Wedding Ring Turns Up Under Fort Lauderdale Restaurant After Three Years

first_imgThe engraving read, “Mike & Lisa 08-21-15.” The staff began their mission to find the ring’s owner. The restaurant found more than just the ring under the deck, Krivoy adds. “She called and said, ‘You’re not going to believe this, but I’m Lisa,’” Formica explains.Courtesy: Coconuts Restaurant/Facebook “We were cleaning up the debris down there and we noticed a bit of a sparkle and we picked up a ring,” he says. “Once we washed it off we realized there was an engraving on the inside.” The coins were minted with a value of $2.50, but now range from $200 to more than $2,000, according to various estimates. The post had been shared about 5,000 times, and found its way to the married couple, who live in New York. A man who vacationed in Fort Lauderdale never thought he would see his wedding ring again after he lost it three years ago.Then, a local restaurant came to the rescue during an unlikely time. “We found a lot of change obviously, but as we’re cleaning off the change we actually found a gold coin,” he said. “After doing a little research, it was a quarter eagle [coin] from 1855.”center_img While serving take-out meals recently during the coronavirus pandemic, Coconuts manager Ryan Krivoy was also replacing the wooden deck on the restaurant’s patio. “We found a couple of $100 bills,” he adds. “I don’t know how those got down there.” “We took to Facebook and basically put the post up as a long shot,” says marketing manager Sasha Formica. “That was on Monday and on [Thursday] Lisa called the restaurant.” Lisa texted pictures of the ring and she and her husband eating at Coconuts in 2017 in order to prove that she was the real owner. The wedding band had slipped off her husband’s greasy fingers and rolled between the wooden floorboards, she said. Krivoy says he plans to put the treasures in the tip jar to help his staff. The wedding ring was sent back to the couple Friday via certified mail.last_img read more

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Cats take Bombers to the limit

first_imgBy The Nelson Daily SportsOn paper, the L.V. Rogers Bombers should have no trouble dealing with the Mount Sentinel Wildcats.But that’s only on paper.Tuesday, at the South Slocan-based school gymnasium, the Cats gave the Bombers everything they could handle during a 75-62 loss to LVR in West Kootenay High School Boy’s Basketball action.LVR, coming off a lacklustre performance during the final game of the Fulton Maroons tournament Saturday in Vernon, continued to struggle early against the Wildcats.Paced by the all-around play from senior Steven Hernandez and Grade 11 forward Zach Grigg, the Wildcats took the early lead in the game.John Zak keyed the Bomber comeback to help the visitors to a 14-13 first quarter advantage.LVR increased the margin to 32-25 at recess.The Cats kept pace with the Bombers in the second half and trailed by only six points with 150 seconds left in the game.However, the hosts could not overcome the deficit before falling to the Bombers.Zak led the Bombers with 26 points while Clay Rickaby added 16.Replying for Mount Sentinel was Grigg with 22 points and Hernandez with 17.The Bombers return to action Thursday when the club hosts rival J. Lloyd Crowe Hawks of Trail at the Hangar.The Senior Girl’s tip off the two-game night at 5 p.m. with the boy’s tilt to follow at 6:30 [email protected]last_img read more

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Trail AA Orioles AA American Legion squad hosts tourney at Butler Park

first_img“This tournament is warm-up for us so to speak,” Mace explained. “Chewelah is a AAA team we are a double A team and of course the Trail Sr. Orioles area a the Senior Men’s team.”The tournament opens Friday with the AA Orioles facing Chewelah at 7 p.m.Saturday, games are at 1 p.m., 3:30 p.m. and 6 p.m.Sunday, the Orioles face Chewelah at 11 a.m. before closing out the tournament at 4 p.m. against Trail Sr. Orioles.The Trail AA Orioles AA American Legion team consists of players from throughout the West Kootenay.Four of the players — Austin Tambellini, Reese Tambellini, Casey Harrison, and Joel Aubert — are from Nelson with two — Nathan Soukeroff and Daniel Gangier — from Castlegar.The rest of the team is from the Trail area.The coaching staff includes Mace as manager, Dallas Calvin as outfield/hitting coach, Kyle Paulson as pitching coach and Kyle Mace, hitting/infield coach. The Trail AA Orioles AA kicks off the season this weekend by hosting the Trail Invitational Baseball Tournament at Butler Park.The Orioles play in a new division of the American Legion Baseball League against teams from Colville, Asotin, Mt. Spokane, Lewis and Clarke, Gonzaga Prep, Mead, Rogers and West Valley“Last year we played to an 8-8 record in league play just out of the playoffs,” said manager Ron Mace.Mace said the Trail AA Orioles play in the XBL men’s league in Trail to prepare for the season.last_img read more

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Microplastic waste fouls up beaches on Sri Lanka’s southern tourism coast

first_imgMicroplastics Beaches along Sri Lanka’s southern coast, a tourism hotspot, are increasingly being contaminated with microplastic pollution, a survey has found.The study found that 60 percent of sand samples and 70 percent of surface water samples from 10 survey sites contained an abundance of microplastics up to 4.5 millimeters (0.18 inches) in size.The researchers have called for meticulous waste management initiatives, regulating the use of plastics, and further studies to ascertain the magnitude of the pollution caused by plastic waste. Sri Lanka’s southern coastline is dotted with popular resorts and beaches, but this once pristine landscape hasn’t been spared by the global plastic waste crisis, a study finds.The authors of the paper, published in the Marine Pollution Bulletin, studied 10 locations along a 91-kilometer (57-mile) stretch of the Indian Ocean island’s southern coast to assess the magnitude of the problem.They found that 60 percent of the sand samples and 70 percent of the surface water samples they collected contained an abundance of microplastics, or MPs, compounding the environmental pressure on a coastline ravaged by the 2004 tsunami and constantly battling against coastal erosion.The problem is just the tip of the iceberg, says lead author J.  Bimali Koongolla, a marine scientist at the  University of Ruhuna in Sri Lanka.“Microplastic waste is becoming a serious environmental problem in Sri Lanka, once considered an island state with unblemished pristine beaches,” she told Mongabay. “The seas are getting contaminated, and beyond environmental, this poses a severe health hazard as it impacts food chains.”She attributed the rising levels of microplastics in the seas and beaches to be poor waste management and an inability to break away from age-old littering practices.“The use of plastics is increasing non-biodegradable waste production. These plastics eventually get washed into the seas, polluting the very environment [local communities] depend on for sustenance,” Koongolla said.The sand sampling sites for the study on the southern coast of Sri Lanka. Image by Earth View Maps.Recreational beaches under threatThe sites worst affected by plastic pollution were Dondra, Weligama and Ambalangoda, all in Southern province, due to significant recreational activity as well as fishing.While recreational beaches had high levels of MPs, more remote beaches and fishing ports also exhibited large amounts of microplastic pollution as well as plastic debris, the researchers found.The size of MPs in surface water and beaches ranged from 1.5 to 2.5 millimeters (0.06 to 0.1 inches) and 3 to 4.5 millimeters (0.12 to 0.18 inches), respectively. Most were identified as polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP), with some polystyrene (PS) foam being also being discovered at a few sites.Researchers found an overall higher abundance of MPs on the beaches than in the waters, while samples from the ports indicated higher levels of MP pollution in the surface water.When sediments were analyzed, the popular and congested recreational beaches appeared to have more microplastic litter. The busy public beach of Weligama was the most polluted by count (157 microplastic items per square meter) as well as weight (5.98 grams per square meter).Though busy recreational beaches like Weligama are cleaned routinely, the process only removes the larger debris and risks burying microplastics even deeper in the sand.The fishing ports in Dondra and Ambalangoda also showed high concentration of MPs by count and weight in the surface water. “This is due to high levels of gear handling and other activities,” Koongolla said.She added that at the three sites classified as remote beaches, there was little or no polystyrene found, and only one of them yielded high counts of MPs in the sand. “This is largely due to storm activity depositing water-borne and land-based debris via runoff,” Koongolla said.Researcher J. Bimali Koongolla conducts a beach survey near the Dondra Harbor. Image courtesy of Kasun Indika.Role of riversKoongolla said that while tourism had flourished in Sri Lanka’s south, good waste management practices have not been introduced.“South has traditionally had a high density of tourist activity, along its coast,” she said. “While we cannot confirm if any MP samples we collected originated in the sea from fisheries or commercial vessels or on land, we can confirm that these beaches are used heavily due to increased tourist activity and tend to leave a lot of visible plastic debris.”Researchers also say there is a dire need to identify the sources of microplastic pollution. This includes determining the role of rivers in transporting MPs into the ocean. “Once we narrow down the localities that are particularly polluting, it is easier to introduce waste management initiatives and to take other preventive action. These can vary from restriction of single-use plastics to having better recycling centers,” Koongolla said.The study came out just before findings from a 2018 survey — commissioned by the National Aquatic Resources Agency (NARA) and supported by Norway’s Institute of Marine Research (IMR) and carried out on the Norwegian research vessel Fridtjof Nansen — were published in January.The survey, the first of its kind in 40 years, found that nearly four-fifths of small pieces of the plastic waste in Sri Lanka’s territorial waters arrived via rivers and canals, said Terney Pradeep Kumara, general manager of the Marine Environment Protection Authority (MEPA).“This means only about one fifth of waste is sea-originated microsplastic wastage, caused by fishermen dumping plastic in mid-sea and oil spills from ships,” said Kumara, also a co-author of the southern coastal study.Following the Nansen survey, Kumara called for collective and effective waste management mechanisms and stricter laws to prevent extensive marine pollution.The polluted Dondra Harbor, a place that converges communities and faiths, but now also microplastic waste. Image courtesy of J. Bimali Koongolla.Further studies neededThe team of researchers point to the absence of sufficient coastal studies as a key reason for selecting the south, a top tourist destination.So far, only two studies have looked at microplastic pollution in the island’s coastal regions. A 2018 study looked at three beaches in Western province, while a 2016 study focused on the north coast.Koongolla said this new study offers only a glimpse of the microplastic problem in Sri Lanka. Ideally, she said, research should be conducted over different seasons and across several years. Sampling volumes should also be much larger to improve the quality of the data, she said.Banner image of a harbor in southern Sri Lanka studded with microplastics, an emerging environmental problem in the Indian Ocean island, once known for its pristine beaches, courtesy of J. Bimali Koongolla.Citation:Koongolla, J. B., Andrady, A. L, Terney Pradeep Kumara, P. B., & Gangabadage, C. S. (2018). Evidence of microplastics pollution in coastal beaches and waters in southern Sri Lanka. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 137, 277-284. doi: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2018.10.031 Article published by dilrukshicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Amazon’s Mura indigenous group demands input over giant mining project

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored In 2013, Potássio do Brasil, a subsidiary of the Canadian merchant bank, Forbes & Manhattan, began drilling exploratory wells for a giant potassium mine — a highly profitable venture that would allow transport of potash along the Amazon and Madeira rivers. Potash is a vital fertilizer for Brazil’s rapidly growing soy agribusiness industry.One big problem: the company was reportedly drilling inside the Jauary Indigenous Reserve and directly adjacent to other indigenous reserves and communities. Indigenous people said that the ancestral lands being drilled, though sometimes not demarcated as being within their reserves, were vital for hunting and other livelihoods.The mine was licensed in 2015. However, legal irregularities resulted in the project stalling. Finally, a court settlement was reached in which the Mura communities would be given the legal right of consultation — a democratic process of self-determination guaranteed under international law rarely practiced in the remote Brazilian Amazon.How the Mura will vote — and whether that vote will be respected by municipal, state and federal governments; agribusiness; a transnational mining giant; and international investors — remains to be seen. However, analysts agree that the result could have far reaching consequences for rural traditional settlements across the Amazon. Tuxaua (chief) Aldinelson Pavão stands beside an exploratory well drilled by Potássio do Brasil. Image by Thais Borges.Mongabay sent a reporting team to Brazil’s Amazonas state in 2019 to cover an ongoing conflict between indigenous people and a company that wants to put a gigantic potash mine within and next to their Amazon reserves. This is Part 2 of a 2 part story. Part 1 can be found here.AUTAZES, Amazonas state, Brazil — We travelled first by canoe through flooded forest, then afoot, scrambling to keep up with the tuxaua (chief) of Urucurituba village. Aldinélson Moraes Pavão set a brisk pace along a narrow path through thick vegetation, passing clearings for small-scale cattle ranching. In the distance we saw dense tropical forest, where, Pavão told us, the Mura indigenous people hunt.Then we reached the exploratory wells, deep vertical shafts dug into the earth by a mining company, Potássio do Brasil, on property that the Mura claim as ancestral lands, but which the firm contends is common land held by the government. The wells had been securely sealed, covered with concrete plates, and clearly identified as property of Potássio do Brasil.The Mura’s discovery of the drilling, first made in 2013, sparked years of conflict which continue to reverberate today between indigenous communities, Potássio do Brasil, the Brazilian government, and the municipality of Autazes, which straddles the Madeira and Amazon Rivers 100 kilometers (62 miles) east of Manaus, the capital of Amazonas state.Most of the Mura were outraged at the company’s attempt to occupy the land. “I am 47 years old,” Pavão told Mongabay. “I was born here and brought up here. My parents and grandparents too. So I won’t be told by Potássio, that comes from outside, that this land isn’t ours. It is our land and they are the invaders.” The indigenous people say that they have another reason to be angry: they claim the firm drilled other wells inside the Jauary Indigenous Reserve, in an area occupied by a sacred burial ground.“When the [other] indigenous leaders realized what was going on,” people from surrounding communities rushed to aid the Mura, remembered Gilmara Lelis, the tuxaua from Sampaio village. “We are all one people. If they interfere with one village, they’re interfering with all of us.”The drilling only stopped when the indigenous people threatened to set fire to the company’s machinery.The conflict that has consumed Autazes for the past six years isn’t only local, it’s international: Potássio do Brasil is a subsidiary of the giant Canadian conglomerate, Forbes & Manhattan (F&M), a leading private merchant bank with a global focus on the resource, agriculture, technology and telecommunications sectors.The firm says their mining claim is not on indigenous land. Rather, the rich lode of potash ore — invaluable as fertilizer to Brazilian soy plantations — is located about ten kilometers (6.4 miles) from the Paracuhuba Indigenous Reserve, and eight kilometers (4.2 miles) from the Jauary Indigenous Reserve, both of which have been demarcated and recognized by the Brazilian government. The mining claim also lies near two other indigenous communities, neither as yet demarcated: Urucurituba village, ten kilometers (6.4 miles) away, and, closest of all, Soares village, just two kilometers (1.4 miles) from the mine site.The company argues that the land where they want to put the potash mine, being non-demarcated, is open for their use. Guilherme Jácome, Project Development Director at Potássio do Brasil, told Mongabay: “All of the mine and the area where potash ore will be extracted lies outside indigenous land.”However, Carlos Marés, former president of FUNAI, Brazil’s indigenous affairs agency, and one of the nation’s leading authorities on indigenous rights, has a different understanding.He points out that the 1988 Brazilian Constitution enshrines the principle of the original right of indigenous people, providing them with an inalienable right to ancestral lands. He explains that, if any lands are permanently inhabited by indigenous groups, and are necessary for their physical and cultural survival, then they are indigenous.“Indigenous land is indigenous, whether or not it has been demarcated, which is after all only an administrative act of marking out the limits,” Marés concluded.A map showing the overlap and proximity of indigenous reserves and potash mining claims. Image by Mauricio Torres.A flawed licensing processBefore it drilled the exploratory wells in 2013, Potássio do Brasil registered requests for prospecting rights and received authorization from the National Department of Mining Research (DNPM), the government regulatory body then in charge of mining activities.The company plans to open two wells, each seven or eight meters (23 to 26 feet) across and an underground mine about 800 meters (2,600 feet) deep. It will need to build a potash plant, a port on the Madeira River, and a 130 kilometer (81 mile) transmission line to link the company into the national grid.The mining will produce large quantities of potentially damaging salt. Although the company says measures will be taken to prevent the salt leaching into the ground, aquifers, and rivers, the Mura are concerned that contamination could occur regardless, given the heavy rainfall, extensive annual flooding and heat that occurs each year — especially because the region is located in a floodplain.The company has carried out an Environmental Impact Study (EIS), as required by the licensing process. The EIS projected a “very high” number of impacts: putting pressure on public health and public services, changing the landscape, and creating an alteration in the reference points in the Indians’ social and cultural world. Clearly, such massive effects would be felt not only at the mine site, but for many miles around and inside reserves, while also disrupting indigenous activities and scaring off game.To comply with the legal requirement that it present the EIS results, the company held two public hearings, one in Autazes and the other in Urucurituba, but according to the Catholic Church’s Missionary Council (CIMI), few indigenous people attended. Pavão speculated as to why: “At the public hearing they only spoke about what was going to be good for the community. They said nothing about the negative impacts.”Maria José, a teacher in one of the communities, did attend. She remembers that in the beginning the company’s positive spin evoked “potash fever” in the villages, with young people enthused by the possibility of mining company jobs. “We spoke calmly to them, talking, showing videos, telling them what would happen in the future,” she recalled. “We managed to bring down the fever in the villages, but in the [larger] towns it has been more difficult.”Governor José Melo grants Potássio do Brasil an environmental license in July 2015. Image by Tabajara Moreno / SECOM.Licensing irregularities stall projectThe potash mine is an ambitious undertaking, with the EIS describing it as “exceptionally large” and “with great potential for pollution.” As a result, in accordance with the 2011 Complementary Law 140, the Amazonas Institute for Environmental Protection (IPAAM), a state agency which certifies small mining projects, should have handed the project over to IBAMA, the federal government’s environmental agency.But that didn’t happen. Instead, IPAAM issued a prospecting license to Potássio do Brasil in 2015. It did so, even though FUNAI had not yet analyzed the impacts on indigenous communities, an obligatory step in the process. Remarkably, the license that was approved included the Jauary territory, an already demarcated indigenous reserve, which is illegal.Still, with all the needed approvals in place, it seemed Potássio do Brasil would soon get its project underway. Construction of the mining complex was slated for 2016.But that was not to be.The Public Federal Ministry, a group of independent public prosecutors, asked the courts to cancel the license, arguing that the permits were issued in an irregular manner, and to assure that “a full, prior and informed consultation” was held with indigenous communities, as required under International Labour Organization Convention 169, which Brazil has signed.Prosecutor Fernando Soave. Image by Thais Borges.At pre-trial negotiations, Potássio do Brasil agreed to the license cancelation. It also agreed to fund the consultation. And to carry out that plan, it deposited R$350,000 (US$87,500) in an account held by the Amazon Pact Institute, an NGO based in southern Amazonas state.The inclusion of the Jauary reserve in the EIS proved particularly objectionable. A prosecutor involved in the case, Fernando Soave, declared: “Mining cannot occur on fully established indigenous reserves. That is not in dispute. The consultation we are holding is over whether or not mining should be permitted on land outside the reserves, where nevertheless it will have an impact on indigenous land.”Later, Potássio do Brasil excluded the Jauary reserve from the mine area. Which is why the company can say today that it has no plan to mine on indigenous land. But the indigenous communities suspect that if the project goes ahead the company will move onto disputed territory they regard as indigenous but which the company does not; especially Soares village, which the Indians claim is their territory but which hasn’t been demarcated and probably won’t be in the near future, as President Jair Bolsonaro has declared that he will not demarcate a single centimeter during his administration.The current status of Soares was not confirmed for this story by either the MPF or Potássio do Brasil.A house in Urucurituba village. Local indigenous people worry how the potash mine will impact their lives and livelihoods. Image by Thais Borges.The consultation beginsThe consultation as agreed upon by all parties will include all of the Mura villages in the municipalities of Autazes and Careiro da Várzea, as well as all traditional riverine communities that will be affected by the mine and its operation.Before conducting the consultation, the Mura first had to agree to the form they wished it to take. “Potássio do Brasil wanted a consultation without a protocol [an official procedure with rules] to be carried out at a public hearing,” said prosecutor Soave. “But the Indians decided that they wanted an [officially stipulated] protocol.”Anthropologist Bruno Caporrino advised the indigenous communities in the shaping of the protocol. A central task, he said, was to get the Indians to understand their rights as citizens. “The underlying theme in all the discussions was to differentiate public policies from favors, to get [indigenous people] to grasp that they had the right to have rights.”According to Caporrino, the state has never had a strong presence in Amazonia, so it has been the rural elites who have handed out rudimentary public services. With the state still absent in rural areas, it’s hard to change that mentality, he explained: “There comes a point, after having a third child die from malaria, that an Indian begs a company to at least build a health post in the village.”Anthropologist Bruno Caporrino. Image by Thais Borges.In the early days, Potássio do Brasil tried to win over indigenous people by offering old-style, paternalistic favors. According to a report drawn up by the MPF in support of a formal protocol, the company offered various deals and percs, promising to build schools and to give money to leaders, in exchange for project support.However, indigenous leaders rejected the company’s approach and began carefully, in consultation with their communities, to draw up the kind of protocol they wanted. First the people had to decide who among them had the right to vote. After long discussion, they determined that Indians living in towns would be excluded and only those living in villages — and thus the ones to be directly affected — would be authorized to vote. Polling, they determined, would take place at formal meetings with minutes.The affected area would be divided into six regions with three voting cycles. At each level of voting, the Indians would attempt to reach a consensus, but, if after three rounds of balloting, consensus didn’t emerge, then the Indians would accept a majority vote.But — and this is crucial — they agreed that project approval must gain the support of at least 75 percent of voters. “They decided against a simple majority because they feared that, with [as much as] 49 percent of the population unhappy, the community would be riven in two,” explained Caporrino.“Agreeing on the protocol was in itself a victory,” said Pavão, who noted that the democratic process hammered out by all can be used not just once, but again and again in future on other divisive issues.In July of 2019, the indigenous communities handed over their approved protocol to the Federal Justice in Amazonas State. The consultation is now underway.Francisco, the tuxaua of Taquara village. Image by Mauricio Torres.Democracy at workFrancisco, the tuxaua of Taquara village, urged that the indigenous communities finally get their hands on the facts: “The protocol is going to force both the government and the company to talk about what is good and what is bad about the project. The good part is that it will bring jobs. The bad part is the impact it will have on the environment and on our people, because a lot of outsiders will be coming in, who can bring in illness and prostitution.”No one knows exactly how long the consultation process might take. “It could be decided in the first cycle or take five months or even 15 months. But it will certainly be done within a year and half,” Caporrino predicted. And no one knows what their communities will decide.But Potássio do Brasil’s Jácome is confident: “We believe that, once they know the project and the plans and programs that have been drawn up for the Indians, the Mura people in Autazes and Careiro da Várzea will accept the project.” And, even if they turn it down, he believes there is a way forward. “If the Mura people don’t agree, we are open to finding out why and adapting the project, so that we can find a solution that is viable for everyone: the company, the community and the government.”Tuxaua (chief) Yuaka Mura, also known as José Claudio Mura, a coordinator for the Mura Indigenous Culture. Image by Mauricio Torres.Some indigenous leaders say, however, that they will never be convinced. One indigenous chief, commonly known by his Brazilian name, José Claudio Mura, but who prefers his indigenous name, Yuaka Mura, remains adamantly opposed. Yuaka Mura, a coordinator for the Mura Indigenous Culture, a militant indigenous movement, declared emphatically: “We don’t want mining on our land. We have seen the cost of mining in other parts of Brazil. It doesn’t have a future.”Caporrino explains that the people have three voting options: “Yes, No, or Yes if….” That third option would mean that the Mura want the mine to go ahead, but only after certain conditions are met. For instance, the people could demand that all of their ancestral land be demarcated.One nagging doubt hangs over the process: will the result of the indigenous consultation be binding or can authorities simply ignore it?The jurist Carlos Marés noted that the idea behind the consultation is to reach a mutually acceptable settlement. “If the State decides to push ahead [with the mine] without indigenous agreement, it will have to use an iron fist.”This is the first time that the Mura have been properly consulted about their future and it is a landmark in their attempt to halt the takeover of their land by outsiders. But, even if in the end they vote “no,” the people may still face a fierce struggle in getting the powerful forces supporting the potash mine to accept their final decision — going up against a juggernaut of municipal, state and federal governments; agribusiness; a transnational corporate giant; and international capital investors.How the Mura vote — and what happens after that vote — in this remote Amazonian municipality could have far-reaching consequences well beyond the making of a potash mine. What happens here could set a legal precedent for indigenous and traditional communities across Brazil as they face intensifying development pressures, and help rural peoples gain some control over the many unprecedented challenges to their way of life.Banner image caption: A child preparing fish in a Mura community. Image by Mauricio Torres.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Map showing demarcated indigenous lands and non-demarcated ancestral lands claimed by indigenous peoples, as well as potash exploratory wells and the Potássio do Brasil mine. Image by Mauricio Torres.center_img Agriculture, Agrochemicals, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Mining, Amazon People, Amazon Soy, Conservation, Controversial, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Featured, Forests, Green, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Mining, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Mining, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation last_img read more

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Women’s Soccer Hosts Northern Iowa on Wednesday

first_imgLive stats and a live stream will be available for the match. Senior midfielder Cassie Rohan netted the game-winning goal in the 42nd minute to record her first score of the season. Freshman Delaney Goertzen and senior Ali Burke were each credited with the first assist of their careers on the play. Forward Sydney Hayden earned All-MVC Honorable Mention status after leading the Panthers with six goals in 2018. The 5-foot-3 senior paces UNI with four assists and ranks second with three goals and 10 points this year. NOTE: Please be aware that this match was originally scheduled for 6 p.m. at Cownie Soccer Complex. This has CHANGED to 7 p.m. at Tiger Field in West Des Moines (3650 Woodland Avenue).DES MOINES, Iowa – The Drake University women’s soccer team hosts in-state rival Northern Iowa on Wednesday night at Tiger Field in West Des Moines (3650 Woodland Avenue). Kickoff is slated for 7 p.m. Head coach Lindsey Horner is aiming for career win No. 101 after joining the triple-digit club following the Bulldogs’ 1-0 win at Evansville on Saturday. The Panthers (5-7, 1-2 MVC) played host to Indiana State in their last match, earning a 2-1 win to halt a four-game skid. UNI, which was picked fifth in the MVC preseason poll, returns 19 letter winners and four starters from last season’s team that finished 9-7-3. Jordyn Rolli has proven to be a dangerous weapon for the Panthers’ offense. The senior forward has recorded team-bests in goals (six) and points (15), and is tied for second on the team with three assists. Story Linkscenter_img Scouting UNI UNI’s defense, however, ranks last in the MVC by conceding 2.25 goals per game, and the Panthers have allowed multiple goals in over half their games. Print Friendly Version Drake and UNI will clash for the 19th time on Wednesday, and the Bulldogs lead the all-time series 10-4-4. Drake bested the Panthers, 2-1, last year in Cedar Falls. Live Stats While Rolli and Hayden lead the charge, UNI boasts a balanced offensive attack that ranks second in the MVC in goals scored per game (1.83). Ten Panthers have scored points this season, and six have posted multiple goals and assists. Live Stream last_img read more

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Elections 2019: Mac Giolla Easbuig elected on first count in Glenties

first_imgIndependent Councillor Micheál Choilm Mac Giolla Easbuig has retained his seat on the first count for Glenties.The Glenties LEA Councillor secured 2007 first preference votes, sailing comfortably over the quota of 1875.Mac Giolla Easbuig has almost doubled his amount of votes since the last Local Election in 2014. In 2014, he achieved 1,100 – while today he was elected with 2,007 first preferences. Mac Giolla Easbuig, a Socialist Republican, is delighted to be elected on the first count.“First and foremost I’d like to thank everybody who has been out helping me; between posters, knocking on doors, and fundraising. A special thanks goes to my father who was out day and night for the past couple of months canvassing.”“I look forward to the next five years to use my seat, not just in day to day work, but to highlight social injustice in both our country as a whole and throughout the world.”Wearing a t-shirt in support of the Craigavon Two campaign, Mac Giolla Easbuig discussed the importance of showing international solidarity with the oppressed in Palestine, the Basque country, and Catalonia. “I will continue advocating for political prisoners, against the ongoing occupation of the six counties, and the military oppression against the working class communities in the six counties,” he told Donegal Daily.Following his landslide re-election, Mac Giolla Easbuig is looking forward to getting back to business.“I don’t take this vote for granted, I need to work for the next five years for the community I serve,” he concluded.More notes on the first count Sinn Féin candidates John Sheamuis Ó’Fearraigh polled highly with 1429 first preferences, as did Marie Therese Gallagher (1089).Noreen McGarvey (FF) and Michael McClafferty (FG) both achieved over 1,000 votes; achieving 1018 and 1012 first preferences respectively. From an electorate of 23,165 and a total poll of 12,851, 147 votes were spoiled.Full results of the first count:Enda Bonner (FF) 893Brian Carr (SF) 922Marie Therese Gallagher (SF) 1089Micheal Choilm Mac Giolla Easbuig (Independent) 2007Michael McClafferty (FG) 1012Noreen McGarvey (FF) 1018Anthony Molloy (FF) 916Liam Mulligan (Aontú) 349Seamus O’Domhnaill (FF) 979John Sheamuis Ó’Fearraigh (SF) 1429Seamus Rodgers (Labour) 544Evelyn Sweeney (FG) 724Liam Whyte (Independent) 822As the lowest scoring candidate, Liam Mulligan’s votes will be distributed. Concerns regarding the accuracy of yesterday’s tallies were voiced this morning in the Highlands Hotel, so the first count has provided a vital indication for how the rest of the day will go for the candidates.For live updates as they happen across the county, follow this link:LIVE: Donegal Daily Local Elections 2019 – follow our updatesElections 2019: Mac Giolla Easbuig elected on first count in Glenties was last modified: May 26th, 2019 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Donegal County Councildonegal election resultsle19donegallocal electionlocal elections 2019mac giolla easbuigMichael Choilm Mac Giolla Easbuigvoteslast_img read more

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Manuel to chair IMF committee

first_imgMinister of Finance Trevor Manuel, right,with President Thabo Mbeki and Deputy President Phumzile Mlambo-Nqcuka. (Image: The Presidency) Trevor Manuel after the announcementthat the 2010 Fifa World Cup wouldtake place in South Africa. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more photos, visit the image library)Janine ErasmusThe International Monetary Fund announced early in September 2008 that South African Minister of Finance Trevor Manuel will head an IMF committee to investigate and improve the organisation’s current decision-making policy and increase its legitimacy among member countries. The committee will then offer recommendations and advice on any modifications that will enable the IMF to carry out its function more efficiently.Manuel chairs a group comprised of a number of distinguished legal and financial experts from around the world, all appointed by Strauss-Kahn.These include Michel Camdessus, former MD of the IMF; Kenneth Dam, the Max Pam Professor of American and Foreign Law at Chicago University; former deputy director of the IMF Mohamed El-Erian, one of the world’s most respected economic and financial analysts; Indonesian Minister of Finance Sri Mulyani Indrawati, recently named as the 23rd most influential woman in the world by Forbes magazine; Guillermo Ortíz, Governor of the Bank of Mexico; Citigroup senior counsellor and former US Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin; and Amartya Sen, Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University and a 1998 Nobel laureate in Economics.The committee’s creation follows a May 2008 report by the IMF’s independent evaluation office – the organisation’s internal watchdog – which said the leadership of the IMF needed to be more accountable for the fund’s effectiveness in overseeing the global economy, and must change to reflect the rising world economic importance of developing markets such as China and India.The roles and responsibilities of the Board of Governors, the International Monetary and Financial Committee, the Executive Board, and Fund Management will soon come under close scrutiny. In this, the committee will add its perspective to work already carried out by other groups and individuals, including the IMF’s independent evaluation office and executive directors, as well as academics, analysts and civil society groups.Strauss-Kahn stated that he hoped to have the committee’s input by April 2009 and that concrete proposals, based on the findings of the committee and other participants, could be established by September 2009.“The task of enhancing the Fund’s legitimacy and effectiveness must also come to grips with the question of whether the significant changes since the establishment of the Fund require reform of the institutional framework through which members’ voting power is actually exercised,” said Strauss-Kahn. “I want to thank these eminent persons for agreeing to bring their experience, expertise, and wisdom to bear on the ongoing reform of IMF governance,” he added.The purse strings of the worldThe International Monetary Fund is one of the world’s most powerful international bodies, making decisions that affect millions of lives in developing countries. The IMF’s primary mission is to provide assistance to countries experiencing serious financial and economic difficulties by disbursing funds deposited by the 185 member countries.The IMF is governed by its member countries, of which South Africa is one. Each appoints one governor and one alternate governor to the board, which meets once annually. The governor is usually the minister of finance or the governor of the central bank of a country. The day-to-day work is carried out by the 24-strong Executive Board, whose members are voted as directors by member countries or groups of countries. The Executive Board selects the managing director of the IMF, who serves for a renewable five-year term.A popular politicianTrevor Manuel was appointed as Minister of Finance in April 1996 and has been one of South Africa’s most popular politicians, having achieved lower taxes, significant revenue overruns, a smaller current account deficit, and a shake-up of the South African Revenue Service during his tenure. Barely a year after his appointment, South Africa’s risk premium started falling on global financial markets and the country was able to borrow at lower interest rates.Manuel serves on a number of local, regional and international boards and committees, such as the World Bank, the African Development Bank Group, and the Development Bank of Southern Africa.In 2007 Manuel was named Euromoney magazine’s African Finance Minister of the year. He has received honorary doctorates in commerce, technology, economics and law from several major institutions, among them the universities of Stellenbosch, Rhodes and KwaZulu-Natal. In 2001 he was inducted into the South African Academy of Engineering.Earlier in 2008, Manuel and Germany’s International Development Minister Heidemarie Wieczorek-Zeul were named by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon as Special Envoys for Development Finance. In 2002 the minister filled the same role for then Secretary-General Kofi Annan, where he partnered with Michel Camdessus.Manuel and Wieczorek-Zeul have been tasked with the organisation of the follow-up International Conference on Financing for Development, which will take place in Doha, Qatar, at the end of 2008.On 29 August 2008 Manuel, an engineer by training, was installed as the first Chancellor of his alma mater, the Cape University of Technology, by South African Minister of Education Naledi Pandor. Manuel was a civil engineering student at the university in the 1970s when it was still known as the Peninsula Technikon.Speaking at the ceremony, Pandor said, “Trevor is a political leader who has survived stringent challenges, and a committed worker who has shown sceptics that a black South African leader of the liberation movement would and could lead South Africa to a path of economic growth and a stable respected post-apartheid business destination. “Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Janine Erasmus on [email protected] articlesSouth Africa’s economy Useful linksSouth African Department of FinanceSouth African Reserve BankInternational Monetary FundUnited Nations Financing for Developmentlast_img read more

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Wait is over as Eya Laure finally gets to showcase game for UST Tigresses

first_imgPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Not only was Laure a two-time Best Opposite Hitter during her high school days, she was a one-time MVP, a two-time Best Attacker, a one-time Best Setter, and a Rookie of the Year.Despite playing such a multi-dimensional game, Laure said she’s focused on being the team’s opposite hitter with captains Cherry Rondina and Milena Alessandrini holding on to the open spiker role.“I’ll still be an opposite hitter but coach [Kung Fu Reyes] told me that I can be a setter or an open spiker in emergency situations,” said Laure.ADVERTISEMENT LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion Manny Pacquiao lighter for Las Vegas returncenter_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ Instead of jumping straight to college, Laure had to go through two more years of high school but the multi-awarded star is headed to the collegiate ranks.“I will show everyone what’ I’ve worked for and how excited I am to play after two years of waiting because we were hit by the K-12,” said Laure in Filipino during the Golden Tigresses’ Thursday practice at UST’s Quadricentennial Pavilion.FEATURED STORIES SPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“I’ll finally be able to showcase my game and what I did to improve myself after what UST did in molding me for college.”Laure is expected to become the team’s starting opposite hitter, which is just one of the positions she’s excelled at in high school. LATEST STORIES Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—It took two years of waiting but Eya Laure is finally heading into the collegiate game.University of Santo Tomas’ prized rookie was just one of the many student-athletes who had to wait a couple of years before entering the seniors’ division of the UAAP due to the implementation of the K-12 program.ADVERTISEMENT Chinese military personnel parade near Hong Kong border PLAY LIST 01:05Chinese military personnel parade near Hong Kong border01:22Thai court upholds death sentence for Myanmar men over Brit killings03:41PDEA chief: Albayalde asked me not to implement dismissal order vs Pampanga cops02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion View commentslast_img read more

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Olympics embarrassment looms as Tokyo governor faces calls to quit

first_imgTokyo Governor Yoichi Masuzoe, under fire for using tax money to pay for family vacations and artwork, faces growing demands to quit over a scandal that may affect national elections and embarrass Tokyo as host of the 2020 Summer Olympics.Masuzoe’s predecessor had to quit over a funding scandal soon after Tokyo won the Olympics hosting rights and now lawmakers in the Tokyo assembly are calling for Masuzoe’s head after repeated inability to justify his use of public funds, which included buying comic books for his children.Masuzoe, 67, who won election in 2014 with support from Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s ruling coalition, will face more pressure to quit from a no-confidence motion likely to be submitted by opposition politicians on Tuesday.But the timing is delicate, balancing coalition fears that Masuzoe could hurt them in a July 10 upper house election against the embarrassment of having a stand-in governor accept the Olympic flag at the Rio Olympics – a symbolic handover that passes the Olympics to the next host.MORE TIMEMasuzoe himself has begged for more time, pledging to return his salary but asking to postpone a no-confidence vote until after the Olympics end on August 22, since losing the vote could mean a gubernatorial election during the Olympics.”I don’t intend to cling to the governor’s seat,” he told the Tokyo assembly after hours of intense questioning on Monday.”But I think the confusion of having an election at the same time as the Rio Olympics would not be to the benefit of the next Olympic host city.”advertisementLawmakers from Abe’s ruling Liberal Democratic Party have not yet backed the no-confidence vote, but their junior coalition partner, the Komeito, may submit its own.LDP officials have acknowledged that the scandal, which has flooded the Tokyo government with complaints from voters, could make things tough for the party.Asked whether the coalition’s backing of Masuzoe in 2014 would have an impact on the upper house election, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said: “Based on that, I believe certain judgments will be made.”Tokyo 2020 Olympics planning officials said Masuzoe’s woes were having no impact on preparations for the games, but planning has been hit by troubles including scrapping plans for the main stadium and plagiarism allegations forcing them to abandon their original games logo.Tokyo’s bid has also come under scrutiny after questions were raised about payments by the bid committee.last_img read more

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