cherwell: “The Oxford Union staff and committee are scrupulous when it comes to the Society’s finances. The Society has never – and, I imagine, will never – offer speakers’ an honorarium [sic]. Any expenses of the Society must be reasonable (a theme throughout the rules), and this is closely scrutinised by the Society’s Finance Committee which any member can attend.“Every year, we have professional and external auditors go through the accounts, after which the accounts are available for any member to view. Debate Select Committee expenses have to be approved by both the Treasurer and the Bursar during a meeting of the Finance Committee.” The Oxford Union’s Standing Committee spent £291,791 in the 2016 financial year, Cherwell can reveal.However, despite President Chris Zabilowicz’s public declaration earlier this month that he wanted “our Society to be as transparent as possible”, the Union refused to let members view the detailed records of expenses claimed by elected officials. This is despite their own rules appearing to mandate it.Accounts seen by Cherwell give an insight into where thousands of Oxford students’ membership fees go. Of the £291,791 spent, over £50,000 went on ‘debate costs’, which includes exclusive dinners, speaker expenses, and drinks. This represents an increase of over £10,000 from the 2015 figure of £40,128. While these figures shed some light on the Union’s finances, the accounts seen by Cherwell do not include what is commonly accepted as full records of expenditure – despite this being permitted to all members by the Union’s own financial regulations.The Society’s rules state that “all income and expenditure records will be available for inspection by any member by appointment with the President”. Cherwell contacted the Financial Director of a major UK law firm for an expert opinion. They disagreed with the Society’s interpretation that “income and expenditure records” only refers to the audited accounts.Instead, they stated that the rules permit members to a more transparent view into the Society’s finances, including a detailed breakdown of income and expense claims. They told Cherwell it would be “very hard to argue” that Rule 63(b) just meant audited accounts, “as if that was the intention there would be no point in adding 63(b) as 63(a) would suffice”.As per the Society’s rules, a request was also sent to the Treasurer Gui Cavalcanti to see the ledger, which is meant to contain “the receipts and expenditure of the Society… which shall be open to the inspection of Members”.On arrival at the appointment, however, it became clear that the ledger did not exist and had not for some time.There is no suggestion of criminal wrongdoing by the Oxford Union Society.This is not the first time the Union has come under fire for appearing to not adhere to its own rules regarding its financial transparency.center_img When approached for clarification on the figure, the Union stressed the costs of paid staff to make and serve the dinners, as well as the expense on table cloths and other items.One member, who was invited to an exclusive Union dinner, told Cherwell: “The dinner was three courses of high-quality food. Costs will have been driven up by the large amount of free alcohol available – both white and red wine, with port at the end. It felt a bit like an exclusive club.” There has also been a rise in ‘food and stationery’ expenditure by the Committee. While in 2013 this was £5,025, by 2016 it rose to £8,222.Cherwell understands that an £8 per day food budget for Union committee members working a full vacation day was a major contributor. A £120 breakfast budget in the Easter and Christmas holidays, rising to £200 over the summer, were further significant expenses within the category. Despite making an appointment with President Chris Zabilowicz in advance, the Bursar Lindsey Warne refused to let Cherwell staff see receipts, not believing these to constitute part of the expenditure records. This interpretation was later confirmed by Zabilowicz.Instead, the Union only allowed the figures which are already available to any member without an appointment.last_img read more

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Mother’s Day High Tea 2018 Sunday May 6 at 1PM

first_imgMothers Day Tea 2018  Looking for a special way to thank Mom this year? Treat her to a specialty High Tea at the Flanders Hotel! Join us for entertainment and a classic three course afternoon tea. Enjoy a selection of tea sandwiches, savories, sweets and a freshly infused pot of tea.Sunday, May 6th at 1pm $39.95 + tax and gratuity. Reservations are required. Book your seat today!As always, join us for our regularly scheduled High Teas the first Thursday and third Sunday of the month.We look forward to seeing you!Call today to book your reservation! (609) 399- 1000 11th Street & the Boardwalkwww.TheFlandersHotel.comlast_img read more

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New café at original Pieminister site

first_imgPieminister has launched a new café and dining concept at a site where the business started 10 years ago, in Stokes Croft, Bristol.The pie business, founded by Jon Simon and Tristan Hogg, has invested £200,000 in the new bistro-style bar and all-day café shop, which includes a bar stocking local craft beers and ciders.The outlet will also be the first to serve Pieminister’s mash-topped pies, which will be served in enamel tins and come in three different varieties: fish pie, cottage pie and pulled pork pie.Pieminister said the site extends back into its old pie kitchens, which has doubled the size of the dining space, and will operate from 10am until 11pm to cater for a number of eating occasions, including breakfast and afternoon tea.Simon said: “Being able to buy our North Bristol pie kitchens in 2012 was a landmark moment for us. It meant we could move forwards and focus on reinvesting in Bristol. Making Pieminister’s birthplace our permanent home feels fantastic and we’re excited to be back in the heart of Stokes Croft.”As part of the financial investment, a new office space has been developed above the café and shop, which will house the company’s marketing, events and sales teams. In addition, 13 new members of staff were hired for the new café, adding to Pieminister’s current workforce at the Stokes Croft site, where more than 40 employees currently work.Last September, the firm acquired its four-acre manufacturing site in Bristol, thanks to a seven-figure funding package from HSBC.This February, Pieminister revealed a 28% increase in sales to £8.3m in the year to 31 March 2012, as part of its latest financial reports filed at Companies House last month.last_img read more

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Mark Rylance Wants to See Nice Fish

first_img‘Nice Fish'(Photo: Teddy Wolff) View Comments Hooked? We now have theater and dates for Mark Rylance and Louis Jenkins’ Nice Fish in the West End. Direct from sold-out seasons Stateside at A.R.T. and St Ann’s Warehouse, the three-time Tony and Oscar-winning Rylance will return to the West End to perform in the production. Helmed by his wife Claire van Kampen, the play will run November 15 through January 21, 2017 at the Harold Pinter Theatre. Opening night is scheduled for November 25.The full New York cast will transfer to London for the limited season, with Rylance as Ron and Lichtscheidl as Erik. They will be joined by Kayli Carter, Bob Davis and Raye Birk.On a frozen Minnesota lake, the ice is beginning to creak and groan. It’s the end of the fishing season and on the frostbitten, unforgiving landscape, two old friends are out on the ice and they are angling for something big, something down there that is pure need, something that, had it the wherewithal, would swallow them whole.Uniquely, theatergoers wanting to hook a free private box ticket are being encouraged to turn up at the box office dressed as a fish or fisherman (with your fishing rod) on the night of the performance. Insert shellfish/selfish joke here.last_img read more

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Panama Seizes 3 Tons of Drugs in 3 Days

first_imgBy Roberto López Dubois/Diálogo October 22, 2020 The Panamanian Air and Naval Service (SENAN, in Spanish) seized about 3 tons of drugs, including cocaine and marijuana, in different operations conducted in Panamanian waters in late August. Authorities captured 13 people, Commissioner Ramón Nonato López, SENAN director, told Diálogo.On August 29, SENAN units, after receiving intelligence from Colombian security institutions, intercepted a fishing vessel that was carrying 800 kilograms of cocaine in the vicinity of Isla Ladrones off the Pacific coast of Panama. Authorities captured five crew members, SENAN’s Public Affairs Office told Diálogo.On August 28, SENAN units responded to an illicit maritime traffic alert from the United States, off the coast of Los Santos province, in the Pacific. Upon noticing security forces, the crew members abandoned the vessel and fled. On board, authorities found 372 kg of cocaine. Two Colombian nationals were captured on the beach, SENAN’s Public Affairs Office reported.The main seizure took place northeast of Isla Grande on August 27, when SENAN units intercepted a go-fast vessel carrying 1,790 packages of drugs, containing more than 1 ton of cocaine and about 20 kg of marijuana, SENAN’s Public Affairs Office reported. Authorities captured the vessel’s five crew members. This operation was carried out with support from Colombian intelligence and U.S. surveillance aircraft.On the same day, SENAN units seized 125 packages of marijuana that were hidden in plastic tanks, during an operation at the Balboa Amador Yacht Club in Panama City, SENAN said in a press release.From January to mid-September 2020, according to data provided by SENAN, the institution seized more than 26 tons of cocaine and 6 tons of marijuana. In the same period in 2019, authorities seized more than 23.8 tons of cocaine and 4 tons of marijuana, the institution said.last_img read more

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Postgraduates and credit unions may benefit from each other

first_imgStudent debt is still astoundingly high and will continue to affect the youth of America. Young adults are saddled with debt and looking for the best financial options to start lives after school. Here is why both postgraduates and credit unions can benefit from joining forces.All about  debtStudent debt is still astoundingly high, and doesn’t appear to be letting up. The Institute for College Access and Success did a state-by-state study of average student debt. New Hampshire had the highest amount of debt at an average of $32,795. New Mexico was the lowest with an average student loan debt of $18,656. In addition, 7 in 10 seniors who graduated from public and nonprofit colleges in 2013 had an average of $28,400 per borrower, a 2 percent increase from the average 2012 student loan debt. Not taking into account interest rates, that would take about five years of $500 a month to pay off, and that’s only the average, not including those who attend private universities.Where credit unions come inThe first couple years out of college are usually ones where young adults learn about the real world, including building their credit score and paying off debt. Because traditional banks generally charge excessive fees, it is unlikely that new grads would want to partner with them. Simple checking accounts or credit cards that will not charge them large amounts if they are late on a payment are the best option. continue reading » 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Is a Dive Bar Still a Dive Bar WIth Covid Safety Measures?

first_imgTwo gloves, a dustpan, a onetime-use broom and some cleaning solution: In Chicago, that’s what the Health Department refers to as a vomit and diarrhea cleanup kit. And until a loathsome regular named Covid sidled up to the bar, Scott Martin, the owner of Simon’s, a beloved Scandinavian dive in the Windy City’s northern reaches, thought a vomit and diarrhea cleanup kit was the most extravagant thing he was required to have on hand in order to keep his very old watering hole in the government’s good graces.Suffice to say, he no longer feels that way.- Advertisement – As Dr. Davidson, who became enamored of this specific type of ultraviolet light when he observed how effective it was in the tuberculosis wards of Philadelphia, explained, the fans suck the air that customers exhale straight toward the ceiling.Should any of those customers unknowingly have the coronavirus, the UV-C lights stop it from spreading, protecting patrons and staff alike. (Such lights are also being used to as a safeguard against the coronavirus in hospitals, schools, restaurants and subway systems, including New York City’s.)Yet for as confident as Dr. Davidson is in UV-C lighting’s ability to slay the coronavirus, he remains a staunch advocate of mask wearing as a means of “source control.” It just so happens Seattle has an indoor mask mandate, something Mr. Meinert’s employees aren’t shy about enforcing.“One of the good things about the 5 Point is people have always gotten thrown out of here,” he said. “We’re not like, ‘The customer’s always right.’” Yet if you think you know that, you don’t know dives. All around America, they’re trying to survive — by letting the light in (or out), for a change.At Simon’s, Mr. Martin moved some of his bar stools into the parking lot and set them up at high-top tables. But that was summer; autumn’s now. He hopes to continue to attract patrons by setting up a large tent with propane heat lamps and fleece blankets, but his real cold-weather draw is glogg, a traditional Swedish concoction that contains red wine, cinnamon, sugar, cloves, oranges, ginger, raisins and bourbon or vodka (take your pick).“You can stay outside and drink glogg and stay fairly comfortable — until you’ve had too many gloggs and then you’re freezing,” said Mr. Martin, who rang in his 60th birthday by wrestling with a bar patron who repeatedly refused to wear a mask. – Advertisement – – Advertisement – While Simon’s was, until recently, able to offer limited seating indoors in addition to its evolving outdoor space, such a plan simply wasn’t feasible for My Brother’s Bar, which, at 167 years of age, is Denver’s oldest continuously operating house of libation.“The building is extremely old with zero ventilation,” said Danny Newman, the owner, adding that his “summer solution” — picnic tables in the parking lot — ”was great.” But now that it’s gotten chillier, Mr. Newman has set up plastic igloos, equipped with heaters and exhaust fans, for single-party groups of up to six people.At first there wasn’t a cap on how much time patrons could spend in the igloos, but after a handful of six-hour hang sessions made it apparent that some imbibers planned to use them as second homes, Mr. Newman instituted a 90-minute limit. While “dive bar” is mostly a term of endearment these days, even the upper echelon of such dark, dank drinking establishments has never been regarded as particularly preoccupied with sparkling tabletops.Dive bars are lived in, died in, rode hard and put away wet in, laughed and cried in a stranger’s arms in, at once fully yourself and completely anonymous in. They’re where folks go to drink, to lie, to love, to sigh, to put Keith Sweat on the jukebox and have no one ask why. Before the pandemic, dive bars were an endangered species in many cities, what with skyrocketing rents and the attendant hoity-toity-ness of pencil-panted transplants. And some people assumed that the coronavirus would make all the great dives descend into dirt. – Advertisement – Mr. Newman added that a nearby restaurant has transformed tiny greenhouses into two-tops so customers can eat outdoors without being bombarded by the elements. Lest anyone wonder whether Colorado’s robust legal marijuana industry has something to do with the ready availability of see-through structures reminiscent of grow houses, Mr. Newman said it was.One of the oldest bars in Seattle, the 5 Point — slogan: “Alcoholics serving alcoholics since 1929” — has also constructed a cozy, heated outdoor area for its patrons. But now that the wind and rain are whipping around, owner David Meinert doesn’t expect the allure to last long. That’s why he recently upgraded his heating, venting and air-conditioning system with Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) filters to improve air circulation. With the help of Dr. Bruce Davidson, a pulmonary physician and the former president of the National Tuberculosis Controllers Association, he installed fans and UV-C lights — not to be confused with retina-singeing UV-A and UV-B lights — on the bar’s ceiling.last_img read more

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Europe sees little risk of avian flu from wild birds

first_imgAug 25, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – European veterinary experts who met in Brussels today concluded there is little immediate risk that wild birds will spread avian influenza from Russia into Europe.Accordingly, the experts determined it is not necessary to follow the precaution taken by the Dutch this week of banning the raising of poultry outdoors, according to a statement from the European Union (EU) Commission. But the group did call for increased surveillance of migratory birds.The Brussels meeting was triggered by the recent spread of H5N1 avian flu into Kazakhstan, parts of southern Siberia, and as far west as the southeastern flank of the Ural Mountains, which divide Siberian from European Russia.The veterinarians said it is not clear whether, or to what extent, wild birds have caused this expansion of the virus’s range.”Taking into account the existing knowledge on the migratory routes of the species proceeding from central and western Asia and that might pose a risk of spreading the H5N1 avian influenza virus into the EU, the immediate risk of introduction of AI [avian influenza] via these birds is probably remote or low,” the EU statement said.”It would not be proportionate to the current risk of disease introduction from Asia, including Russia (Siberia) through migratory birds to implement a generalized ban on keeping poultry outdoors,” the statement added.However, authorities called on member countries to step up testing of migratory waterfowl along flyways that could pose a risk of introducing avian flu. They also advised countries to:Encourage farmers to improve biosecurity measures and be alert for avian fluReview and update contingency plans for dealing with avian fluCarefully enforce regulations on importing birds and bird products into the EUIn contrast to the EU’s official optimism on the immediate risk, the president of the British Veterinary Association said the spread of avian flu to Britain is inevitable, according to press reports.BBC News quoted Dr. Bob McCracken as telling the gathered European vets, “Wild birds that have migratory pathways over Europe and the UK will become infected. It is inevitable that bird flu will be carried to this country by migrating birds.”McCracken further said, “The majority of our reared birds are still intensively reared and bred in large houses that are wild bird–proof. The danger is to free range birds and to backyard flocks.”In the Netherlands, where a highly pathogenic H7N7 avian flu virus forced the destruction of about 30 million poultry in 2003, farmers were told to keep all poultry indoors starting Aug 22. The order affects about 5 million free-range poultry, along with 80 million birds already kept in buildings, according to an Agence France-Presse report today.But experts who were quoted in a Canadian Press story yesterday expressed doubts about the effectiveness of keeping poultry indoors to protect them from avian flu.Dr. Karen Becker, a vet with the US Department of Health and Human Services, said there are no data to support the measure and commented that infectious diseases often sweep through poultry flocks that are confined indoors. And a British Columbia health official said chickens kept indoors were more vulnerable than those outside during the province’s outbreak of H7N3 avian flu last year.In other developments, Russian officials yesterday reported signs that the H5N1 outbreaks in southwestern Siberia were calming down. The government lifted quarantines at 12 locations in five regions where the virus had been found or suspected, according to a Reuters report.One place where the quarantine was lifted was the province of Kalmykia, near the Caspian Sea in European Russia, where the disease had been suspected but was never confirmed.However, the Reuters report also said avian flu had been detected in a wild duck in a previously unaffected part of Siberia, the Altai Republic. The republic is separate from the Altai region, where H5N1 avian flu was confirmed previously, the story said.The government of the republic said samples from the duck had tested positive for avian flu “of the fifth type,” but didn’t specify whether the strain was H5N1, Reuters reported.last_img read more

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