Youth from Indigenous Communities Join the Peruvian Army

first_img“We believe it is important for parents to entrust their children to the Army, because we can open a door to opportunities for personal and professional growth,” said Gen. Astudillo, who emphasized the multiple options to study for careers in production and technical vocations, such as carpentry, mechanics, welding, electricity, plumbing, shoemaking, and tailoring. During that time, they’ll receive basic Military training, a combat-related specialization, health insurance, and education through certified production and technical vocation programs that allow Soldiers quick entry into the workforce; they’ll also receive a stipend of $300 per month. The training provides recruits with skills they need to monitor the conservation and preservation of the ecosystem in their respective jurisdictions, said Colonel Iván Rojas Rodríguez, chief of the Peruvian Army Reserves and Mobilization Command (COREMOVE). They’ll also be prepared to combat terrorism, illegal logging, human trafficking, and drug trafficking in the VRAEM, the country’s main illegal coca-producing area. “These new Soldiers will be the representatives of our institution and will work to eradicate the illegal logging, human trafficking, and drug trafficking activities that might occur in their communities,” said General César Astudillo, chief of the VRAEM Special Command and the Commanding General of the Army 4th Division. Pedro Castañeda Vela, mayor for the district of Pangoa, said non-billeted Military service is a valuable opportunity for young people to prevent crime and criminals from gaining a toehold in indigenous communities. “Every two months, the youths return to the barracks for ten days where they acquire new knowledge and learn new Military tactics so they can subsequently return to their communities and apply what they’ve learned,” Col. Rojas said. “But when circumstances so require, personnel can be recalled unexpectedly and for an indefinite period of time.” Months of training “The Government of Peru is providing a magnificent opportunity to don an Army uniform and proudly fight several types of crimes and offenses,” Castañeda said. Months of training Indigenous Troops to fight an array of illegal activities In 2015, a total of 19,000 people were recruited for billeted Military service in Peru. “We believe it is important for parents to entrust their children to the Army, because we can open a door to opportunities for personal and professional growth,” said Gen. Astudillo, who emphasized the multiple options to study for careers in production and technical vocations, such as carpentry, mechanics, welding, electricity, plumbing, shoemaking, and tailoring. In 2015, a total of 19,000 people were recruited for billeted Military service in Peru. Congratulations to all the brave men who joined different military groups, keep it up and follow the footsteps of the heroes who passed on their bravery in the group, place and work they had. Hurrah for the brave men and may God bless you. Call on our God wherever you may be because being a believer does not diminish your manhood. It’s important for indigenous peoples to join in societal, economic and political activities, as a disadvantaged class, to contribute their actions to developing Peru. Something good to improve the country from so much violence. The youth are the future of the country.Let them carry on for the good More or less, it’s not so great Good for the natives. Were they well trained to fight criminals and/or all those involved ILLEGALLY in corruption ?????????? It’s good that the recruitment program includes workforce training. The Army should also learn from their customs and thus achieve better engagement. Since there are duties owed to the country, for them the homeland represents honor and respect for their ancestors, it is not in vain that they are cultures that conserve thousands of years of knowledge which needs to be preserved. It’s good that the Army is becoming integrated into the history of our Peruvian compatriots. Soldiers billeted in barracks may serve for 12, 18, or 24 months, depending primarily on the recruit’s desire to remain in the institution, Col. Rojas said. “These new Soldiers will be the representatives of our institution and will work to eradicate the illegal logging, human trafficking, and drug trafficking activities that might occur in their communities,” said General César Astudillo, chief of the VRAEM Special Command and the Commanding General of the Army 4th Division. By Dialogo June 17, 2015 Indigenous Troops to fight an array of illegal activities “The age for youths in billeted service is from 18 to 25,” said Col. Rojas, specifying that the Soldier stays on base from Monday through Friday but has Saturday afternoon and part of Sunday to visit with family. A total of 130 Peruvian youths between the ages of 18 and 30 who belong to indigenous communities located in the Apurímac, Ene, and Mantaro River Valleys (VRAEM) region have volunteered for 24 months of non-billeted Army service. At the beginning of their service, the indigenous youths are housed in Military barracks – just as billeted service members are – and undergo three months of training. After that, they gather every two months to receive additional training and learn new skills. The non-billeted Military service is rendered in the typical clothing of the indigenous communities. The benefits of military service “Every two months, the youths return to the barracks for ten days where they acquire new knowledge and learn new Military tactics so they can subsequently return to their communities and apply what they’ve learned,” Col. Rojas said. “But when circumstances so require, personnel can be recalled unexpectedly and for an indefinite period of time.” Just like service members billeted in barracks, non-billeted Soldiers receive a series of benefits, such as access to health care for life through a comprehensive insurance plan that ends only if the person acquires a different insurance policy. Most of the Military recruits belong to the indigenous communities of Santo Domingo de Sonomoro, Alto Kiatari, San Ramón de Pangoa, Alto Anapati, Mazaronquiari, Mayni, Cubantia, Santa Clara Chavini, San Jerónimo, Matereni, Nomatsiguenga, and Ashaninka, which are located in the city of Pangoa, province of Satipo, in the region of Junín, some 12 hours by road from Peru’s capital city, Lima. “The Government of Peru is providing a magnificent opportunity to don an Army uniform and proudly fight several types of crimes and offenses,” Castañeda said. Every recruit enlisted in non-billeted Military service will be given a national identification card issued by the National Identification and Vital Statistics Registry, as well as a debit card issued by the National Bank to which their stipends will be credited. A total of 130 Peruvian youths between the ages of 18 and 30 who belong to indigenous communities located in the Apurímac, Ene, and Mantaro River Valleys (VRAEM) region have volunteered for 24 months of non-billeted Army service. Soldiers billeted in barracks may serve for 12, 18, or 24 months, depending primarily on the recruit’s desire to remain in the institution, Col. Rojas said. During that time, they’ll receive basic Military training, a combat-related specialization, health insurance, and education through certified production and technical vocation programs that allow Soldiers quick entry into the workforce; they’ll also receive a stipend of $300 per month. The training provides recruits with skills they need to monitor the conservation and preservation of the ecosystem in their respective jurisdictions, said Colonel Iván Rojas Rodríguez, chief of the Peruvian Army Reserves and Mobilization Command (COREMOVE). They’ll also be prepared to combat terrorism, illegal logging, human trafficking, and drug trafficking in the VRAEM, the country’s main illegal coca-producing area. “The age for youths in billeted service is from 18 to 25,” said Col. Rojas, specifying that the Soldier stays on base from Monday through Friday but has Saturday afternoon and part of Sunday to visit with family. Every recruit enlisted in non-billeted Military service will be given a national identification card issued by the National Identification and Vital Statistics Registry, as well as a debit card issued by the National Bank to which their stipends will be credited. The benefits of military service Pedro Castañeda Vela, mayor for the district of Pangoa, said non-billeted Military service is a valuable opportunity for young people to prevent crime and criminals from gaining a toehold in indigenous communities. Just like service members billeted in barracks, non-billeted Soldiers receive a series of benefits, such as access to health care for life through a comprehensive insurance plan that ends only if the person acquires a different insurance policy. Most of the Military recruits belong to the indigenous communities of Santo Domingo de Sonomoro, Alto Kiatari, San Ramón de Pangoa, Alto Anapati, Mazaronquiari, Mayni, Cubantia, Santa Clara Chavini, San Jerónimo, Matereni, Nomatsiguenga, and Ashaninka, which are located in the city of Pangoa, province of Satipo, in the region of Junín, some 12 hours by road from Peru’s capital city, Lima. At the beginning of their service, the indigenous youths are housed in Military barracks – just as billeted service members are – and undergo three months of training. After that, they gather every two months to receive additional training and learn new skills. The non-billeted Military service is rendered in the typical clothing of the indigenous communities. last_img read more

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Badgers fall to pair of ranked Big Ten powers

first_imgDEREK MONTGOMERY/Herald photoThe University of Wisconsin softball team fell short against Northwestern in both games of a doubleheader Sunday, falling 8-7 and 3-2. With the losses, Wisconsin drops to 12-17 on the season and 3-5 in the Big Ten.After suffering a sweep at the hands of the nation’s No. 1 team, Michigan, Friday and Saturday, Wisconsin was hoping to bounce back against No. 18 Northwestern, in arguably its toughest weekend of the season.Wisconsin took a 3-0 lead in the bottom half of the second inning of Sunday’s first game thanks to a two-run single with the bases loaded by sophomore center fielder Sam Polito.Northwestern struck back in the top of the third when Wildcat right fielder Erin Mobley hit a two-run homerun off UW sophomore pitcher Eden Brock to make the score 3-2.Wisconsin answered with a two-out rally in the fourth inning. With two down, Polito came up with senior left fielder Anastasia Miller on third and drove her in with an infield single that went no further than four feet in front of the plate. Freshman first baseman Katie Hnatyk then laced a single to right, and both runners advanced one base on an error. Senior shortstop Kris Zacher then drew a walk, as ball four got past the catcher, allowing Polito to scamper home. Senior catcher Boo Gillette then walked, but not before Zacher stole second. Northwestern’s pitcher then balked before throwing her next pitch, allowing Hnatyk to score and giving Wisconsin a 6-2 lead.But the Wildcats quickly responded with a three-run fifth inning, before tying the score in the sixth, despite the defensive play of the game by Wisconsin. With a runner on second, Wildcat shortstop Stephani Churchwell crushed a double that hit off the top of the wall. The Wildcat runner attempted to score on the play, but Miller made a great relay throw to freshman third baseman Joey Daniels, who fired a perfect strike to Gillette at home to throw out the runner at the plate. Mobley drove in Churchwell, however, to make the score 6-6.Wisconsin managed to get runners on second and third with only one out in the bottom half of the inning, but the rally stalled, and Northwestern took the lead in the seventh, when a pair of UW errors, their third and fourth of the game, led to a pair of two-out runs in the inning.“Four errors in the first game, when you know the ball is going to put in play, you just have to get yourself up mentally and do a better job defensively,” Badger head coach Karen Gallagher said.Wisconsin closed the gap to one in the bottom of the seventh when Miller homered to right-center, her fifth blast of the season, but would draw no closer, falling 8-7.In game two, Wisconsin fell behind early, giving up a two-out, two-run single to Churchwell, who ended the day 7-for-8 with two doubles, three runs and three RBIs. Churchwell’s lazy fly down the right-field line allowed the runners on second and third to score easily.Wisconsin answered the next inning, with Polito drawing a one-out walk to bring up Hnatyk. The freshman took the first pitch she saw and deposited it beyond the wall in left center for her third homerun of the season, tying the score at 2-2.With the game knotted up, the contest quickly became a pitchers duel. Wisconsin senior Katie Layne and Northwestern’s Eileen Canney combined to allow only five hits through the rest of the game. Layne cruised after giving up the two runs in the second, striking out six and only allowing three hits.Wisconsin was equally unable to get to Canney after Hnatyk’s blast, managing only two hits the rest of the game.A crucial play came in the Northwestern half of the fifth inning, when the Wildcats loaded the bases with no outs. Catcher Jamie Dotson blooped a single to left, allowing a run to score. However, a base-running error by Northwestern allowed the Badgers to throw out a runner at the plate as part of a double play, keeping the Wildcat damage to just one run.That one run would be the difference, however, as UW failed to create a threat in the final two frames, dropping their fifth game in a row and suffering a sweep on the weekend.“Eden Brock and Katie Layne did their job today, and all weekend,” Gallagher said. “Eden gave up a lot of hits, but they weren’t hits that hurt us. What hurt us was not playing solid defense behind them.”Gallagher was disappointed with the four losses, but was encouraged that UW played the top competition in the conference very tough and potentially could have gone 3-1 on the weekend.“When the luck is with you, it’s with you, and it wasn’t for us this weekend,” Gallagher said. “You look at who is stepping up; it is the younger players. All in all, I thought we played very competitive ball. When you are losing one-run ball games to the No.1 and No. 18, you have to take what you can out of that. I feel good about the rest of the year; we just have to get back on a roll.”last_img read more

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Rebels ride Zubick to 3-1 victory over Leafs

first_imgIt’s an Achilles Heel that keeps on haunting the Nelson Leafs — goal scoring.For the second straight game all the Green and White could manage was a single goal en route to dropping a 3-1 decision to the Castlegar Rebels Friday night in Kootenay International Junior Hockey League action at the NDCC Arena.The win by the Rebels evens the season series between the two Murdoch Division rivals a 1-1-1.Despite being out shot 11-9 by the visitors, it was the Leafs getting on the scoreboard first as Nolan Percival combined with Tim Nichols and Matt MacDonald to open the scoring five minutes into the first period.However, Castlegar tied up the game catching the Leafs on the power play with a shorthanded tally by Mike Bhatoa midway through the frame.In the second Cal Owens scored what proved to be the winner, scoring on Nelson netminder Adam Maida. Lindan Calliou scored into an empty net in the third to seal the win for the Rebels.Nelson out shot Castlegar 32-29 but Patrick Zubick, named the Away Star, came up big throughout the game to silence the Leafs offence.Zubick held Nelson to a single goal last weekend in a 1-1 overtime tie between the two teams.Nelson now drops into a tie with the red-hot Beaver Valley Nitehawks for top spot in the Murdoch Division.Beaver Valley, winners of three straight games, edged Kimberley Dynamiters 4-3 in Fruitvale.Kimberley suffered its second consecutive loss after starting the season 6-0.Nelson returns to action Saturday when Spokane visits the NDCC Arena for a 7 p.m. puck drop.The Leafs conclude the weekend Sunday afternoon at 2 p.m. in Castlegar against the Rebels.Meanwhile Castlegar host Revelstoke Grizzlies at 7 p.m. in the Castlegar Complex.last_img read more

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Trail AA Orioles AA American Legion squad hosts tourney at Butler Park

first_img“This tournament is warm-up for us so to speak,” Mace explained. “Chewelah is a AAA team we are a double A team and of course the Trail Sr. Orioles area a the Senior Men’s team.”The tournament opens Friday with the AA Orioles facing Chewelah at 7 p.m.Saturday, games are at 1 p.m., 3:30 p.m. and 6 p.m.Sunday, the Orioles face Chewelah at 11 a.m. before closing out the tournament at 4 p.m. against Trail Sr. Orioles.The Trail AA Orioles AA American Legion team consists of players from throughout the West Kootenay.Four of the players — Austin Tambellini, Reese Tambellini, Casey Harrison, and Joel Aubert — are from Nelson with two — Nathan Soukeroff and Daniel Gangier — from Castlegar.The rest of the team is from the Trail area.The coaching staff includes Mace as manager, Dallas Calvin as outfield/hitting coach, Kyle Paulson as pitching coach and Kyle Mace, hitting/infield coach. The Trail AA Orioles AA kicks off the season this weekend by hosting the Trail Invitational Baseball Tournament at Butler Park.The Orioles play in a new division of the American Legion Baseball League against teams from Colville, Asotin, Mt. Spokane, Lewis and Clarke, Gonzaga Prep, Mead, Rogers and West Valley“Last year we played to an 8-8 record in league play just out of the playoffs,” said manager Ron Mace.Mace said the Trail AA Orioles play in the XBL men’s league in Trail to prepare for the season.last_img read more

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Indonesia agrees to attempt Sumatran rhino IVF with eggs from Malaysia

first_imgConservationists have welcomed a long-awaited agreement by Indonesia and Malaysia to move ahead with assisted reproductive technology for the captive breeding of the nearly extinct Sumatran rhino.Indonesia has long balked at sending rhino sperm to Malaysia for use in artificial insemination, but has now agreed to accept eggs from Malaysia to carry out in vitro fertilization.If successful, the program would give the species a much-needed boost in genetic diversity.Scientists in Germany last year used IVF to successfully produced embryos — though not a baby — of white rhinos, an African species. JAKARTA — The governments of Indonesia and Malaysia have agreed to carry out in vitro fertilization of Sumatran rhinos, heralding a breakthrough in a decades-long effort to breed the nearly extinct species in captivity.The procedure will take place in Indonesia, which has long balked at requests to send sperm to Malaysia for artificial insemination efforts there.Conservationists in both countries and abroad had been pushing for some kind of assisted reproductive technology for the species, whether through artificial insemination (introducing sperm taken from a male rhino into a female) or IVF, in which an egg extracted from a female is fertilized in a lab and implanted in a surrogate female.Indonesia is home to an estimated 30 to 80 Sumatran rhinos (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis), at most, while Malaysia now has just one — a female — after its last male died in May. Under the newly announced plan, researchers hope to use sperm from one of Indonesia’s captive male rhinos to fertilize eggs sent from the lone female of the species in Malaysia.“Originally the plan was to bring sperm [of the rhinos in Indonesia] there [to Malaysia], but after discussions and negotiations, it’s eventually decided to bring the eggs here [to Indonesia],” Indra Exploitasia, the director of biodiversity conservation at Indonesia’s environment ministry, told reporters in Jakarta on July 31.“We have actually agreed on this at lower levels,” she said, adding that both Indonesian and Malaysian governments were completing the administrative process. These include requirements under the Nagoya Protocol, which governs the international sharing of genetic material.Zulfi Arsan, head veterinarian at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, hand feeds Andalas, the first Sumatran rhino bred and born in captivity in over a century. Image by Jeremy Hance/Mongabay.Indra said the IVF procedure would be performed by Indonesian experts, with funding from the Indonesian government.“We would pick the best sperm from all of the male rhinos we have here,” she said, referring to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas National Park.Should the procedure prove successful, resulting in a viable embryo, Indra said it would be implanted in the uterus of a surrogate mother from one of the captive female rhinos in Indonesia. Indra said Indonesia and Malaysia had not yet agreed on ownership of any offspring resulting from the IVF program.Despite this last sticking point, conservationists from both countries have welcomed the advance in this long-awaited collaboration, noting that producing a viable Sumatran rhino embryo through IVF would add much-needed diversity to the captive population.Four of the seven rhinos at the Indonesian SRS, including all of the males, are closely related. Iman, the Malaysian female, comes from a population in Borneo that was once considered a separate subspecies, and which has been genetically separated from the Sumatran populations for thousands of years.The journey toward collaboration between the two countries has been a fraught one, with Indonesia for years reluctant to heed Malaysian requests for a transfer of sperm to attempt artificial insemination in Malaysia. Last October, Indonesia’s conservation chief, Wiratno, said the IVF program had been postponed because Iman, who was being treated for a uterine tumor, had ceased to produce viable eggs.Officials from the Sabah Wildlife Department, in Malaysian Borneo, reported last December that Iman had suffered a ruptured tumor in her uterus, leading to massive bleeding. Since then, however, an intensive regimen of medical treatment and feeding has raised hopes about her prospects for recovery.The team caring for Iman, believed to still be fertile, says the rhino is recovering and produces viable oocytes with assistance.John Payne, the head of the Borne Rhino Alliance, said that collecting eggs from Iman would be very challenging and would require a highly skilled and coordinated team of veterinarians and anesthetists.“This is not a time for training or capacity building. It is a time to get on the best experts,” he told Mongabay in an email.Iman is the last Sumatran rhino left in Malaysia. A tumor in her uterus ruptured in 2017, and while scientists don’t believe she can carry a baby to term, they’re confident her eggs can still be used for in vitro fertilization. Image courtesy of the Sabah Wildlife Department.He said the rhino would be put under general anesthesia, which entailed some degree of risk, particularly inadvertent puncturing of a blood vessel if the animal moved slightly but suddenly during the egg extraction process.“This is even more dangerous in a rhino with large fibroids in the uterus, like Iman,” he said. “Great skill and rapid performance are both of the essence.”After the successful collection, Payne said the eggs had to be taken in a buffer solution, kept at the rhino’s body temperature, to where the IVF would be conducted.“Essentially, the quicker this is done the better, within a 24 hour time frame,” he said. “However, if the eggs are found to be still immature, they will need to be kept in a specialist laboratory for maturation, which could take up to a few days.”Payne suggested the collection be carried out by Thomas Hildebrandt, a professor from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research in Berlin, who has successfully extracted eggs from Iman since 2014. He added that Zainal Zahari Zainuddin, Iman’s Malaysian veterinarian, should also be involved in the process.For the IVF, Payne suggested Arief Boediono, an Indonesian professor who is an expert in the practice.Widodo Ramono, the executive director of the Indonesian Rhino Foundation (YABI), said his team was ready to help with getting the sperm needed to fertilize the collected eggs. “This would be an opportunity for our experts to perform IVF,” he said.Payne said his pick for the best sperm donor would be Andalas, a male at the SRS who was born in a captive-breeding program at Cincinnati Zoo in 2001 and has since sired two calves.“[H]e is a proven father, and the spontaneous method should ideally be used” to collect the specimen, Payne said.Widodo said the experts needed to ensure the availability of a healthy surrogate rhino mother before performing the IVF. “Right now, there’s only one: Ratu, who is currently going under a natural breeding program,” he said noting that experts hoped she would achieve more natural pregnancies. (Ratu is the mother of the two calves conceived naturally with Andalas.)“If there is an embryo [resulting from the IVF], it should be kept until a surrogate mother is available,” Widodo said, suggesting that Ratu, a proven natural breeder, should be kept in that role.There’s a growing urgency to step up the captive-breeding program for the critically endangered species. With such a small population to draw from in Indonesia, the risk of genetic defects being passed on through captive breeding are high — which makes the need for the Indonesia-Malaysia collaboration all the more important.Scientists in Germany reported success in producing embryos — but not yet a baby — of an African species, the white rhino (Ceratotherium simum), through IVF. Before this, this form of assisted reproductive technology remained unproven in rhinos, and some experts were skeptical it could be perfected in time to stall the extinction of a species.Earlier this year, a 7-year-old greater one-horned rhino (Rhinoceros unicornis) gave birth following a combination of induced ovulation and artificial insemination.“This is the very first attempt at IVF using eggs from an aging and sick female with the sperm of an aging and fit male,” Payne said. “The chances of getting offspring at the first attempt is close to zero. What we are seeing here is the beginning of a process of refining techniques and protocols with a goal of success after several attempts.”Ratu, right, with her daughter, Delilah. Ratu and Andalas are parents to Andatu, a male born in 2012, and Delilah, a female born in 2016. Image by Jeremy Hance/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Biodiversity, Captive Breeding, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Environment, Ex-situ Conservation, Extinction, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, Megafauna, Rainforest Animals, Rhinos, Saving Species From Extinction, Sumatran Rhino, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Article published by Basten Gokkoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Plans revealed for a big Bundoran welcome on St Patrick’s Day

first_imgUp to 10,000 spectators are expected to flock into Bundoran for the annual St Patricks’ Day parade which will take place this Sunday 17th March from 3:30pm.The parade, with the theme “Welcome Home”, will commence at East End and make its way up the Main Street and into the West End.Parade director John O’Connell is delighted with the response for participants so far. He said: “We’ve had a number of community groups, local businesses and organisations registering to take part on the day. “We also have a number of marching and pipe bands including the Killadeas Pipe Band, Letterbreen Silver Band and the Moybrone Pipe Band.“Local musicians will also take part in the parade which promises a spectacle of colour as it moves through the Main Street on the day. The parade will once again be led by a colour party from the Irish Defence Forces based at nearby Finner Camp.”Tourism Officer Shane Smyth added: “While the parade is the anchor event, there’s plenty more happening across town right throughout the holiday weekend. All of the pubs will have live music during the day and into the evening.“The Allingham will have a 3 day weekend festival, Bundoran Adventure Park will be open as well as the amusement centres, the cinema, bowling, equestrian centre, surf schools and of course bars and restaurants.” There’s still time to join in the fun. If you’re a local business, tourism attraction, community group or organisation and would like to take part in the parade, then register now at www.discoverbundoran.com/parade.Cash prizes will be awarded for the best floats so make sure to put some thought into your entry!For those unable to make it to Bundoran for the parade on the day, it can be viewed live on the Discover Bundoran Facebook page from 3:30pm.For all the details on what’s happening in Bundoran for the holiday, log on to www.discoverbundoran.com/stpatricksdayPlans revealed for a big Bundoran welcome on St Patrick’s Day was last modified: March 11th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:bundoranSt Patrick’s Day Paradelast_img read more

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Springboks honour Breyton, Os

first_img22 July 2005Os du Randt and Breyton Paulse have both been honoured for their outstanding services to Springbok rugby. It happened on Thursday evening, during a live broadcast of Supersport’s popular Boots and All rugby programme.In recognition of their contribution, both players were presented with unique Tag Heuer watches.Paulse, who has joined French club Clermont on a two-year contract, will be playing in his fifty-second test when he faces the Wallabies at Ellis Park on Saturday in the return leg of the Nelson Mandela Challenge Shield.It is the first test of the year for the nippy winger because a knee injury forced him to miss the Springboks’ previous four matches.Paulse’s last test?There is the very real possibility that it might also be Paulse’s last game in the green and gold. His contract doesn’t include an agreement that he be released for Springbok matches if selected.Coach Jake White reckons he wants the winger in his squad for the 2007 World Cup, but the possibility of Paulse playing home tests looks bleak at best. Would White be willing to accommodate him given the nature of his contract in France? The answer to that question will become clear soon enough.Paulse’s superb test career began in November 1997 against Italy, a match that South Africa won 62-31. The Bok side that day included Os du Randt at loosehead prop.The Free State stalwart won’t be playing on Saturday. He is out of the test due to injury.World Cup winnerDu Randt’s test career began even before Paulse’s did, in October 1994, when South Africa beat Argentina 42-22 in Port Elizabeth. The following year he was an integral part of the Springboks’ World Cup winning effort on home soil.Later, Du Randt spent almost four-and-a-half years out of international rugby after at one stage retiring from the game. Bok coach Jake White recalled him in June 2004 for a two-match series against Ireland and he was immediately rewarded as Du Randt showed he could still compete with the best.As a result, he won the Players’ Player of the Year Award in 2004 and also appeared in all 13 of South Africa’s tests.He won his fiftieth test cap at Twickenham last year and has played in 54 tests in all. That is a record for a Springbok prop.Jake White is a big fan of both Paulse and Du Randt.“The gifts, he said, “are only a small gesture of appreciation to remind them of their service and loyalty to their country and the team. Os and Breyton are two exceptional individuals and I am extremely lucky to be able to call on their services.” Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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South Africa pumps R800m into research

first_img15 November 2012 Science and Technology Minister Derek Hanekom has approved the transfer of R798-million to South Africa’s National Research Foundation (NRF) for human resource development over the next three years. This is to strengthen South Africa’s postgraduate training, research and innovation, and to improve the country’s global competitiveness. As approved in the medium term expenditure framework (MTEF), the Department of Science and Technology will allocate the additional R87-million, R310-million and R401-million to NRF programmes in the 2012/13, 2013/14 and 2014/15 financial years respectively. The department has identified new-generation researchers, emerging researchers and established researchers as key components of South Africa’s human capital pipeline, and will invest heavily in the development of human capital in each sector. New-generation researchers are set to get R450-million, while emerging researchers will get R196-million and postgraduate bursaries R340-million. The allocation will enhance funding for postgraduate students in the country by improving the per capita bursary values and increasing the number of funded students, thus boosting the postgraduate pipeline retention in scarce and critical knowledge areas. The NRF’s internship programme will receive an increased allocation of R110-million over the next three years. The department has supported the placement of an average of 250 graduate interns annually. In an effort to increase this figure and enhance the race, gender and age profiles of productive researchers, the department will strengthen its support for emerging researchers by increasing investment in programmes such as once-off research development grants for qualifying young, black and/or women researchers with a valid NRF Y-rating. Research career advancement fellowships will be offered to senior post-doctoral fellows, who will be groomed for eventual research leadership positions and as potential candidates for the South African Research Chairs Initiative. The targets for allocation will be 50 percent women and 80 percent black individuals to bring about transformation in scientific leadership. These funds will provide funding for two centres of excellence that were previously not fully funded, as well as for the establishment of six new centres of excellence. Source: SANews.gov.zalast_img read more

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Market volatility likely to continue

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Doug Tenney, Leist MercantileThe “word for the day” certainly became multi-faceted last month. Words such as, trade, tariffs, retaliatory, deadlines, rhetoric, and US/China all combined for lower prices for soybeans, corn, and wheat, and developed into just one word: volatility. US/China trade relations for a brief moment in May seemed to be resolved erasing many weeks of uncertainty during March and April. However, that optimism quickly faded as grain prices collapsed during the first two weeks of June. Tougher talk from both the U.S. and China expanded into further trade retaliations on more and more goods and products in both countries. At one point, the U.S. wanted China to accept an additional $50 billion of U.S. goods. That number grew to $80 billion as discussions continued. The real sticking point continues to be intellectual property rights. The U.S. feels that China has stolen its technology. China does not even want to talk about intellectual property rights. Two realities quickly must be pointed out. No one wins in a trade war. Trade wars are not bullish for grains. Grain’s volatility has ramped up significantly in June due to the trade war issues with the U.S. and China.High U.S. administration officials traveled to China as discussions continued in multiple sessions each lasting several days. Meetings took place in both countries as trade officials attempted to iron out differences. Concerns in April seemed to slide away with the reality of any real tariffs imposed by the U.S. not taking place until late May or early June. At times it seemed as if each side knew what the other would do as tariffs proposed by the U.S. or China would be met with equal retaliatory tariffs on additional goods by the opposite party within 12 to 24 hours. In recent weeks it has become apparent that traders in the night session have different reactions to trade news and weather than the traders during the day session.  Numerous sessions of night trading activity had grains with small gains or losses at the close of the night session at 8:45 am EDT. As volume and the number of traders increased during the day session restart at 9:30 am EDT, small losses during the night session often expanded to double-digit losses by the close at 2:20 pm EDT.Grains fell to new year lows mid-June with July CBOT corn at $3.55 after reaching a 10-month peak in late May at $4.12. July CBOT soybeans touched $9.05 in mid-June with all of the trade uncertainty with China of the last few months. They had a high earlier this year in March at $10.90 on shrinking Argentina production.The June 29, 2018 USDA acreage report will be old news at your reading of this column. It is USDA’s first estimate of actual planted acres for 2018 U.S. crops. Corn and soybeans are the biggest numbers that producers will be anxiously awaiting. The March 30 Planting Intentions Report by USDA had 2018 US corn at 88 million acres and 2018 U.S. soybeans at 89 million acres. Both corn and soybean acres with the March report were less than last year. In 2017 the US had 90.2 million acres of corn and 90.1 million acres of soybeans. The 2018 acres decline for both corn and soybeans was a surprise to the market back in March. The March report indicated acres for the minor crops of spring wheat, oats, cotton, sorghum, and rice would increase 3.3 million acres. Corn and soybeans as a total were forecast to decline by 3.3 million acres. Farm revenue continues to be declining since 2012 as producers attempt to tweak acres to improve income.  The June 12 Monthly Supply and Demand Report brought good news to corn as old crop U.S. exports were increased while ending stocks declined. The 10-cent gain that day quickly evaporated in the next three days as US/China trade tensions escalated. Producers around the country continue to hope that the U.S. trade tariffs with China scheduled to begin July 6 are never implemented.last_img read more

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A farmer panel with Seed Consultants

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio Ag Net’s Joel Penhorwood sat down with farmers Charlie Roberts of Pickaway Co., Ron Bywater of Union Co., and Chuck Hann of Madison Co., alongside Seed Consultants’ Director of Agronomic Services Bill McDonald to talk a range of topics hitting agriculture. The group chats on everything from the trend of low potash applications and the ongoing government shutdown to a change in equipment dealer ownership and ruts in fields. Tune in!last_img read more

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