Sceneplay: Ran

first_imgby Ross PhilipsIn today’s cinema the truly epic battle scene has been replaced by computer generated images. Although the capabilities of CGI to create realistic and sophisticated battle animations have grown incredibly over the last ten years, it’s just not the same as seeing real armies and actual destruction. The most truly epic and beautiful battle scene ever captured on film is not in the Lord of the Rings. It is the attack on Hidetora’s castle, in Ran, Akira Kurosawa’s samurai inspired adaptation of King Lear. In this scene, Lord Hidetora Ichimonji, brilliantly portrayed by Tatsuya Nakadai, is betrayed by his son, Taro, to whom he has bequeathed his crown. Instead of using fast paced editing, sound effects, and handy-cams in order to immerse  us in a first person perspective of the battle, Kurosawa uses long takes with the camera watching from high above as thousands of samurai warriors storm the castle. He shows scenes of incredible carnage, piles of bodies strewn with arrows, a man holding his severed arm, another man who has been shot through the eye with an arrow; however, instead of the sounds of battle, Kurosawa plays only the dramatic orchestral score. This allows the audience to reflect on what is being shown. Kurosawa often cuts away from these images of carnage to show the sun shining through the clouds, creating a visual metaphor of the heavens above juxtaposed with hell on earth. It is as if the camera is the eye of God watching from above.The scene ends with Hidetora sitting motionless as arrows fly around his head and his castle burns around him. All of his bodyguards and his concubines have been killed. The troops outside wait for the castle to finish burning down expecting that Hidetora will commit suicide rather than dishonor himself in defeat, but to their amazement Hidetora emerges from the smoke. He slowly walks down the steps towards the samurai army. Instead of attacking him the soldiers move to create a path for him to walk through. Despite his now pitiful state they are unwilling to attack the man who was once their tyrannical leader. As Hidetora walks through the gates of the exterior wall, Kurosawa frames the burning castle behind him. What makes this scene truly amazing is that there is no CGI. Kurosawa built a castle solely for the purpose of burning it down in order to film this one scene. For this reason, each shot in the scene had to be filmed in one take. Kurosawa manages to pull it off flawlessly. When it was released in 1985, Ran the most expensive ever made in Japan; however, this scene set a benchmark of excellence not only for Japan, but also for cinema around the world.last_img read more

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Ian Chappell: Fight Coronavirus with Sachin Tendulkar’s approach in this magical knock!

first_imgImage Courtesy: AFP/BCCIAdvertisement a8n2wNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs038Wingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Ejztne0( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) nowy0yWould you ever consider trying this?😱vzCan your students do this? 🌚xz1eRoller skating! Powered by Firework The novel Coronavirus pandemic has not only halted human life across the globe, it has also hampered all sporting activities. While countries observe lock downs and citizens, sportspersons and celebrities alike remain under self isolation, doctors, nurses and healthcare workers are on their relentless duties to fight the deadly virus outbreak. Amidst these worrying times, former cricketer Ian Chappell provides some much needed inspiration, and what could be better suited as an example than the icon of cricket himself, Sachin Tendulkar?Advertisement Image Courtesy: AFP/BCCIIn the current scenario, the human population is undergoing the test of patience, will power and motivation to battle against the COVID-19 outbreak. There has already been over 1,800,000 confimed cases globally, and the death roll has risen to 115,246 till date.In a recent interview with ESPNcricinfo, Ian Chappell stated that the rules that are there for players, also become useful for citizens in their daily lives.Advertisement With the COVID-19 pandemic biting hard, citizens of all countries are being asked to display – among other attributes – patience, determination, and a bit of initiative,” Chappell said in the interview.The former Australia and South Africa international took to the composure of Sachin Tendulkar, and recalled the former Indian cricket stalwart’s amazing 155 not out in a Test series against Australia back in 1998.Advertisement The Little Master, following the advise of Ravi Shastri, pulled off a memorable knock in the second innings of the match, which became the perfect example of Chappell to compare to the current challenge against Coronavirus.“Tendulkar, having been dismissed cheaply by Warne in the first innings, strides to the crease with his team two down and only 44 runs in front,” Chappell went on, “the ball is spinning sharply and Warne, boosted by a four-wicket haul in the first innings, is confident,”However, the Men in Blue turned the match around thanks to Sachin’s blistering performance, as the 76 year old continued: “Tendulkar’s determination and initiative were rewarded when he put his well-thought-out plan into operation.”“He immediately attacked deliveries pitching in the footmarks, and after a series of electrifying shots reached and cleared the boundary, Warne reluctantly went back over the wicket. Tendulkar had won the battle and India would go on to win the Test.” Chappell added.Later, adding another example of former Australian legend Ian Redpath’s test of patience against West Indies in 1976, Chhappell concluded: “Combine Tendulkar’s initiative and determination with Redpath’s patient courage and you have some of the qualities required to survive this devastating pandemic.”Also read-Michael Vaughan banters Ravindra Jadeja on sword wielding post!‘Neymar: 28 years old; his mother’s new boyfriend is 22! Advertisementlast_img read more

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