Indonesia’s president signals a transition away from coal power

first_imgAir Pollution, carbon, Carbon Emissions, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Coal, Emission Reduction, Energy, Environment, Fossil Fuels, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Impact Of Climate Change, Pollution Indonesia’s president has reportedly signaled a major shift in energy policy, saying he wants to “start reducing the use of coal.”Such a policy would run counter to the administration’s previously stated long-term plans of fueling the country’s growing energy demand with coal, with 39 coal-fired plants under construction and 68 more announced.Indonesia is one of the world’s biggest emitters of greenhouse gases, and while the main culprit is deforestation and land-use change, the energy sector is poised to overtake it.Energy policy analysts have welcomed the reported change in stance from the government, noting that Indonesia has long lagged other countries in developing clean power, despite having an abundance of renewable energy sources. JAKARTA — President Joko Widodo has reportedly expressed his intention to wean Indonesia off coal, in a move that runs counter to his own administration’s stated policy of increasing the country’s reliance on the fossil fuel.The president made the announcement at a July 8 cabinet meeting, according to Siti Nurbaya Bakar, the minister of environment and forestry.“[T]he president emphasized that we must develop the energy sector with a focus on renewable energy,” Siti said at a recent event in Jakarta. “Therefore, the president has explicitly asked to ‘start reducing the use of coal.’”The reported comment comes amid a period of particularly dire air quality in the capital, Jakarta, that’s prompted a citizen lawsuit holding top officials, including the president, liable for the pollution, blamed in part on coal-fired power plants operating near the city. (The lawsuit was filed July 4, four days before the president made his remark; it’s not clear whether the latter was prompted by the former.)If the administration follows through on the statement with concrete policies to phase out coal use, this could signal the beginning of a transition to renewable energy for Indonesia, the largest energy consumer in South East Asia and one of the biggest consumers of coal in the world, analysts say.“When I heard about it, I was ecstatic, surprised and filled with hope,” Alin Halimatussadiah, head of the Institute for Economic and Social Research at the state-run University of Indonesia, told Mongabay.Adhityani Putri, executive director of Yayasan Indonesia Cerah, a local policy and communications nonprofit that advocates for clean energy transition, also welcomed the news.“This statement represents a significant step forward and one that will put Indonesia in step with the major economies of the world,” she told Mongabay.Both Alin and Adhityani said a policy shift on coal was long overdue, given that the fossil fuel has for years been falling out of favor by other major economies in favor of increasingly cost-competitive renewable energy.“We’re left behind as many other countries have committed to phase out coal, while we haven’t said anything about that,” Alin said. “This is the first step, and with the president saying that, that’s a good thing.”But any meaningful change will have to start with an overhaul of the electricity procurement plan, or RUPTL, by the state-owned utility, PLN. At present, the RUPTL calls for increasing the absolute figure for renewable power generation over the long term, but shrinking its share of the overall energy mix in favor of more coal-fired electricity.“In the RUPTL document, coal is still dominant, so we haven’t seen [any plan to phase out coal] in any planning document,” Alin said.Adhityani said the government would need “a comprehensive and just coal phase-out plan that ensures a just transition for all and accelerated deployment of renewables” in the next mid-term national development plan.The ideal plan would have to offer both fiscal and non-fiscal incentives that would lower the price of renewable power to make it competitive with coal, said Elrika Hamdi, an analyst at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA).“What’s also important is that the policies taken should be consistent and in effect for a long time in order to give assurance to investors and funders,” she added.Indonesian President Joko Widodo speaks to the press accompanied by Indonesian Minister of Environment and Forestry Siti Nurbaya Bakar on his left in April. Photo courtesy of the Indonesian government.Emissions reduction goalWith President Widodo recently winning an election that keeps him in office through 2024, an easing of Indonesia’s reliance on coal will help with the country’s carbon dioxide emissions reduction goals, said Siti, the environment minister.“I welcome that statement with joy because this truly empowers our work,” she said.Indonesia is currently one of the world’s biggest CO2 emitters, most of it from deforestation and land-use change. However, emissions from the energy sector are poised to dominate in the near future as Indonesia’s demand for electricity continues to rise.The country’s energy consumption growth is among the fastest in the world, with coal accounting for nearly 60 percent of the energy mix in 2018. Its energy policy therefore has important implications not just for the country’s climate future, but also for global efforts to achieve cuts under the Paris Agreement.Under current plans, the committed emissions from coal-fired power plants would peak only around 2035, with an eventual phase-out only by 2069; to have a shot at meeting the Paris goals, meanwhile, the Southeast Asian region will need to phase out coal by 2040, analysts agree.Falling short of the Paris Agreement commitments would be especially disastrous for tropical countries like Indonesia. A new study by the research group Crowther Lab finds that cities in the tropics are likely to see the strongest impacts from climate change, even as they experience smaller changes in average temperature.The study, looking at 520 major cities worldwide, finds that Jakarta will be among those facing “unprecedented” climate shifts by 2050, including changes in rainfall patterns that will lead to more severe flooding and droughts. It also predicts a mean annual temperature rise by then of 1.7 degrees Celsius (3.1 degrees Fahrenheit), with a rise in maximum temperatures of 3.1 degrees Celsius (5.6 degrees Fahrenheit).Switching more of Indonesia’s power generation from coal to renewable energy sources could be key to achieving the country’s emissions reduction goals, said Ruandha Agung Sugardiman, the environment ministry’s climate change chief.Indonesia has set itself the target of cutting its emissions by 29 percent from the business-as-usual scenario by 2030, or 41 percent with international assistance.Ruandha said there was more room for emissions cuts in the energy sector than in the land-use and forestry sectors. Under the current target, emissions in the latter sectors needs to go down by 70 percent, including through scaling back deforestation rate and boosting reforestation; the energy sector, meanwhile, only needs to achieve a 19 percent emissions reduction.“It’s very clear that the energy sector could be much more ambitious [in reducing emissions],” Ruandha said. “That’s in line with what the president is saying that we need to phase out coal. And this is supported by the energy and mineral resources minister, who will change our energy pattern.”Ruandha has been tasked by Siti with studying the possibility of Indonesia setting an even more ambitious emissions cut goal of 45 percent to help rein in global heating.“In recent events, including the G20 meeting, actually there’s a hope for each countries to set a target up to 45 percent,” the minister said. “I’ve asked the director-general [of climate change] to do some calculations, even though for us to meet the 41 percent target is already tough.”Siti added that she’d begun discussions with the energy minister, Ignasius Jonan, on steps to cut back on coal use and advance renewable energy during last month’s G20 summit in Japan.A coal barge in the Samarinda River estuary. The coal produced in the region is used in power plants or sold for export. Photo by Tommy Apriando/Mongabay-Indonesia.More coal-fired plantsThat a transition away from coal is even being discussed at the highest levels of government marks a major change in tone from longstanding energy policies that have relied on an abundance of cheap and available coal. In fact, Indonesia’s coal reserves have made it one of the world’s biggest exporters of the commodity over the course of the last 15 years.Policies by successive governments have helped; coal-fired power plants receive hefty subsidies, and there are no carbon disincentives to encourage investment in renewable energy. The reliance on coal hasn’t shown any sign of easing in recent years. Thirty-nine coal-fired power plants are under construction, and 68 have been announced, which will maintain coal’s dominance of the energy mix at nearly 55 percent by 2025. Three of the six new plants expected to go online this year will be fired by coal; the other three are small-capacity facilities powered by gas, hydro and solar, respectively.Over the 40 to 50 years that each plant will be in operation, it will have a devastating impact on local populations and ecosystems, activists say, polluting the air and water, and churning huge volumes of CO2 into the atmosphere.“Promising to burn massive quantities of low quality Indonesian coal may have kept some voters warm, but Indonesians will be paying a very high price for their love affair with coal,” says a report by the IEEFA. “And the younger generation will be stuck with limited options to fix a rigid system.”This heavy reliance on coal comes at the cost of growing Indonesia’s renewable energy sector, with its adoption trailing far behind most countries and short of the country’s true potential, according to a new report by the management consulting firm A.T. Kearney.The government expects to generate 23 percent of the country’s energy from renewable sources by 2025. To date, however, renewables account for just 12 percent of the total energy mix. That proportion isn’t expected to increase by 2025.“While many countries are taking rapid strides to adopt renewable energy for power generation, the progress in Indonesia has been rather slow,” said Alessandro Gazzini, a partner at A.T. Kearney and co-author of the report. “However, the country has significant potential in renewables, including in solar and wind, and hence the stage is set for the country to leapfrog over the next few years if the policy is given a hard look.”Locals who are affected by coal power plants around Indonesia gather during a protest in front of the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources office in Jakarta, Indonesia. They’re demanding the government to switch from coal to renewable energy. Image by Hans Nicholas Jong/Mongabay.Growing public awarenessPublic awareness has been growing recently about the negative impacts of the coal industry, especially during the presidential election campaign that ended in April. At various points in the campaign, Widodo and his rival, Prabowo Subianto, came under scrutiny for their lack of commitment to new, greener energy technologies. The business ties between the candidates, their political allies and the coal industry were also highlighted in a documentary called “Sexy Killers.”The documentary, viewed more than 24 million times on YouTube since it was uploaded days before the April 17 election, also highlighted the devastating impact of coal mines and power plants to local communities, including lush forests being razed in the search for more coal, and coral reefs being wrecked by coal barges.Residents living near the massive power plants in Java and Bali also pay a price. The film shows many of them being evicted to make room for the plants, while those who refuse to leave have to deal with the constant pollution.The film drew the ire of local officials, who scrambled to shut down public screenings and even accused the filmmakers of spreading “hate speech” against both candidates.Alin said it was possible Widodo had had a change of heart after the recent intense public spotlight on the coal industry, as well as the shifting global trend to renewables.“We may never know what’s inside the head of the government, but if we see recent events where the public responded to various information circulating [about the impact of the coal industry] through social media, it’s possible that the government is reacting to that,” she said. “Or the government might also be reacting to global pressure.” Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Banner image: A group of locals affected by coal-fired power plants around Indonesia stages a protest in front of the headquarters of President Joko Widodo’s campaign team in Jakarta. Image by Hans Nicholas Jong/Mongabay.last_img read more

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Salvadoran fishermen ditch blast fishing for artificial reefs

first_imgBlast fishing has taken a toll on both the fishermen and marine life of El Salvador’s Jiquilisco Bay Biosphere Reserve.Some residents have lost limbs or eyes or suffered bad burns. And populations of mangroves, fish, and critically endangered hawksbill sea turtles have declined.Over the last decade, officials have made rooting out the practice a top priority, placing their bets on a creative alternative that a local fisherman suggested in 2009: the creation of artificial reefs to replenish marine life.Today blast fishing has declined by 90 percent and the communities are trying to market their seafood as “clean fish” at a premium price. To read an interview with the man who sparked the artificial reefs of Jiquilisco Bay, see the companion piece to this article:Bringing back the fish: Q&A with a repentant blast fishermanJIQUILISCO BAY, El Salvador — With no police patrol in sight, a young fisherman named Jose Salvador Soriano kneeled into his long, narrow boat and began preparing an explosive with the power to bring in nearly an entire day’s catch. The explosive contained sulfur, benzoate, chlorate and sugar, packed into a tube of newspaper with a wick made from a bicycle-brake hose.The best spot to throw an explosive was under the long, spider-like roots of the mangroves lining both sides of the estuary, as fish gather there in large numbers to lay their eggs. But this time, Soriano miscalculated. Before he could toss the explosive — the wick quickly burning down — it went off in his hand, leaving him amputated up to the high wrist.Soriano, now 47, got away easy compared to many other residents of the 35 fishing communities along El Salvador’s Jiquilisco Bay Biosphere Reserve, a 241-kilometer (150-mile) wetland that contributes approximately 2 tons of fish to the country’s seafood markets every day. Some residents have been badly burned, lost an eye or — because explosives are normally packed with the tube held between the thighs — their legs and genitals.But blast fishing has also taken a toll on Jiquilisco Bay’s marine life. Populations of yellowfin snook (Centropomus robalito), hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) and Pacific red snapper (Lutjanus peru), as well as six kinds of mangrove trees, have shown noticeable declines since nearby communities began using explosives in the 1980s.Over the last decade, officials have made rooting out the illegal practice a top priority, placing their bets on a creative alternative that a local fisherman suggested in 2009: What if an artificial reef could be dropped into the bay where they normally fish? Done correctly, it might allow for both an easy catch and a sustainable way of bolstering biodiversity.Fisher Juan Jose Amalla said on a good day he brings in about 30 fish from the artificial reef he fishes in Jiquilisco Bay. Image by Max Radwin for Mongabay.“It may not have been as good as blast fishing,” said José Maria Argueta, program director for the local NGO the Mangrove Association, “but we argued that it was also sustainable and not dangerous. You could relax and catch fish and not worry about running from the police.”It is now the 10th anniversary of the artificial reef project’s inception, and a dozen local cooperatives have installed more than 20 artificial reefs — collections of logs and hollow concrete structures — for line-and-pole fishing. But officials say blast fishing continues in some areas, and managing the reefs has become its own challenge.“It’s a sustainable way to catch fish,” Argueta said. “It also allows people to fish without damaging the environment or themselves. But we need a plan to manage the artificial reefs.”Blast fishing: ‘It’s just not a good idea’The transition from blast fishing to artificial reefs has been, and continues to be, a slow one. Even after Soriano lost his hand in 1997 — before the reefs were even an idea — he kept using explosives for another five years, resisting officials’ attempts to persuade him to switch to traditional fishing methods.Like most fishermen in the area, Soriano was looking for the most efficient way to bring in the largest possible catch. Given the cost of gas, bait, boat rental and fees to his local fishing cooperative, line fishing before the era of artificial reefs didn’t make much sense. It only brought in about 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) of fish on a typical outing, sold for between $1 and $2 per pound. Explosives, meanwhile, with a radius as large as 80 feet (24 meters), sometimes brought in upwards of 40 pounds (18 kilograms) — and in a fraction of the time.Luis Gonzalez Benitez lost an arm while blast fishing and now splits his time between using nets and line fishing on the reef. Image by Max Radwin for Mongabay.For other fishermen, explosives were all they knew. Their fathers never taught them how to line-fish. Or the nets they’d used in childhood were abandoned in the wake of the country’s civil war.Politically motivated violence throughout the 1970s saw tens of thousands die at the hands of right-wing death squads, igniting a left-wing guerrilla movement and drawing in the U.S. through to the war’s end in 1992.Many residents around Jiquilisco Bay joined the People’s Revolutionary Army and the Farabundo Martí Liberation People’s Force guerrilla groups. In the 1980s, they had decided to fight a war of attrition, carrying out sniper attacks, ambushes and land mine bombings. One hour from the shores of Jiquilisco Bay, the 400-meter (1,300-foot) Golden Bridge was destroyed by guerrilla-made dynamite.Still other residents fled to other parts of Central America, such as Panama. Upon returning later in the war, they allegedly encountered two military officers who showed them how to make explosives. Today, no one knows the names of those two officers, but they are still talked about in various fishing communities, even mentioned vaguely in government reports, almost as myth: the bringers of explosives to Jiquilisco.By the 1990s, the bay was showing a noticeable drop in marine life. Though there was little data taken in that time period, fishermen recall returning from trips with smaller and smaller catches.“At first it was a good way to fish, but after a while not so much because we killed everything,” said fisherman Luis Gonzalez, 47, of Puerto El Flor. “More than anything else, this was business. It starts to get expensive when you’re coming back without fish.”Other marine life suffered, as well. Critically endangered hawksbill sea turtles occupy approximately 37 kilometers (23 miles) of nesting habitat in and around Jiquilisco Bay. But between 2004 and 2008, the Zoological Foundation of El Salvador reported 18 fatalities caused by blast fishing — the hawksbills’ leading cause death during that period.Due to the bay’s thousands of acres of mangrove trees, it was declared a Ramsar site— an international recognition for wetlands — in 2005. Mangroves are not only important breeding grounds for marine life; they’re also a key player in preventing coastal soil erosion. Officials suspect that human activity, including blast fishing, has contributed to a 10 percent loss in the bay’s mangrove cover.“When it comes to blast fishing,” Gonzalez added, “it’s just not a good idea. It means putting an end to all the fish.”last_img read more

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Microplastic waste fouls up beaches on Sri Lanka’s southern tourism coast

first_imgMicroplastics Beaches along Sri Lanka’s southern coast, a tourism hotspot, are increasingly being contaminated with microplastic pollution, a survey has found.The study found that 60 percent of sand samples and 70 percent of surface water samples from 10 survey sites contained an abundance of microplastics up to 4.5 millimeters (0.18 inches) in size.The researchers have called for meticulous waste management initiatives, regulating the use of plastics, and further studies to ascertain the magnitude of the pollution caused by plastic waste. Sri Lanka’s southern coastline is dotted with popular resorts and beaches, but this once pristine landscape hasn’t been spared by the global plastic waste crisis, a study finds.The authors of the paper, published in the Marine Pollution Bulletin, studied 10 locations along a 91-kilometer (57-mile) stretch of the Indian Ocean island’s southern coast to assess the magnitude of the problem.They found that 60 percent of the sand samples and 70 percent of the surface water samples they collected contained an abundance of microplastics, or MPs, compounding the environmental pressure on a coastline ravaged by the 2004 tsunami and constantly battling against coastal erosion.The problem is just the tip of the iceberg, says lead author J.  Bimali Koongolla, a marine scientist at the  University of Ruhuna in Sri Lanka.“Microplastic waste is becoming a serious environmental problem in Sri Lanka, once considered an island state with unblemished pristine beaches,” she told Mongabay. “The seas are getting contaminated, and beyond environmental, this poses a severe health hazard as it impacts food chains.”She attributed the rising levels of microplastics in the seas and beaches to be poor waste management and an inability to break away from age-old littering practices.“The use of plastics is increasing non-biodegradable waste production. These plastics eventually get washed into the seas, polluting the very environment [local communities] depend on for sustenance,” Koongolla said.The sand sampling sites for the study on the southern coast of Sri Lanka. Image by Earth View Maps.Recreational beaches under threatThe sites worst affected by plastic pollution were Dondra, Weligama and Ambalangoda, all in Southern province, due to significant recreational activity as well as fishing.While recreational beaches had high levels of MPs, more remote beaches and fishing ports also exhibited large amounts of microplastic pollution as well as plastic debris, the researchers found.The size of MPs in surface water and beaches ranged from 1.5 to 2.5 millimeters (0.06 to 0.1 inches) and 3 to 4.5 millimeters (0.12 to 0.18 inches), respectively. Most were identified as polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP), with some polystyrene (PS) foam being also being discovered at a few sites.Researchers found an overall higher abundance of MPs on the beaches than in the waters, while samples from the ports indicated higher levels of MP pollution in the surface water.When sediments were analyzed, the popular and congested recreational beaches appeared to have more microplastic litter. The busy public beach of Weligama was the most polluted by count (157 microplastic items per square meter) as well as weight (5.98 grams per square meter).Though busy recreational beaches like Weligama are cleaned routinely, the process only removes the larger debris and risks burying microplastics even deeper in the sand.The fishing ports in Dondra and Ambalangoda also showed high concentration of MPs by count and weight in the surface water. “This is due to high levels of gear handling and other activities,” Koongolla said.She added that at the three sites classified as remote beaches, there was little or no polystyrene found, and only one of them yielded high counts of MPs in the sand. “This is largely due to storm activity depositing water-borne and land-based debris via runoff,” Koongolla said.Researcher J. Bimali Koongolla conducts a beach survey near the Dondra Harbor. Image courtesy of Kasun Indika.Role of riversKoongolla said that while tourism had flourished in Sri Lanka’s south, good waste management practices have not been introduced.“South has traditionally had a high density of tourist activity, along its coast,” she said. “While we cannot confirm if any MP samples we collected originated in the sea from fisheries or commercial vessels or on land, we can confirm that these beaches are used heavily due to increased tourist activity and tend to leave a lot of visible plastic debris.”Researchers also say there is a dire need to identify the sources of microplastic pollution. This includes determining the role of rivers in transporting MPs into the ocean. “Once we narrow down the localities that are particularly polluting, it is easier to introduce waste management initiatives and to take other preventive action. These can vary from restriction of single-use plastics to having better recycling centers,” Koongolla said.The study came out just before findings from a 2018 survey — commissioned by the National Aquatic Resources Agency (NARA) and supported by Norway’s Institute of Marine Research (IMR) and carried out on the Norwegian research vessel Fridtjof Nansen — were published in January.The survey, the first of its kind in 40 years, found that nearly four-fifths of small pieces of the plastic waste in Sri Lanka’s territorial waters arrived via rivers and canals, said Terney Pradeep Kumara, general manager of the Marine Environment Protection Authority (MEPA).“This means only about one fifth of waste is sea-originated microsplastic wastage, caused by fishermen dumping plastic in mid-sea and oil spills from ships,” said Kumara, also a co-author of the southern coastal study.Following the Nansen survey, Kumara called for collective and effective waste management mechanisms and stricter laws to prevent extensive marine pollution.The polluted Dondra Harbor, a place that converges communities and faiths, but now also microplastic waste. Image courtesy of J. Bimali Koongolla.Further studies neededThe team of researchers point to the absence of sufficient coastal studies as a key reason for selecting the south, a top tourist destination.So far, only two studies have looked at microplastic pollution in the island’s coastal regions. A 2018 study looked at three beaches in Western province, while a 2016 study focused on the north coast.Koongolla said this new study offers only a glimpse of the microplastic problem in Sri Lanka. Ideally, she said, research should be conducted over different seasons and across several years. Sampling volumes should also be much larger to improve the quality of the data, she said.Banner image of a harbor in southern Sri Lanka studded with microplastics, an emerging environmental problem in the Indian Ocean island, once known for its pristine beaches, courtesy of J. Bimali Koongolla.Citation:Koongolla, J. B., Andrady, A. L, Terney Pradeep Kumara, P. B., & Gangabadage, C. S. (2018). Evidence of microplastics pollution in coastal beaches and waters in southern Sri Lanka. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 137, 277-284. doi: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2018.10.031 Article published by dilrukshicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Wild orchid trade in China is huge, overlooked and ‘devastating,’ study finds

first_imgIn just one year of survey, researchers recorded more than 400 species of wild-caught orchids, involving 1.2 million individual plants worth potentially more than $14.6 million, being traded at markets in southern China.At least some of the trade is illegal and in breach of CITES regulations, the study found.Traders frequently sell non-native species of orchids. Moreover, native species that either have very small populations or have probably gone extinct in China also appear in the markets, suggesting they are likely being sourced from neighboring countries. If you’re looking to buy orchids from plant markets in southern China, chances are you’ll find plenty of orchids that have been collected from the wild, sometimes illegally. And these vibrant wild orchids are usually priced much cheaper than those grown in nurseries, according to a new study.Researchers have found trade in more than 400 species of orchids collected from the wild, involving more than 1.2 million individuals, potentially worth more than $14.6 million — all in just one year of survey.“The results of this study are devastating,” Jacob Phelps, a lecturer at Lancaster University and co-chair of the IUCN SSC Orchid Specialist Group – Global Trade Programme, who was not involved in the study, told Mongabay. “We already knew that there was illegal trade of wild orchids in China, but this is our first real insight into the huge scale and richness of that trade.”Orchids, popular as ornamental plants and used in traditional medicine and food, are traded widely across the world. They also represent the single largest group of flora or fauna for which international trade is regulated: all 29,000-odd species of known orchids have been listed on Appendix I or Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES).According to official data reported to the CITES, nearly all global commercial orchid trade involves artificially propagated plants. However, a number of studies have revealed that the trade in wild-sourced orchids, mostly undeclared and undocumented, may in fact be much greater than currently estimated.Stephan W. Gale, an orchid specialist at the Kadoorie Farm and Botanic Garden in Hong Kong, frequently came across orchids on sale in markets in China that he was sure had been collected from the wild.“Often, the plants that I can no longer find in the wild, I can see in the markets, so there is a huge imbalance,” Gale, the lead author of the study, told Mongabay. “There was also very little attention on this, either from policymakers or from scientists.”Southern China’s plant markets sell wild-sourced slipper orchids like Paphiopedilum hirsutissimum. Image by Orchi via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).So Gale and his colleagues decided to look into the scale of the wild orchid trade in China for the first time ever. They focused on southern China, a region that’s especially rich in orchids.Through field visits and by talking to experts, the researchers zeroed in on the major markets selling orchids in the provinces of Yunnan, Guangxi and Guangdong, as well as the special administrative region of Hong Kong. Then, over the course of one year from June 2015 to May 2016, they regularly surveyed stalls in five big markets that sold wild orchids, identifying species that were on sale, noting the prices they were being sold for, and estimating the weight and number of individuals of the species on display.The team could differentiate the wild orchids from the artificially grown ones from several subtle telltale signs.“Products coming from nurseries are usually very uniform in size, appearance, they’re all packaged in the same way, they’re potted in the same way, they’ve got a very standard medium in the pot. So they’re much more uniform,” Gale said. “Whereas plants coming from the wild are usually damaged because they’ve been pulled off trees, or they’ve been pulled out of the ground or rocks. They have damaged roots, they’ve often been subject to herbivory, so the leaves could be pockmarked, there will be lichens growing on the leaves, moss on the roots. To be honest, the average person would never even think [about] looking at these small telltale signs, and this is a problem because they don’t know what they’re buying.”In just one year, the researchers recorded nearly 140 stalls selling up to 440 species of wild orchids.Wild orchids in a market in southern China. Image courtesy of Stephan Gale.The study also uncovered some surprising trends.In the wild, the diversity of native orchid species in southern China declines from west to east, with Yunnan having the richest mix of species, followed by Guangxi, Guangdong and Hong Kong. Yet the team found that the diversity of orchids in the markets increased eastward, suggesting that traders were transporting orchids over large distances to sell. This, Gale said, could be because the markets in Yunnan may have a lower customer base with fewer people wanting to buy orchids.“I think the vendors know there’s more money to be made in the big cities, with the larger markets where there’s more money to be made there and people are willing to pay more money for more unusual things,” Gale said.The mean price of orchids per stem also increased eastward, the study found. But wild orchids in general were priced considerably lower than those coming from nurseries.This finding is alarming, Phelps said.“Many policy-makers, including within China, hope that the legal production of greenhouse-grown plants will provide a sustainable alternative to the illegal trade of wild plants,” he said in an email. “This study shows that this is unlikely to happen for most orchid species: many consumers are concerned with price, and wild plants are cheaper than the farmed ones. Unless farmed plants become dramatically cheaper, or enforcement against the trade in wild plants increases, this study anticipate a status quo for orchid exploitation.”Cheap pricing of wild orchids is not entirely surprising though, Gale said. Nurseries can have huge overheads in terms of business setup and infrastructure, which translates into higher sticker prices.While sourcing orchids from the wild would also require paying people to go into forests and collecting the plants, many of the orchids seem to be coming from countries like Laos and Myanmar, where labor is cheap, Gale said. “Traders go there, and they’ll pay villagers to climb up into the mountains, paying them extremely low labor costs for kilograms or tons of orchids. So the value of the wild orchids is still far too low, and doesn’t price in the ecological damage that’s being done,” he added.In fact, the researchers found that some 100 species of orchids being sold in the southern China markets were not native. There were also no declared imports in the CITES trade database for the majority of the species, which meant that the trade was in breach of CITES regulations.“Things are definitely coming from across the borders, and not being properly regulated,” Gale said. “Although we don’t have direct evidence, my co-authors and I are very confident that the numbers that we put in the paper are a vast underestimate, because it’s illegal trade and difficult to prove. But the kinds of species and amounts that we’re seeing suggest that a far greater proportion are coming from across the borders.”Even native species that appear in the markets could be coming from neighboring countries, Gale said, especially species that either have very small populations or have probably gone extinct in China, such as several species of Dendrobium and Paphiopedilum.Despite being traded widely, orchids aren’t protected by law in mainland China. And despite orchids making up more than 70 percent of all CITES-listed species, the trade of these plants rarely makes it onto the agenda of discussions on illegal trade, Gale said. This includes the ongoing 18th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to CITES (CoP18) in Geneva.“Parties and the [CITES] Secretariat should be responding to research that documents such widespread, blatant non-compliance with the Convention,” Phelps said. “I am not suggesting that this is an easy challenge, particularly along porous international borders. But we cannot afford to simply ignore the problem.”Dendrobium aphyllum is a commonly sold orchid in southern China’s plant markets. Image by lienyuan lee via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0)Citation:Gale, S. W., Kumar, P., Hinsley, A., Cheuk, M. L., Gao, J., Liu, H., … & Williams, S. J. (2019). Quantifying the trade in wild-collected ornamental orchids in South China: Diversity, volume and value gradients underscore the primacy of supply. Biological Conservation, 238, 108204. doi: 10.1016/j.biocon.2019.108204 Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Green, Illegal Trade, Orchids, Plants, Research, Trade, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Article published by Shreya Dasguptacenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Pan Borneo Highway development endangers the Heart of Borneo

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Conservation, Deforestation, Development, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Infrastructure, Logging, Mammals, Mining, Poaching, Poverty, Rainforests, Roads, Saving Rainforests, Sustainable Development, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation The construction of the Pan Borneo Highway in the Malaysian state of Sabah could disrupt the connections between wildlife populations and appears to run counter to the state’s conservation commitments, according to a new study.Passages under the highway and the rehabilitation of key forest corridors could lessen the impacts of the road, but the authors of the study caution that these interventions are expensive and may not be effective.They argue that planners should consider canceling certain sections of the road with the greatest potential for damaging the surrounding forest. A planned highway network in the Malaysian state of Sabah on the island of Borneo threatens the forests protected as part of the Heart of Borneo agreement made with Indonesia and Brunei, a new study has found.The goal of the agreement was to ensure the survival of continuous rainforest in central Borneo that houses wildlife populations, helps to mitigate climate change and fosters the island’s unique biology. But the construction and expansion of roads for the Pan Borneo Highway project could carve up the core of this ecosystem, the researchers who wrote the paper say.“We just know that these [roads] are going to have really severe effects in some of the last, sizable intact tracts of forest in Borneo and in the world,” William Laurance, a tropical ecologist at James Cook University in Australia and the study’s senior author, said in an interview.Construction for the Pan Borneo Highway in Sabah. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.The team’s research, published Sept. 18 in the journal PLOS ONE, plotted out the series of new and expanded roadway construction that’s part of the multi-year Pan Borneo Highway project in Sabah. The researchers compared these plans with the locations of intact forests, parks and reserves in the state, and then they modeled the repercussions on surrounding forests.“Some of the planned highways are relatively benign, but several are flat-out dangerous,” Sean Sloan, the study’s lead author and an ecologist at James Cook University, said in a statement. “The worst roads, in southern Sabah, would chop up and isolate Sabah’s forests from the rest of those in Borneo.”In particular, a planned stretch between the towns of Kalabakan and Sapulut near Sabah’s southern border with the Indonesian province of North Kalimantan would slice through the Heart of Borneo conservation area.The cross-border initiative covers some 220,000 square kilometers (85,000 square miles), and since its inception in 2007, Sabah has more than doubled the area of forests protected under state law. But to succeed, the Heart of Borneo requires transnational cooperation, as it spans parts the three countries with territory on the island.Constructing parts of the highway in sensitive areas of Sabah is tantamount to “plunging a dagger into the heart of Borneo’s endangered forests and wildlife,” Laurance said. In the researchers’ view, plans for the Pan Borneo Highway project should incorporate not just the impacts on parts of Sabah, but on the broader — and still relatively intact — ecosystem that the Heart of Borneo was designed to protect.The incursion of roads into previously untouched or lightly used forest often leads to a rise in deforestation, hunting, illegal mining and other damaging effects to the surrounding ecosystem.A Bornean elephant in the Kinabatangan River in central Sabah. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Borneo is home to some of the oldest rainforests on the planet, which have existed for 130 million years. In that time, the island’s unique species have flourished, evolving alongside a unique set of ecological dynamics.Laurance pointed to the mast fruiting of the towering dipterocarp trees that anchor the island’s forest ecosystems. Every few years, bunches of these trees fruit in a synchronized pulse, resulting in a cornucopia of food for bearded pigs (Sus barbatus), sun bears (Helarctos malayanus), orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) and a host of other hungry species. Some animals track these migrations across routes that extend for hundreds of kilometers.Sun bears follow the mast fruiting of dipterocarp trees on the island of Borneo. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.“That is a really important part of the Borneo story,” Laurance told Mongabay. “The migration was absolutely critical to Borneo.”But the construction and expansion of roads throw up potential hurdles to these migrations, as well as the movement of animals like Borneo’s dwarf variety of elephant, that are integral to the biology of the island, he said.Planners have proposed stitching together patches of rehabilitated forest to serve as corridors and building underpasses that would allow animals to move from one side of the road to another without endangering themselves or motorists. But Laurance and his colleagues question how effective they’ll be in maintaining meaningful connections between populations.“These proposed mitigation measures for these highways are very likely to be grossly inadequate,” Laurance said.Bearded pigs historically migrate to take advantage of mast fruiting. Image by Rufus46 via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).Forest rehabilitation and underpass construction are expensive, the researchers note. They calculated that a set of underpasses at eight proposed sites along the highway’s routes could cost $38 million or more, a figure that’s larger than the state’s annual budget for the Heart of Borneo initiative.The team’s analysis also suggests that Sabah’s plans miss crucial corridors that would help secure the links that are vitally important to the health of wildlife populations — if the animals choose to go along with these remedies, that is.“We also know that wildlife are often doggedly uncooperative in using these things,” Laurance said.Whether these strategies are successful also hinges upon the quality of the habitat that the corridors or underpasses stitch together.“When you build a new road you typically get a lot of forest destruction and fires, along with poaching, and that means vulnerable wildlife will largely avoid the area,” Mohammed Alamgir, an ecologist at James Cook and one of the paper’s authors, said in the statement. “Relying on underpasses to reduce road impacts is like trying to treat cancer with a band-aid.”Highway construction cuts through a mangrove in northwestern Sabah. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.The researchers suggest rethinking or canceling the parts of the highway with the most potential for causing damage, especially the Sapulut-Kalabakan section. If the Pan Borneo Highway goes forward there as planned, it’s likely to “cut off the head of the Heart of Borneo,” Laurance said, irreversibly altering one of the world’s critical repositories of biodiversity.“This a very obvious and dramatic existential threat to some of the last surviving intact forests” in Borneo, he said.Banner image of a Bornean orangutan by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonEditor’s note: William Laurance is a member of Mongabay’s advisory board.Citation:Sloan, S., Campbell, M. J., Alamgir, M., Lechner, A. M., Engert, J., & Laurance, W. F. (2019). Trans-national conservation and infrastructure development in the Heart of Borneo. PLOS ONE, 14(9), e0221947. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0221947FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Gabon could earn up to $150 million for forest conservation

first_imgclimate finance, Conservation Finance, Ecosystem Finance, Forests, Rainforests, Redd, Redd And Biodiversity, Redd And Communities, Tropical Forests Article published by Genevieve Belmaker Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Home to 12 percent of the Congo Basin’s forests, the African nation has an established conservation and sustainable management practices track record.Since the early 2000s, Gabon has worked to create 13 national parks, while improving performance on timber resource management outside of the parks.Gabon’s rainforest has been largely preserved by these and other measures, a key reason why the Central African Rainforest Initiative is brokering a 10-year, $150 million agreement for results-based payments. Gabon is set to become the first nation in Africa to earn millions in results-based payments for conservation to the tune of $150 million. The deal, brokered by Central African Rainforest Initiative (CAFI) on behalf of the Norwegian government, aims to bolster the successes already seen by Gabon in their rainforest conservation. The 10-year agreement will reward Gabon – in the form of results-based payments – for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and degradation. The agreement will also reward them for the absorption of carbon dioxide by natural forests. It will retroactively honor performance from as far back as 2016. Monies from those and future results will be paid out annually. Notably, the Norway-CAFI-Gabon deal will set a carbon price floor of $10 per certified ton as a financial incentive to cut greenhouse gas emissions. Gabon plans to use ART (Architecture for REDD+ Transactions) to certify emission reductions and removal. The processes include third-party verification.  Although it is home to just 12 percent of the Congo Basin’s rainforests, the presence of nearly 60 percent of Africa’s remaining forest elephants is seen as indicative of good conservation and sustainable management practices. In fact, since the early 2000s, Gabon has worked to create 13 national parks and improve performance on timber resource management outside the parks. “I am very pleased with this results-based partnership through CAFI, which includes a historic carbon floor price to further encourage Gabon to continue to preserve its rainforest,” said Ola Elvestuen, Norway’s Minister of Climate and Environment, in a statement.Approximately 88 percent of Gabon has forest cover, and the government aims to preserve most of that in the coming years – as much as 98 percent. “Norway’s agreement to double the price of a ton of rainforest carbon dioxide is highly significant and gives us hope that the international community will move towards a realistic price that will provide a real incentive for rainforest countries to follow our example,” said Lee White, Gabon’s Minister of Forest, Seas, Environment and Climate Change, in a statement. Part of the hope is that as the value of Gabon’s rainforest goes up, the Gabonese people will also benefit through an improved standard of living, new jobs, and more conservation and sustainable exploitation successes. Details laid out in an addendum to the announcement note that the programs under the agreement are not yet defined. Once the details of a national investment plan are worked out, the reinvestment of the results-based payments will be determined. The government of Gabon will work with various stakeholders and the CAFI executive board on the plan. The final say will lay with Gabon’s Ministry of Economy and the National Climate Council.CAFI supports REDD+-based investment frameworks and development of low emissions in the Central African region’s six “high forest cover countries,” including Gabon. It is managed under the UN Multi-Partner Trust Fund Office and the UN Development Programme. last_img read more

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New honeyeater species described from Indonesia’s Alor Island

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Deforestation, Dry Forests, Environment, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Land Use Change, New Discovery, New Species, Species Discovery, Tropical Deforestation, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Scientists have described a new bird species found only on the island of Alor in eastern Indonesia.The Alor myzomela is easily distinguished from other known members of the Myzomela genus of honeyeater birds thanks to its unique call and paler upper wings.A growing human population on the island is already fragmenting the species’ only known habitat, prompting the researchers to recommend it be considered endangered on the IUCN Red List.The bird’s scientific name, Myzomela prawiradilagae, is a tribute to prominent ornithologist Dewi Malia Prawiradilaga from the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI). JAKARTA — Scientists have described a new bird species found only on the Indonesian island of Alor, where a growing human population is already encroaching on the bird’s volcanic habitat.The description of Myzomela prawiradilagae — named after prominent ornithologist Dewi Malia Prawiradilaga from the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) — is a culmination of field observations by different research groups between 2002 and 2016, according to a paper published in the Journal of Ornithology on Oct. 5.“The presence of an endemic species of Myzomela honeyeater on Alor is of great biogeographic significance,” the authors write.Google Earth images of Indonesia and, inset, Alor Island.The habitat of the Alor myzomela. Image courtesy of Philippe Verbelen.The Alor myzomela is known to inhabit only eucalyptus woodland at elevations above 1,000 meters (3,300 feet) on the island, showing more pronounced differences in ecological preferences and lifestyle than other honeyeaters in the genus. It’s closely related to the crimson-hooded myzomela (M. kuehni) from the nearby island of Wetar, down to the red head, but differs in other physical characteristics and in its calls. These include dusky brown upper wings that are much paler than the black upperwings of other Myzomela species, and a call that researchers have transcribed as “tssip” or “vick.”“The whole team was excited to have scientifically described the new bird species from Alor,” Mohammad Irham, a scientist with LIPI and the lead author of the paper, told Mongabay in an email.He said the team spotted about 20 individuals of the new species during a single observation, but getting a full population estimate for the Alor myzomela will require further research.The field visits were important in collecting a specimen, getting sound recordings and photographs, and characterizing their habitat use, the authors write. They used DNA sequencing to confirm the species is new to science.The Alor myzomela (Myzomela prawiradilagae). Image courtesy of Philippe Verbelen.A population estimate will be critical to assessing any threats to the species. The researchers note that its habitat is undergoing fragmentation by a growing human population on the island, which has prompted them to recommend it be considered endangered on the IUCN Red List.Frank Rheindt, a scientist with the National University of Singapore’s Department of Biological Sciences and co-author of the paper, said most tribes on Alor built their villages on hilltops, from where it was easier to cultivate the surrounding slopes.“The population of these hilltop villages has been steadily increasing with high modern reproduction rates following increasing development,” Rheindt told Mongabay in an email.“Burgeoning human populations will exert ever more pressure on the remaining woodlots in this area,” he added.While the locals have long known of the species, Rheindt said it was a generally small, inconspicuous member of the local birdlife that the villagers didn’t pay much attention to.“Awareness about its existence was a necessary first step to ensure it does not silently go extinct,” he said.In Indonesia, all species in the genus Myzomela are protected under the country’s 1990 Conservation Law and a 1999 government regulation on wildlife.The researchers said the description of the Alor myzomela as the latest species endemic to the island of Alor should elevate the island to the status of an “endemic bird area.”“This status can be a reference for the local government to highlight Alor as an important island for wildlife, especially birds,” Irham said.“The reference hopefully can be a foundation for conservation management there, considering that [species endemic to] small islands have a much higher risk of extinction than big islands, and also for other potential [initiatives] that support the economy, such ecotourism.”The Alor myzomela (Myzomela prawiradilagae). Image courtesy of Philippe Verbelen.Irham, M., Ashari, H., Suparno, Trainor, C. R., Verbelen, P., Wu, M. Y., & Rheindt, F. E. (2019). A new Myzomela honeyeater (Meliphagidae) from the highlands of Alor Island, Indonesia. Journal of Ornithology. doi:10.1007/s10336-019-01722-2FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Basten Gokkonlast_img read more

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‘A crisis situation’: Extinctions loom as forests are erased in Mozambique

first_imgSmall mountains called “inselbergs” are scattered widely across the central and northern Mozambique landscape. They are crowned by rainforests, which are homes to species that have evolved in isolation for millennia.Inselberg forests are Mozambique’s last inland primary forests. But they’re getting smaller and smaller as humans burn them for agriculture and to flush out game animals, and chop them down for lumber and charcoal.One such inselberg is Mount Nallume, which researchers recently surveyed during a November expedition. While there, they found chameleons that they suspect may be a new speciesHowever, Nallume’s forest is disappearing quickly, with the researchers estimating it may be gone in five to 15 years if deforestation continues at its current rate. They urge the government of Mozambique to do more to protect these “islands in the sky” before they, and the unique animals that live in them, disappear forever. NACOPA, Mozambique — It’s nighttime on Mount Nallume in central Mozambique and the chirping of frenzied crickets fills the thick forest air. Then, toward midnight, another voice joins the cacophony.“I found one!” yells Julian Bayliss to his colleagues Vanessa Muianga and Phil Platts. Muianga is a curator and freshwater expert at the Museum of Natural History in Maputo while Platts and Bayliss are conservation scientists, Platts at the University of York and the IUCN Climate Change Specialist Group, and Bayliss at the African Butterfly Research Institute (ABRI), the Transglobe Expedition Trust and Oxford Brookes University. According to Bayliss, they are the first biologists to set foot on Mount Nallume.They emerge from the underbrush holding a tiny green chameleon just a few inches long. This pygmy chameleon (genus Rhampholeon) holds special significance for the researchers; they suspect it could be a species new to science, one that may live nowhere else in the world except for in this small forest.And soon, Bayliss says, it may live nowhere at all.This chameleon might belong to a species new to science. Photo by Julian Bayliss.Nallume’s forest, home to the chameleon and other wildlife — including more species Bayliss suspects are new to science — is rapidly disappearing as residents from nearby communities chop down its trees for lumber and burn it for food. Bayliss estimates that at its current pace of deforestation, it will be gone in five to 15 years. And it’s not the only one. Dotted throughout the northern half of the country, most of Mozambique’s mountaintop forests are rapidly vanishing as farmers, hunters and loggers hack away their trees for food and money.That’s why Bayliss, Muianga and Platts are here. They are surveying the wildlife of Mount Nallume before it’s too late and the forest and its animals are gone forever.Islands in the skyNallume’s forests are home to native trees that tower 30 meters (100 feet) above the ground, a height that Platts confirms using measurements from a range finder taken at different spots in the forest.Using a hemispherical camera fitted with a fisheye lens that takes 190-degree images of the canopy from many points within the forest, he is also able to deduce that this forest has a lot more moisture than others in the region.“From these measurements we can work out the amount of leaf area in the forests that relate to the potential of the forests to sequester carbon through photosynthesis,” Platts says, adding that the team will estimate the amount of carbon held by Nallume’s trees when they come back in 2020. This expedition is part of a 15 year-research program of the high altitude mountains of northern Mozambique and the researchers’ desire to see them conserved.In addition to the pygmy chameleon discovered during this trip, many other kinds of animals inhabit these forests; hornbills, bush babies, rabbits, antelope, snails, frogs, spiders, pigs, honey bees, crabs, fish, bats, monkeys and leopards can all be seen here. Bayliss also suspects the existence of another endemic butterfly species.The researchers also suspect they uncovered a new species of butterfly. Photo by David Njagi for Mongabay.Next to the campsite a small stream flows, fed by a swamp that stretches deep into the forest. At night droplets of water from the tree canopy can be heard falling onto pitched tents and the forest floor. Around the forest, bogs form a protective moat.When Bayliss and Platts stop at a clear spot to fly a drone and capture aerial images of the forest; blue swallows circle it, perhaps wondering who the noisy intruder might be. Platts reckons the rare birds have migrated from the Congo Basin and have come here because the rainy season is about to begin.Mount Nallume is what geologists call an “inselberg,” which is basically a small rocky mountain. Typically composed of hard granite in Mozambique, inselbergs formed as the softer land around them eroded away through the millennia, exposing more and more of the hard rock outcrops.Rising up from the flatlands, Mount Nallume is crowned with forest. Photo by Phil Platts.Because of their height, inselbergs are able to trap moisture that the surrounding lowlands cannot, making them ideal spots for forest to grow. These forests are oases for animals and plants that wouldn’t be able to survive in the drier, sparser lowlands.Inselbergs are scattered widely across the central and northern Mozambique landscape, often separated by 16 kilometers (10 miles) or more. Their forests used to be connected, back when the region was cooler and wetter and carpeted in trees. But 10,000 years ago or so the region dried out, confining its lush forests and the animals that lived in them to the tops of mountains where they’ve evolved in isolation ever since.Inselbergs and their unique forests and wildlife aren’t limited to Mozambique, but can be found throughout eastern and southern Africa. Researchers have long known of their potential to harbor undiscovered species, with new chameleons, vipers and other animals regularly uncovered during biological surveys.Bayliss himself has around 20 inselberg expeditions under his belt, most recently to Mozambique’s Mount Lico, which lies about 130 kilometers (80 miles) southwest of Nallume. There, he and his team scaled the steep rock cliffs to the forest above where they claim they found several species new to science, including a butterfly.They spent a total of two weeks in 2018 surveying Lico and another inselberg nearby. For this trip to Nallume and another site, they had less than a week, but are planning a longer, more formal expedition later next year.last_img read more

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Audio: The best animal calls featured on the Mongabay Newscast in 2019

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki As regular listeners to the Mongabay Newscast already know, bioacoustics is the study of how animals use and perceive sound, and how their acoustical adaptations reflect their behaviors and their relationships with their habitats and surroundings. Bioacoustics is still a fairly young field of study, but it is currently being used to study everything from how wildlife populations respond to the impacts of climate change to how entire ecosystems are impacted by human activities.On today’s episode, we listen to recordings of stitchbirds in New Zealand, river dolphins in Brazil, humpback whales in the Pacific, right whales in the Atlantic, and gibbons in Indonesia.If you want to check out the whole episodes featuring these recordings, here they are:The sounds of a rare New Zealand bird reintroduced to its native habitatChatty river dolphins in Brazil might help us understand evolution of marine mammal communicationListen to the first-ever recordings of right whales breaking into songHumpback whales across the Pacific Ocean are singing the same songHow listening to individual gibbons can benefit conservationAnd here’s this episode’s top news:Tropical forests’ lost decade: the 2010sCentral American countries pledge to protect Mesoamerica’s ‘5 Great Forests’Mountain gorilla census reveals further increase in numbersWould you like to hear how Mongabay grew out of its founder’s childhood adventures in rainforests and a fascination with frogs? Or how a Mongabay editor reacted to meeting one of the world’s last Bornean rhinos? We now offer Insider Content that delivers behind-the-scenes reporting and stories like these from our team. For a small monthly donation, you’ll get exclusive access and support our work in a new way. Visit mongabay.com/insider to learn more and join the growing community of Mongabay readers on the inside track.If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.Male stitchbird or hihi (Notiomystis cincta) on Tiritiri Matangi Island. Photo by Duncan Wright, licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animal Behavior, Animals, Apes, Bioacoustics, Bioacoustics and conservation, Birds, Conservation, Dolphins, Environment, Freshwater Animals, Mammals, Marine Animals, Marine Mammals, Podcast, Primates, Whales, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored This is our last episode of 2019, so we took a look back at the bioacoustic recordings we featured here on the Mongabay Newscast over the past year and today we will be playing some of our favorites for you.As regular listeners to the Mongabay Newscast already know, bioacoustics is the study of how animals use and perceive sound, and how their acoustical adaptations reflect their behaviors and their relationships with their habitats and surroundings. Bioacoustics is still a fairly young field of study, but it is currently being used to study everything from how wildlife populations respond to the impacts of climate change to how entire ecosystems are impacted by human activities.On today’s episode, we listen to recordings of stitchbirds in New Zealand, river dolphins in Brazil, humpback whales in the Pacific, right whales in the Atlantic, and gibbons in Indonesia. This is our last episode of 2019, so we took a look back at the bioacoustic recordings we featured here on the Mongabay Newscast over the past year and today we will be playing some of our favorites for you.Listen here:last_img read more

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To deter Chinese sea claims, Indonesia puts its fishers on the front line

first_imgArticle published by Basten Gokkon Coastal Ecosystems, Conservation, Environment, Environmental Policy, Fisheries, Fishing, Governance, Illegal Fishing, Marine, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Overfishing, Sustainability Indonesia is increasing both its security and fishing presence in the waters around the Natuna Islands, following the latest incursion into the area by Chinese vessels.China claims much of the South China Sea, including the waters near the Natunas, but that particular area is internationally recognized as part of Indonesia’s exclusive economic zone.In a bid to deter future incursions, the Indonesian government has called on fishing fleets operating in the Java Sea to move to the Natunas.But observers warn that the arrival of the better-equipped Java fishers could create new tensions with the small-scale fishers already plying the Natuna waters, while doing little to thwart Chinese or other foreign fishing boats. JAKARTA — Indonesia is ramping up its fisheries in the waters around its northern Natuna Islands, following an incursion into the area by fishing boats and a coast guard vessel from China.The area in question is internationally recognized as part of Indonesia’s exclusive economic zone, a sweep of sea extending 200 nautical miles (370 kilometers) from the country’s coast. But according to China, the area falls within the “Nine-Dash Line” that stakes Beijing’s claim to much of the South China Sea. (China doesn’t claim the islands themselves, but fishing rights within the seas around them.)The latest standoff began last December when a fleet of Chinese fishing vessels appeared to be operating in the Natuna waters, accompanied by a Chinese coast guard ship. While foreign boats are allowed to pass through a country’s EEZ, fishing there is strictly prohibited.Indonesia has since beefed up its military presence in the area, with the Chinese vessels reportedly leaving Indonesia’s EEZ earlier this month. President Joko Widdodo, who visited the islands in a show of force, has also asked Japan to invest in fisheries, energy and tourism in the Natunas, in a bid to cement Indonesia’s presence in the area.“There is no bargaining when it comes to our sovereignty, our country’s territorial,” Widodo said on Jan. 6.In addition, the government has called on domestic fishing fleets operating in the Java Sea to deploy to the Natunas some 1,000 kilometers (600 miles) away. This last move has prompted criticism of both the longstanding lack of government support for Natuna’s local fishers, and the potential for a fresh dispute if the better-equipped Java fishers are perceived to benefit at the expense of the Natuna fishers.Indonesian President Joko Widodo, center, and officials from the fisheries ministry visit Natuna following illegal fishing activity by Chinese boats in Indonesian waters. Image courtesy of the Indonesian Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries.Experts have highlighted the scarcity of Indonesian fishing vessels operating in the Natunas and the lack of facilities on land to process catches, which inevitably end up being taken to Java.“We’ve always been weak in exploiting the natural resources in Indonesia’s EEZ, including the Natuna waters,” Ari Purbayanto, a fisheries professor at the Bogor Institute of Agriculture Institute (IPB), outside Jakarta, told Mongabay in a text message.Most of the catches brought ashore in the Natunas come from vessels smaller than 10 gross tonnage (GT), while larger boats reportedly almost never landed their catches there. The Natuna waters are estimated to have more than 750,000 tons of fish stock. The government has tried to address this by establishing a cold storage center and a boat repair station in Natuna.“Exploiting the resources in Indonesia’s EEZ by our national fleet is a form of ‘effective occupation’ by us [who] clearly have the sovereign right there,” Purbayanto said.Chinese fishing boats operating in the waters of Indonesia’s Natuna Íslands. Image courtesy of the Indonesian Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries.But others have criticized the plan to send hundreds of fishermen from the northern coast of Java to Natuna. They warn the increased Indonesian fishing presence won’t necessarily deter Chinese or other foreign fishing vessels, while at the same time they could potentially trigger conflict with the local small-scale fishers of Natuna.“We can and are willing to sail all the way to the EEZ, but the thing is our fleet is inadequate and we don’t have the technology,” Al Izhar, a fisherman from Natuna, told Mongabay Indonesia in a phone interview.“But if we are trained, we can contribute to play our role in being on the front line for the nation,” he added.Beefing up the state’s security presence is also key to tackling fishing by foreign vessels, experts say. Indonesia’s former fisheries minister, Susi Pudjiastuti, was widely hailed for her tough policy against foreign poachers, which centered on seizing and sinking their boats.“Indonesia’s tough policy against foreign fishing boats under Susi’s leadership in the last five years clearly grabbed the attention of and became a key consideration for neighboring fishing vessels to be more careful when they operate in the borders or within Indonesia’s EEZ,” Arifsyah Nasution, oceans campaigner at Greenpeace Indonesia, told Mongabay in a text message.Maritime observers have called for an immediate easing of tensions between Indonesia and China in Natuna, which they warn could affect the sustainability and security of the fisheries industry in the region.Purbayanto said that Chinese fishing boats typically used destructive equipment such as large pair trawls. “They will drain the resources while we just watch it happen,” he said. “It’s possible that right now we’re importing fish from China that actually was stolen from Indonesia.”President Joko Widodo has ordered an increased security presence in the Natuna waters following the incursion by Chinese fishing boats and coast guard. Image courtesy of the Indonesian Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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