EXCLUSIVE: Delicate Steve Talks About His Psychedelic Guitar Stylings Praised By NPR And Paul Simon

first_imgLive For Live Music: Delicate Steve, are you a delicate man?Delicate Steve: Yes.L4LM: If you had a dime for every time somebody asked you that, would you be a wealthy man? Delicate Steve: Yes!L4LM: Well, now that we have that settled, the first thing that caught my attention when listening to your band, as I’m sure goes for most people, was the absence of lyrical content. Was the decision to be entirely instrumental made intentionally or has singing just never been something that you’ve done? Delicate Steve: I don’t think of myself as a lyricist, so I’m just playing to my strengths as a guitar player who is interested in making songs, writing songs, and producing pop music. I know that I’m good at the guitar, so I decided that that would be the focus of the music instead of trying to write lyrics.L4LM: In regards to that topic, would you say that when you listen to music, you’re more immediately attracted to the beat of a song rather than to the lyrics?Delicate Steve: No, I like lyrics, I would say that’s what I like most. I’m definitely paying attention to singers when I listen to music.L4LM: That’s interesting to me. But you probably wouldn’t say that one is more important than the other, would you? Delicate Steve: No, you just need to have a lot of strong elements in the song and that could come from anywhere. It could be the beat, it could be the melody, it could be the lyrics; but a good song has to have at least one of those things happening.L4LM: When you made the decision to venture off as a predominantly instrumental band, you had to have known that it would be difficult to break into any sort of a mainstream market. Did that notion ever intimidate you? Or was that never a concern of yours?Delicate Steve: Well, I was just making this music in my room, so I wasn’t really thinking of anything external. So this was just sort of what I would do if I was uninhibited by thoughts about where it would end up or how it would do in the world. So that’s how the first album came to be.L4LM: How old were you when you made the first album? Delicate Steve: I think I was 22 or 23.L4LM: So you were just making music to make music, it wasn’t intended for anybody but yourself? Delicate Steve: Not exactly. It was for friends, and it was for bands that I was inspired by.L4LM: Were you playing shows anywhere at that time? Delicate Steve: Not with this music until after it was recorded.L4LM: Once this music was recorded, and you started performing live and writing new music. Did you notice any changes in your creative process as you were probably beginning to take certain external factors into account? Delicate Steve: It’s changed; it’s definitely different now. I take into account where I am, which isn’t just in my bedroom anymore. It’s in the world in some way. I like to be conscious, as much as I can be when I’m making music, so I’m not just thinking about myself.L4LM: Do you think that you’ve ever compromised your creative independence when writing a song in order to guarantee success?  Delicate Steve: No. It’s easier to do whatever you want; it’s harder to make something that you think will be successful. If you’re not bound by that, then you can make anything, and no one is going to yell at you. In some ways, it’s easier to experiment freely than it is to make a pop song. So in some ways, I think it strengthens my creative muscle to try and make music that other people will want to listen to.L4LML: I imagine that many bands who compose songs without lyrics can have a difficult time engaging an audience. I have to say that for myself personally, at the two shows that I attended of yours, the lack of singing went almost entirely unnoticed, and I think that’s because I felt like, in a way, your guitar was doing the singing. Is that a reaction that you often receive?Delicate Steve: Yeah (laughs). I don’t know, I don’t know how it looks to other people, but people do say that.L4LM: Is that a reaction that you try to provoke in people?Delicate Steve: No, I don’t think I need to try so much—that just sort of feels natural for me to do all that stuff when I’m up there playing.L4LM: Do you think you play your guitar differently or more eccentrically than someone who would be singing and playing at the same time? Delicate Steve: I think that I play my guitar differently and more eccentrically than most of the guitar players that I see, if they’re singing or not, just because of how I grew up, and what I think is cool or not cool. I combine all those thoughts in my own head, and I’m kind of doing what I think is really cool and what I’m not seeing a lot of in the world.L4LM: Many musicians use their lyrics to express themselves, whether it be in relation to a personal experience or a more global topic. Is it ever frustrating that you can’t share those opinions or stories with your audience?Delicate Steve: No, I feel like I’m doing that when I’m playing. I think people are getting a sense of who I am through my music, even though it doesn’t have words. It’s just like when people listen to groups from around the world and even though they can’t understand what’s being said, they can still connect to it.L4LM: Are the musicians that accompanied you on your most recent tour considered to be the official band (Max Jaffe, Jon Wiley and Jessica Pavone), or are those members continuously rotating?Delicate Steve: It’s the official band right now. It’s changed over the years, but those who are playing now have hopped on over the past year or so.L4LM: The title of your album, This is Steve, is seemingly blunt. Is the meaning behind that name quite so obvious or is there a bit more of a story behind it? Delicate Steve: I would leave it to the person checking out the music. In one way, it serves as a glimpse into who I am as a person through this music, and I felt like this third album was the time to call an album This is Steve.L4LM: Do you think this album is the most accurate representation of yourself as an artist? Delicate Steve: They’re all different mirrors, but this one was set up in a way that was the most welcoming in some way. L4LM: Any exciting things on the horizon for you and your music? Delicate Steve: I’m just keeping busy all the time in New York—producing bands, working on music with a bunch of different artists, and playing guitar. I just want to be known, so I just want to keep doing my thing, and the world will catch up eventually. Sometimes I get a little impatient, but I also know that I’m doing something special, and that I’m not going to stop anytime soon. So I’ve just got to harness my patience and just keep making music. L4LM: One final question, under what circumstance does Harsh Steve come to town? Delicate Steve: Harsh Steve is always there; he could come out at any minute (laughs). Everyone has got a harsh side, so not more than anybody else do I have one, but I’m definitely capable of those emotions. Steve Marion, better known by his stage name Delicate Steve, is a musician who’s been around the block, performing on NPR’s Tiny Desk Concert and having worked with big names like Paul Simon, Tame Impala, Dirty Projectors, and more. However, the eccentric guitarist has been in a state of evolution throughout his career, as evidenced by the musical progression across his albums, with his latest album, This Is Steve, coming out earlier this year. Growing from writing his fully instrumental songs for himself and friends in his bedroom to writing in consideration of the followers he’s been rabidly gaining, Delicate Steve continues onward and upward with guitar-driven, psychedelia-tinged pop rock songs leading the way.Live For Live Music was recently able to chat with the guitarist, who gave us a taste of his musical philosophy, stage personality, and future industry aspirations. Read the interview below, and check out more information about Delicate Steve along with his upcoming tour dates on his website here.last_img read more

See More

Air Force to upgrade old weapons system, form new air command

first_imgThe Indonesian Air Force is upgrading its primary weaponry defense system (Alutsista) and developing various new commands.The plan was conveyed by Air Force chief of staff Marshal Yuyu Sutisna during the force’s 74th anniversary ceremony at its headquarters in Cilangkap, East Jakarta, on Thursday. He said the Air Force was working on the fourth phase of its strategic plan, which is expected to be completed by 2024.”Our main priority in this particular stage is to replace our Alutsista, especially our jet fighters, radars and missiles,” Yuyu said during the ceremony on Thursday as quoted by kompas.com. Read also: Jokowi spends large on defense, but ‘without clear vision’He said Air Force personnel should also prepare for the development of new commands, including the National Air Operation Command (Koopsudnas), which will be responsible for air defense within the archipelago. Koopsudnas is created by combining the Air Force Operations Command (Koopsau) with the National Air Defense Command (Kohanudnas)The formation of the national command is a follow up to the formation of the Joint Defense Area Command (Kogabwilhan), which oversees the existing combat units of all three military branches.Before the formation of the joint command, each branch’s regional command had its own separate chain of command, which hindered coordination in joint military operations.Yuyu said the Air Force would complete its grand plan under the 15-year-old weaponry modernization program, the Minimum Essential Force.The Air Force’s 74th anniversary celebration was attended by only a handful of military personnel due to the government’s call for physical distancing to curb the spread of COVID-19. Prior to the coronavirus outbreak, the force held several events, including a jet fighter air show. (vny)Topics :last_img read more

See More

Odion Ighalo tipped to replace Manchester United striker Romelu Lukaku by Arsenal legend Kanu

first_imgAdvertisement Metro Sport ReporterMonday 17 Feb 2020 10:15 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.8kShares Kanu has hailed new Manchester United striker Odion Ighalo (Picture: Getty)Kanu has backed Odion Ighalo to replace Romelu Lukaku as the Nigerian forward prepares to make his Manchester United debut.Red Devils fan Ighalo joined the Premier League giants on transfer deadline day on a loan deal until the end of the season.The 30-year-old, who played for Watford between 2014 and 2017, could make his Manchester United debut on Monday evening against Chelsea.A number of United fans were left underwhelmed by the Ighalo signing but Arsenal hero Kanu says he can replace Lukaku, who left Old Trafford last summer.ADVERTISEMENT‘Yes he can replace him [Lukaku],’ Kanu told Goal. ‘If you watch him play, you’d find out that he is strong and can score goals.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘What he needs is the service. In this team, I am sure his game will improve because the team has great players.‘Despite playing in the Chinese league, Ighalo is not a player you would look down on and say he is not a good player. Comment Arsenal legend Kanu (Picture: Getty)‘I think he’s probably pinching himself at times, because he’s now at his favourite club at the age of 30.‘Hopefully he’ll prove to you what I think he will. He’s a proven goalscorer, so he’ll do all right.’Manchester United will close the gap on fourth-placed Chelsea to four points with victory at Stamford Bridge on Monday.MORE: Luis Figo rates Manchester United’s £67m transfer move for Bruno FernandesMORE: Arsenal eyeing shock move for former Manchester United star Daley Blindcenter_img Ighalo has been tipped to replace Romelu Lukaku at Old Trafford (Picture: Getty)‘I believe in him and I know he can deliver if given the chance. Bringing him to Old Trafford means that those in the club believe in his ability, and we have to respect that.‘I don’t think he will not disappoint because he will give them value for their money.’Ole Gunnar Solskjaer defended Manchester United’s controversial move for Ighalo and said this week that he could sign a permanent deal with the club in the summer.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘It’s a loan, but when you’re in the door and if you impress it gives you a chance,’ Solskjaer said. ‘That’s exactly the same for everyone who signs if it’s permanent or it’s a loan.‘If you impress as a player, if you impress as a person, if you can help this group improve, then of course there’s a chance that we’ll look at extending things.‘That doesn’t just go for Odion, but since you asked, yes, of course his incentive is to play as well as he can. And it’s up to us to make sure that he’d want to stay if we wanted him. Odion Ighalo tipped to replace Manchester United striker Romelu Lukaku by Arsenal legend Kanu Advertisementlast_img read more

See More