Crew chief named for Kennedy’s Bristol ride

first_imgChris Carrier named crew chief of Turner Scott Motorsports’ fourth Truck Series entry WATCH: Logano celebrates Michigan win “I look forward to the opportunity to compete again in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series,” said Carrier. “I enjoy working with young talent, and I think Ben Kennedy and Cale Gale have what it takes to be successful in this sport. We have a great team behind us at Turner Scott Motorsports, and I am looking forward to getting to work and joining the truck series this week at Bristol.”Carrier, a NASCAR Sprint Cup, Nationwide and NCWTS veteran, has served as crew chief for 329 events throughout the three series, earning five wins, 24 top fives, 52 top 10s and seven poles. Carrier’s most recent work in the NCWTS includes serving as crew chief on the No. 30 last season, leading Nelson Piquet Jr. to two wins, nine top fives, 15 top 10s and four poles. The Tennessee native earned his first career win with Harry Gant in 1994 at Atlanta Motor Speedway.The organization has also named Pat Tryson as crew chief for the No. 30 NASCAR Nationwide Series entry. Tryson will take over the crew chief duties for Piquet Jr. starting in the August 23 race at Bristol.”I am very excited about the opportunity to join Turner Scott Motorsports and the No. 30 team,” said Tryson. “I am really looking forward to working with Nelson Piquet Jr. and the rest of the team. Nelson is a very talented, hard-nosed competitor and I think we will work very well together. The pieces are in place at Turner Scott Motorsports to have a championship caliber team, and I am looking forward to helping this team get to victory lane. I would like to thank [co-owners] Steve Turner and Harry Scott, Jr. for giving me the opportunity to join their organization, and I am looking forward to getting to work this weekend at Bristol.”Tryson, a NASCAR Sprint Cup, Nationwide and Camping World Truck Series veteran has served as crew chief for 516 events, earning a total of 10 wins, 66 top-five, 139-top 10s and four poles throughout the three series. The Malvern, Pa. native earned his first career win with Elliott Sadler in 2001 at Bristol Motor Speedway.READ MORE: READ: Full coverage from Michigan, Mid-Ohio WATCH: Johnson out early at Michigancenter_img FULL SERIES COVERAGE• View all articles • View all videos • View all photos WATCH: Dillon spins in Stewart’s No. 14 Turner Scott Motorsports announced Monday that the team has named Chris Carrier as crew chief of the team’s fourth NASCAR Camping World Truck Series entry.Carrier and his TSM team will be at Bristol Motor Speedway Wednesday night providing support for Ben Kennedy Racing’s No. 96 entry in the Camping World Truck Series UNOH 200. Carrier will also be on the pit box and calling the shots for the No. 96 at Iowa, Chicago, Martinsville and Homestead-Miami Speedway. The team will run a limited schedule for the remaining portion of the year with Kennedy and Cale Gale behind the wheel.last_img read more

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Bracknell’s £750m makeover unveiled

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APG to considerably expand illiquid investments unit

first_imgDutch pensions manager APG will be hiring 50 new employees for its illiquid investments division over the next two years, according to Peter Branner, CIO of APG Asset Management.The department currently employs around two hundred people in Amsterdam, Hong Kong and New York.“Our customers such as Dutch civil service scheme ABP and the industry-wide pension fund for construction workers BPF Bouw would like to invest even more in illiquid categories like real estate, infrastructure and private equity,” said Branner in an interview with Dutch pension publication PensioenPro.“If you want to invest more in the public markets, you can do that with the same number of investors who just buy more shares or bonds,” he added. “The situation is different for illiquid investments; you cannot simply put an extra billion in direct real estate, for example. To be able to do this, you have to find suitable properties and close deals – which requires extra people.” “People want to work here because we have a lot of knowledge and because we are leaders in the field of responsible investing”Peter Branner, CIO of APG Asset Management Branner acknowledged that salaries for this type of investor job are high, but said that although APG was a big player, in the investment industry it was just of many parties and therefore did not “call the shots” on pay.“It’s a competitive global market in which we operate,” he said.APG invests more than €514bn on behalf of its clients, of which more than a fifth in illiquid categories. An important driver of plans for more investment in these areas is the low interest rate environment.“It is necessary to invest more in illiquid categories as the yield on government bonds is virtually nil,” said Branner. “You can’t just make up for that by investing in shares. Moreover, the outlook for equity is not that bright either.”Further readingStrategically Speaking: APGBranner spoke to IPE’s Liam Kennedy about career mission, looking for yield, tech and more The CIO, who joined APG in September last year from Sweden’s SEB, does not expect to have any trouble attracting talented young investors to work in Hong Kong, Amsterdam or New York. “People want to work here because we have a lot of knowledge and because we are leaders in the field of responsible investing,” he said. “We can grow and attract people. That is different in other parts of the financial industry. Banks regularly announce large redundancy rounds.”last_img read more

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Fortran computer-language developer Backus, 82

first_imgThe result, Fortran, short for Formula Translation, reduced the number of programming statements necessary to operate a machine by a factor of 20. Even more importantly, “it took about as long to write one line of Fortran as one line of assembly code,” Horning said. Previous attempts at high-level language had failed on that count, so Fortran showed skeptics that machines could run just as efficiently without hand-coding. From there, a wide range of programming languages and software approaches proliferated, although Fortran also evolved over the years and remains in use. That organization gave Backus its 1977 Turing Award, one of the industry’s highest accolades. Backus also won a National Medal of Science in 1975 and got the 1993 Charles Stark Draper Prize, the top honor from the National Academy of Engineering. “Much of my work has come from being lazy,” Backus told Think, the IBM employee magazine, in 1979. “I didn’t like writing programs, and so, when I was working on the IBM 701 (an early computer), writing programs for computing missile trajectories, I started work on a programming system to make it easier to write programs.” John Warner Backus was born in 1924 and grew up in Wilmington, Del. His father was a chemist who became a stockbroker. Backus had what he would later describe as a “checkered educational career” in prep school and the University of Virginia, which he left after six months. After being drafted into the Army, Backus studied medicine but dropped it when he found radio engineering more compelling. Backus finally found his calling in math, and he pursued a master’s degree at Columbia University in New York. Shortly before graduating, Backus toured the IBM offices in midtown Manhattan and came across the company’s Selective Sequence Electronic Calculator, an early computer stuffed with 13,000 vacuum tubes. Backus met one of the machine’s inventors, Rex Seeber – who “gave me a little homemade test and hired me on the spot,” Backus recalled in 1979. Backus’ early work at IBM included computing lunar positions on the balky, bulky computers that were state of the art in the 1950s. But he tired of hand-coding the hardware, and in 1954 he got his bosses to let him assemble a team that could design an easier system. John Backus, whose development of the Fortran programming language in the 1950s changed how people interacted with computers and paved the way for modern software, has died. He was 82. Backus died Saturday in Ashland, Ore., according to IBM Corp., where he spent his career. Prior to Fortran, computers had to be meticulously “hand-coded” – programmed in the raw strings of digits that triggered actions inside the machine. Fortran was a “high-level” language because it abstracted that work – it let programmers enter commands in a more-intuitive system, which the computer would translate into machine code on its own. “It was just a quantum leap. It changed the game in a way that has only happened two or three times in the computer industry,” said Jim Horning, a longtime programmer who co-chairs the Association for Computing Machinery’s award committee. last_img read more

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