The Home Equity Problem for Generation X

first_img Baby Boomers Generation X Home Equity Millennials 2017-07-18 Joey Pizzolato Related Articles The Home Equity Problem for Generation X Tagged with: Baby Boomers Generation X Home Equity Millennials Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago There is a disparity with home equity between Gen Xers and millennials, according to a recent report released by Zillow—which says that millennials and Gen Xers have similar median loan to value ratios on their mortgage.And the reason for this similarity, they say? The timing each generation got into the housing market in relation to the housing bust in the mid 2000s. Many Gen Xers were just beginning to purchase their homes in the years or months preceding the housing crash, which means they were hit the hardest when prices plummeted. Zillow estimates that homes lost 22.9 percent of their value on average between April 2007 and December 2011. Other generations that had been in the housing market for longer, like the Baby Boomers and the Silent generation, had built up enough equity in their home to sustain the crash.Most millennials (64.2 percent) have entered the housing market in the past five years, which means they weren’t around when the market crashed, and subsequently entered as home prices were rising. If Gen Xers bought their house before the crash, and lost a good percentage of their equity, they would be just getting back to their original prices as millennials entered.Certain metros were hit harder than others in the crash. For example, Las Vegas home values fell 62 percent between peak and trough, meaning that many millennials have more equity than their Gen X brethren. Similarly, median LTV ratio for millennials is far more favorable than it is to Gen Xers.In terms of high equity, the Silent Generation is the generation with the highest number of LTVs under 10, (11.8 percent), followed by Baby Boomers (6.1 percent). Gen X is further behind at 1.3 percent, and millennials are close at 0.3 percent.Zillow’s data shows that only 36.7 percent of all homeowners have a LTV of 0. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Previous: Get a Move On Next: Suburban Boom in Daily Dose, Featured, Headlines, Market Studies, News Sign up for DS News Daily Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago  Print This Post The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agocenter_img Home / Daily Dose / The Home Equity Problem for Generation X Share Save The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago July 18, 2017 2,211 Views Joey Pizzolato is the Online Editor of DS News and MReport. He is a graduate of Spalding University, where he holds a holds an MFA in Writing as well as DePaul University, where he received a B.A. in English. His fiction and nonfiction have been published in a variety of print and online journals and magazines. To contact Pizzolato, email [email protected] Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago About Author: Joey Pizzolato The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

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Caffè Nero opens unit at student accommodation in Leeds

first_imgHigh street coffee chain CaffèNero has agreed a 10-year lease with developer Downing to open a ground floor unit at CitySide student accommodation, Leeds.The coffee brand has taken a 2,200 sq m ground floor unit at the development on Calverley Street, which includes an outdoor seating area.The double-height unit features floor-to-ceiling windows and was delivered to a specification to allow Caffè Nero to transform the space to meet their requirements.“Caffè Nero is one of the UK’s leading brands and will be a fantastic addition to the CitySide complex,” said John Clegg, head of property management at Downing.“The unit sits within a vibrant development located within the centre of Leeds’ student community, which attracts great footfall from both students and local workers. We’re expecting the cafe to be very popular with our student tenants and local residents.”last_img read more

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Ocean currents spin a web of interconnected fisheries around the world

first_imgConservation, Environment, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Overfishing, Saltwater Fish Article published by Basten Gokkon Most marine catches are made within a given country’s territorial waters, but the fish most likely originated in spawning grounds in another country’s jurisdiction, a new study shows.The modeling of catch, spawning and ocean current data shows that the dispersal of baby fish caught by ocean currents creates an interconnection between global marine fisheries.The finding highlights the need for greater international cooperation in protecting marine ecosystems everywhere, as an estimated $10 billion worth of fish spawn in one country and are caught in another every year. Chances are the locally caught fish you bought down by the wharf was spawned thousands of miles away, migrating on ocean currents, a new study has found.An estimated 90 percent of marine catches are caught within 200 miles, or 320 kilometers, of countries’ shores, but they most likely originated in spawning grounds under the jurisdiction of a different country, according to the study published June 21 in the journal Science.Analyzing data of catch and known spawning grounds of more than 700 fish species, coupled with ocean current data, the paper’s researchers developed a computer model to show where the various species tended to be born and caught.The simulation then showed that the dispersal of baby fish caught by ocean currents created an interconnection between global marine fisheries, the study said.“Now we have a map of how the world’s fisheries are interconnected, and where international cooperation is needed most urgently to conserve a natural resource that hundreds of millions of people rely on,” said co-author Kimberly Oremus, an assistant professor at the University of Delaware’s School of Marine Science and Policy.The global network of flows of fish spawn across international boundaries. The circles represent ocean territories and the lines indicate flows between them. The lines are curved such that the clockwise direction represents flows from source to sink. Image by Nandini Ramesh/University of California, Berkeley.Any two given countries are connected by an average of five degrees of separation, with effects from fishery disruptions — habitat destruction, overfishing, and sea warming — that take place in one country spreading to other nations, both near and possibly on the other side of the world, according to the researchers.This ripple effect could theoretically look like this: If there’s a decline in a species’ spawning population in Indonesian waters, the catch in Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia, the Philippines, Australia, and India’s Andaman and Nicobar Islands will most likely drop.According to the study, the spawning grounds around Japan, Alaska and China are the three regions that currently contribute the most catch to other countries, through their productive spawning populations. Each contributes about 1 million tons to other countries’ catches.Indonesia has the most landed value attributable to other countries, meaning much of its catch originates from the spawning grounds of its neighbors, such as Singapore, Malaysia, the Philippines and Papua New Guinea, according to the researchers.“This is something of a double-edged sword,” said lead author Nandini Ramesh, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Berkeley.“On one hand, it implies that mismanagement of a fishery can have negative effects that easily propagate to other countries; on the other hand, it implies that multiple countries can benefit by targeting conservation and/or management efforts in just a few regions.”The finding highlights the need for greater international cooperation in protecting marine ecosystems everywhere — such as large marine ecosystems and marine protected area networks — as an estimated $10 billion worth of fish spawn in one country and are caught in another every year, the authors say. Global fisheries production in 2016 was valued at $130 billion, according to the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization.“This allowed us to talk about how vulnerable a nation is to the management of fisheries in neighboring countries,” Oremus said.A spawning aggregation of Nassau groupers. Image by Alexander Tewfik for WCS.According to the study, the risks to nations’ economies and labor forces are generally highest in the tropics. This is due to a combination of factors, such as there being a large number of small, coastal countries close together in regions with relatively fast ocean currents; economies that rely heavily on marine fisheries; and populations with a high percentage of workers employed in fishing-related jobs.“Our hope is that this study will be a stepping stone for policy makers to study their own regions more closely to determine their interdependencies,” Ramesh said. “This is an important first step. This is not something people have examined before at this scale.”Citation:Ramesh, N., Rising, J. A., & Oremus, K. L. (2019). The small world of global marine fisheries: The cross-boundary consequences of larval dispersal. Science, 364(6446), 1192-1196. doi:10.1126/science.aav3409FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Chance rescue turns out to be first record of elusive tortoise species in India

first_imgTwo tortoises that a range officer in Arunachal Pradesh in northeast India rescued from a group of boys turned out to be the impressed tortoise (Manouria impressa), an elusive species that has never been recorded in India before.Researchers who have studied the reptile in Myanmar say the high-elevation habitat in Arunachal Pradesh where the tortoises were found is quite similar to that in Myanmar.Very little is known about impressed tortoises, and researchers and the range officer hope that a long-term survey will be launched to find more individuals of the species in India.For now, the two rescued individuals have been sent to a zoo in the state’s capital. It was a chance encounter. But it turned Bunty Tao’s life around.In mid-June, a group of boys were heading back from a fishing trip to a forest near the town of Yazali in Arunachal Pradesh state in northeast India, when Tao, a range officer with the state forest department, noticed that they had two tortoises with them.“I don’t know why they had taken the tortoises from the forest, whether out of curiosity or something else, but I told them they couldn’t keep the animals,” Tao told Mongabay.Tao took the tortoises away and put them in a small forested plot near his house until the authorities could take a decision on the reptiles. The tortoises had golden-hued shells ⁠— a color Tao had not seen on tortoises from the area before. So he sent photographs of the individuals to an anti-hunting WhatsApp group he’s a member of, hoping someone would help identify the species. The group members forwarded the photos to other experts, and in a few days, Jayaditya Purkayastha, a herpetologist based in the neighboring state of Assam, came back with an answer. The rescued tortoises, he said, looked like the impressed tortoise (Manouria impressa), an elusive species that had never been recorded in India before.Bunty Tao with the rescued tortoises. Image courtesy of Bunty Tao.Purkayastha and other experts, including Shailendra Singh and Arpita Dutta of the nonprofit Turtle Survival Alliance, rushed to Arunachal Pradesh, examined the tortoises in question, and confirmed that the reptiles were indeed impressed tortoises.Until recently, the impressed tortoise has been known from the high-elevation mountainous forests of Myanmar, southern China, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia and Malaysia. There, the reptile prefers the moist forest floor with lots of leaf litter, Singh told Mongabay. “They eat things like mushrooms on the forest floor. They also bury into the leaves and tend to camouflage with the forest floor.”Singh, who has studied the impressed tortoise in Myanmar, said the habitat in Arunachal Pradesh where the tortoises were found is quite similar to that in Myanmar. “So it shouldn’t be a surprise to find more such animals along the Indo-Myanmar border,” he said. “What is surprising is that the tortoises weren’t found before because so many people would have visited the forest in the past.”Tao, however, said the tortoise may have always been in the area, “but before this nobody probably took the initiative to identify it,” he said. “It is like an apple falling from a tree. I’m a range officer, I’m passionate about wildlife, and I was curious to find out what it was, so I posted it for identification. ”The high-elevation habitat in Arunachal Pradesh where the impressed tortoises were collected from is similar to that in Myanmar where the species is also found. Image courtesy of Shailendra Singh.With very little known about impressed tortoises, Singh said he hopes that a long-term survey will be launched to find more individuals of the species in India.“Finding two individuals and identifying them is fine, but the critical thing to do is to go look and see if there is a ecologically viable population residing in that area,” he said. “If that population is there, then we have to collect scientific data on it and try and protect it.”As for the two individuals themselves, they have been sent to a zoo in Itanagar, the state capital. Singh said the species doesn’t do very well in captivity, though. “They need moist environment, a special diet and they are very delicate. They also don’t like too much handling,” he said.Researchers examining the rescued impressed tortoises. Image by Jhonson Tao.Tao, on his way to visit the tortoises at the Itanagar biological park, said that with the identification part of the story now over, research was needed. “But it is for the forest department to decide,” he said.“The IUCN tortoise and freshwater turtle specialist group recently sent us a letter of appreciation, lauding the efforts of the forest department for finding the species,” Tao said. “They even offered their technical support if the department wanted to initiate a conservation effort for the species.”Tao said he hopes the discovery of the tortoise in June and the attention it’s bringing will translate to conservation efforts on the ground.“I feel incredibly happy to be part of this history,” Tao said. “I’m a tribal boy and I feel that we tribal people should be involved in research because we can use our traditional knowledge for conservation. I think we can convert this opportunity to create bigger conservation projects, such as a sustainable ecotourism project that can help protect wildlife and help us earn a livelihood.”The rescued impressed tortoises. Image courtesy of Shailendra Singh.Banner image of impressed tortoise courtesy of Shailendra Singh. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Shreya Dasguptacenter_img Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Herps, Reptiles, Species Discovery, Tropical Forests, Turtles And Tortoises, Wildlife last_img read more

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Salvadoran fishermen ditch blast fishing for artificial reefs

first_imgBlast fishing has taken a toll on both the fishermen and marine life of El Salvador’s Jiquilisco Bay Biosphere Reserve.Some residents have lost limbs or eyes or suffered bad burns. And populations of mangroves, fish, and critically endangered hawksbill sea turtles have declined.Over the last decade, officials have made rooting out the practice a top priority, placing their bets on a creative alternative that a local fisherman suggested in 2009: the creation of artificial reefs to replenish marine life.Today blast fishing has declined by 90 percent and the communities are trying to market their seafood as “clean fish” at a premium price. To read an interview with the man who sparked the artificial reefs of Jiquilisco Bay, see the companion piece to this article:Bringing back the fish: Q&A with a repentant blast fishermanJIQUILISCO BAY, El Salvador — With no police patrol in sight, a young fisherman named Jose Salvador Soriano kneeled into his long, narrow boat and began preparing an explosive with the power to bring in nearly an entire day’s catch. The explosive contained sulfur, benzoate, chlorate and sugar, packed into a tube of newspaper with a wick made from a bicycle-brake hose.The best spot to throw an explosive was under the long, spider-like roots of the mangroves lining both sides of the estuary, as fish gather there in large numbers to lay their eggs. But this time, Soriano miscalculated. Before he could toss the explosive — the wick quickly burning down — it went off in his hand, leaving him amputated up to the high wrist.Soriano, now 47, got away easy compared to many other residents of the 35 fishing communities along El Salvador’s Jiquilisco Bay Biosphere Reserve, a 241-kilometer (150-mile) wetland that contributes approximately 2 tons of fish to the country’s seafood markets every day. Some residents have been badly burned, lost an eye or — because explosives are normally packed with the tube held between the thighs — their legs and genitals.But blast fishing has also taken a toll on Jiquilisco Bay’s marine life. Populations of yellowfin snook (Centropomus robalito), hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) and Pacific red snapper (Lutjanus peru), as well as six kinds of mangrove trees, have shown noticeable declines since nearby communities began using explosives in the 1980s.Over the last decade, officials have made rooting out the illegal practice a top priority, placing their bets on a creative alternative that a local fisherman suggested in 2009: What if an artificial reef could be dropped into the bay where they normally fish? Done correctly, it might allow for both an easy catch and a sustainable way of bolstering biodiversity.Fisher Juan Jose Amalla said on a good day he brings in about 30 fish from the artificial reef he fishes in Jiquilisco Bay. Image by Max Radwin for Mongabay.“It may not have been as good as blast fishing,” said José Maria Argueta, program director for the local NGO the Mangrove Association, “but we argued that it was also sustainable and not dangerous. You could relax and catch fish and not worry about running from the police.”It is now the 10th anniversary of the artificial reef project’s inception, and a dozen local cooperatives have installed more than 20 artificial reefs — collections of logs and hollow concrete structures — for line-and-pole fishing. But officials say blast fishing continues in some areas, and managing the reefs has become its own challenge.“It’s a sustainable way to catch fish,” Argueta said. “It also allows people to fish without damaging the environment or themselves. But we need a plan to manage the artificial reefs.”Blast fishing: ‘It’s just not a good idea’The transition from blast fishing to artificial reefs has been, and continues to be, a slow one. Even after Soriano lost his hand in 1997 — before the reefs were even an idea — he kept using explosives for another five years, resisting officials’ attempts to persuade him to switch to traditional fishing methods.Like most fishermen in the area, Soriano was looking for the most efficient way to bring in the largest possible catch. Given the cost of gas, bait, boat rental and fees to his local fishing cooperative, line fishing before the era of artificial reefs didn’t make much sense. It only brought in about 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) of fish on a typical outing, sold for between $1 and $2 per pound. Explosives, meanwhile, with a radius as large as 80 feet (24 meters), sometimes brought in upwards of 40 pounds (18 kilograms) — and in a fraction of the time.Luis Gonzalez Benitez lost an arm while blast fishing and now splits his time between using nets and line fishing on the reef. Image by Max Radwin for Mongabay.For other fishermen, explosives were all they knew. Their fathers never taught them how to line-fish. Or the nets they’d used in childhood were abandoned in the wake of the country’s civil war.Politically motivated violence throughout the 1970s saw tens of thousands die at the hands of right-wing death squads, igniting a left-wing guerrilla movement and drawing in the U.S. through to the war’s end in 1992.Many residents around Jiquilisco Bay joined the People’s Revolutionary Army and the Farabundo Martí Liberation People’s Force guerrilla groups. In the 1980s, they had decided to fight a war of attrition, carrying out sniper attacks, ambushes and land mine bombings. One hour from the shores of Jiquilisco Bay, the 400-meter (1,300-foot) Golden Bridge was destroyed by guerrilla-made dynamite.Still other residents fled to other parts of Central America, such as Panama. Upon returning later in the war, they allegedly encountered two military officers who showed them how to make explosives. Today, no one knows the names of those two officers, but they are still talked about in various fishing communities, even mentioned vaguely in government reports, almost as myth: the bringers of explosives to Jiquilisco.By the 1990s, the bay was showing a noticeable drop in marine life. Though there was little data taken in that time period, fishermen recall returning from trips with smaller and smaller catches.“At first it was a good way to fish, but after a while not so much because we killed everything,” said fisherman Luis Gonzalez, 47, of Puerto El Flor. “More than anything else, this was business. It starts to get expensive when you’re coming back without fish.”Other marine life suffered, as well. Critically endangered hawksbill sea turtles occupy approximately 37 kilometers (23 miles) of nesting habitat in and around Jiquilisco Bay. But between 2004 and 2008, the Zoological Foundation of El Salvador reported 18 fatalities caused by blast fishing — the hawksbills’ leading cause death during that period.Due to the bay’s thousands of acres of mangrove trees, it was declared a Ramsar site— an international recognition for wetlands — in 2005. Mangroves are not only important breeding grounds for marine life; they’re also a key player in preventing coastal soil erosion. Officials suspect that human activity, including blast fishing, has contributed to a 10 percent loss in the bay’s mangrove cover.“When it comes to blast fishing,” Gonzalez added, “it’s just not a good idea. It means putting an end to all the fish.”last_img read more

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Reef fish are faring fine in eastern Indonesia, study suggests

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Coral Reefs, Environment, Fish, Fishing, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Marine Animals, Marine Conservation, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Overfishing, Protected Areas, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A new study examines the health of reef fish populations in the lesser Sunda-Banda seascape, a part of the Coral Triangle, which overlaps with Indonesian waters in the western Pacific.In remote areas far from large human populations, reef fish are generally doing well, the researchers found.The researchers propose turning one area in Southwest Maluku, Indonesia, into a marine protected area. The coral reefs of the lesser Sunda-Banda seascape in southeastern Indonesia host some of the planet’s most biodiverse marine ecosystems, which remain relatively untouched even as overfishing ravages sea life to the country’s west and all over the world. New research suggests reef fish inhabiting understudied sections of the lesser Sunda-Banda are doing well overall in terms of species present and total numbers.“This study seems to be the first assessment ever of all species of consumable reef fishes for this area in the peer-reviewed scientific literature,” said Hawis Madduppa, head of the Marine Biodiversity and Biosystematics Lab at the Bogor Institute of Agriculture (IPB), who was not affiliated with the study.“It’s not all bad news for Indonesian marine conservation. We still have hope for good, sustainable reef fisheries.”The paper, published in IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science, intends to inform reef management in the far-flung lesser Sunda-Banda seascape, which lies in the Coral Triangle, a vast region of the western Pacific that’s home to the highest diversity of corals and reef fishes anywhere on the planet.From 2014 to 2015, the researchers conducted three expeditions involving underwater surveys of reef fish communities in the Indonesian districts of East Flores, Alor and Southwest Maluku, where people catch a vast variety of fish to feed their families or sell at markets. The census covered 1,800 square kilometers (695 square miles) throughout 62 spots at a depth of 10 meters (33 feet). Divers collected and classified exploitable reef fish into 5-centimeter (2-inch) intervals of length, from 3 to more than 50 centimeters (1 to 20 inches). Then the scientists derived fish biomass figures by means of known relationships between the size and weight of the species they observed.In this way, lead author Fakhrizal Setiawan and his colleagues recorded 176 reef fish species that support the livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of Indonesians. More than half the fish the team encountered were plankton-eating dark-banded fusiliers (Pterocaesio tile), but they concluded that the ranges and counts of species in the reef systems were generally sound and balanced.“Southwest Maluku has the highest biomass and quite a lot of abundance, very different from Alor and East Flores because pressure in fisheries is very low there,” said Fakhrizal, who at the time of the research was working as a reef fish ecologist for the Wildlife Conservation Society. Fakhrizal collaborated on the study with researchers from WWF-Indonesia and the Fisheries Diving Club at IPB.“Many islands in Southwest Maluku are very remote, so fish live happy and healthy with little contact with humans,” he said.A school of dark-banded fusilier of the coast of northern Sulawesi, Indonesia. Image by Bernard Dupont/Flickr.The lowest stocks occurred in East Flores, which has been subject to intensive reef fishing associated with a larger human presence. The harvested fish community in Alor looked stressed as well, a condition possibly resulting from harmful extraction methods, including potassium cyanide poisoning.The wealth of reef fish in Southwest Maluku, where fishers typically practice old-style, low-impact handlining, makes this place ecologically significant, so Fakhrizal proposed turning it into a marine protected area (MPA) to bolster biodiversity throughout the lesser Sunda-Banda. Because diversity is comparable across the three regions, he said, Southwest Maluku can “give fish to the areas with high-pressure fishing and supply spillover fish to sustain the ecosystem.” Hawis added that with MPA designation, “the important spawning and nursery area can be protected, and the degraded area can have a chance to recover.”There are, however, limits to reef fish resilience that could devastate the local fishing industry and national economy dependent on it, Fakhrizal noted.“When one area is open to more and more destructive fishing, at some point, it cannot recover from pressure,” he said. “Fishermen get more money using poison or bombing to get a lot of reef fish, but maybe their children cannot get fish from the area, move far away, then need money for fuel. An area like Southwest Maluku with small fisheries may not be high-value, but it’s economically sustainable enough for long-term opportunity. In Alor and East Flores, there could be a decrease in fisheries in a few years.”A scorpionfish in Alor, Indonesia. Image by prilfish/Flickr.Fakhrizal’s paper echoes monitoring work completed in 2017 by Reef Check Indonesia, a nonprofit based in Bali. It also determined that fusilier fish were the most abundant ones in East Flores and Alor, since upwelling transported plentiful nutrients to this species there.Altogether the current findings provide reason for optimism, said Hawis. “In Indonesia, the farther east you go, the higher the abundance and biomass due to the remoteness,” he said. “I’m very glad we still have an area with a high abundance of natural fish stock, more than 2,000 kilograms per hectare,” or about 1,800 pounds per acre.To maintain stocks, strong multi-scale laws should be established and enforced to prohibit damaging fishing equipment and the removal of breeding or developing fish, said Sila Sari, data and knowledge coordinator with Reef Check Indonesia. Alongside intensifying surveillance to reduce offenses in Southwest Maluku, she recommended enhancing rules with traditional knowledge that has for millennia moderated fishing and preserved Indonesian reefs.“Eastern Indonesia is rich with different local wisdoms that can be engaged through management and protected area regulation,” said Sari, who was not involved in the study. “It’ll be great to see changes between each area and between inside or outside the MPA and assess how effectively it works by assessing fish stocks. Each year or two, we need to repeat the same survey at the same sites.”Hawis emphasized the broad research on lesser Sunda-Banda marine biodiversity required to safeguard the target reef fish, too. To create an MPA, he said, biologists must investigate connectivity across islands or populations by harnessing molecular mechanisms, such as environmental DNA and population genetics, and evaluate the relatedness of organisms in reef ecosystems.“Mostly, people in Indonesia want faster, easier reef restoration,” Fakhrizal said. “But to be conserved effectively, coral reefs need time to recover without human disorder. We should give reefs in the lesser Sunda-Banda time to rebuild with MPAs.”Citation:Setiawan, F., Muhidin, Agustina, S., Pingkan, J., Estradivari, Tarigan, S. A., . . . Sadewa, S. (2019). Stock estimation, species composition and biodiversity of target reef fishes in the lesser Sunda-Banda Seascape (East Flores, Alor and South West Maluku regencies), Indonesia. IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science, 278, 012070. doi:10.1088/1755-1315/278/1/012070Banner: A bluestreak fusilier fish. Image by Rickard Zerpe/Flickr. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by mongabayauthorlast_img read more

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Germany cuts $39.5 million in environmental funding to Brazil

first_imgGermany has announced plans to withdraw some €35 million (US $39.5 million) to Brazil due to the country’s lack of commitment to curbing deforestation in the Amazon rainforest shown by the administration of far-right President Jair Bolsonaro.The funding loss will impact environmental projects in the Amazon, Atlantic Forest and Cerrado biomes.The cut will not, however, impact the Amazon Fund — a pool of some $87 million provided to Brazil each year by developed nations, especially Norway and Germany — to finance a variety of programs aimed at halting deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon.Some experts have expressed concern that Germany’s $39.5 million cut could cause other developed nations to withdraw Brazil funding, and even threaten the Amazon Fund, or the ratification of the recently concluded EU/Mercosur Latin American trade agreement. A wide range of environmental and conservation projects in Brazil are at stake after the government of Germany suspended funds to the country amid the report of alarming rises in monthly Amazon deforestation rates and controversial policies adopted by the administration of far-right President Jair Bolsonaro.On August 10, German Environment Minister Svenja Schulze reportedly announced Germany’s plans to withdraw some €35 million (US $39.5 million) to Brazil due to the Latin American country’s lack of commitment to curbing deforestation in the Amazon rainforest.“The policy of the Brazilian government in the Amazon raises doubts as to whether a consistent reduction of deforestation rates is still being pursued,” Schulze told the Tagesspiegel newspaper.Germany’s move came a week after the head of the Brazilian National Institute of Space Research (INPE), Ricardo Magnus Osório Galvão, was fired, raising concerns over the future of an institution recognized nationally and internationally for its cutting-edge satellite-imaging and deforestation monitoring program.The Bolsonaro administration has intensely criticized deforestation data released by INPE showing a 2019 spike in cleared area. In July, INPE issued an alert identifying deforestation and degradation totaling some 2,072 square kilometers (800 square miles) for the month of June in Legal Amazonia — a federal designation that includes all or parts of nine Brazilian states — detected by DETER, its real-time detection system. A 2018-2019 month-to-month comparison showed Brazil’s Amazonian deforestation in June 2019 was 88 percent greater than for the same month in 2018, while deforestation in July 2019 was 278 percent higher than July 2018.Bolsonaro immediately reacted to Germany’s announcement of funding cuts, saying that Brazil doesn’t need German funding to finance conservation projects in the country. “They can use this money as they see fit. Brazil doesn’t need it,” Bolsonaro told journalists in Brasilia on Sunday.But experts contacted for this story told Mongabay that Bolsonaro’s statements are not accurate, as Brazil has relied for decades on funding from Germany and other countries to finance environmental projects, given the South American country’s budget shortfalls.Giant waterlily (Victoria amazonica). Deforestation threatens terrestrial and aquatic biodiversity. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.The lost German funding not only helped protect the Amazon region, but also financed conservation projects in the Mata Atlântica (Atlantic Forest) and Cerrado savanna biomes, as well as other environmental initiatives such as promoting carbon markets and curbing carbon emissions, in addition to projects supporting indigenous peoples and traditional communities.“Germany’s decision shows that they are really concerned about environmental policies… They do not want to contribute to a government that does not have a clear and objective policy and does not show itself to be committed to reducing deforestation and to good environmental management,” Adriana Ramos, coordinator of the policy program for the Brazilian NGO Socio-environmental Institute (ISA), told Mongabay.“Public budget resources for the implementation of environmental public policies are very scarce. So many programs and initiatives lose out [due to the loss of] these [German] resources, including programs that benefit the Atlantic Forest and Cerrado [biomes] and this will certainly contribute to an environmental vulnerability, illegal actions, and to halting the country’s progress in environmental policies,” explained Ramos, who also represents The Climate Observatory, an NGO.Aerial view of Brazilian Cerrado savanna showing the line where deforestation meets native vegetation. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Knock-on effects?In addition to the lost $39.5 million, the German government currently contributes annually to the Amazon Fund — a pool of some $87 million provided to Brazil each year by developed nations, especially Norway and Germany — to finance a variety of programs aimed at halting deforestation. The Amazon Fund won’t be affected by the just announced cuts, according to the German Environment Ministry.However, the future of the Amazon Fund was recently put in play after Brazilian Environment Minister, Ricardo Salles, on 17 May, unilaterally announced an overhaul of the Fund’s administrative rules due to alleged irregularities amounting to $1.2 billion in spending by NGOs in past years; Salles provided no evidence to back up his charges. His statements were denied by European nations; both Germany and Norway complained that their governments were not notified of the rule changes, nor have they approved them.Brazil’s Ministry of Environment did not respond to requests for comment regarding the future of projects affected by Germany’s cuts and also about the Amazon Fund as of the time of publication.Paulo Barreto, a senior researcher at Brazilian NGO Imazon, said that Germany’s $39.5 million cut could trigger a knock-on effect, leading not only to a potential reduction in Germany’s contributions to the Amazon Fund, but also possibly influencing the funding flowing from other countries, including Norway.“The situation worsened a lot with INPE’s head being sacked and [due to] other issues. Germany’s decision itself is an indication that things got worse. In addition to specific projects, it also further degrades the image and reputation of Brazil in this area, and this may have consequences for the Amazon Fund and other things that Brazil is willing to do, including the EU-Mercosur [Latin American economic bloc] trade agreement [ratification],” Barreto said.“Brazil signed the EU-Mercosur Agreement and Germany was one of the main supporters of that agreement. This type of Brazilian behavior will make it difficult to approve the [trade] agreement… given the increase of representatives in the European Parliament with environmental concerns,” Barreto concluded.Banner image caption: Satellite image from Google Earth of Brazilian Amazon rainforest in the state of Amazonas.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Karla Mendescenter_img Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Controversial, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Featured, Forests, Green, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation last_img read more

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In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, August 9, 2019

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannon There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsAn anthropologist tried to fight off poachers’ dogs going after chimpanzees in Uganda (The Atlantic).Agri-giant Chiquita says it will take steps to protect biodiversity (Produce News).Lawmakers in California are considering a rule that would penalize companies for not standing in the way of forest destruction (ProPublica).Forest communities and conservation efforts stand to lose if India’s Forest Rights Act isn’t passed, says wildlife biologist Ravi Chellam (The Hindu).Rainforests can only hold so much carbon dioxide, new research shows (UPI).Mozambique’s Gorongosa has African wild dogs once again (The New York Times).Other newsA water shortage is devastating herders in western India (Al Jazeera).The combination of fire and destructive elephants may not be as harmful to savanna trees as once thought, scientists have found (The Economist).Sixteen black rhinos were successfully moved to Swaziland in July from South Africa (The Maravi Post).Canada has two new ocean sanctuaries aimed at protecting sea ice and wildlife in the Arctic (Mother Nature Network).The new report from the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warns about the dangers of climate change to water and food security (The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Economist, The Atlantic, The Guardian).More young conservatives in the U.S. see climate change as a priority (The New York Times).Climate change could cause a global financial meltdown (The Atlantic).Fires in Siberia were set by illegal loggers, authorities say (The Irish Times, Reuters, The Moscow Times).Mercury concentrations in fish are rising, despite decades of emissions reductions through regulation (The Atlantic).Banner image of a chimpanzee in Uganda by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Conservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update last_img read more

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‘A green desert’: Mammals take a hit in Colombia’s oil palm plantations

first_imgEditor’s note: William Laurance is a member of Mongabay’s advisory board.Citations:Pardo, L. E., Campbell, M. J., Edwards, W., Clements, G. R., & Laurance, W. F. (2018). Terrestrial mammal responses to oil palm dominated landscapes in Colombia. PLOS ONE, 13(5). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0197539Maddox, T., Priatna, D., Gemita, E., & Salampessy, A. (2007). The conservation of tigers and other wildlife in oil palm plantations. Jambi Province, Sumatra, Indonesia. ZSL Conservation Report No. 7. The Zoological Society of London, London. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Maria Salazar Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Interns, Mammals, Palm Oil, Plantations, Research, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Researchers studying oil palm plantations in Colombia found that mammal diversity dropped compared to nearby savanna.Some mammals used plantations for hunting and foraging, but none stayed permanently.With the Colombian government’s pledge to drastically increase its cropland, scientists fear savannas and wetlands could be at threat. As oil palm plantations expand across the world, razing swaths of tropical rainforests in their path, fears about their impact on the environment have also grown. In the plantations of Colombia, a new study has found yet another way they are altering global biodiversity: by impacting the diversity of mammals.“Some species do very well” in oil palm plantations, said Lain Pardo, one of the authors of the study published in the journal PLOS ONE. These include species such as the crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous), jaguarundi (Herpailurus yagouaroundi) and giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).“Our results suggest that even within the terrestrial mammals group there is a lot of variability,” Pardo said.Relatively common species, especially small- to medium-sized predators, likely feed on the rodents and other agricultural pests that abound in oil palm plantations. For giant anteaters, their main food source is also a common denizen of plantations. But most other mammals, including larger rodents such as the agouti (Dasyprocta fuliginosa), spiny rat (Proechimys spp.) and paca (Cuniculus paca) struggle to find food and shelter in the monoculture. Scientists found that these species were rarely present in plantations, if at all. And even those that were frequently found within the plantations were only there to forage, returning to the forests to sleep.Camera trap images of a fox, left, and two giant anteaters captured during the study. Image courtesy of Lain Pardo.The researchers undertook the study in oil palm plantations converted from former pasture in Colombia’s Llanos Orientales region, meaning sensitive species such as tapir (Tapirus spp.) and giant armadillo (Priodontes maximus), both listed as vulnerable by the IUCN, had been driven out long ago.The loss of such large mammals may have made the difference in species richness between the plantations and remaining forest fragments less stark than it would have been in a previously untouched area, according to the study. Scientists only detected puma (Puma concolor), tayra (Eira barbara), coati (Nasua nasua) and collared peccary (Pecari tajacu) — all ecologically important species — in oil palm areas bordering less disturbed savanna and the Meta-Casanare and Alto Rio Meta conservation corridors.The study’s results are supported by a 2007 paper by researchers at the Zoological Society of London, which focused on mammal species abundance in oil palm plantations in Southeast Asia. Researchers found that only four mammals — a mere 10 percent of the species known to exist within the landscape — made use of oil palm plantations. As with the Colombia study, none of the species found within the plantation were a conservation priority.Both studies came to similar conclusions.“These results show that some large-scale palm oil expansion generally has severe impacts on native mammals,” said William Laurance, a co-author of the Colombian study and professor at James Cook University in Australia.But he also acknowledged that maintaining adjacent forest corridors and allowing undergrowth in plantations could substantially increase species diversity.Palm oil plantation with undergrowth, left, and without. Image courtesy of Lain Pardo.“At all costs, we want to avoid ‘sterile’ plantations that have nothing but palm oil trees,” Laurance said. “These are little more than biological deserts.”The researchers chose to survey mammals due to their sensitivity to ecosystem quality and because they serve as an excellent indicator for overall biodiversity.“Vegetation inside the plantations helps to provide more complex environments and therefore promote the presence of other species such as spiders, butterflies, crustaceans, and even other vertebrates (snakes, birds), which attracts other mammals,” Pardo said in an email.The researchers also write that free-roaming cattle negatively impacted the biodiversity within the plantations, suggesting the importance of better livestock management and proper enclosures.An anaconda (Eunectes spp.) killed after the removal of understory vegetation on an oil palm plantation. Image courtesy of Lain Pardo.Palm oil has been a staple crop in West Africa for 5,000 years. But when European traders introduced it to Southeast Asia in the early 19th century, they found the humid climate so suitable that today, Indonesia and Malaysia produce 85 percent of the world’s palm oil.South America currently accounts for just 6 percent of all globally traded palm oil, but experts say this looks poised to change.The Colombian government has pledged to expand the land given over to plantations and other cash crops to 7 million hectares (17.3 million acres) by 2020 — an area almost the size of Ireland. The figure is nearly 14 times the 516,000 hectares (1.3 million acres) of land that Colombia devoted to palm oil in 2017, which in turn was a threefold increase from the 157,000 hectares (388,000 acres) dedicated to oil palm cultivation in 2000.Pardo warns that Colombia’s savannas and wetlands may bear the brunt of this expansion. He said savanna “could be under great pressure” from agriculture, including palm oil, and petroleum companies. It might not be the deforestation commonly associated with palm oil, but it could be just as ecologically devastating.Despite palm oil’s environmental impact, the commodity itself is so widely used that, according to WWF, it’s in almost 50 percent of packaged supermarket products. Odorless and flavorless, it’s a natural preservative, cheaper than other vegetable oils, and is found in products as diverse as instant noodles and toothpaste. Palm oil can be used as a biofuel, and even raises the melting point of ice cream. As a crop, it’s incredibly efficient: an acre of oil palms yields 10 times more vegetable oil than the same area of soybean or coconut crops.Worldwide, oil palm plantations cover a combined 27 million hectares (66.7 million acres). That’s a little larger than the area of New Zealand.Aerial view of monoculture oil palm plantation in Colombia. Image courtesy of Lain Pardo.In 2018, the IUCN concluded that palm oil is “here to stay.” But there are ways, as this study indicates, to reduce its negative impacts.last_img read more

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Palm oil giant Korindo silences critical report with cease-and-desist letter

first_imgArticle published by Hans Nicholas Jong Korindo, a major palm oil operator in Indonesia’s Papua region, has sent a cease-and-desist letter to delay the publication of a report highlighting its various violations there.The report was to have been published Sept. 5 by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), but the organization says it’s had to postpone publication indefinitely.Mighty Earth, the campaign group whose focus on Korindo’s operations prompted the two-year FSC investigation, says Korindo effectively robbed local communities of hundreds of millions of dollars in land, natural resources and livelihoods.Korindo says it issued the letter to seek more time to address some points, and denies that it’s threatening litigation over the report. It also says it’s working to address the findings of violations. JAKARTA — The Forest Stewardship Council, the world’s foremost body certifying the sustainable forestry industry, has delayed the publication of its findings into a palm oil company’s operations in Indonesia, following a cease-and-desist letter.The FSC found earlier this year that subsidiaries of Korindo, an Indonesian-South Korean joint venture that’s an FSC associate, had violated the terms of that association by clearing valuable tracts of rainforest in the Papua region. It also found that the companies failed to properly consult local communities about plans to convert their land into oil palm plantations.The full findings of the two-year investigation, compiled into three investigative reports, had been set for publication on Sept. 5. However, Korindo, one of the biggest palm oil companies operating in Papua, sent a letter to the FSC ordering it not to publish further information specific to the findings, in a move perceived as a legal threat.As a result, the FSC has decided to postpone the release of the reports indefinitely, according to FSC Indonesia country manager Hartono Prabowo.“As a standard legal precautionary measure derived from cease-and-desist orders, FSC has postponed publication of further information concerning the Korindo PfA [policy for association] to allow time for our legal team to analyze in full detail the specific requirements included in the document,” he told Mongabay. Hartono added that the FSC’s international secretariat was currently discussing the matter with the organization’s board of directors.Despite the legal threat, he said the FSC remained committed to transparency, without specifying whether the organization would eventually release the reports.“FSC is committed to transparency and the timely release of relevant information on all of its PfA cases and will provide updated and relevant information on the Korindo PfA as soon as this is made possible,” Hartono said.Speakers from various NGOs and campaign organizations pose together with Papuan indigenous peoples during a press conference about Korindo’s cease-and-desist letter in Jakarta, Indonesia. Daniel Sim Ayomi (second from right), the spokesperson of Korindo Papua, takes issue with Mighty Earth’s claim about the company’s operation in Papua, saying that the organization should go to the field and ask all indigenous peoples, not just one or two people. Image courtesy of Mighty Earth.‘Something to hide’The investigation was prompted by a complaint filed by Mighty Earth, a campaign group that has highlighted Korindo’s practices in Papua. In response to the latest development, Mighty Earth lambasted Korindo for sending the cease-and-desist letter to the FSC.“Korindo is using the threat of legal action to bury the FSC’s findings and suppress evidence of its wrongdoing,” Mighty Earth senior campaign director Deborah Lapidus said. “These are not the actions of an innocent party. Korindo’s willing embrace of bullying tactics is proof they have something to hide.”Anselmus Amo, a pastor with the Papuan indigenous rights organization SKP-KAMe Merauke, which has been advocating for some of the communities affected by Korindo’s operations, said he was surprised about the letter to the FSC. He said the company had previously shown a willingness to remedy its mistakes.“I was surprised because why did the company threaten [the FSC] using the cease-and-desist letter?” he told Mongabay. “Actually this harms Korindo itself. The more these problems remain, the more harmful they are.”Luwy Leunufna, Korindo’s senior manager for resources management, denied that the company was threatening litigation against the FCS if it released the reports.“That’s the perception of Mighty Earth,” he said. “I don’t know that they have made a conclusion like that.”Luwy said the company had only asked the FSC to hold off on publishing the reports so that the company could clarify some points, without specifying what those points were.“We just want to be given space for us to clarify,” he said. “If FSC ended up publishing [the reports], we’re not in a position [to forbid them]. We just told [the FSC] that we needed time to clarify.”Luwy added that Korindo had nothing to hide. “We don’t close off any information. All information [that’s] needed, we’re open to submit them.”A pile of wood that has been prepared to be burned in land controlled by Korindo in Papua. Photo courtesy of Mighty EarthAdmission of ‘guilt’Following its investigation, the FSC announced in July that Korindo would continue to be associated with the certification body, but that it must “secure remedy” for the damage it had done in Papua or else face expulsion from the organization.It said it would “closely monitor Korindo’s progress of the measures and conditions stipulated by FSC. Failure to satisfactorily meet these conditions would be the basis for FSC to end its association with the company.”After the announcement, Korindo acknowledged that some of its activities were not in full compliance with the certification body’s policies, including the “destruction of high conservation values in forestry operations” and “significant conversion of forests to plantations or non-forest use.” Korindo also said that its practice of obtaining the free, prior and informed consent of local communities might not have met FSC standards. The company said it would fix its mistakes to meet those standards.“The Korindo Group agrees to collaborate in good faith and work with FSC in a constructive way and in a safe environment to implement appropriate measures and to take necessary actions in order to mitigate any past negative impacts,” the company said on its website.Mighty Earth campaign director Phil Aikman said Korindo’s statement was a sign that it had “accepted its guilt.” However, Korindo’s letter contradicts that good will, he said, which might lead to the termination of Korindo’s association with the FSC.“So on one hand, they want to work collaboratively with all stakeholders,” Aikman said. “On the other hand, they want to sue the investigators. So Korindo remains at risk of being disassociated and dispelled from FSC. If Korindo fails to solve these problems, then FSC executive board will cut ties [with Korindo].”As such, Aikman said, Korindo must “remove the legal threats against FSC, and support FSC in publishing these reports. They need to accept their responsibilities for their wrongdoings.”Aikman also urged Korindo to return customary lands, resolve social conflicts and grievances, and pay fair compensation to local communities for lost land, natural resources and livelihoods.“I will say that having foreknowledge of these reports, the amount that they had effectively robbed from the communities run [into] hundreds of millions of dollars,” he said. “They also need to restore areas equivalent to how much they destroyed. So if Korindo wants to remain with FSC, all of its operation has to comply with FSC standards.”An access road into one of Korindo’s concessions in Papua. Photo courtesy of Mighty EarthFixing the mistakesAmo said publishing the reports would be a key step toward resolving the problems.“It’s better to publish these investigative reports by FSC so that we can know where we have to solve,” he said.Responding to the activists’ demand, the FSC’s Hartono said stakeholders didn’t have to wait for the reports to be published to start making changes.“Tangible and meaningful progress in Korindo’s future operations can be achieved with or without publication of FSC’s investigation reports,” he said. “FSC is fully committed to continue the improvement process with Korindo for the benefit of Indonesia’s forests and its local Indigenous Communities as agreed by Korindo and presented by FSC in its conclusion on the case.”Hartono said Korindo had started taking steps to fix its mistakes, but it’s too early to say whether there’s been progress on the ground yet.“Apart from the disagreement on the publication of FSC’s investigation reports, Korindo are so far following the steps expected to prepare the improvements expected of them,” he said. “However, in terms of progress in the field, it is still too early in the process to expect specific progress. A roadmap, designed through a multi-stakeholder consultation, must first be designed and implemented for any initial progress to materialize.” Banner image: Forest in West Papua. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. Clarification 9/27/2019:  The caption of the first photo in this article previously misidentified one of the people in the photo, and it has been updated to say he’s from Korindo.  Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Land Conflict, Land Rights, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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