Diabetes, Obesity and Nutrition Physician Scientist (3-309-992/993)

first_imgThe Department of Medicine’s Endocrinology, Diabetes &Nutrition Division at the University of Maryland School of Medicineis recruiting for full-time Associate/fullProfessor-basic/clinical/translational scientist-investigators witha focus on diabetes, obesity and nutrition.Clinical care responsibilities are not required, however, can beincorporated for the right candidate, provided the candidate isBE/BC in Endocrinology and is eligible for an independent Marylandmedical license. Expected faculty rank for this position isAssistant Professor or higher, however, final rank, tenure statusand salary will be commensurate with selected candidate’squalifications and experience.For immediate consideration, please send a cover letter and arecent CV, including names and contact information of threereferences.For additional questions after application, please [email protected] :Successful candidates will be accomplished, federally fundedinvestigators, with a strong record of publications and documentedexperience in teaching, mentoring and leadership. Qualifiedcandidates are expected to contribute to the research, teachingand/or clinical missions of the University, sustain an externallyfunded individual research program consistent with the Departmentand School of Medicine’s vision, assist in the recruitment offunded investigators, and enhance research opportunities for thedivision. Ample time will be protected for research.last_img read more

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Home Canning

first_imgIf you are thinking about following in your grandmother’s footsteps to preserve food this summer, start preparing now by gathering your equipment and supplies. The proper tools should be kept in good condition to ensure safe, high quality, home-canned food.If you need to purchase equipment, there are two types of canners to consider: boiling water canners and pressure canners.A boiling water canner is used for canning acidic or acidified foods like most fruits, pickles, jams and jellies. Boiling water canners cost between $30 and $100, or they can be assembled at home using a large stockpot, a secure lid and a rack to keep jars off the bottom of the pot.A pressure canner is essential for canning low-acid foods such as vegetables, meats, fish and poultry. Temperatures inside pressure canners reach higher than boiling water canners — around 240 degrees Fahrenheit or higher compared to around 212 degrees Fahrenheit. In following the tested processes, canning at higher temperatures is necessary to kill the toxins that produce spores of the bacteria Clostridium botulinum. If these spores are not killed, they can grow out and produce a deadly toxin, or poison, in low-acid foods stored at room temperature.Pressure canners are available in two types: a dial-gauge canner or a weighted-gauge canner. Most steps in managing the pressure canning process are the same, but the two styles of canners have different types of gauges to indicate the pressure inside the canner. Expect to spend $100 to $150 or more on a pressure canner.If you use a dial-gauge canner, it’s important to have the gauge tested for accuracy when the gauge is dropped or damaged and before each canning season. It isn’t as easy as it used to be to get gauges tested. Try a local hardware store or your local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent, although not all offices continue to provide this service.For either type of canner, make sure that the rubber gasket is flexible and soft. If it is brittle, sticky or cracked, replace it with a new gasket. Also check that any openings, like vent ports, are completely clean and open.You’ll also need jars, lids and ring bands for canning. When getting started, new jars are a worthwhile investment, as opposed to purchasing used jars from a yard sale or flea market, because very old jars may break under pressure and heat. Mason-type jars of standard sizes — half-pint, pint and quart — are recommended for the tested processes. These jars are available for purchase from science-based sources such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture and land-grant universities like UGA.Make sure the jars are manufactured and sold for canning purposes; not all glass and Mason jars are tempered to prevent breakage due to the extreme heat and temperature swings of the canning process.When you begin to can your harvest, follow the manufacturer’s advice for preparing the jars and lids. In addition to standard cooking utensils like cutting boards and bowls, you will also want to have a jar funnel, jar lifter, lid wand, headspace tool and bubble freer handy for canning.If you choose to freeze your harvest, use packaging such as plastic bags or rigid containers that are intended for freezer storage of foods. Not all plastics are the same, and some materials will not hold up to freezer temperatures and protect your goodies from damaging air and mixtures of odors.A final must for canning is reliable, up-to-date canning and other food preservation instructions. Specific kitchen equipment or ingredients may also be needed to successfully follow directions as they are written for food preservation. In the case of canning in particular, very significant food safety risks are associated with following unsound recommendations.The sixth edition of the popular UGA Extension food preservation book, “So Easy to Preserve,” can be ordered through setp.uga.edu for $18. Check with your local UGA Extension office too, as some offices keep the book in stock. Reliable, up-to-date canning instructions can also be found on the National Center for Home Food Preservation’s website at nchfp.uga.edu.last_img read more

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COVID-19: Govt hopes Saudi Arabia will announce decision on haj soon

first_imgMedia outlets and news agencies reported in April that Saudi Arabia had asked Muslims to “postpone” plans to perform the obligatory pilgrimage this year as the kingdom grapples with its COVID-19 outbreak. It has suspended umrah since March.According to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University, 33,731 confirmed COVID-19 cases had been recorded in Saudi Arabia with 219 deaths as of Friday. The Saudi government has been ramping up testing after it eased a 24-hour curfew, except in hot spots including the Islamic holy city of Mecca.While waiting for a decision from Saudi Arabia, the government has asked Indonesian pilgrims to pay their haj travel fees in full, which range from Rp 31.4 million (US$2,102) to Rp 72.3 million per pilgrim. The ministry has recorded that nearly 180,000 of around 210,000 pilgrims had paid for their scheduled journeys.The first batch of Indonesian pilgrims was scheduled to depart on June 26.Some 2.5 million faithful from around the world traveled to Saudi Arabia last year to participate in the pilgrimage.Topics : He added that the government hoped the Saudi authorities would announce a final decision before the summer break on May 13.“If the decision was made after the summer break, it would leave us with not enough time to prepare for the pilgrimage.”Nizar asserted that preparations for the haj were continuing, with ministry officials holding manasik (pilgrimage rehearsals) virtually through videos disseminated through the ministry’s official social media accounts.Read also: Govt carries on with haj prep, claiming haj ‘cancellation’ a case of lost in translation The Religious Affairs Ministry is still waiting for Saudi Arabia to announce its final decision on this year’s haj that will see millions of Muslims performing rituals in the holy city of Mecca, as the kingdom mulls a plan to put the annual tradition on hold amid the COVID-19 pandemic.The ministry’s haj and umrah (minor haj) director general, Nizar Ali, said his office had been coordinating with the haj consul of the Indonesian Consulate General in Jeddah regarding this year’s haj, initially slated to be held from July 28 to Aug. 2.“There has yet to be a decision from Saudi Arabia’s Haj and Umrah Ministry on whether this year’s pilgrimage will take place,” Nizar said on Wednesday.last_img read more

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ISDH reports 4,944 positive COVID-19 cases

first_imgStatewide—As of midnight on Monday morning,  the Indiana State Department of Health announced that 4,944 Hoosiers have been diagnosed with COVID-19 in Indiana. To date, 26,191 tests have been reported to ISDH.  A total of 139 Hoosiers have died to date. Locally Decatur County had 90 confirmed cases, 55 for Franklin County, and 70 cases confirmed in Ripley County.last_img

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