Brooklyn Bowl Hosts All-Star Benefit For John Perry Barlow [A Gallery]

first_imgLoad remaining images Last night, Brooklyn Bowl hosted a great tribute to honor the songs of poet and Grateful Dead lyricist, John Perry Barlow. The event featured Grahame Lesh, Ross James, Alex Koford, and Scott Padden, aka the Terrapin Family Band, alongside an all-star cast of special guests. Eric Krasno and Jackie Greene both added their unique guitar playing to the occasion, with Jon Graboff of Ryan Adams & The Cardinals, Karina Rykman of Marco Benevento Band, Katie Jacoby, Rob Barraco of Dark Star Orchestra, Leslie Mendelson, and more.HeadCount and D’Angelico Guitars teamed up to auction off an exclusive guitar signed by Bob Weir and John Perry Barlow. The auction and show were designed to raise money for the John Perry Barlow Wellness Trust to aid the longtime Grateful Dead lyricist in his current medical battle. In case you weren’t able to make the event, you can also donate here. Check out the full gallery below, courtesy of Andrew Scott Blackstein Photography.last_img read more

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Europe sees little risk of avian flu from wild birds

first_imgAug 25, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – European veterinary experts who met in Brussels today concluded there is little immediate risk that wild birds will spread avian influenza from Russia into Europe.Accordingly, the experts determined it is not necessary to follow the precaution taken by the Dutch this week of banning the raising of poultry outdoors, according to a statement from the European Union (EU) Commission. But the group did call for increased surveillance of migratory birds.The Brussels meeting was triggered by the recent spread of H5N1 avian flu into Kazakhstan, parts of southern Siberia, and as far west as the southeastern flank of the Ural Mountains, which divide Siberian from European Russia.The veterinarians said it is not clear whether, or to what extent, wild birds have caused this expansion of the virus’s range.”Taking into account the existing knowledge on the migratory routes of the species proceeding from central and western Asia and that might pose a risk of spreading the H5N1 avian influenza virus into the EU, the immediate risk of introduction of AI [avian influenza] via these birds is probably remote or low,” the EU statement said.”It would not be proportionate to the current risk of disease introduction from Asia, including Russia (Siberia) through migratory birds to implement a generalized ban on keeping poultry outdoors,” the statement added.However, authorities called on member countries to step up testing of migratory waterfowl along flyways that could pose a risk of introducing avian flu. They also advised countries to:Encourage farmers to improve biosecurity measures and be alert for avian fluReview and update contingency plans for dealing with avian fluCarefully enforce regulations on importing birds and bird products into the EUIn contrast to the EU’s official optimism on the immediate risk, the president of the British Veterinary Association said the spread of avian flu to Britain is inevitable, according to press reports.BBC News quoted Dr. Bob McCracken as telling the gathered European vets, “Wild birds that have migratory pathways over Europe and the UK will become infected. It is inevitable that bird flu will be carried to this country by migrating birds.”McCracken further said, “The majority of our reared birds are still intensively reared and bred in large houses that are wild bird–proof. The danger is to free range birds and to backyard flocks.”In the Netherlands, where a highly pathogenic H7N7 avian flu virus forced the destruction of about 30 million poultry in 2003, farmers were told to keep all poultry indoors starting Aug 22. The order affects about 5 million free-range poultry, along with 80 million birds already kept in buildings, according to an Agence France-Presse report today.But experts who were quoted in a Canadian Press story yesterday expressed doubts about the effectiveness of keeping poultry indoors to protect them from avian flu.Dr. Karen Becker, a vet with the US Department of Health and Human Services, said there are no data to support the measure and commented that infectious diseases often sweep through poultry flocks that are confined indoors. And a British Columbia health official said chickens kept indoors were more vulnerable than those outside during the province’s outbreak of H7N3 avian flu last year.In other developments, Russian officials yesterday reported signs that the H5N1 outbreaks in southwestern Siberia were calming down. The government lifted quarantines at 12 locations in five regions where the virus had been found or suspected, according to a Reuters report.One place where the quarantine was lifted was the province of Kalmykia, near the Caspian Sea in European Russia, where the disease had been suspected but was never confirmed.However, the Reuters report also said avian flu had been detected in a wild duck in a previously unaffected part of Siberia, the Altai Republic. The republic is separate from the Altai region, where H5N1 avian flu was confirmed previously, the story said.The government of the republic said samples from the duck had tested positive for avian flu “of the fifth type,” but didn’t specify whether the strain was H5N1, Reuters reported.last_img read more

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Chase joins elite company as Windies escape with unlikely draw

first_img… becomes first Windies player in 50 years to score a century and take five wickets in the same Test(REUTERS) – Roston Chase joined elite company as West Indies escaped with an unlikely draw against India after the second Test concluded in Jamaica yesterday.Chase scored 137 not out to lead West Indies to safety, with the home team losing only two wickets on the fifth and final day at Sabina Park in Kingston.West Indies had reached 388 for six in their second innings when India captain Virat Kohli conceded a draw with a few overs still remaining.If not quite qualifying as a miracle, the result was certainly unexpected after the Windies began the final day staring down the barrel of defeat, precariously placed on 48 for four and still needing another 256 to make India bat again.Even though rain washed out most of day four, it seemed a formality for India to quickly wrap up victory and take a 2-0 lead in the four-Test series, but West Indies batsmen dominated from the very first over as Chase and his fellow middle-order batsman displayed assurance and more than a touch of class.Their performance will give Caribbean cricket fans hope that their team has a future in the five-day format.Chase, in just his second Test, took 5-121 with his off-spin in the India innings, before showing his class with the bat.He became just the fourth West Indies player to score a century and take five wickets in the same Test, and the first to do so in 50 years.Gary Sobers, the only player to accomplish the feat twice, last achieved that double in 1966.RAPTUROUS APPLAUSEThe small crowd erupted in rapturous applause when Chase completed his century and raised his bat in celebration, with nobody clapping louder than Viv Richards.Chase received excellent support from fellow 24-year-old Jermaine Blackwood (63) and Shane Dowrich (74), who was unfortunate to be given out lbw to Amit Mishra, with replays showing he appeared to get a thick inside.Blackwood displayed excellent technique with a series of classic straight drives that offered evidence of why he kept his place in the team despite a pair in the first Test.He smashed two sixes and nine fours in a 54-ball knock as he dominated a brisk fifth-wicket stand of 93 with Chase until he was superbly caught by a diving Cheteshwar Pujara, via bat-pad, off the spin bowling of Ravichandran Ashwin.Chase then shared in a sixth-wicket partnership of 144 with Dowrich, who departed with the result still very much in the balance.Captain Jason Holder, the fast-bowling all-rounder who knows how to wield a bat coming in at number eight, teamed up with Chase to assure the draw.The pair put on 103, Holder bringing up his 50 in style by hoisting Ashwin over long-off for six. He was 64 not out at the close.The rearguard action had statisticians searching through the record books, revealing it to be the first time ever that West Indies batsmen at five, six, seven and eight had each scored a half-century in the same innings.West Indies’ crushing defeat in the series-opener in Antigua, by an innings and 92 runs, meant the hosts had lost seven out of eight Tests while drawing the other game.But the series suddenly has new life going into the third Test to be played at Gros Islet on the island of Saint Lucia from August 9 to 13.WEST INDIES1st innings 196 (J. Blackwood 62; R. Ashwin 5-52)INDIA 1st innings 500 for 9 decl. (L. Rahul 158, A. Rahane 108 n.o.; R. Chase 5-121)WEST INDIES 2nd innings (Overnight 48-4)K. Brathwaite c Rahul b Mishra 23R. Chandrika b I. Sharma 1Da. Bravo c Rahul b Shami 20M. Samuels b Shami 0J. Blackwood c Pujara b R. Ashwin 63R. Chase not out 137S. Dowrich lbw b Mishra 74J. Holder not out 64Extras: (lb-2, nb-3, w-1) 6Total: (for 6 wickets, 104 overs) 388Fall of wickets: 1-5, 2-41, 3-41, 4-48, 5-141, 6-285.Bowling: I. Sharma 18-3-56-1 (nb-2), M. Shami 19-3-82-2, A. Mishra 25-6-90-2 (nb-1), U. Yadav 12-2-44-0 (w-1), R. Ashwin 30-4-114–1.last_img read more

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