Open Rank Faculty – Public Policy (Hobby School of Public Affairs) – (FAC001590)

first_imgA Curriculum VitaA Letter of InterestEvidence of teaching effectiveness and commitment to mentoringstudentsA statement of research specialization and interestsUp to three representative papersThree names and email addresses of prospective writers ofletters of recommendation. Upon receiving applications, referencesmay be contacted via the online application system to submitletters directly for junior applicants, but not for seniorapplicants (we will inform applicants prior to asking for lettersin that case). The University of Houston is responsive to the needs of dual careercouples and able to provide access to high-quality childcare spotsat the University’s Children’s Learning Centers. The University ofHouston is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer, andencourages minorities, women, veterans, and persons withdisabilities to apply.Review of applications will begin December 1, 2020 and continueuntil the position is filled. Questions may be directed to thesearch committee chair, James Granato, [email protected] :A Ph.D. in the discipline and a scholarly record consistent withthe rank is required.Notes to Applicant: Official transcripts are required for afaculty appointment and will be requested upon selection of finalcandidate. All positions at the University of Houston are securitysensitive and will require a criminal history check. Incompleteapplications may not be considered. The Hobby School of PublicAffairs at the University of Houston (UH) seeks to hire threetenured or tenure-track faculty members to begin in Fall 2021. Ourschool is new and we are growing. We are well-supported by UH andwe are interested in applicants who will help chart the future ofour school with fresh ideas, practical experience, and aninterdisciplinary mindset. Our faculty include experts intheoretical, practical, and analytical disciplines associated withpublic policy and we seek to complement that collective expertisewith the three new hires. The University of Houston is a CarnegieDesignated Tier One Research University and is one of the mostracially and ethnically diverse institutions in the nation.Competitive candidates may have expertise in one or more of thefollowing areas or in another foundational area of public policy orpolicymaking:Philosophy or ethics of some area of public policy,including, but not limited to, education, energy, the environment,health, housing, immigration, or in a theoretical perspective suchas race, gender, governance, or markets that cuts across andinforms diverse policy areas.Policy data formulation and analysis – Individuals withcross-cutting disciplinary and/or methodological interests areencouraged to apply. Candidates with strong formal andmethodological skill sets in areas including, but not limited to,data visualization, decision algorithms, GIS, natural languageprocessing, network analysis, small area models, survey researchmethods, laboratory and/or field experiments, and probabilisticforecasts are of high interest.Some core area of public policy and policymaking, including,but not limited to, education, energy, the environment, foreigneconomic policy, health, housing, immigration, public finance,voting, political institutions, political economy, social mobility,urban and community development, or other significant public policyareas.In the selection process, the Hobby School will prioritizecollaborative scholars who demonstrate their experience and desireto: (1) engage in nationally-recognized, interdisciplinary work onsignificant public policy issues, (2) are interested in workingwith diverse populations, and (3) demonstrate an eagerness tocontribute to undergraduate and graduate education and studentsuccess.To apply, please provide the following:last_img read more

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New car bans planned for Oxford city centre

first_img“We want to express again our long term support forintegrated measures (bus gates, parking charges and improvements to publictransport and walking and cycling) to reduce congestion, improve air qualityand enhance the sustainability of the City of Oxford.” The University of Oxford supports the gates, but has concerns that they could harm the operation of the University if implemented in isolation.   Oxford Brookes University and the Oxford University StudentUnion have joined residents in supporting the bus gates. Charlie Hicks from Build Back Better Oxford told Cherwell: “Bus gates are key to a better Oxford. By cutting congestion massively through the city centre, we will be able to redesign the public spaces for people, air will be cleaner, more people will cycle and walk, we can have more open-air markets, trees, benches – you name it” Councillor Tom Hayes said: “Oxford’s narrow medieval streets are routinely clogged up with stop-go traffic, with vehicles cutting through, using the city centre as a permanent rat run. The Council has asked for residents’ views through an online consultation. What Oxford could look like, proposed by Build Back Better’s #BetterOxford The Oxford branch of Build Back Better, a Coronavirus Recovery Campaign, has backed the measures and called for a total of seven bus gates in a petition to the council. A City Council Residents Panel found that 80% of residentssupported restricting private vehicle movements in the city during the daytime. The bus gates will be in operation between 7.30 am and 6.30 pm. The City Council says: “Bus gates do not prevent access to areas of the city, however aim to redirect traffic through a different route and aims to reduce the use of the city centre as a through-route.” Only 10% of residents surveyed travelled into the city bycar, and a 2017 survey found that 70% of shoppers arrived by bus. The proposed bus gates come as part of wider measures to aid economic recovery after the pandemic. Oxfordshire County Council has committed to investing almost £3 million to support safe pedestrian and cycle spaces in cities, whilst the City Council is working to allow pedestrians and cyclists to maintain social distancing. “Colleagues across the university are concerned about how they will get to work as the new term starts and we believe this will be made more difficult – and that it could adversely affect the operation of the University – unless mitigating measures are taken in parallel with the introduction of the new bus gates,” said David Prout, Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Planning and Resources). Build Back Better Oxford has also created a series of photos of a car-free Oxford. “Broad St. and St Giles could be some of the most beautifulstreets in Europe, if they were not car parks!” The Councils have not set a duration for the bus gates, but Experimental Traffic Regulation Orders have a maximum time limit of 18 months and full public consultation is required before they can be made permanent. Ben Farmer, VP Charities and Community, Oxford SU said: “We…welcome the proposed temporary bus gates in Oxford City centre, as a good measure to reduce traffic in central Oxford and provide safer streets for walking and cycling.” One bus gate will be located on either Hythe Bridge Street or Worcester Street, and the other on St Cross Road or South Parks Road. A third bus gate will be kept under review and implemented at a later date. They will only be accessible to buses, taxis, blue badge holders, disabled tax class vehicles, and emergency services. Oxford is set to implement two temporary bus gates, restricting cars from entering certain parts of the city centre. Backed by both Oxford City Council and Oxfordshire County Council, the measure aims to reduce congestion and support Oxford’s recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. “Right now we need to support businesses and support people to shop in thecity centre, and supporting travel by buses, cycling, and walking is how we canachieve this. We can’t afford to have vehicles cutting through that don’t stop,don’t spend, and don’t support local jobs and businesses during the toughesttime they’ll ever know.” The temporary bus gates will be installed at the end of September at the earliest, but the timescale will reflect the consultation with stakeholders and the public, government guidance, and the spread of COVID-19 in Oxford. The city centre already has bus gates at High Street, GeorgeStreet, and Castle Street. Images provided by Build Back Better UK – Oxford.last_img read more

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Professors discuss global health

first_imgStudents and faculty spilled into the aisles of a DeBartolo Hall auditorium Monday evening as two renowned experts discussed liberation theology as a means to end poverty. Harvard professor Paul Farmer, a medical anthropologist, physician and founder of Partners in Health, an organization that provides healthcare and medical treatment to poor people around the world, said people could not end poverty if they did not understand it. “Real service to the poor involves understanding global poverty,” said Farmer. “An understanding of poverty must be linked to efforts of ending it. Poverty is structured evil. Understanding it is not the same as fighting it, but if we believe that knowledge informs practice then we can really make progress.” Notre Dame theology professor Fr. Gustavo Gutierrez agreed that understanding, was a means to end global poverty. “When we speak about the preferential option for the poor we are speaking about persons, not about poverty,” Gutierrez said. “Without fraternity, sympathy and community we have not committed to ending poverty.” Ending poverty is not an easy goal, Farmer said, but it is not impossible. “As long is there is poverty and inequality, we humans will need accompaniment —practical, spiritual and theological — to understand why and how they work so that we may attempt to eradicate it,” Farmer said. Gutierrez agreed that poverty is not a quick fix. “Poverty is not a destination, it’s a situation,” Gutierrez said. “Addressing poverty is not a one-time cure. It’s a constant adjustment.” Gutierrez coined the term “liberation theology” in the 1970s, which originated from the Latin American Catholic Church and addresses the poor’s ability to embrace suffering with hope just as Christ did. Gutierrez acknowledged the difficulty of reconciling suffering and the notion that an all-powerful God loves those who suffer. “The challenge we must face is how to say to poor persons, ‘God loves you,’” Gutierrez said. Liberation theology, however, is one answer to this challenge, Gutierrez said. “Theology changes to adapt to the historical demands of the time,” Gutierrez said. “It is a reflection of the daily life of a person and of the way to be Christian. Theology acts as the medium between living faith and announced faith.” Farmer said the fight to end poverty should be one of solidarity rather than charity. “Liberation theology is an inexhaustible font for understanding poverty,” Farmer said. “We live in one world, not three. Nothing else I have seen from earthquakes to floods to violence will lead me to believe otherwise.” Farmer emphasized the importance of comprehending poverty’s existence before attempting to end it. “It’s not easy to listen,” Farmer said. “It’s hard and sometimes painful. These experiences tried me in some ways that I cannot forget. I am determined to understand why poverty exists and how it functions in the modern world.” Farmer listened, studied Scripture and derived meaning from what he learned within the Latin American context. “Poverty is not a result of random acts of nature,” Farmer said. “Human beings constitute and create the social world and shape it.” Gutierrez said poverty is an issue that needs to be addressed on every front. “Poverty means death,” Gutierrez said. “For the poor in Latin America and all around the world, this means dying before their time. Death is not only a social issue, not only a matter of a social doctrine; it’s more than that — it’s a global issue and we need to rethink from the position we are in.” The preferential option for the poor means serving the least fortunate comes before all other concerns, Gutierrez said. “Preferential means they are first,” Gutierrez said. “It does not mean all the poor are good or generous or very gentle. Not all of them are good persons, but because God is good we must work to end their suffering. We are not really in solidarity for the poor unless you are against poverty.”last_img read more

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