Crew chief named for Kennedy’s Bristol ride

first_imgChris Carrier named crew chief of Turner Scott Motorsports’ fourth Truck Series entry WATCH: Logano celebrates Michigan win “I look forward to the opportunity to compete again in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series,” said Carrier. “I enjoy working with young talent, and I think Ben Kennedy and Cale Gale have what it takes to be successful in this sport. We have a great team behind us at Turner Scott Motorsports, and I am looking forward to getting to work and joining the truck series this week at Bristol.”Carrier, a NASCAR Sprint Cup, Nationwide and NCWTS veteran, has served as crew chief for 329 events throughout the three series, earning five wins, 24 top fives, 52 top 10s and seven poles. Carrier’s most recent work in the NCWTS includes serving as crew chief on the No. 30 last season, leading Nelson Piquet Jr. to two wins, nine top fives, 15 top 10s and four poles. The Tennessee native earned his first career win with Harry Gant in 1994 at Atlanta Motor Speedway.The organization has also named Pat Tryson as crew chief for the No. 30 NASCAR Nationwide Series entry. Tryson will take over the crew chief duties for Piquet Jr. starting in the August 23 race at Bristol.”I am very excited about the opportunity to join Turner Scott Motorsports and the No. 30 team,” said Tryson. “I am really looking forward to working with Nelson Piquet Jr. and the rest of the team. Nelson is a very talented, hard-nosed competitor and I think we will work very well together. The pieces are in place at Turner Scott Motorsports to have a championship caliber team, and I am looking forward to helping this team get to victory lane. I would like to thank [co-owners] Steve Turner and Harry Scott, Jr. for giving me the opportunity to join their organization, and I am looking forward to getting to work this weekend at Bristol.”Tryson, a NASCAR Sprint Cup, Nationwide and Camping World Truck Series veteran has served as crew chief for 516 events, earning a total of 10 wins, 66 top-five, 139-top 10s and four poles throughout the three series. The Malvern, Pa. native earned his first career win with Elliott Sadler in 2001 at Bristol Motor Speedway.READ MORE: READ: Full coverage from Michigan, Mid-Ohio WATCH: Johnson out early at Michigancenter_img FULL SERIES COVERAGE• View all articles • View all videos • View all photos WATCH: Dillon spins in Stewart’s No. 14 Turner Scott Motorsports announced Monday that the team has named Chris Carrier as crew chief of the team’s fourth NASCAR Camping World Truck Series entry.Carrier and his TSM team will be at Bristol Motor Speedway Wednesday night providing support for Ben Kennedy Racing’s No. 96 entry in the Camping World Truck Series UNOH 200. Carrier will also be on the pit box and calling the shots for the No. 96 at Iowa, Chicago, Martinsville and Homestead-Miami Speedway. The team will run a limited schedule for the remaining portion of the year with Kennedy and Cale Gale behind the wheel.last_img read more

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Sunny Afternoon Star Danny Danny Horn on Diving into His First Musical

first_img View Comments Sunny Afternoon won this year’s Olivier Award for Best Musical, and Danny Horn has stepped into the demanding leading role of Kinks frontman Ray Davies at the Harold Pinter Theatre. The delightful Horn spoke to Broadway.com about why this is the role and the musical for him, and getting acting tips from the great Gambon.What is it like stepping into a part that won an Olivier Award for its creator, John Dagleish—and where you’re playing a real person as well?All of it felt like big boots to fill. I think what helps on this show is that it’s not as if Ray [Davies] never existed: because he is a real person and there are countless interviews and archive images of Ray, so you can take it from there. I’m sure if there were 10 different actors who studied Ray, they would each find something different to bring to the part. What John saw in him is probably very different from what I see.Has Ray seen you in action? If so, did he offer any advice?He has, and I have to say it was very weird pretending to be someone in front of the person that you’re pretending to be—that took some getting used to! He came to a few rehearsals and talked about his life and his past and his relationship with [brother] Dave and his sister who passed away but his remarks were mostly about steering me in the right direction rather than telling me to do it this way or that way.Tell me about coming into a show knowing it’s a proven successThat really was great. What was funny was that I had booked tickets to see the show when it was first on at the Hampstead Theatre, but I got an acting job in Yorkshire so had to sell my ticket. It was only five or six months ago when I finally saw the show on the West End and then just as a punter.You weren’t thinking you’d be in it?I’d never done a musical or thought that I would do a musical. I’d been gigging around with my guitar for years, but never thought I would be considered for this. At first I almost laughed the whole thing off as a waste of everyone’s time.What persuaded you otherwise?First off, the fact that they obviously saw something Ray-ish in me! And then they sent me to [vocal coach] Mark Meylan, who is a genius and through a lot of hard work they managed to get me to a place where I could sing it six times a week. I have an OK voice but no technique at all, so Mark drilled technique into me over many sessions—how to use my larynx and breath control, and all those things I had absolutely no idea about.Why hadn’t musicals been on your radar?I’ve got nothing against them – they’re a great art form and I love them when they’re done well. But I always thought I’d be a straight actor doing theatre and TV and film and most of my career so far had been on screen and I was enjoying that. So I was flabbergasted to land the lead in a West End show.What’s your regimen for getting through six shows a week?Well, I wake up and drink loads of water. Now that I have this posh little steamer, I have become one of these people who steams—which isn’t something I thought I would ever do! It’s all about warming up gradually throughout the day and getting my voice ready and not pushing it.Are you having to adopt a monastic life: no after-show carousing?I wouldn’t say that! We do tend to go for a pint afterwards since the nature of the show is that it’s like a rock concert and so you get an adrenalin rush that always seems to send us straight to the pub. And then Saturday night we tend to go out properly: it’s nice actually to unwind.I gather you made a splash right out of drama school appearing in [celebrated TV series] Doctor Who.Yes, it was a one-off episode: a Christmas special where I played a younger version of Michael Gambon, and I couldn’t have asked for a more dreamlike first job. I remember asking [Gambon] for some tips on the last day and he said, “Danny, when you act, don’t move your eyebrows and if you have to sit down, don’t look at the chair.”Any more musicals you’re eyeing after this?The way I think of Sunny Afternoon is that it’s the only one I could really do! I don’t have a musical theater voice per se. I have a musician’s voice, and I don’t think the way I sing would translate well to Les Miserables, for instance. And you know what? If I don’t do a musical again, I will be very happy to have done the coolest one there is.last_img read more

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