EXCLUSIVE: Delicate Steve Talks About His Psychedelic Guitar Stylings Praised By NPR And Paul Simon

first_imgLive For Live Music: Delicate Steve, are you a delicate man?Delicate Steve: Yes.L4LM: If you had a dime for every time somebody asked you that, would you be a wealthy man? Delicate Steve: Yes!L4LM: Well, now that we have that settled, the first thing that caught my attention when listening to your band, as I’m sure goes for most people, was the absence of lyrical content. Was the decision to be entirely instrumental made intentionally or has singing just never been something that you’ve done? Delicate Steve: I don’t think of myself as a lyricist, so I’m just playing to my strengths as a guitar player who is interested in making songs, writing songs, and producing pop music. I know that I’m good at the guitar, so I decided that that would be the focus of the music instead of trying to write lyrics.L4LM: In regards to that topic, would you say that when you listen to music, you’re more immediately attracted to the beat of a song rather than to the lyrics?Delicate Steve: No, I like lyrics, I would say that’s what I like most. I’m definitely paying attention to singers when I listen to music.L4LM: That’s interesting to me. But you probably wouldn’t say that one is more important than the other, would you? Delicate Steve: No, you just need to have a lot of strong elements in the song and that could come from anywhere. It could be the beat, it could be the melody, it could be the lyrics; but a good song has to have at least one of those things happening.L4LM: When you made the decision to venture off as a predominantly instrumental band, you had to have known that it would be difficult to break into any sort of a mainstream market. Did that notion ever intimidate you? Or was that never a concern of yours?Delicate Steve: Well, I was just making this music in my room, so I wasn’t really thinking of anything external. So this was just sort of what I would do if I was uninhibited by thoughts about where it would end up or how it would do in the world. So that’s how the first album came to be.L4LM: How old were you when you made the first album? Delicate Steve: I think I was 22 or 23.L4LM: So you were just making music to make music, it wasn’t intended for anybody but yourself? Delicate Steve: Not exactly. It was for friends, and it was for bands that I was inspired by.L4LM: Were you playing shows anywhere at that time? Delicate Steve: Not with this music until after it was recorded.L4LM: Once this music was recorded, and you started performing live and writing new music. Did you notice any changes in your creative process as you were probably beginning to take certain external factors into account? Delicate Steve: It’s changed; it’s definitely different now. I take into account where I am, which isn’t just in my bedroom anymore. It’s in the world in some way. I like to be conscious, as much as I can be when I’m making music, so I’m not just thinking about myself.L4LM: Do you think that you’ve ever compromised your creative independence when writing a song in order to guarantee success?  Delicate Steve: No. It’s easier to do whatever you want; it’s harder to make something that you think will be successful. If you’re not bound by that, then you can make anything, and no one is going to yell at you. In some ways, it’s easier to experiment freely than it is to make a pop song. So in some ways, I think it strengthens my creative muscle to try and make music that other people will want to listen to.L4LML: I imagine that many bands who compose songs without lyrics can have a difficult time engaging an audience. I have to say that for myself personally, at the two shows that I attended of yours, the lack of singing went almost entirely unnoticed, and I think that’s because I felt like, in a way, your guitar was doing the singing. Is that a reaction that you often receive?Delicate Steve: Yeah (laughs). I don’t know, I don’t know how it looks to other people, but people do say that.L4LM: Is that a reaction that you try to provoke in people?Delicate Steve: No, I don’t think I need to try so much—that just sort of feels natural for me to do all that stuff when I’m up there playing.L4LM: Do you think you play your guitar differently or more eccentrically than someone who would be singing and playing at the same time? Delicate Steve: I think that I play my guitar differently and more eccentrically than most of the guitar players that I see, if they’re singing or not, just because of how I grew up, and what I think is cool or not cool. I combine all those thoughts in my own head, and I’m kind of doing what I think is really cool and what I’m not seeing a lot of in the world.L4LM: Many musicians use their lyrics to express themselves, whether it be in relation to a personal experience or a more global topic. Is it ever frustrating that you can’t share those opinions or stories with your audience?Delicate Steve: No, I feel like I’m doing that when I’m playing. I think people are getting a sense of who I am through my music, even though it doesn’t have words. It’s just like when people listen to groups from around the world and even though they can’t understand what’s being said, they can still connect to it.L4LM: Are the musicians that accompanied you on your most recent tour considered to be the official band (Max Jaffe, Jon Wiley and Jessica Pavone), or are those members continuously rotating?Delicate Steve: It’s the official band right now. It’s changed over the years, but those who are playing now have hopped on over the past year or so.L4LM: The title of your album, This is Steve, is seemingly blunt. Is the meaning behind that name quite so obvious or is there a bit more of a story behind it? Delicate Steve: I would leave it to the person checking out the music. In one way, it serves as a glimpse into who I am as a person through this music, and I felt like this third album was the time to call an album This is Steve.L4LM: Do you think this album is the most accurate representation of yourself as an artist? Delicate Steve: They’re all different mirrors, but this one was set up in a way that was the most welcoming in some way. L4LM: Any exciting things on the horizon for you and your music? Delicate Steve: I’m just keeping busy all the time in New York—producing bands, working on music with a bunch of different artists, and playing guitar. I just want to be known, so I just want to keep doing my thing, and the world will catch up eventually. Sometimes I get a little impatient, but I also know that I’m doing something special, and that I’m not going to stop anytime soon. So I’ve just got to harness my patience and just keep making music. L4LM: One final question, under what circumstance does Harsh Steve come to town? Delicate Steve: Harsh Steve is always there; he could come out at any minute (laughs). Everyone has got a harsh side, so not more than anybody else do I have one, but I’m definitely capable of those emotions. Steve Marion, better known by his stage name Delicate Steve, is a musician who’s been around the block, performing on NPR’s Tiny Desk Concert and having worked with big names like Paul Simon, Tame Impala, Dirty Projectors, and more. However, the eccentric guitarist has been in a state of evolution throughout his career, as evidenced by the musical progression across his albums, with his latest album, This Is Steve, coming out earlier this year. Growing from writing his fully instrumental songs for himself and friends in his bedroom to writing in consideration of the followers he’s been rabidly gaining, Delicate Steve continues onward and upward with guitar-driven, psychedelia-tinged pop rock songs leading the way.Live For Live Music was recently able to chat with the guitarist, who gave us a taste of his musical philosophy, stage personality, and future industry aspirations. Read the interview below, and check out more information about Delicate Steve along with his upcoming tour dates on his website here.last_img read more

See More

Conservation Tillage Conference

first_imgSustaining agriculture’s future through conservation practices will be the focus of an upcoming workshop in Lyons, Ga. on Thursday, Feb. 13.The Conservation Tillage Production Systems Training Conference/Workshop will be held at the University of Georgia Vidalia Onion and Vegetable Research Center. The workshop is designed to educate farmers on the potential benefits conservation tillage can bring to their day-to-day operations.“Conservation tillage practices have become increasingly popular by farmers over the last 20 years. A lot of farmers use conservation practices, to some extent,” said Chris Tyson, the UGA Extension agent in Tattnall County. “I’d say more and more people are doing some type of conservation practice. They may just be running a strip-till rig through winter weeds that they kill off, or they may be planting a cover crop like a wheat cover crop. Or they may be using something like a heavy rye cover crop.”Tyson will lead inside and outside field day demonstrations at the fourteenth annual event. “What we’re doing at this year’s workshop is focusing more on back to basics; very basic stuff in conservation tillage. Why are they important? Why it’s important to conserve water or prevent erosion?”Farmers will see a rye crop planted adjacent to the Vidalia Onion Research Lab where the conference will be held. Tyson will point out the process used in growing the rye and explain the benefits.UGA Extension faculty members will discuss various conservation practices. Gary Hawkins, a UGA Extension water resource specialist, will cover how to conserve soil and water resources. In his study of conservation tillage, (caes.uga.edu/topics/sustainag/contillage), Hawkins describes the technique as a process of preparing land for crops with the focus of enhancing aspects of a healthy soil. One way this is done is by planting a row crop, like rye, during the winter months. The rye is planted but killed prior to planting cotton. As a result, limited tillage is needed during cotton planting. This reduces the amount of disturbed soil. If this process is repeated every year, residue left from the winter cover crops builds the soil’s organic matter, reduces erosion and runoff and improves soil quality and water quality. For a list of the system’s benefits, see caes.uga.edu/topics/sustainag/contillage/benefits.UGA Extension weed specialist Stanley Culpepper will discuss weed management issues and UGA Extension ag economist Amanda Smith will focus on the economics of conservation systems.“From an economic standpoint, conservation tillage farmers make fewer trips across the field because they’re not having to disc or plow the soil. So there’s a savings from the standpoint of machinery and equipment with lower fuel, labor and repair costs as well as time,” Smith said. “Some farmers have found that if they use conservation tillage practices, they can actually expand their acres. They’re spending the same amount of time in the fields, but farming more acres.”Yields from conservation tillage compare to those from conventional tillage, she said. However, farmers who practice conservation tillage enjoy non-monetary benefits that result from limited tillage of farmland.The workshop will begin at 9 a.m. with registration and welcome and conclude at 2 p.m. Registration is free, but interested participants are asked to register at ugatiftonconference.org/calendar.last_img read more

See More

Mass brawl mars Olympique Marseille’s rare win at PSG

first_imgPARIS: Olympique Marseille earned a smash-and-grab 1-0 win at Ligue 1 champions Paris St Germain after forward Florian Thauvin struck in the 31st minute of a pulsating though ill-tempered match at the Parc des Princes on Sunday.Littered with fouls throughout, the clash boiled over in the last minute of stoppage time with referee Jerome Brisard sending off five players after a full scale brawl broke out on the pitch. Paris Saint Germain’s Neymar, Laywin Kurzawa and Leandro Paredes as well as Marseille’s duo of Dario Benedetto and Jordan Amavi were given their marching orders after rival players threw punches and kicks at each other. But it did not bother Marseille manager Andre Villas-Boas after the 1993 European Cup winners celebrated their first league win against PSG since November 2011. “A tough and important win as well as a historic one,” Villas-Boas told reporters after his side condemned last season’s Champions League runners-up to a second successive defeat following a 1-0 opening day setback at Lens. “We struggled to cope with PSG’s early pressure because they are very good at it, but we found a way to grind out a great victory. It wasn’t pretty and we suffered.” Thauvin scored against the run of play, steering in a Dimitri Payet free kick inside the near post from close range after the home side had come close through Marco Verratti and Neymar, who also missed a pair of chances in the second half. Missing several first-team regulars who had contracted the COVID-19 virus, PSG pressed hard in the closing stages but Marseille’s rugged defence held firm. PSG sports director Leonardo, a former World Cup winner with Brazil, criticised the referee’s actions. “A total of 14 cards were brandished and five of them were red, which means the match got out of control,” Leonardo told the Telefoot television channel. “(Brisard) lost his head. He officiated the League Cup final but he doesn’t have the experience for this kind of fixture.” After the match, Neymar tweeted: “My only regret is not hitting him in the face.” Minutes later, he came up with another tweet, saying: “VAR catching my “aggression” is easy, now I want to see the image of the racist calling me a monkey, that I want to see! What’s up? REEL u punish me, CASCUDO I am expelled, what about them? What’s up.” After the match, Villas-Boas defended his player Gonzalez as he accused Angel Di Maria of spitting at one of his players. “Alvaro is an experienced player. There is no room for racism in football, but I don’t think that’s it. Neymar was a little annoyed by this situation at the end of the match. I hope that will not distract from this victory. We also have Di Maria who spat on one of our players. It was a Clasico and we must remember this historic victory for OM,” Goal.com quoted Boas as saying. Agencies Also Watch: Watch: River Flows Inside People’s Bedroomlast_img read more

See More

GamCare backs London problem gambling service

first_img GambleAware forms ‘Lived Experience Group’ supporting treatment research July 23, 2020 Submit Share Share StumbleUpon Related Articles UKGC launches public awareness campaign on gambling controls, rights and safeguards August 3, 2020 GamCare will continue to support those afflicted by problem gambling after backing a new NHS Primary Care Gambling Service (PCGS) which has opened in London.The new service will give problem gamblers access to a multidisciplinary team of mental health nurses, GPs, GamCare treatment practitioners and therapists. It will also work alongside GPs to improve awareness of problem gambling, offering guidance on how to identify and support problem gamblers.Starting in South East London (Lambeth, Southwark, Lewisham, Bexley, Bromley and Greenwich) there is a plan to expand the service further in the next few months.The PCGS will work alongside the National Gambling Treatment Service to support problem gamblers, with GamCare having developed an ‘integrated care pathway’.A Competency Framework for gambling treatment in primary care is also being developed by the PCGS, which is being funded by GambleAware.The new framework will set out the skills and experience needed for practitioners in this field and is a project being taken forward in association with the Royal College of General Practitioners.London’s primary care service will be led by NHS General Dr Clare Gerada who commented on the launch: “There is evidence that many people who have problems related to gambling are in contact with their GP, but don’t necessarily talk about their gambling. We will be exploring how to identify them, and how to help them get access to the treatment that is right for them. We know from other areas of work that people value the option of getting treatment in primary care settings.” GambleAware data finds stigma to be key barrier to treatment for women July 16, 2020last_img read more

See More