Primus Announces Red Rocks Performance With Claypool Lennon Delirium

first_imgBassist Les Claypool is set to pull double duty at Red Rocks Amphitheatre on May 16th, as he’ll be performing with Primus and special guest, The Claypool Lennon Delirium, for a night of mayhem at the famed Morrison, CO venue. It seems that both bands will be performing throughout 2017, as Claypool now has dates scheduled for each unique act this year.The show will start with the psychedelic style of Claypool Lennon, fusing Claypool’s funky offbeat bass with Sean Lennon’s otherworldly guitar playing. Fans will then get to hear a full set of Primus music, placing Claypool within the outfit that he’s led now for over 25 years. Primus will also hit the intimate Fox Theatre on May 15th, treating fans to an evening of their music ahead of the big Red Rocks event.Tickets and more information about the show can be found here, and you can see the artwork below.last_img read more

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Chief judge-clerk rule tabled for now

first_img December 1, 2004 Senior Editor Regular News Chief judge-clerk rule tabled for now Gary Blankenship Senior Editor A controversial procedural rules amendment on the relationship between chief circuit judges and court clerks has been tabled until next summer.The Rules of Judicial Administration Committee, at its October 28 meeting, voted to reconsider its earlier suggested change to Rule of Judicial Administration 2.050. It then decided to table the matter until July 1, after the Florida Legislature meets next spring and has a chance to address the matter.“We’re going to back off and show respect for the process,” said committee Chair and 13th Circuit Judge Claudia Isom.At issue is the autonomy of clerks and the authority of the legislature to regulate what clerks do. The committee’s proposed amendment would have clerks report to chief circuit judges when it comes to their functions that support court operations. That is different from language approved by the legislature when it drew up laws to implement Revision 7, the constitutional amendment that required the state to take over more funding of the trial courts.The proposed rule had raised reservations among legislators involved in Revision 7, as well as the Bar Board of Governors. Lawmakers said appropriations for clerks is a legislative prerogative, but the proposed rule would appear to give circuit judges some of that authority by allowing them to define clerks’ duties.“Appropriations is a legislative function, not a judicial function,” said Rep. Dudley Goodlette, R-Naples, one of six lawmakers who sent a letter to the Bar about the proposed rule amendment. “A lot of what is being proposed for the chief judges in the circuit to do would have some potential funding ramifications. We think that’s a legislative function and it’s not appropriate to blur those lines.”The legislature is also ready to look at any problems arising in clerks support of the courts in glitch legislation, Goodlette said. He also sent to the Bar and committee a legislative staff analysis making a constitutional separation of powers argument on why the committee’s suggested rule change was wrong.The possibility of legislative action was also raised by Bar President Kelly Overstreet Johnson when she wrote to the committee passing along the Board of Governors’ suggested changes, adopted at its August meeting, to the committee’s proposed amendment.“The Florida Bar believes that those conscientious Florida legislators charged with continued implementation of Revision 7 will readily understand these new concerns, will appreciate their impact on an open court system, and will deal with them responsibly in the coming session,” she wrote.going to the legislature, Johnson said, “the BoG opted for a course of action that next places this issue in a different governmental arena, still allowing for continued discussion of this topic among those legislators, clerks, and judges involved with ongoing Revision 7 matters during the 2005 Legislative Session.”The Rules of Judicial Administration Committee proposed including this sentence in Rule 2.050(3): “The clerk of court shall discharge its constitutional and statutory duties at the direction of and in consultation with the chief judge to effectively and efficiently accomplish the administrative plan.”Subsection (9) would add this sentence: “The clerks of court shall be subject to the direction of the chief judge for the efficient and proper administration of all courts within the circuit. The clerk of court shall perform all responsibilities required by law and provide such other services for the efficient and proper administration of the court as may be required by administrative order or local rule.”The board’s proposed modifications would alter both sections to say the chief judge would have “administrative supervision” rather than “direction” over the clerks. The last sentence of subsection (9) would be shortened to “The clerk of court shall perform all responsibilities required by law.”Officials from the Supreme Court’s Trial Court Budget Commission, which approved in negotiations the law passed by the legislature, also said the proposed amendment would undermine their ability to work with the legislature on trial court financial matters.Isom said she will have to write the Supreme Court, which had asked the Rules of Judicial Administration Committee to look at the clerk issue, and ask for a delay.A subcommittee also studied the issue and concluded under case law clerks in their court supporting functions are part of the judicial branch, and not the executive or legislative, she said. Isom added, though, that the committee is aware of the opinion prepared by House staff for Rep. Goodlette, and that his assurance the legislature would look into the committee’s concerns had a lot to do with the panel deciding to table the rule for now.Under policies for procedural rules, the Bar cannot change a rule committee’s proposed amendments, but can endorse them or recommend changes to the Supreme Court or advise the amendments be rejected. Johnson, at the board’s October meeting, noted the board’s actions from August were sent to the Rules of Judicial Administration Committee in hopes it would change its amendments before forwarding them to the Supreme Court.“We are not suggesting there is not an issue or a problem there. What we are saying is at this time we do not need to do this [rule amendment],” she told board members, urging them to contact committee members. “If it’s still a problem in a year, we can revisit it.. . . A lot of us are very concerned about the impact this would have in the legislature next year. A lot of our friends in the legislature are warning us.”At the August meeting, board members said they understood committee members’ arguments that the issue was about separation of powers. But in this case, they agreed with the legislature and clerks were correct in that the clerks, as constitutional officers, do not fall directly under the control of the courts. Chief judge-clerk rule tabled for nowlast_img read more

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Dirty Brands: How clean is your brand?

first_imgA few days ago, I made an early morning trip to a local big-box athletic supply store in search of new walking shoes. I entered the store as one of the first customers of the day and right away could tell they hadn’t cleaned up from the day before. The floors were dirty, merchandise was scattered about and nothing looked clean.When trying on something in the dressing room, it got even worse. Un-purchased clothes from the day before still hung on the racks and dust bunnies and someone’s used Band-Aid (yuck) were on the floor. It just wasn’t a pleasant experience.How your bank or credit union facilities appear absolutely matters to your brand. You can have terrific consumer engagement from staff and all the right talking points in your brand mantra but it doesn’t really matter if consumers are distracted by an unkempt appearance.As we conduct mystery shops as part of the On The Mark Strategies marketing audit process, a few examples of “dirty” bank and credit union brands include: 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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Irish DB schemes strengthen funding as reform looms

first_imgSource: The Pensions AuthorityWhile the data was only correct to last year, and much of it was more than 12 months old according the Pensions Authority, the overall picture was a positive one.The Irish DB sector has been in the spotlight in recent months as politicians have sought to improve regulatory protections for savers to stop sponsors walking away from schemes and leaving them underfunded.Politicians are set to debate reforms later this year. Across 628 pension funds that submitted an annual actuarial data return (AADR), the regulator reported an 11% decline in the number of DB schemes with active members still accruing benefits, from 503 to 447.On aggregate, Ireland’s DB system was 104.6% funded, with €60.8bn of assets and €58.1bn of liabilities, according to data submitted to the regulator by 31 March.There were 163 schemes not meeting with the country’s funding standard, The Pensions Authority said.While the “vast majority” had proposals in place to meet the funding standards, the regulator said there were three schemes with no funding proposal. These ran the risk of regulatory action, the authority said, which could include an enforced wind-up or benefit cuts.Liability analysis showed that pensioners accounted for 58.5% of total liabilities, despite only making up 16.2% of DB scheme membership. Actively contributing members accounted for 17.7% of the total, the regulator reported.Aggregate asset allocation data showed a shift away from equities and government bonds towards alternative assets such as property, absolute return funds, and hedge funds.Allocation to equities fell to 32.5%, the regulator said, compared to 35.8% in 2015 and 41.7% in a year earlier.Asset allocation of Irish DB funds, 2015-16 Roughly three-quarters of Ireland’s defined benefit (DB) schemes meet the minimum funding level, according to data collected by The Pensions Authority.The 74% of schemes meeting the standard marked an improvement on last year’s figure of 70%, the Irish regulator reported.However, larger schemes were less likely to meet the requirement, the authority said. Of the top 50 biggest DB schemes, 28 of them (56%) met the funding standard.Irish pensions law requires DB schemes to hold sufficient assets to meet transfer values for all members along with the estimated costs of winding up.last_img read more

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Grinding Gears: Discouraging loss is yet another nail in the coffin

first_imgAll it took for the bubble to burst was one bad snap. On USC’s fourth play from scrimmage out of halftime, nursing a 14-0 lead, redshirt senior center Toa Lobendahn uncorked a snap over the head of freshman quarterback JT Daniels so far that it traveled 22 yards, rolling into the end zone for a safety. And then the floodgates opened. Following the bad snap, senior cornerback Isaiah Langley yelled at teammates on the sideline. On the ensuing Cal drive, freshman cornerback Olaijah Griffin mouthed off to the Cal offense before being beaten badly on a touchdown reception. An interception of Daniels and another Cal touchdown sealed a 15-14 win for the visitors on Saturday, but not before senior cornerback Iman Marshall committed an asinine unsportsmanlike conduct penalty late in the fourth quarter that served as the nail in the coffin.It was a comedy of errors, a procession of blunders that so aptly serves as a microcosm for this lost season — a season that lacks proper coaching, discipline and composure. And on Saturday for USC, the disappointment of no longer controlling its own destiny in the Pac-12 South deteriorated slowly into the realization that the best result the Trojans can garner out of the season is to make a bowl game. For comparison: Georgia State made a bowl game last season. So did Marshall, Colorado State and Western Kentucky. Also: Arkansas State, Middle Tennessee, Akron. USC is going to have to fight to reach the same goal that Middle Tennessee achieved last season. Nothing against Middle Tennessee, but the sheer number of things that have to go wrong for that statement to be true is large — extremely large.That’s where we’re at: USC, sitting at 5-5, needing to beat either UCLA or Notre Dame just to save face and make a bowl. There are plenty of explanations for this. Blame it on starting a true freshman at quarterback or on the numerous injuries to pivotal players or even give credit to the opposition. As Helton said after the loss, sometimes a season just doesn’t go your way.“Better days are to come,” he said. “Programs I’ve seen across the country, win a Rose Bowl, win a Pac-12 Championship and then have an off-season and then come right back.” That is true. But the one caveat is a big one: USC, even during a down season, still possesses as much talent as any of the top-tier teams in the country, and this team is definitely no exception. It keeps coming back to this point, the fact that — with this many four and five-star recruits on the roster — there is no way a .500 record is even close to acceptable.All signs point to Helton surviving until at least the end of the season; Athletic Director Lynn Swann’s comments two weeks ago during Trojans Live seemed to make it apparent that he had confidence in the head coach. But to any observer, let alone Helton’s boss, Saturday’s letdown was pitiful. It is one thing to blow a comfortable lead, as USC has done several times this season. It is another to do so because of sheer incompetence — namely, attempting unnecessary trick plays, committing turnovers at inopportune times, not snapping the ball properly, burning timeouts and being flagged for unsportsmanlike conduct during crucial moments. It doesn’t help when the head coach defends the unsportsmanlike conduct calls by calling his players “sportsmen” and “first-class” players, or when he calls Lobendahn a “man of honor and great football player” in response to the center’s botched snap, or when Helton talks about how the next two games are great opportunities to win the Victory Bell and the Jeweled Shillelagh — two meaningless trophies to wrap up a meaningless season.If the second half of this game — which saw USC produce 41 yards of offense for zero points on 31 plays — doesn’t convince Swann to make a coaching change, then nothing will. Last week, Helton’s first game since taking over playcalling duties was a success. But the Trojans faced Oregon State. Saturday, against actual competition, Helton’s offense looked like the status quo — that is, predictable, unimpressive and ineffective.The fans think so, too. Boos rained down when Helton called a timeout before a fourth down play in the second half. They booed again when Helton walked through the tunnel after the loss, and “fire Helton” chants were audible from the crowd.“It sucks,” senior linebacker Cam Smith said of the crowd’s reaction. “Can’t lose fans of our team, man.”But that’s what has happened. USC has lost its fans. It is spiraling out of control in the wrong direction, and knowing the expectations, the hype that surrounds this team daily, the pressure to make a change sooner rather than later may be too much to ignore. Eric He is a senior majoring in journalism. He is also the managing editor of the Daily Trojan. His column, “Grinding Gears,” runs Mondays.last_img read more

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