VETERINARY TECHNICIAN: ER/CCU

first_imgVETERINARY TECH 1(35301) or VETERINARY TECH 2(35302) or VETERINARYTECH 3(35303) Position Summary: This position performs technical responsibilities in support of the24/7 needs of the Critical Care Unit and Emergency Services of UWVeterinary Care (UWVC). The position requires the individual tomake independent and responsible decisions which may affect theoutcome/quality of animal life. Requires the ability to lift aminimum of 50lbs. independently and physical and manual dexterityto perform specialized technical tasks. Responsibilities mayinclude, but are not limited to:1) Oversees/guides workflow in area focusing on special patientneeds.2) Anticipates needs of clinicians in procedures and primarycare.3) Participates in case overviews to better access and directtechnical patient support.4) Develops knowledge and responsibility in area of specializationto include maintenance of special equipment, instructing others inuse and care, assisting clinician/students in procedures.5) Contributes to team management care utilized in Critical CareUnit and Emergency Services. Week 1: Monday 4:30PM-4:30AM / Tuesday 4:30PM-2:30AM / Wednesday4:30PM-2:30AM / Saturday 4PM-5AMWeek 2: Sunday 4PM-5AM / Monday 4:30PM-2:30AM / Thursday4:30PM-4:30AMWill include Holiday and weekend shiftsNight and Weekend differential applicable on top of the basepay The University of Wisconsin is an Equal Opportunity andAffirmative Action Employer. We promote excellence throughdiversity and encourage all qualified individuals to apply.If you need to request an accommodation because of a disability,you can find information about how to make a request at thefollowing website: https://employeedisabilities.wisc.edu/disability-accommodation-information-for-applicants/ License or Certificate: Highly qualified candidates will have the following: a minimum of 2years’ experience working as a critical care/ emergency technician;excellent technical skills, communication skills, including theability to triage phone calls, perform patient intake, performtreatments, understanding of critical cases to assist the doctors.Ability to multitask and prioritize while assisting/teaching 4thyear students. Ability to function calmly in stressful situationsand to work cooperatively with other people. Job no: 229936-USWork type: Staff-Full TimeDepartment: VET M/CCU-ANESTH-ER/CCULocation: MadisonCategories: Animal Care, Veterinary Medicine Additional Information: Department(s): No Degree Required 229936-US Certification as Wisconsin Veterinary Technician or Eligibility toObtain within 12 months Work Schedule: Employment Class: The University of Wisconsin-Madison is engaged in a Title and TotalCompensation (TTC) Project to redesign job titles and compensationstructures. As a result of the TTC project, official job titles oncurrent job postings may change in Fall 2020. Job duties andresponsibilities will remain the same. For more information pleasevisit: https://hr.wisc.edu/title-and-total-compensation-study/.Employment will require a criminal background check. It will alsorequire you and your references to answer questions regardingsexual violence and sexual harassment.The University of Wisconsin System will not reveal the identitiesof applicants who request confidentiality in writing, except thatthe identity of the successful candidate will be released. See Wis.Stat. sec. 19.36(7).The Annual Security and FireSafety Report contains current campus safety and disciplinarypolicies, crime statistics for the previous 3 calendar years, andon-campus student housing fire safety policies and fire statisticsfor the previous 3 calendar years. UW-Madison will provide a papercopy upon request; please contact the University of Wisconsin PoliceDepartment . A878150-SCHOOL OF VET MEDICINE/CCU-ANESTH-ER/CCU Appointment Type, Duration: Applications Open: Dec 22 2020 Central Standard TimeApplications Close: May 10 2021 11:55 PM Central DaylightTimecenter_img Institutional Statement on Diversity: Minimum Years and Type of Relevant Work Experience: List of Duties Minimum $16.50 HOURLYDepending on Qualifications Position Duties: Degree and Area of Specialization: Contact: Begin the online application process by clicking the ” button.Applicants are asked to upload a cover letter outlining yourexperience as related to the position, current resume, as well as alist of professional references. This position is being posted atVet Tech levels 1, 2 and 3. Level and pay are commensurate withexperience. Melinda [email protected] Access (WTRS): 7-1-1 (out-of-state: TTY: 800.947.3529, STS:800.833.7637) and above Phone number (See RELAY_SERVICE for furtherinformation. ) Requires the ability to lift a minimum of 50 lbs. independently andphysical and manual dexterity toperform specialized technical tasks.This position is posted at Vet Tech levels 1, 2 and 3. Level isdetermined by qualifications based on type of prior veterinary techexperience.To qualify for Level 1: Entry level, new CVT grad or awaiting tosit for the CVT exam, or some CVT working experience with nospecialization.To qualify for Level 2: Generally over 3 years of veterinary techexperience, may substitute years of experience forspecialization.To qualify for Level 3: Veterinary Tech Specialist (VTS), or highlyqualified and specialized in a specific area, may have priorexperience from another university hospital. Official Title: University Staff-Ongoing Job Number: Ongoing/Renewable Diversity is a source of strength, creativity, and innovation forUW-Madison. We value the contributions of each person and respectthe profound ways their identity, culture, background, experience,status, abilities, and opinion enrich the university community. Wecommit ourselves to the pursuit of excellence in teaching,research, outreach, and diversity as inextricably linkedgoals.The University of Wisconsin-Madison fulfills its public mission bycreating a welcoming and inclusive community for people from everybackground – people who as students, faculty, and staff serveWisconsin and the world.For more information on diversity and inclusion on campus, pleasevisit: Diversity andInclusion Instructions to Applicants: Salary:last_img read more

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Protecting Workers

first_imgAs the spring harvest approached, members of the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association knew they would need assistance to provide important information about COVID-19 safety measures and food handling protocols to workers who make up the majority of the seasonal agricultural workforce, many of whom are native Spanish speakers.University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and Cooperative Extension faculty responded quickly by producing a COVID-19 safety video in Spanish that could be incorporated into farm employee trainings. UGA Extension Southwest District Director Andrea Scarrow, Tift County Extension Agent Justin Hand, and Assistant Professor Laurel Dunn in the UGA Department of Food Science and Technology were a part of the group that spearheaded the effort to quickly produce and distribute the video resources to producers throughout the state.Bill Brim, CEO of Lewis Taylor Farms in Tift County, previously worked with UGA Extension to develop financial education materials in Spanish for temporary workers at the farm, so he knew who to ask when the need for COVID-19 educational materials arose, Scarrow said.“Our growers, both small and large, depend on Extension to get immediate answers and help for all kinds of issues. Mr. Brim knew we had that capacity to develop resources in Spanish so he contacted us for that reason,” Scarrow said. “Our producers are in constant communication with our agriculture agents, they depend on us quite a bit. Our agents are very sensitive to the needs of farmworkers and the large Hispanic population we have in the area that supports farming, so we moved on it as fast as we could.”Working with Beth Oleson, a director of education and food safety for Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association, UGA Extension recruited the help of UGA Professor Francisco Diez, director of the UGA Center for Food Safety, and his wife, Claudia Buzo, a ServSafe consultant who trains Hispanic restaurant workers, to translate the video scripts and record the video in Spanish.“Dr. Dunn and I work together frequently on food safety issues. Crafting employee safety language was easy, but making sure we included CDC recommendations that seemed to be changing frequently was a challenge,” said Oleson. “Working with Dr. Diez and Buzo really made the video a success. Buzo’s experience with Hispanic employees helped guide the language and examples to make it approachable to the Spanish-speaking audience.”During the COVID-19 crisis, UGA Extension has been actively involved in getting research-based materials from faculty out to farms, packing houses, u-pick farms and other agricultural producers.“We enlisted the help of NC State Extension, which shared a lot of materials they had already translated into Spanish,” Dunn said. “This was great, but we felt we needed audio-visual resources to reach a greater number of Spanish-speaking workers.”Working with Oleson, Dunn developed a general script explaining what the COVID-19 disease is, where it came from, why it is different from other illnesses and why employers would have new safety rules this year.“It also showed workers how to protect themselves, explained why social distancing is important and outlined what modifications employers can and cannot require,” Dunn said.Diez and Buzo, who translated the script into Spanish, said they were happy to help communicate this important message to Spanish-speaking agricultural workers through the video, titled “Lo que necesita saber sobre el coronavirus” (“What you need to know about coronavirus”) available at www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugddqd8N0S4.“My wife and I are originally from Mexico and we are native Spanish speakers. In an urgent situation, such as the one we are in, information like this could make the difference between someone getting sick or not,” Diez said. “We are committed to helping the Hispanic community as much as we can, and many of the migrant workers who come to work on these farms are individuals with only a grade school or middle school education. We wanted to make sure to use simple language and messages so it would be useful and understandable.”The 24-minute video was distributed through the network of UGA Extension offices around the state and shared directly with producers. “This is most of what I do really, it is just the subject matter that changed,” said Dunn, a food microbiologist and Extension specialist. “Producers are used to hearing from me about salmonella and E. coli, so we just switched the message to keeping workers healthy.”The request for the video came in the day before a worker safety production training was to be held at Lewis Taylor Farms, a major agricultural producer in Tift County, so Hand said the UGA team worked throughout the night to get the video ready to show the next morning.“Jessica Kirk, director of food safety and marketing at Lewis Taylor Farms, talked to several of her crew leaders and some of the workers who said the video really helped the workers to understand the situation a lot better,” Hand said. “These workers came into the U.S. from Mexico and they didn’t know how much this had spread or how important safety is to stop the spread of this virus. They said it was easy to understand the video and they appreciated the message.”UGA Extension’s COVID-19  resources in English and Spanish are available at extension.uga.edu/emergencies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also has print resources in multiple languages, including posters that describe how to stay healthy during this time, how to protect members of your household, proper hygiene and many other topics, available at www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/communication/index.html.last_img read more

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NAFCU on Hill as lame-duck session reopens

first_img 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr NAFCU’s lobbyists are back on Capitol Hill today pressing the need for a national data security standard for merchants, privacy notice relief, parity in federal coverage for Interest on Lawyers Trust Accounts (IOLTAs) and more as the 113th Congress reconvenes its lame-duck session.The lame-duck session of the 113th Congress come to a close this month. NAFCU has been thanking lawmakers for their support of credit unions in their press for regulatory relief and for their continued support of the credit union tax exemption – and it will seek their continued support on these issues going into 2015. In the meantime, the association will be pressing for action on these key bills as the Congress winds down:S. 2699 and S. 2698, the “Regulatory Easement for Lending Institutions that Enable a Vibrant Economy (RELIEVE) Act,” both of which would ensure credit unions parity with FDIC-insured institutions concerning deposit insurance coverage on Interest on Lawyers Trust Accounts (IOLTAs);S. 635, the “Privacy Notice Modernization Act,” to eliminate redundant annual privacy notice requirements.S. 1577, the “Mortgage Choice Act 2013,” which seeks to provide relief on points and fees on qualified mortgages.These issues will be competing for attention in coming weeks, when key players will be looking to pass a stopgap spending bill to keep federal agencies and departments working past Dec. 12, defense spending, terrorism risk insurance reauthorization and more. continue reading »last_img read more

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