Jadestone sets in motion arbitration action against Total

first_imgSingapore-based oil and gas company Jadestone Energy has started arbitration against the French oil major Total related to a breach of a farm out agreement for an asset located offshore Philippines. Jadestone informed last week that its subsidiary, Jadestone-56, had started an arbitration action against Total Philippines, a subsidiary of Total.Jadestone-56 has started the action as a response to the breach of the farm out agreement (FOA) dated August 23, 2012, between Jadestone-56 and Total Philippines in respect of Service Contract 56, Philippines.Total farmed into the block in exchange for a carry through of the go-forward exploration program. The block covers a total area of around 4,300 km², in water depths ranging from 200 to 3,000 meters.The operatorship was transferred to Total in 2014, after a decision was made to drill an exploration well on Halcon prospect. Jadestone-56 holds a twenty five percent interest in SC 56, while Total Philippines holds the remaining seventy five percent.The notice of arbitration was filed with the Singapore International Arbitration Centre in accordance with the terms of the farm out agreement, Jadestone said.In the notice, Jadestone-56 claims that, among other things, Total Philippines failed to drill an exploration well on the Halcon prospect located within the block covered by Service Contract 56 and is seeking damages as a result of this failure to drill.Offshore Energy Today Stafflast_img read more

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Researchers discover right whales singing for the first time ever

first_imgRight whales — three species of large baleen whales in the genus Eubalaena — have never been known to sing. As far as scientists knew, right whale vocalizations consisted entirely of individual calls, as opposed to the repeated, patterned phrases of true whale songs.But according to a study published in The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America this month, the extremely rare eastern North Pacific right whale appears to use its gunshot calls in a repeating pattern — the first instance ever recorded of a right whale population breaking into song.A research team with the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) analyzed 17-years’-worth of data from autonomous recorders deployed in the Bering Sea and documented four distinct right whale song types at five different locations between the years 2009 and 2017. Whales like humpbacks are famous for their mellifluous calls, typically referred to as whale songs. But right whales — three species of large baleen whales in the genus Eubalaena — have never been known to sing. As far as scientists knew, right whale vocalizations consisted entirely of individual calls, as opposed to the repeated, patterned phrases of true whale songs.Gunshot calls — loud, concussive bursts of noise — are already known to be part of the North Pacific right whale’s vocal repertoire, as well as what are known as screams, upcalls, and warbles. But according to a study published in The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America this month, the extremely rare eastern North Pacific right whale appears to use its gunshot calls in a repeating pattern — the first instance ever recorded of a right whale population breaking into song.Jessica Crance, a marine biologist with the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the lead author of the study, said that she and her colleagues first detected “a weird pattern of sounds” while doing a summer field survey in the southeastern Bering Sea in 2010.“We thought it might be a right whale, but we didn’t get visual confirmation,” Crance said in a statement. “So we started going back through our long-term data from moored acoustic recorders and saw these repeating patterns of gunshot calls. I thought these patterns look like song. We found them again and again, over multiple years and locations, and they have remained remarkably consistent over eight years.”An eastern North Pacific right whale. Photo Credit: NOAA.Two summers ago, Crance and team were again working in the Bering Sea when they were able to visually confirm that the repeated patterns of gunshot calls were indeed coming from eastern North Pacific right whales.“We heard these same songs during a summer survey in 2017, and were able to localize the songs to male right whales” in real-time using sonobuoys that can record audio underwater, Crance said. “We can now definitively say these are right whales, which is so exciting because this hasn’t been heard yet in any other right whale population.”There are two groups of North Pacific right whales: in addition to the sub-population in the eastern North Pacific/Bering Sea, there is also a larger western population of 100 to 200 individuals in the Sea of Okhotsk. The roughly 400 North Atlantic right whales that still survive live mostly in the western North Atlantic Ocean, while the more abundant Southern right whale can be found mostly in the Southern Ocean.All of the singing North Pacific right whales whose sex could be determined were male, according to the study. Crance and team analyzed 17-years’-worth of data from autonomous recorders deployed in the Bering Sea and documented four distinct song types at five different locations between the years 2009 and 2017.You can listen to a couple of the recordings Crance and team made below, thanks to Gizmodo’s Earther: Article published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Bioacoustics, Environment, Mammals, Marine Animals, Marine Mammals, Oceans, Research, Whales, Wildlife “Each song type consists of a hierarchical structure of 1–3 different repeating phrases comprised predominantly of gunshot sounds; three of the four songs contained additional sound types (downsweep, moan, and low-frequency pulsive call),” Crance and the NOAA team write in the study. “Songs were detected annually (July–January); all song types remained consistent over eight years. Two different songs often occurred simultaneously, produced by different individuals; the same song was never detected simultaneously at the same location. The same song type was detected on the same day and time at two distant locations, indicating multiple individuals can produce the same song.”NOAA Fisheries scientist Jessica Crance deploys a sonobuoy to acoustically monitor for North Pacific right whale calls. Photo Credit: NOAA.These findings raise a number of new questions, Crance said: “Why is this population of right whales singing? Do the other populations also sing, and it just hasn’t been documented yet, or is this unique to our population?”Working in the vast, remote expanses of the Bering Sea will make getting answers to those questions difficult, Crance noted, especially given that there are believed to be fewer than 30 whales left in the eastern sub-population of North Pacific right whales. The subspecies is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List as a whole, but the eastern sub-population has been assessed independently and listed as Critically Endangered.We have very little data on the vocalizations of female right whales, Crance said, but lone male right whales have been found to make gunshot calls more frequently than females. Now that we have direct evidence that male right whales turn their gunshot calls into a song, Crance and team suspect that this behavior may be solely exhibited by males as a sort of reproductive display.“With only 30 animals, finding a mate must be difficult,” Crance said. “Perhaps the 2:1 male ratio in the North Pacific has led to our males singing to attract females. But we may never be able to test that or know for sure.”The NOAA team says that their next step is to look at the evolution of the newly discovered whale songs over time and to determine whether or not they’re seasonal and if certain songs are produced at specific times. “We also want to find out whether these songs contain individual-specific information,” Crance said. “There is so much I would love to know.”An eastern North Pacific right whale, the world’s most endangered great whale. The V-shaped exhale is unique to right whales. Photo Credit: NOAA.CITATIONS• Crance, J. L., Berchok, C. L., & Keating, J. L. (2017). Gunshot call production by the North Pacific right whale Eubalaena japonica in the southeastern Bering Sea. Endangered Species Research, 34, 251-267. doi:10.3354/esr00848• Crance, J. L., Berchok, C. L., Wright, D. L., Brewer, A. M., & Woodrich, D. F. (2019). Song production by the North Pacific right whale, Eubalaena japonica. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 145(6), 3467-3479. doi:10.1121/1.5111338FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Salvadoran fishermen ditch blast fishing for artificial reefs

first_imgBlast fishing has taken a toll on both the fishermen and marine life of El Salvador’s Jiquilisco Bay Biosphere Reserve.Some residents have lost limbs or eyes or suffered bad burns. And populations of mangroves, fish, and critically endangered hawksbill sea turtles have declined.Over the last decade, officials have made rooting out the practice a top priority, placing their bets on a creative alternative that a local fisherman suggested in 2009: the creation of artificial reefs to replenish marine life.Today blast fishing has declined by 90 percent and the communities are trying to market their seafood as “clean fish” at a premium price. To read an interview with the man who sparked the artificial reefs of Jiquilisco Bay, see the companion piece to this article:Bringing back the fish: Q&A with a repentant blast fishermanJIQUILISCO BAY, El Salvador — With no police patrol in sight, a young fisherman named Jose Salvador Soriano kneeled into his long, narrow boat and began preparing an explosive with the power to bring in nearly an entire day’s catch. The explosive contained sulfur, benzoate, chlorate and sugar, packed into a tube of newspaper with a wick made from a bicycle-brake hose.The best spot to throw an explosive was under the long, spider-like roots of the mangroves lining both sides of the estuary, as fish gather there in large numbers to lay their eggs. But this time, Soriano miscalculated. Before he could toss the explosive — the wick quickly burning down — it went off in his hand, leaving him amputated up to the high wrist.Soriano, now 47, got away easy compared to many other residents of the 35 fishing communities along El Salvador’s Jiquilisco Bay Biosphere Reserve, a 241-kilometer (150-mile) wetland that contributes approximately 2 tons of fish to the country’s seafood markets every day. Some residents have been badly burned, lost an eye or — because explosives are normally packed with the tube held between the thighs — their legs and genitals.But blast fishing has also taken a toll on Jiquilisco Bay’s marine life. Populations of yellowfin snook (Centropomus robalito), hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) and Pacific red snapper (Lutjanus peru), as well as six kinds of mangrove trees, have shown noticeable declines since nearby communities began using explosives in the 1980s.Over the last decade, officials have made rooting out the illegal practice a top priority, placing their bets on a creative alternative that a local fisherman suggested in 2009: What if an artificial reef could be dropped into the bay where they normally fish? Done correctly, it might allow for both an easy catch and a sustainable way of bolstering biodiversity.Fisher Juan Jose Amalla said on a good day he brings in about 30 fish from the artificial reef he fishes in Jiquilisco Bay. Image by Max Radwin for Mongabay.“It may not have been as good as blast fishing,” said José Maria Argueta, program director for the local NGO the Mangrove Association, “but we argued that it was also sustainable and not dangerous. You could relax and catch fish and not worry about running from the police.”It is now the 10th anniversary of the artificial reef project’s inception, and a dozen local cooperatives have installed more than 20 artificial reefs — collections of logs and hollow concrete structures — for line-and-pole fishing. But officials say blast fishing continues in some areas, and managing the reefs has become its own challenge.“It’s a sustainable way to catch fish,” Argueta said. “It also allows people to fish without damaging the environment or themselves. But we need a plan to manage the artificial reefs.”Blast fishing: ‘It’s just not a good idea’The transition from blast fishing to artificial reefs has been, and continues to be, a slow one. Even after Soriano lost his hand in 1997 — before the reefs were even an idea — he kept using explosives for another five years, resisting officials’ attempts to persuade him to switch to traditional fishing methods.Like most fishermen in the area, Soriano was looking for the most efficient way to bring in the largest possible catch. Given the cost of gas, bait, boat rental and fees to his local fishing cooperative, line fishing before the era of artificial reefs didn’t make much sense. It only brought in about 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) of fish on a typical outing, sold for between $1 and $2 per pound. Explosives, meanwhile, with a radius as large as 80 feet (24 meters), sometimes brought in upwards of 40 pounds (18 kilograms) — and in a fraction of the time.Luis Gonzalez Benitez lost an arm while blast fishing and now splits his time between using nets and line fishing on the reef. Image by Max Radwin for Mongabay.For other fishermen, explosives were all they knew. Their fathers never taught them how to line-fish. Or the nets they’d used in childhood were abandoned in the wake of the country’s civil war.Politically motivated violence throughout the 1970s saw tens of thousands die at the hands of right-wing death squads, igniting a left-wing guerrilla movement and drawing in the U.S. through to the war’s end in 1992.Many residents around Jiquilisco Bay joined the People’s Revolutionary Army and the Farabundo Martí Liberation People’s Force guerrilla groups. In the 1980s, they had decided to fight a war of attrition, carrying out sniper attacks, ambushes and land mine bombings. One hour from the shores of Jiquilisco Bay, the 400-meter (1,300-foot) Golden Bridge was destroyed by guerrilla-made dynamite.Still other residents fled to other parts of Central America, such as Panama. Upon returning later in the war, they allegedly encountered two military officers who showed them how to make explosives. Today, no one knows the names of those two officers, but they are still talked about in various fishing communities, even mentioned vaguely in government reports, almost as myth: the bringers of explosives to Jiquilisco.By the 1990s, the bay was showing a noticeable drop in marine life. Though there was little data taken in that time period, fishermen recall returning from trips with smaller and smaller catches.“At first it was a good way to fish, but after a while not so much because we killed everything,” said fisherman Luis Gonzalez, 47, of Puerto El Flor. “More than anything else, this was business. It starts to get expensive when you’re coming back without fish.”Other marine life suffered, as well. Critically endangered hawksbill sea turtles occupy approximately 37 kilometers (23 miles) of nesting habitat in and around Jiquilisco Bay. But between 2004 and 2008, the Zoological Foundation of El Salvador reported 18 fatalities caused by blast fishing — the hawksbills’ leading cause death during that period.Due to the bay’s thousands of acres of mangrove trees, it was declared a Ramsar site— an international recognition for wetlands — in 2005. Mangroves are not only important breeding grounds for marine life; they’re also a key player in preventing coastal soil erosion. Officials suspect that human activity, including blast fishing, has contributed to a 10 percent loss in the bay’s mangrove cover.“When it comes to blast fishing,” Gonzalez added, “it’s just not a good idea. It means putting an end to all the fish.”last_img read more

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July 2019 was the hottest month ever recorded on Earth

first_imgUN secretary general António Guterres announced that July 2019 was the hottest month on record in a press conference yesterday.In his remarks to the press, Guterres noted that the record-breaking July temperatures follow the hottest June ever recorded, adding: “This is even more significant because the previous hottest month, July 2016, occurred during one of the strongest El Niño’s ever. That is not the case this year. All of this means we are on track for the period from 2015 to 2019 to be the five hottest years on record.”The impacts of global climate change are being felt around the globe, perhaps nowhere more dramatically than in the Arctic, where high temperatures have caused sea ice levels to collapse. June 2019 saw near-record lows in Arctic sea ice extent. In a press conference yesterday, UN secretary general António Guterres announced that July 2019 was the hottest month on record.Data for the month is still being collected, but July 2019 temperatures already appear to have been as high as if not slightly higher than the previous record for the hottest month in history, set in July 2016. According to preliminary data from the World Meteorological Organization, average global temperatures in July 2019 were at least 2.16 degrees Fahrenheit or 1.2 degrees Celsius higher than the pre-industrial average.“We have always lived through hot summers. But this is not the summer of our youth. This is not your grandfather’s summer,” Guterres said.Jean-Noël Thépaut, head of Europe’s Copernicus Climate Change Service, which produced the temperature data cited by Guterres, sounded a similar theme: “As a citizen I am as concerned as anyone else with what is happening,” Thépaut told Rolling Stone magazine. “My children are experiencing extreme weather situations which did not exist when I was their age.” He called the climatic trends on display in July 2019 “very disturbing.”In his remarks to the press, Guterres noted that the record-breaking July temperatures follow the hottest June ever recorded, adding: “This is even more significant because the previous hottest month, July 2016, occurred during one of the strongest El Niño’s ever. That is not the case this year. All of this means we are on track for the period from 2015 to 2019 to be the five hottest years on record.”The impacts of global climate change are being felt around the globe, perhaps nowhere more dramatically than in the Arctic, where high temperatures have caused sea ice levels to collapse. June 2019 saw near-record lows in Arctic sea ice extent.Citing data from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the climate impact tracking platform Climate Signals pointed out that there were 132 all-time-high temperatures recorded around the globe in July 2019, versus just two all-time-lows. “In a stable climate, record high and low temps are about even,” Climate Signals noted. “Human-caused warming is driving this imbalance.”In adopting the Paris Climate Agreement, world leaders pledged to limit global warming to no more than 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit or 2 degrees Celsius, while an additional, aspirational goal included in the agreement would limit warming to just 1.5 degrees Celsius. Climate scientists have repeatedly warned that anything more than 1.5 degrees Celsius of warming could threaten the stability of life on Earth as we know it. But an analysis by the group Climate Action Tracker shows that, under current climate policies, the world is on track for 3.3 degrees Celsius of warming or more by 2100.“This year alone we have seen temperature records shatter from New Delhi to Anchorage — from Paris to Santiago — from Adelaide to the Arctic Circle,” Guterres said. “If we do not take action on climate change now, these extreme weather events are just the tip of the iceberg. And that iceberg is also rapidly melting.”Arctic sea ice is in retreat as the climate crisis deepens. Photo via Pixabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Big Data, Climate Change, data collection, Environment, Global Warming, Impact Of Climate Change, Sea Ice, Temperatures last_img read more

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The end of the road: The future of the Pan Borneo Highway

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The construction of more than 2,000 kilometers (1,200 miles) of road for the Pan Borneo Highway across Malaysian Borneo holds the promise of spurring local economies for its proponents.But from the outset, conservationists and scientists voiced concerns that the road would displace people, harm sensitive environments, and threaten Borneo’s splendid diversity of wildlife.As construction moves forward, these groups are working with planners to find a way for the highway’s construction to avoid the worst environmental damage. This is the sixth article in our six-part series “Traveling the Pan Borneo Highway.” Read Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four and Part Five.KOTA BELUD, Malaysia — Road building is a messy process. In late July, a friend drove me to see the construction of the Pan Borneo Highway along the narrow road strip of tarmac that currently snakes its way along what’s being billed as the “Gold Coast” of northwestern Borneo. We passed once-forested hillsides that abut the azure waters of the South China Sea, now being vertically scrapped away truckload by truckload to build up the foundation of the highway. Down below, bulldozers packed the tan earth into wide platforms where the road will eventually sit, filling in spots where mangroves once stood. Around one corner, dust rose from the beach below where, apparently, the highway will soon pass within meters of the water’s edge.Driving north of the Malaysian state of Sabah’s capital, Kota Kinabalu, was the culmination of the nearly three weeks I spent traveling along the highway’s path. The project will stretch across more than 2,000 kilometers (1,200 miles) in Sabah and the state of Sarawak. In the villages and towns I visited along the way, local officials and many residents eagerly awaited the completion of the roadway to ease travel, speed the flow of goods to and from markets, and bring in tourists, all of which they hoped would invigorate local economies.A section of the Pan Borneo Highway along the northwestern coast of Sabah. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.But from the outset, conservationists and scientists voiced concerns that the road would force people from their homes, harm sensitive environments, and threaten Borneo’s splendid diversity of wildlife. From what I saw in my travels, those concerns weren’t unfounded.Researchers from the Sabah-based NGO Forever Sabah figure that the construction — whether widening existing roadways, “realigning” them on similar but separate paths, or cutting entirely new stretches through the island’s mangroves and rainforests — will displace at least 12,000 households in the state. Spray-painted numbers tag the buildings earmarked for eventual demolition next to the route.Along that span north of Kota Kinabalu, crushed mangrove trees sat piled in the pooling water on either side of the new highway. Narrow culverts run under the highway, but conservation groups worry that they won’t facilitate enough water flow to replace the heaving of the tide that brings a vital influx of nutrients. Scientists also worry that clearing the path for the highway would further carve up the habitat of proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus), which are a major tourist draw.Mangroves cleared for construction of the highway in northwestern Sabah. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.But I also questioned whether it was fair of me to judge such a massive project at this nascent stage, literally before the dust has settled. After all, the society I come from in the United States has benefited wildly, economically and otherwise, from the connectivity that an intricate road network can provide, and that’s no doubt come with huge costs to the environment.It’s difficult to fault a country for pursuing a path toward development or making it easier for people to get from point to point. The 19-hour-long bus ride I took that connects Sarawak’s two largest cities, Kuching and Miri, is exhausting, and my fellow passengers were eager for construction on the Pan Borneo Highway there to be finished, likely slashing the travel time by half. I noticed the stark contrast — especially in my own comfort — between the ruddy, under-construction road currently serving as Sarawak’s major artery, and the smooth-surfaced, recently completed stretch from outside Kuching to Tanjung Datu National Park at Borneo’s westernmost point.But there’s also research demonstrating that the economic potential of infrastructure development often remains unrealized, or at least unequally distributed. Studies have shown that the benefits of roads are often concentrated in the hands of big companies, whether focused on timber, minerals or agriculture, leaving the average citizen behind and sometimes leading to unrest and conflict.An oriental pied hornbill takes flight over the Kinabatangan River. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.With new roads, poachers too face fewer obstacles to reach their quarry (though one conservation-focused local leader I met in Sarawak also suggested that the roads would help wildlife rangers in policing a primate-rich wildlife sanctuary and national park). Borneo has its own species of critically endangered orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) and a variant of the endangered Asian elephant (Elephas maximus), considered by some scientists to be a distinct subspecies. The elephants’ tusks have become a target for poachers, and wildlife traffickers go after the babies of orangutans and other primates for the exotic, high-value pet trade.What’s more, ecologists like William Laurance from James Cook University in Australia have cataloged the proliferation of deforestation for human settlement, agriculture and industry that follows road construction. That can mean a cascade of the same problems, including increased hunting and a loss of habitat, that ripple through nearby forest ecosystems.Despite these potential drawbacks, some of the highway’s most prominent backers insist it’s possible to build a road that will fulfill its promises for development while minimizing environmental damage. Seated in his Kuala Lumpur office, Baru Bian, Malaysia’s minister of works, seemed to see no contradiction in his desire for both development and environmental protection. Baru describes himself as an environmentalist, and before he became a politician worked as a lawyer fighting for the rights of his own people, the Lun Bawang, and others facing the prospect of losing control of their land to outside interests. Now, his earnestness is focused on creating a booming economy for the people of Sabah and Sarawak, and he sees the Pan Borneo Highway as the way to do it.A hillside cleared of trees next to the Pan Borneo Highway. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Baru might be overlooking the hazards that come with such a massive infrastructure project — at a cost of around $6.4 billion with a completion date in the mid-2020s — while focusing just on the potential benefits. But he has also shown a willingness to listen. In the days before our interview, he met with scientists to learn more about the threats to the environment that the highway’s construction could pose. And other leaders are following a similar path, if their public comments are any indication: In March, the chief minister of Sabah called for as little destruction as possible during the construction.Alongside these leaders’ apparent openness to outside input, a movement among conservation-focused NGOs and research organizations led by Coalition 3H (Humans, Habitats, Highways) in Sabah has arisen to work with, instead of in opposition to, highway planners. Nearly all I spoke with who were concerned about the impacts of the road insisted that they weren’t “anti-development,” and this collaborative spirit could be seen as a reflection of that sentiment. In that convergence could be what one policy analyst called “win-wins” that would avoid the worst environmental destruction while bringing the benefits that roads can offer.Like the unfinished highway, the fruits of this cooperation remain uncertain. Still, federal budget constraints mean that the second and third phases of the highway, which include controversial sections through central Sabah, likely won’t be budgeted for until 2021 or later under what’s known as the 12th Malaysia plan. That means that groups like Coalition 3H still have time to weigh in on still-unconstructed sections of the road, Baru said.Houses slated for destruction along the path of the highway have been marked with spray-painted numbers. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.In some cases, petitioning the government has gained traction. In early 2019, the coalition discovered that the contractor working on the road heading up Sabah’s Gold Coast was doing so without having its environmental impact assessment approved. In April, the state’s Environmental Protection Department stopped work on part of the road, though it resumed a few weeks later once the department said the issue was corrected. It’s evidence, members of the coalition say, that change is possible — but also shows how difficult it can be to change the course of these projects once they’re underway.The tide of infrastructure development currently rolling across Southeast Asia right now could be terribly destructive, Laurance said during a recent talk at the International Conference of Conservation Biologists. But he also offered a rare, if small, dose of optimism about projects like the Pan Borneo Highway, suggesting that it’s possible to change the outcomes.“I don’t see this as a helpless situation,” Laurance said. “I see this as a dire situation absolutely, but I don’t see it as one in which we can’t have an impact. I absolutely think that we can.”Banner image of a buffalo on a stretch of the highway under construction near Kota Kinabalu by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonEditor’s note: William Laurance is a member of Mongabay’s advisory board.Citations:Ancrenaz, M., Gumal, M., Marshall, A.J., Meijaard, E., Wich , S.A. & Husson, S. (2016). Pongo pygmaeus (errata version published in 2018). The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T17975A123809220. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-1.RLTS.T17975A17966347.enChoudhury, A., Lahiri Choudhury, D.K., Desai, A., Duckworth, J.W., Easa, P.S., Johnsingh, A.J.T., Fernando, P., Hedges, S., Gunawardena, M., Kurt, F., Karanth, U., Lister, A., Menon, V., Riddle, H., Rübel, A. & Wikramanayake, E. (IUCN SSC Asian Elephant Specialist Group) (2008). Elephas maximus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2008: e.T7140A12828813. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2008.RLTS.T7140A12828813.enFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Animals, Biodiversity, Community Development, Conservation, Conservation And Poverty, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Infrastructure, Logging, Poaching, Poverty, Poverty Alleviation, Rainforests, Roads, Saving Rainforests, Sustainable Development, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking last_img read more

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As climate crisis deepens, wildlife adapts, maybe with lessons for us

first_imgAdaptation To Climate Change, Animal Behavior, Animals, Arctic Animals, Birds, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Mammals, Orangutans, Wildlife Shifts in the timing of lifecycle events, like reproduction or migration, are widely thought to be the most common response of wildlife to global warming.In recent years, pikas have been observed modifying their foraging habits in ways that may be behavioral adaptations to a changing climate.A long-term study in Kutai National Park on the island of Borneo in Indonesia has shown how extreme weather, brought by the intensifying El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle, is affecting the behavior, habitat requirements, feeding ecology and birth intervals of orangutans.Researchers have discovered that African penguins, may be falling into a sort of “ecological trap,” one that humans created through overfishing and climate change. Recent studies of Twitter posts have shown that people can be quick to shrug off extreme weather as normal. However, researchers are also finding that some wildlife — maybe better attuned to changes in the natural world around them — are adapting successfully to climate change.As the United Nations prepares to convene for the 2019 Climate Action Summit on September 23 in New York City, and for Climate Week (Sept. 22-29), Mongabay has gathered here some of our reporting, showcasing how three animals: the American Pika, orangutan and penguin are shifting their behaviors to face the challenges of a rapidly altering world.The American Pika beats the heatIt may be a tiny tailless mammal, but the American pika could teach humans a thing or two about adapting to the impacts of global climate change.Shifts in the timing of lifecycle events, like reproduction or migration, are widely thought to be the most common response of wildlife to global warming, and according to research in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, the scientific literature on the subject mostly bears that assertion out. Since behavioral responses were most noticeable in species with a lifespan of at least three years, the American Pika (Ochotona princeps) provides an apt example to explore.American pikas can alter their body temperature somewhat via posture, squeezing into a fluffy ball, a body posture with minimum surface area, to hold in heat during winter, or stretching out the surface area of their bodies to cool down in summer. In recent years, pikas have also been observed modifying their foraging habits in ways that may be behavioral adaptations to a changing climate. Photo Credit: J. Jacobson, from figure 4 of Beever et al (2017). doi:10.1002/fee.1502.Pikas don’t dig burrows and typically make their homes in alpine rockpiles at the base of cliffs, known as talus slopes, at high-elevations in western North America’s mountains. These relatives of rabbits and hares inhabit an expansive range as a species, but individuals don’t typically stray more than a kilometer from their stony habitats. And that has led to several distinct populations, which makes the pica an especially good species to study — population comparisons offer us a better understanding of localized responses to quick changing environmental conditions.For example, one population of more malleable pikas turned out not to be home bodies, but instead appear willing to seek out new cooler places to live as temperatures rise. They give up their old, hotter rockpiles and seek out new favorable and cooler microclimates nearby. This move allows the animals to remain more active during the daytime when ambient temperatures at their original talus habitat — frequently subjected to full sun — had turned much higher.Scientists think that pikas capable of adapting their behavior in this manner might have better chances of surviving as global warming advances.Another important area of adaptation that’s been observed in American pikas is thermoregulation. In the more northern parts of the species’ range, freezing temperatures in winter are severe. In response, pikas moderate their body temperature to some degree through posture — squeezing into a fluffy ball, a pose with minimum surface area, to hold in heat during winter; or stretching out their body surface area to cool down in summer.Read more at: The American pika: A case study in wildlife acclimating to climate changeOrangutans adjust their birth cyclesA long-term study in Kutai National Park on the island of Borneo in Indonesia has shown how extreme weather, brought by the intensifying El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle, is affecting the behavior, habitat requirements, feeding ecology and birth intervals of orangutans.Kutai’s protected habitat is one of the driest regions on the island and also the driest, least productive rainforest where orangutans can be found — in fact, it is the least wet of all current orangutan research sites. In this part of Borneo, the ENSO cycle is marked by periods of drought, interspersed with periods of normal rainfall and unusually heavy rains.Researchers found that the ENSO cycle influences the lives of Kutai’s orangutans in a surprising way. Much like humans, orangutan females don’t ovulate when their bodies are malnourished, especially during an El Niño drought, so bear no young during such periods.Interestingly, El Niños occur every six years on average, and Kutai orangutans possess an average inter-birth interval of 6.1 years — roughly in sync with the ENSO cycles. In comparison, orangutans in Sumatra reproduce every 8.75 years, and every 7.7 years in wetter central Borneo, meaning that orangutan mothers are still caring for their previous infant when the next El Niño comes along. This phenomenon is known as infant stacking and is rarely recorded in orangutans.Female and infant orangutan in Kutai National Park. The morio orangutans of east Borneo are usually much darker than their Sumatran cousins. Image by Orangutan Project Kutai.Because the Kutai great apes live in the most challenging and variable conditions of any orangutans, these findings could help conservationists understand how orangutans are currently adapting to difficult climatic conditions — a potentially invaluable insight as the human-caused climate crisis escalates in future.Read more at: For orangutans affected by El Niño, change unfolds over timePenguin survival depends on following food and breeding cuesThe emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) is the largest of all living penguin species and the only one that breeds during the Antarctic winter. A recent study gives a sneak peek into how the penguins might respond to disappearing stable sea ice conditions brought by climate change — for good or ill.Female emperor penguins lay their single eggs early in the Antarctic winter, around May, then take turns with their partners incubating the eggs and subsequently raising the chicks through the extremely cold winter months. That’s to ensure chicks are ready to leave their nesting ground by the summer months of January or February.Emperor penguins are the only known bird to never breed on dry land, preferring to hatch and rear chicks on frozen sea. But in 2016, following abnormally stormy weather, the sea ice of the emperor penguin colony at Halley Bay on the Weddell Sea broke up in October, long before the chicks had fledged and were ready to go out to sea. In 2017 and 2018, too, the ice broke up early, leading to the likely death of all the chicks at Antarctica’s second-largest colony of emperor penguins.But it’s not all gloom. Between 2016 and 2018, satellite images picked up a massive increase in the numbers of emperor penguins at the nearby Dawson-Lambton Glacier colony, located 55 kilometers (34 miles) to the south of Halley Bay. While the estimated number of adult penguin pairs at Dawson-Lambton had steadily decreased from 3,690 in 2010, to 1,280 in 2015, those numbers jumped up to 5,315 pairs in 2016; 11,117 in 2017; and 14,612 pairs in 2018 — a surprise to scientists.“It appears that many of the birds from Halley Bay have relocated to Dawson-Lambton, with the rest remaining at Halley Bay, but not breeding successfully,” the authors explained.So it seems that some penguins are using migration successfully as a fundamental climate change strategy. But alter surroundings too much or too quickly, and suddenly such adaptations might point organisms in the wrong direction. For example, across the ocean from Antarctica, on the southern tip of Africa, researchers have discovered that African penguins (Spheniscus demersus), an Endangered species according to the IUCN, may be falling into a sort of “ecological trap,” one that humans created through overfishing and climate change.Emperor penguins need intact sea ice until the chicks are ready to leave their nesting grounds. Image by Christopher Michel via Flickr (CC BY 2.0).Penguin numbers in South Africa’s Western Cape have plummeted by around 80 percent in recent decades. Biologists chalked this decline up to the disappearance of their favorite prey species, anchovies and sardines, from the Western Cape, the penguins’ preferred feeding ground to the west of their nesting sites. Overfishing and water chemistry changes — knock-on climate change effects — pushed breeding shoals of these fish eastward or wiped them out entirely.In the past, penguins in search of their favorite foods adapted by picking up on cues, such as the chemicals that plankton release and water temperature, to tell them where to find food. But now, when they follow cues to formerly reliable feeding spots, they’re more likely to find jellyfish and low-calorie gobies, rather than energy-dense sardines and anchovies. Without the right cues, they go hungry.Researchers used satellite monitoring to follow the movements of young penguins as they left their breeding grounds in Namibia and South Africa and headed into the open ocean to feed. The data revealed that the fledgling penguins’ behavior wasn’t flexible enough to accommodate the change to their environment, and instead led them to a subpar food source.Again, there could be a lesson here for humanity: escalating climate change is complex, and it may take ongoing trial and error to find the right survival response — with some individuals making viable choices, and others not.Read more at:Large emperor penguin colony suffers ‘catastrophic’ breeding failureEcological trap ensnares endangered African penguinsBanner image caption: Emperor penguin colony. Image by IIP Photo Archive via FlickrThis story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 news outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Willie Shubertlast_img read more

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Seven elephants found dead as Sri Lanka’s human-wildlife conflict escalates

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Authorities have launched an investigation into the suspected poisoning deaths of seven elephants last month in Sri Lanka.Human-elephant conflict caused by habitat loss has long been a problem on the country, with both the elephant and human death tolls climbing in recent years.Investigations into previous elephant deaths have failed to hold anyone liable, and conservationists say they fear the recent spate of deaths will also go unpunished.Conservationists say the root causes for human-elephant conflict need to be removed or mitigated, including through community-based electric fencing, increased manpower for the wildlife department, and conservation of elephant habitat. ANURADHAPURA/COLOMBO — Wildlife authorities in Sri Lanka have launched an investigation after seven elephants were found dead late last month in the north-central district of Anuradhapura.Four of the elephants were found dead near the city of Habarana on Sept. 27, and three more on the following day. All except one were female, and all are believed to have been poisoned.“There is a chemical poisoning, but we do not know if it was a deliberate attempt. We are still trying to verify this,” said M.G.C. Sooriyabandara, the director-general of Sri Lanka’s Department of Wildlife Conservation (DWC).The minister of wildlife and tourism, John Amaratunga, has appointed a special committee to investigate the matter, but it has yet to release its findings.While the exact cause of death has yet to be confirmed, it’s strongly believed that the elephants were poisoned by farmers, likely in retaliation for raiding their crops. If confirmed, the recent discoveries would bring to 10 the toll of elephants killed by poisoning in Sri Lanka.Although the island is home to fewer than 6,000 Sri Lankan elephants (Elephas maximus maximus), a subspecies of the Asian elephant, the loss of their habitats and the expansion of human settlements have intensified the frequency of human-elephant conflicts.In 2018 alone, 319 elephants and almost 100 people were killed in such encounters. Sixty-four of those deaths were caused by explosive devices hidden in fodder bait, known as hakka patas. Fifty-three elephants died of gunshot injuries. The last four years have seen at least 21 cases of elephant poisoning deaths, according to Sooriyabandara, for which no perpetrators have been identified.Elephants roam into villages and fields, causing significantdestruction and even human deaths. Image courtesy of the Centre for Conservation & Research“There have been many cases of suspected poisoning, but it is almost never proven,” said Prithiviraj Fernando, head of the Sri Lankan Centre for Conservation and Research. “Elephant deaths are continuously going up. In the past year, they exceeded 300 for the first time, and we are on track to exceed 300 again this year,” he told Mongabay.Shrinking habitatsElephants are Sri Lanka’s most iconic animal and occupy an important place in the local culture. But there is only so much space on the island: Forests are being cleared, trees cut down, rivers rerouted to fill village tanks for agriculture. Elephant habitats are shrinking, and managing elephant-human co-existence has become the core issue.The government has tried to restrict elephants to protected areas under the Department of Wildlife Conservation, but Fernando maintains this approach has failed. Translocated elephants rarely stay in place, he notes, and the drives to round them up for relocation makes the animals more aggressive, increasing the likelihood of conflict.“More than 70 percent of elephants are outside of protected areas,” Fernando said. “People and elephants live in the same landscape, and this is where the conflict occurs. People feel like they have to take matters into their own hands and do something about it.”With people and elephants sharing space across roughly 44 percent of Sri Lanka, a sustainable solution has to be found to stop suffering on both sides, conservationists say. From bio-fences to thorny crops and from nature reserves to elephant thunders, many approaches have been tried. Fernando has found one to be workable: “Putting up fences around human settlements and cultivated areas has proven to be effective. Basically, the only way currently to manage the conflict is community-based electric fencing.”Even if this solution is scaled up, clashes between elephants and rural communities are still likely to continue as long as human settlements and farms encroach deeper into elephant territory. This will leave the animals little choice but to plunder villages and fields in search of food and water, and villagers to see no other option than to retaliate.In places like this rural road near Tangalle in the south ofSri Lanka, elephants share space with humans. Image by Sofia C.C. Valladares via Pixabay.As the mounting death toll indicates, the authorities lack sufficient resources to protect the elephants against such attacks. “The wildlife department has less than a thousand people in the field,” said Jagath Gunawardena, an expert on environmental law. “They are stretched thin in so many different sections that they cannot work effectively.”Gunawardena said it was this lack of enforcement, rather than a lack of legal deterrent, that was the issue. He noted that Sri Lanka’s Fauna and Flora Protection Ordinance has several provisions dealing exclusively with elephants and affords them the highest degree of protection.“Anyone who harms, kills or injures an elephant is liable for imprisonment or a fine of up to several hundred thousand rupees,” he said. “I do not think it is necessary to afford elephants additional legal protection. The existing provisions are more than enough.”In any case, he said, demanding stricter laws might miss the point: Fines or jail terms are of little consequence if no one is convicted.“All these offenses are criminal offenses and need to be proven beyond a reasonable doubt,” Gunawardena said. “When there is poisoning or a hakka patas, there is no way of tracing it to the person who is responsible, unless we have some very good circumstantial evidence.”In many places, elephants can no longer retreat into theforests and are forced to co-exist in a human-dominated landscape. Image by Celles via Pixabay.The case of the seven Habarana elephants illustrates the difficulties in investigating this kind of crime, said Ravi Perera, chief operating officer of the Serendipity Wildlife Foundation and a veteran wildlife crime scene investigator.“If the elephants were indeed poisoned, toxicology results should show what type of substance was found,” he said. “Unfortunately, there is no way of tracing it back to the responsible party. Once the substance is identified, we would rely on intelligence gathering to pinpoint certain areas.”Perera has investigated poisonings before: “In Kenya, where our foundation operates, there have been several known cases, the majority of them due to human-animal conflict. Easily available insecticides are hidden in animal carcasses or fruit. Poisoning is silent and cheap, and very often a suspect cannot be found. If we are lucky, a whistle-blower or someone known to the suspect would divulge valuable information.”No one may ever be held liable for the deaths of the seven elephants in Habarana. For the moment, even the cause of their death is speculation, even as experts indicate it’s more than just an ordinary case of poisoning.Fernando said he was puzzled that the perpetrator would target female elephants, as it is mostly adult males that are known to raid farms. “Even if they wanted to target females, female elephants are always with their young ones. It is a great mystery how only the adults can be poisoned without poisoning the young ones as well.”Perera raised the same point: “If these deaths were due to poisoning, it is baffling why the mother died while the baby survived.”With the latest deaths adding to the toll in the escalating human-elephant conflict, conservationists and policymakers continue to work with various solutions to the problem. For now, that means that community-based electric fencing, increased manpower for the wildlife department, and the conservation of existing elephant habitat are the steps seen as best protecting Sri Lanka’s elephants and allowing for a peaceful co-existence with humans. Banner image of an electrocuted elephant in southern Sri Lanka, courtesy of the Centre for Conservation & Research. Article published by dilrukshi Elephants, Environment, human-elephant conflict, Wildlife Conservation last_img read more

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Indonesian official at center of licensing scandal charged in new case

first_imgCorruption, Crime, Development, Environment, Environmental Crime, Forests, Governance, Infrastructure, Law, Law Enforcement, Palm Oil, Plantations Indonesia’s anti-corruption agency has charged a former district head from Borneo in connection with a port development project.Darwan Ali, who was the head of Seruyan district in Central Kalimantan province from 2003 to 2013, is accused of conspiring to inflate the budget to build the Segintung seaport, allegedly causing losses to the state of $1.48 million.Investigators also allege that Darwan steered the contract for the project to a developer in exchange for the company’s support for his election campaign.Environmental activists say they hope the investigation will lead the way to probing other, more serious allegations against Darwan, who was the subject of a 2017 investigative report by Mongabay and The Gecko Project into a massive scheme to flip permits for oil palm plantations to multinational firms. JAKARTA — Indonesia’s anti-corruption agency has charged a former politician from Borneo in connection with a port development project, in a move that could shed light on an earlier scandal involving permits for oil palm plantations.Darwan Ali, who was the head of Seruyan district in Central Kalimantan province from 2003 to 2013, is accused of conspiring to inflate the budget for a seaport in Segintung Bay between 2007 and 2012. Investigators at the country’s Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) said the scheme incurred 20.84 billion rupiah ($1.48 million) in losses to the state during that period.Indonesia’s Seruyan district on the island of Borneo.The KPK also alleges that Darwan steered the contract for the project to developer PT Swa Karya Jaya, in exchange for the company backing his 2003 election bid. “It’s believed that the director at PT SKJ is a close friend of [Darwan’s],” Febri Diansyah, a spokesman for the KPK, told reporters in Jakarta on Oct. 14.Febri said the decision to charge Darwan was made after investigators questioned 32 witnesses and raided his home in Jakarta. The KPK has also applied for a travel ban to prevent Darwan leaving the country.Environmental activists have called on the agency to expand its investigation and root out other individuals involved in the project. “The KPK must also go after those that benefited from this project,” said Zenzi Suhadi, the head of advocacy at the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi).Zenzi added that this case could also be a stepping stone to probe other, more serious corruption allegations against Darwan.The politician was the subject of an extensive investigative report by Mongabay and the Gecko Project in 2017. Part of the award-winning “Indonesia for Sale” series, the report uncovered how Darwan, while head of Seruyan district, presided over an elaborate scheme to use shell companies as vehicles for selling oil palm plantation permits to firms owned by the billionaire Kuok and Rachmat families for millions of dollars.The scheme threatened to turn the southern reaches of Seruyan into a sea of oil palm. Local activists reported Darwan to the KPK in this case, and the agency investigated him but never pressed charges.Darwan Ali provided licenses to 18 companies owned by his family and cronies. Almost all of them were sold to Triputra Agro Persada and to the Kuok Group’s oil palm arm, PPB Oil Palms, which was later merged with Wilmar International. Source: Bursa Malaysia, Ditjen AHU, Nordin Abah, Marianto Sumarto and others.Below is a promotional video from the Segintung seaport agency in Seruyan district.Correction 10/18/19: A previous version of this story said Darwan took office in 2005, rather than in 2003.This story was first reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and published here on our Indonesian site on Oct. 15, 2019.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Audio: Reporter Katie Baker details Buzzfeed’s explosive investigation of WWF

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworecki On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Katie Baker, a reporter for Buzzfeed News investigating allegations of human rights violations and other abuses committed against local indigenous communities by park rangers in Asia and Africa who receive funding from conservation organization WWF.Baker and her colleague Tom Warren have written a series of articles detailing the allegations and WWF’s response. In the latest installment, the journalists report that the director and board of WWF were made aware of the abuses by one of their own internal reports more than a year before Buzzfeed broke the story.In this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, Baker discusses the findings of her investigative reports, what it took to chase this story down, and the impacts she’s seen so far from her reporting. On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Katie Baker, a reporter for Buzzfeed News investigating allegations of human rights violations and other abuses committed against local indigenous communities by park rangers in Asia and Africa who receive funding from conservation organization WWF.Listen here: The investigation by Buzzfeed News revealed that anti-poaching forces funded and trained by WWF have been accused of imprisoning, torturing, and killing indigenous villagers on the fringes of national parks. Baker and her colleague Tom Warren have written a series of articles detailing the allegations and WWF’s response. In the latest installment, the journalists report that the director and board of WWF were made aware of the abuses by one of their own internal reports more than a year before Buzzfeed broke the story.In this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, Baker discusses the findings of her investigative reports, what it took to chase this story down, and the impacts she’s seen so far from her reporting.“No one is saying that [WWF’s rangers] don’t have really difficult jobs… but just because they have a difficult job doesn’t mean they can rape and kill and torture with impunity or arrest people without evidence,” Baker says, adding: “I have not received any hate mail from [WWF employees] telling me I got it wrong.”Here’s this episode’s top news:Violence against indigenous peoples explodes in BrazilStudy finds massive reorganization of life across Earth’s ecosystems$85 million initiative to scale up agroforestry in Africa announcedOnce close to extinction, western South Atlantic humpback population close to full recoveryWould you like to hear how Mongabay grew out of its founder’s childhood adventures in rainforests and a fascination with frogs? Or how a Mongabay editor reacted to meeting one of the world’s last Bornean rhinos? We now offer Insider Content that delivers behind-the-scenes reporting and stories like these from our team. For a small monthly donation, you’ll get exclusive access and support our work in a new way. Visit mongabay.com/insider to learn more and join the growing community of Mongabay readers on the inside track.If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.Chitwan National Park. Photo by Stefanos Nikologianis, licensed under CC BY 2.0.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Anti-poaching, Conservation, Environment, Human Rights, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Interviews, Journalism, National Parks, Poaching, Podcast, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Rangers last_img read more

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Ban on destructive fishing practice helps species recovery in Indonesian park

first_imgEnvironment, Environmental Policy, Fisheries, Fishing, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Illegal Fishing, Law Enforcement, Marine, Marine Conservation, Oceans, Overfishing, Regulations, Saltwater Fish, Sustainability Article published by Basten Gokkon In 2011, a destructive fishing practice known as muroami was banned in Karimunjawa National Park off Indonesia’s Java Island.In 2012-2013, the overall biomass of herbivorous fish species in the park had more than doubled from the 2006-2009 period, researchers have found.They attribute this recovery to the muroami ban and have called for it to be implemented in other marine parks across Indonesia. JAKARTA — Fish stocks in a marine national park in Indonesia increased significantly in the years after a ban on the use of coral-destroying nets was imposed, a recent study has found.The overall biomass of herbivorous fish species in Karimunjawa National Park more than doubled in 2012-2013 from the 2006-2009 period, signaling a recovery in fish stock, the researchers write in their study published in July in the journal Ecological Applications.They attribute the increase in biomass, which is key in conserving reef fish biodiversity, to a complete ban in 2011 on muroami fishing. This particular practice, common across Southeast Asia, uses large, non-discriminatory nets in combination with pounding devices to smash into coral reefs to flush out fish. Local fishermen also use compressor-and-hose diving equipment, putting their own lives at risk.Muroami fishermen haul in their catch. Image courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).A muroami fisherman inspects a net as it’s pulled up. Image courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).The paper notes that the imposition of the muroami ban met with minimal resistance from local fishermen as they already understood that the practice was unprofitable and endangered their lives.In addition to biomass doubling rapidly following the ban, the variety of fish species recorded, or taxonomic richness, also increased by 30 percent, the authors write. Co-author Shinta Pardede, a researcher with the Wildlife Conservation Society’s (WCS) Indonesia marine program, called Karimunjawa “the last frontier of coral reefs ecosystem in the Java Sea.”“The reefs in the Karimunjawa chain provide high marine biodiversity and reef fish fisheries that mainly support both local and national fisheries resources,” she added.Declared in a marine reserve in 2001, the park today spans 1,100 square kilometers (425 square miles) and encompasses 22 islands that are part of the Karimunjawa Archipelago. A patchwork of zoning policies allows artisanal fishing in certain areas, as well as tourism and research activities.The island chain is one of seven marine national parks in Indonesia, and is renowned for its coral reefs. Nearly 500 species of reef fish thrive in the waters around Karimunjawa, and the park is a popular tourist attraction for divers and snorkelers.A muroami fisherman in Karimunjawa marine national park. Image courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).Muroami fishing is destructive to coral reefs. Image courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).A muroami fishing net covers a coral reef. Image courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).The impact of the muroami ban in Karimunjawa bolsters the case for having similar policies in other marine parks across Indonesia, particularly in areas where there’s poor compliance with existing regulations, the researchers say.“It underlines the importance of these regulations for breaking cycles of resources depletion, habitat destruction, and low compliance to zoning, thus alleviating threats to food security and ecosystem integrity,” the researchers write.Shinta said the lessons learned from Karimunjawa’s fisheries management had been successfully replicated at other sites nationwide, including in the provinces of West Nusa Tenggara, North Maluku, North Sulawesi, and Aceh.“Karimunjawa fish catch data have been used in many scientific papers that enhance comprehension on practical fisheries management yet support marine conservation program in Indonesia and worldwide,” she said.Muroami fishing boats. Image courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).Citation:Bejarano, S., Pardede, S., Campbell, S. J., Hoey, A. S., & Ferse, S. C. (2019). Herbivorous fish rise as a destructive fishing practice falls in an Indonesian marine national park. Ecological Applications, 0(0). doi:10.1002/eap.1981FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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