Governor Eric Holcomb Directs Flags to Be Flown at Half-Staff

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Governor Eric J. Holcomb is directing flags at state facilities across Indiana to be flown at half-staff in honor of Peace Officers Memorial Day.  Flags should be flown at half-staff sunrise to sunset on Monday, May 15, 2017.Governor Holcomb also asks businesses and residents statewide to lower their flags to half-staff to honor the occasion.last_img

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5G, IoT and Security: Protecting Emerging Technology

first_imgWith the rise of emerging technology, unforeseen security challenges can appear. As 5G becomes ubiquitous, it’s the machines that need to be protected from human beings. That’s because cybercriminals, hacktivists and industrial spies have set their sights on IoT devices as a massive attack surface for denial-of-service (DoS) strikes, data theft and even global disruption.If you’re a communications service provider reading this, maybe you’re thinking “I’m glad that I’m not responsible for securing all those IoT devices.” But you are. If service providers wish to monetize IoT communications, they’ll need to wrap security around those communications. It’s a big task, compounded by the fact that most IoT devices will be so small that they’ll have no built-in security of their own. The stakes for service providers, however, are too high to ignore: personal data, mission-critical applications and even national security are all at risk from IoT-based attacks.Okay, now take a deep breath: You don’t need to solve all these problems today — the IoT revolution isn’t here yet. But you do need to be thinking about IoT security right now, studying the potential attack surface of new applications (e.g., telehealth services, connected cars) and developing strategies to mitigate the unknown unknowns that will invariably arise as new IoT applications are created and launched.What will this new attack surface look like? Let’s dig deeper into a few high-profile IoT applications to understand the potential security risks.eHealthTelehealth use has taken off in 2020, but it was already becoming a popular alternative to in-person healthcare, particularly in areas where healthcare services weren’t readily available. One risk of telehealth, however, is the transmission of highly personal information that could be subjected to a man-in-the-middle attack. This risk becomes even more serious when you consider the number of connected medical devices that are expected to be activated on 5G networks. For example, what happens when a remote heart monitor is compromised or real-time emergency services are disrupted by a DoS attack? And who underwrites that risk: the communications provider, the healthcare provider or the device manufacturer?Energy providersIt goes without saying that energy services are mission-critical applications. One of the more interesting 5G applications is the use of connected devices to manage smart grids, power plants and municipal energy services such as water and electricity. But what happens if cybercriminals seize control of wireless water meters? Or if a regional smart grid is disrupted? As for safety sensors in nuclear power plants that might manage heating and cooling—well, let’s not even go there.Those scenarios may sound unlikely, but attacks like that have already happened and been highly successful. The Mirai botnet is a classic example. It compromised a massive field of 4G IoT devices that nearly brought down the Internet. An interesting caveat: that malicious code was quickly shared on the Internet for other cyber criminals as well. Yes, cybercrime as a service is a now a thing, and a lucrative one at that.Connected vehiclesThe concept of an Internet-connected vehicle may seem futuristic, but almost every modern vehicle is already a connected device. There are GPS connections, digital satellite radio connections, roadside service connections and collision radar connections. Then there are Bluetooth connections to our smartphones, which are themselves connected to a radio access network. And that’s before we even get into self-driving vehicles.Beyond the safety risks of turning our car into a two-ton IoT device, personal data is also at risk in our car. We can log on the Internet right now and track where our family members are located through their GPS device. Going forward, in-car email and streaming video will be packaged with cars for a monthly fee, creating an even greater need for secure, encrypted communications. When vehicle-to-vehicle communications arrive, new security mechanisms will need to be put in place for that too.Ultimately, service providers will need to extend their view of security to not only address subscribers but the millions of connected devices that ride alongside their network in massive Machine Type Communications (mMTC) slices or support enterprise applications at the network’s edge. This will require the ability weigh risk appetite against opportunity, anticipate the unknown and react to new threats in real time. In other words, 5G will be a very different world for service providers from a security perspective.ConclusionFor a better perspective of IoT security in a 5G world, talk to Dell Technologies. We’re committed to providing service providers with end-to-end security solutions that can effectively monetize 5G opportunities while mitigating risk. At Dell Technologies, we believe the world is better when machines and human beings are working together for a common good.last_img read more

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Biden fears Trump will try to delay US polls

first_img“Mark my words, I think he is gonnatry to kick back the election somehow, come up with some rationale why it can’tbe held,” Biden said during an online fundraiser Thursday. Joe Biden, pictured in March 2020, says he thinks Donald Trump will try to postpone the November election. AFP WASHINGTON – Presumptive Democraticpresidential nominee Joe Biden has predicted that United States PresidentDonald Trump will try to postpone the country’s November election in an attemptto win. Six months before US voters head to thepolls, Trump’s mind is already in election mode. (AFP) The 77-year-old former vice presidentsaid it is “the only way he thinks he can possibly win.”last_img read more

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Rudolf reigns in Friday SportMod qualifier at Las Vegas

first_imgLAS VEGAS, Nev. ­(Nov. 13) – He hasn’t seen his name in lights yet but Chase Rudolf stole the headlines Friday night at the Duel In the Desert.The 17-year-old from Norwalk, Iowa, led every lap of the $500 to win qualifying feature for Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods on the Las Vegas Motor Speedway Dirt Track.He’ll advance to Saturday’s $1,777 to win show along with fellow top six finishers Rick Diaz, Clay Money, Ryan Wolla, Nick Spainhoward and Adam Armstrong.The race ran caution-free and Rudolf stayed flawless up front, leading by a straightaway when lap 12 was scored. A flat tire took Michael Johnson out of a transfer spot with three laps left.Diaz took second well ahead of Money and Wolla.Qualifying feature results – 1. Chase Rudolf, Norwalk, Iowa; 2. Rick Diaz, Los Banos, Calif.; 3. Clay Money, Penokee, Kan.; 4. Ryan Wolla, Williston, N.D.; 5. Nick Spainhoward, Bakersfield, Calif.; 6. Adam Armstrong, Beatrice, Neb.; 7. Jerry Hoffman, Oronogo, Mo.; 8. Kyle Smith, Yuma, Ariz.; 9. Wayne Dotson, Bakersfield, Calif.; 10. Brian Cooper, Yuba City, Calif.; 11. Nick Sylvester, Bakersfield, Calif.; 12. Chris Toth, Holtville, Calif.; 13. Jordan Hagar, Bakersfield, Calif.; 14. Fred Ryland, Brentwood, Calif.; 15. Brendon Frye, Taft, Calif.; 16. Luke Krogh, Dickinson, N.D.; 17. Todd Cooper, Yuba City, Calif.; 18. Brian Roode, Brooks, Alb.; 19. Tony Konold, Clear Lake, S.D.; 20. Anthony Fierro, Cheyenne, Wyo.; 21. Michael Johnson, Bakersfield, Calif.; 22. Shane Helton, Artesia, N.M.; 23. Jerry Hinton, Adel, Iowa; 24. Varion Hetle, Underwood, N.D.1st heat – 1. Rick Diaz, Los Banos, Calif.; 2. Kyle Smith, Yuma, Ariz.; 3. Jerry Hoffman, Oronogo, Mo.; 4. Arie Schouten, Blair, Neb.; 5. Adam Armstrong, Beatrice, Neb.; 6. Joey Yantis, Bakersfield, Calif.; 7. Scott Saunders, Colorado Springs, Colo.; 8. Ricky Saunders, Colorado Springs, Colo.; 9. Mark Odgers, Mariposa, Calif.; 10. Ricky Childress Jr., Bakersfield, Calif.2nd heat – 1. Anthony Fierro, Cheyenne, Wyo.; 2. Brendon Frye, Taft, Calif.; 3. Shane Helton, Artesia, N.M.; 4. Nick Spainhoward, Bakersfield, Calif.; 5. Brenda Kirby, Lomita, Calif.; 6. Ryan Gilland, Beatrice, Neb.; 7. Marisa Odgers, Mariposa, Calif.; 8. Chuck Black, Phoenix, Ariz.; 9. Jason Wilkey, Batesville, Ark.; 10. Gary Dutton, Bakersfield, Calif.3rd heat – 1. Tony Konold, Clear Lake, S.D.; 2. Jerry Hinton, Adel, Iowa; 3. Todd Cooper, Yuba City, Calif.; 4. Nick Sylvester, Bakersfield, Calif.; 5. Garrett Jernagan, Bakersfield, Calif.; 6. Rick Kreitschmann, Sheboygan Falls, Wis.; 7. Merl Fitzpatrick, Brooks, Alb.; 8. Anthony Giuliani, Morgan Hill, Calif.; 9. Rex Higgins, Bloomfield, N.M.; 10. Jesse Hoskins, Longdale, Okla.4th heat – 1. Chase Rudolf, Norwalk, Iowa; 2. Michael Johnson, Bakersfield, Calif.; 3. Fred Ryland, Brentwood, Calif.; 4. Brian Cooper, Yuba City, Calif.; 5. Danny Concelman, Colorado Springs, Colo.; 6. Brenden Damon, Great Bend, Kan.; 7. Jason Nation, Bakersfield, Calif.; 8. Bill Ferguson, Norwood, Colo.; 9. James Cecil, Bakersfield, Calif.; 10. Jason George, Laveen, Ariz.5th heat – 1. Ryan Wolla, Williston, N.D.; 2. Clay Money, Penokee, Kan.; 3. Jordan Hagar, Bakersfield, Calif.; 4. Jeremy Hoff, Copperopolis, Calif.; 5. Sean Tyson, Council Bluffs, Iowa; 6. Brian Roode, Brooks, Alb.; 7. Ron Tex Jr., Papillion, Neb.; 8. Chuck Delp, Rock Springs, Wyo.; 9. Billy Simkins, Bakersfield, Calif.; 10. Greg Larson, Kindred, N.D.6th heat – 1. Wayne Dotson, Bakersfield, Calif.; 2. Varion Hetle, Underwood, N.D.; 3. Luke Krogh, Dickinson, N.D.; 4. Chris Toth, Holtville, Calif.; 5. Jared Schweitzer, Bakersfield, Calif.; 6. Austin Frye, Taft, Calif.; 7. Travis Poll, Green River, Wyo.; 8. Buddy Ray Jones, Council Bluffs, Iowa; 9. Shawn Harker, Nebraska City, Neb.1st “B” feature – 1. Adam Armstrong; 2. Nick Spainhoward; 3. Joey Yantis; 4. Arie Schouten; 5. Scott Saunders; 6. Ryan Gilland; 7. Mark Odgers; 8. Chuck Black; 9. Marisa Odgers; 10. Ricky Saunders; 11. Brenda Kirby; 12. Jason Wiley; 13. Ricky Childress Jr.; 14. Gary Dutton.2nd “B” feature – 1. Nick Sylvester; 2. Brian Cooper; 3. Garrett Jernagan; 4. Danny Concelman; 5. Jason George; 6. Brenden Damon; 7. James Cecil; 8. Merl Fitzpatrick; 9. Rex Higgins; 10. Anthony Giuliani; 11. Jason Nation; 12. Rick Kretschmann; 13. Bill Ferguson; 14. Jesse Hoskins.3rd “B” feature – 1. Chris Toth; 2. Brian Roode; 3. Billy Simkins; 4. Jeremy Hoff; 5. Chuck Delp; 6. Travis Poll; 7. Shawn Harker; 8. Austin Frye; 9. Jared Schweitzer; 10. Ron Tex Jr.; 11. Sean Tyson; 12. Buddy Ray Jones; 13. Greg Larson.last_img read more

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Possible City merger with WPIAL an insult

first_imgThe possibility of the City League joining the WPIAL brings mixed reactions. If it was just the eight or nine schools it would be no problem. But the proposed five-team split is an insult to the city, City League fans and city taxpayers. What about tradition, rivalries? Why should fans come out to watch?Obama-Westinghouse-Prep vs. Perry-Oliver? That’s stupid. And why is it the White schools can stand on their own? Carrick and Allderdice are the only two schools projected to stand alone. How many championships of any kind has Carrick won? The other projected combo is Brashear-Langley.Are they saying that if divided into the classes its population warrants, be it Class A, AA, AAA or AAAA, City League schools cannot compete athletically in any sport with the WPIAL? So in order to be competitive they must be combined?The biggest insult to city dwellers is this is the first time any of us have heard of it. Why hasn’t it been discussed at school board meetings in which some kind of feedback could have been gotten from the parents and fans. But most importantly, the taxpayers who are going to have to foot the bill.Why do I say taxpayers?  Well, think of the cost when just about every kid has to leave his or her school to practice. Where do North Side kids practice? Perry or Oliver. What about Hill District kids? Do they go to the Brashear-Langley or Prep-Obama-Westinghouse? Do they practice at Prep-Milliones, Westinghouse, Brashear or Langley?Don’t get me wrong, living on the North Side I would somewhat love to see a combined Perry-Oliver sports team. We would kick some WPIAL butt. Man, just think of the football team they would have. And what Phyllis Jones of Westinghouse, who has dominated City League hoops for the past two decades, could do with Westinghouse-Obama-Prep girls hoops teams combined. Wow, wow, wow. But where does Debbie Lewis from Schenley go? The coaching question is a big one also. Who gets cut out when the nine is cut to five?In all fairness, this whole plan needs to be evaluated and taken to the general public for more feedback. I’m just not all that hot on Hill District kids, especially young males, having to catch buses from Obama in East Liberty late night after a game.I can see Westinghouse and Langley being joined with some other school. Westinghouse, because of its low enrollment, and Langley because of its total ineptness in sports as a whole. So here’s my makeup.Perry, Oliver, Obama- Westinghouse, Prep, Langley-Brashear, Carrick, and Allderdice. This reduces the City League from nine to seven teams, because Schenley is gone anyway, with most of its students going to Prep because it’s located in the Hill. But I do really like the Perry-Oliver combo, just call them the North Side Destroyers. With these seven combinations there would still be some rivalries left, and some school pride.last_img read more

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Coaches Dave McLellan, Greg Andrusak ‘part ways’ with Nelson Leafs

first_imgHughes, who won the job over McLellan and two other candidates, took a director’s position with the Pursuit of Excellence Hockey Academy in Kelowna leaving the Leafs without a coach and GM days before the start of training camp.To say the Leafs were in panic mode at the time after Hughes informed the team was an understatement of the brief KIJHL season.However, the Leafs were optimistic McLellan, with Junior A hockey experience, had the tools, and contacts, to find the right players when Nelson opened camp for the 2014-15 seasonMcLellan had BCHL experience on staff with the Burnaby (now Coquitlam) Express from April 2005 to February 2010 before heading the coaching staff in 2007.He then coached the Delta Ice Hawks for two seasons where he took the franchise to the Pacific Junior Hockey League title in 2012.Before coming to Nelson McLellan coached in the North Vancouver Minor Hockey system.However, returning the Leafs back to an elite KIJHL team never materialized as Nelson finished fourth last season, losing to Beaver Valley in the first round of the Murdoch Division playoffs.This season Leaf fans were optimistic with a full off season of recruiting McLellan — finishing his time in Nelson with a 37-35-0-6-5 record — would restore the Leafs to the top of the Murdoch Division with the heavyweights like Beaver Valley Nitehawks and Castlegar Rebels.But after a solid start, the Leafs began sliding, losing 14 of 17 games since October 31 — the most embarrassing loss coming December 2 on the road against Castlegar 9-0.During the slide McLellan had a revolving door on the Leafs dressing room as players were released and signed on almost a weekly basis.Nelson was able to snap a recent seven-game losing streak Tuesday at home, rallying from a 3-0 deficit to edge Grand Forks 4-3 in overtime.Wednesday in Spokane, Nelson was trying to make it two straight over the Braves, a team Nelson had yet to lose against this season.The plan now for the Leafs executive is to then find a coach and GM during the Christmas break and before the Leafs return to face Beaver Valley in a two-game, home-and-home series beginning December 30 in Fruitvale.Story originated at The Nelson Daily During his first interview with The Nelson Daily in August of 2014, Leaf coach and GM Dave McLellan said he took the position with the Heritage City franchise Nelson is “run more like a Junior A franchise.”McLellan may have been right as the Leafs decided to make a decision more reserved for ownership in the BC Hockey League than the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League by “parting ways” with coaches Dave McLellan and Greg Andursak Wednesday morning.Leaf president John Dooley was unavailable for comment as he traveled to Spokane Wednesday with the team.However, in an emailed statement to The Nelson Daily, Lauren Suomi, Marketing Coordinator with the Nelson Leafs Hockey Society said:“I can confirm that at this time, the Leafs have parted ways with Dave McLellan and Greg Andrusak.”“President John Dooley is in Spokane, accompanying the team on their scheduled road trip along with Sean Dooley, who is standing in as coach,” Suomi added.“In reference to other media reports about this story, our full statement will be released when our president returns to the country.”Those media reports, which had the head coach slamming the Leafs board, said McLellan and Andrusak “told the board they were stepping down Wednesday morning.”McLellan leaves the Leafs in a similar way to finding the job with the Green and White.The 50-year-old skipper was parachuted into the Leafs coaching position in August of 2014 after the Nelson’s top candidate to replace former coach and GM, Frank Maida, Matt Hughes, decided to dump the Leafs for another job in July.last_img read more

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Conservation tech prize with invasive species focus announces finalists

first_imgAcoustic, Agriculture, algae, Artificial Intelligence, cameras, Conservation Technology, Drones, early warning, Frogs, Insects, Invasive Species, Monitoring, Oceans, Sensors, surveys, Technology, Turtles And Tortoises, Wildtech The Con X Tech Prize announced its second round will fund 20 finalists, selected from 150 applications, each with $3,500 to create their first prototypes of designs that use technology to address a conservation challenge.Seven of the 20 teams focused their designs on reducing impacts from invasive species, while the others addressed a range of conservation issues, from wildlife trafficking to acoustic monitoring to capturing freshwater plastic waste in locally-built bamboo traps.Conservation X Labs (CXL), which offers the prize, says the process provides winners with very early-stage funding, a rare commodity, and recognition of external approval, each of which has potential to motivate finalists and translate into further funding.Finalists can also compete for a grand prize of $20,000 and product support from CXL. The Con X Tech Prize just announced its second round will be funding 20 finalists each with $3,500 to create their first prototypes. Some 150 teams submitted ideas that use technology to address a conservation challenge. The 20 winners of this first stage of the competition will also compete for a grand prize of $20,000, plus support from CXL on product development and attracting investment.The prize accepts ideas for any conservation problem, with a particular focus on addressing threats from a specific theme. This second round of the prize focused on reducing impacts from invasive species to native species and ecosystems. The first round, sponsored in 2018, focused on ocean conservation.Biotech Steve Orwig removes an invasive Mexican weeping pine (Pinus patula) from the crater of Hawai’i’s Haleakalā National Park. Pines like these grow rapidly, are spread by wind from nearby forest plantings, and disrupt native ecosystems by shading out native shrubs and taking up water and nutrients. Image courtesy of U.S. National Park Service.“We have a range of hardware and software solutions we are funding, including tools in aquatic invasive species, camera traps, ag-tech, human-wildlife conflict, marine acoustics, and many more,” said Tom Quigley, who manages the digital makerspace community at Conservation X Labs, which offers the prize. “It’s a really exciting cohort.”Seven of the 20 finalists focused specifically on designs to address invasive species, while the remaining 13 teams sought to address a range of conservation issues, from wildlife trafficking to acoustic monitoring to capturing freshwater plastic waste in locally-built bamboo traps.The projects specifically addressing invasive species proposed a wide range of ideas to address an equally wide range of associated problems. They include:1. Pig-finding drone-based thermal cameras to conserve critically endangered giant tortoises on Santa Cruz island in the Galápagos by finding feral pigs that dig up tortoise nests and eat their eggs, which has prevented hatching of new generations of tortoises. The camera, equipped with machine learning algorithms, would also detect tortoise nests to help Galápagos National Park rangers find and protect them on the ground.Santa Cruz giant tortoise (Chelonoidis porteri) in Santa Cruz Island, Galápagos National Park, Ecuador. Invasive pigs and dogs destroy nests of giant tortoises, hindering recovery of tortoise populations from prior hunting and habitat loss. Image by Bernard Gagnon via Wikimedia Commons, CC 4.0.2. A mobile machine unit to remove invasive plants that have taken over grasslands in India’s protected areas, facilitated by local wood harvest, leaving elephants in parks without food and thus more likely to approach adjacent human crop fields, causing conflict. The repurposed commercially available charcoal producer would pick invasive plants, crush them into sawdust, and form usable charcoal briquettes from the dust to reduce the demand for fuelwood.3. Helping reduce the lionfish population off the Florida coast by connecting divers with fish processors through an online platform to facilitate processing of the small volumes of this highly invasive predatory fish caught by divers. Demand for the fish beyond Florida exceeds production, so the platform would also encourage more local processors.4. Remote amphibian refuges in Guatemala to attract frogs, using call playbacks, to a small tube-shaped container with a tiny pool and an Arduino computing unit inside. The unit has sensors that notify nearby researchers they’ve caught a frog, so they can identify it and determine if it carries invasive chytrid fungus.A Guatemalan spikethumb frog (Plectrohyla guatemalensis). Finding frogs at night when they are active is difficult, so researchers are seeking to attract them to tiny refuges where they can be identified and checked for invasive chytrid fungus. Image by Josiah H. Townsend, http://calphotos.berkeley.edu, CC 3.0.5. Find that plant, a machine-learning algorithm to detect individual invasive plants from drone-based images and produce geographic coordinates of the locations of plants identified as invasives to inform management decisions.6. Early insect pest detection system integrates low-cost sensors that record images, sounds, and environmental conditions, pheromone and light lures, and species identification algorithms to monitor invasive insect pests of agriculture and forests.7. Floating robots detect invasive marine algae species using image classification algorithms that identify the species and record its location while navigating. The automated identification from images would facilitate monitoring and help researchers detect and eradicate invasive plants before they become well-established.Why focus on invasive species?Humans transport non-native plants and animals from their homes on one continent to new places that often lack the predators or other mechanisms keeping populations of the species under control. Some of these non-native species become invasive, meaning they spread and outcompete or harm native plants and animals or destroy native habitat.The caterpillar of the fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda), which has invaded Africa and Asia from the Americas, destroying maize, sorghum, millet, rice, and other crops. Image by Frank Peairs, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org, CC 3.0.The accelerated spread of invasive species over the past few decades has led to severe reductions, and even extinctions, of some native species, especially on islands.“Over 30 percent of the IUCN Red List species extinctions were caused or impacted by invasives,” Quigley said. “As the world’s population grows and globalization increases, the risk of invasive species introductions increases dramatically. Innovation and new technology solutions are needed to prevent the spread of invasive species and novel emerging pathogens.”Role of tech prizes in conservationQuigley told Mongabay that the early funding and recognition that they have received a prize have been “transformative” for some first-round finalists.“The process provides winners with very early-stage funding, a rare commodity, and recognition of external approval,” Quigley said, “each of which has potential to motivate finalists and translate into further funding.”He added that the opportunity to compete for the prize with a submission deadline can motivate groups who’ve perhaps been considering an idea or design to address a conservation problem to actually develop it into a prototype.A common lionfish (Pterois miles) from the Red Sea. These carnivorous fish native to the western Indo-Pacific region and the related P. volitans invaded the western Atlantic in the 1980s. There, their populations have exploded as they reproduce rapidly, consume more than 50 native fish species, and have no predators in their new home. Image by Magnus Kjaergaard via Wikimedia Commons, CC 3.0.Quigley identified three features that he thought help teams advance their prototype development most effectively:  keeping a strong focus on a discrete problem; partnering with a group that actually faces the problem; and including team members from different disciplines, such as an oceanographer partnering with a camera tech expert and a fundraiser or an engineer with a web developer and a project manager.The Con X Prize strives to bring people from a variety of disciplines to apply their skills to solving conservation challenges and broadening the conservation community.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Sue Palmintericenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Climate justice advocates at UN: ‘Come with plans not speeches’

first_imgActivism, Climate Activism, Climate Change, Corporate Responsibility, Human Rights, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Rights Article published by Genevieve Belmaker As the Peoples’ Summit on Climate, Rights and Human Survival convened in New York last weekend, leaders had a call to action for attendees: bring solutions.The climate justice movement meeting brought human rights and climate leaders together for one of the most prominent such gathering to date.The meetings came amid debates over aggressively gutted environmental safeguards by the US, including its withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. The UN special envoy for this year’s climate summit, Ambassador Luis Alfonso de Alba, opened the September 19-20 Peoples’ Summit on Climate, Rights and Human Survival with an admonition for nations the coming week: “This will not be a traditional summit.” The time for addressing linkages between climate and human rights has passed, de Alba said and concentration should shift to individual and collective action.The meeting integrating human rights and climate leaders was the most prominent and clearest representation of the climate justice movement to date. According to Amnesty International, one of the event’s organizers, the meeting aimed to galvanize the human rights community to urgently scale-up its efforts on climate justice, creating the most diverse movement ever assembled to tackle the climate crisis.The gathering preceded this week’s Climate Action Summit at UN headquarters in New York City, where leaders from approximately 60 nations are gathered to form a plan of action to address the climate emergency.The UN secretary general wants ambitious new commitments at the pace and scale required to significantly reduce emissions. The climate justice group made clear that generalized rhetoric is no longer welcome.“There needs to be a multi-front response to the emergency of climate change,” said Craig Mokhiber, director of the New York Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights. “[That] includes legal strategies that the various communities can bring, social and political strategies that includes looking at aspects of economic decisions that have led us to where we are now, and the full spectrum of tactics that goes from action in court to action to civil disobedience in the streets, because that’s where we are in terms of crisis.”The earth’s rapid warming as a result of humankind’s activities has created what panelist and UN special rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, Philip Alston, described as a “climate apartheid,” where the disproportionate effects of the climate crisis are borne by colored populations.“When you tell people there’s a leak in the boat, they’ll believe you when they’re up to their knees in water,” said Mokhiber on the importance of bringing together the voices of those who have already been dramatically affected and those who will be without meaningful immediate action. “That’s where we are now.”Much of what has been done to address the climate crisis thus far has been described as “rearranging the deck chairs of the Titanic.” As world leaders gathered in New York this month, he puts special blame on the US. “Worse than that,” Mokhiber said, “the US is buttressing the iceberg.”President Donald Trump, who made a surprise 14-minute appearance on the opening day of the climate summit before departing for a meeting on religious freedom, has aggressively gutted environmental safeguards since taking office and is leading the US withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. According to human rights leaders, such negligence might constitute a human rights violation.Jennifer Morgan is the executive director of Greenpeace International. “While we all recognize [climate and human rights] linkages, and they are more and more prevalent every single day, I don’t believe that corporations and states have truly understood that their lack of action on climate change is a violation of their human rights obligations.”Kumi Naidoo is the current Secretary-General of Amnesty International. “I just have one message to the leadership of the fossil fuel companies of the world,” Naidoo said. “They need to understand that we are now going to be using the full weight of human rights law. They need to understand that any decision they make now to invest one cent more in new fossil fuel projects is an investment in the death of our children and their children.”A number of countries have not been selected to speak at the climate summit, including coal-supporting nations like Japan and South Africa. According to Financial Times, also excluded will be the US, as well as Brazil and Saudi Arabia.The energy in New York was undeniably positive as the imperative for action seems to be gaining traction, if just in the public’s consciousness.Ellen Dorsey is the executive director of the Wallace Global Fund, a private foundation focused on progressive social change in the fields of environment, democracy, human rights and corporate accountability. “The real measure of success of this summit is that it unleashes the process where we have built such power and collaborative action so strong and so clear that the fossil fuel companies will tender plans consistent with a 1.5-degree world,” Dorsey said.What does that mean for corporations and governments?“That means they must wind down or fundamentally transform themselves and they must stop their capital expenditures now – no new fossil fuels,” said Dorsey, whose organization seeks to put the rights of people at the center of climate solutions. “We will ensure that as we move into the new energy economy that it is a rights-respecting economy and the solutions out people not profit at the center and that the renewable energy companies themselves are held accountable to human rights as well as environmental standards. That power is building and it is time that we show that power in very clear ways.”At the end of the first day of the Climate Action Summit, Nemonte Nenquimo, of the Waorani Nation in Ecuador and one of the founding members of the indigenous organization Ceibo Alliance, delivered a rousing speech at an indigenous community event hosted by the Ford Foundation. “We must respect the right to live well, to conserve air, water, and land,” she said. “This is my fight. Not just for my country, for the indigenous, this work is for the world. This is a fight for all.”Lavetanalagi Seru is a co-founder of the Alliance for Future Generations, a youth-led voluntary organization working for education and climate justice, who traveled from Fiji. “There is very little time left now for systems change,” Seru urged in his closing remarks to last week’s indigenous peoples’ summit.“Let us use our moral voice to call on our governments to take ambitious climate action, demanding corporate accountability and also by playing our part in the current unsustainable consumption, production and distribution patterns. Let us rise to the challenge this planet seeks of us––or we shall all be judged for our inaction by a jury that is yet to be born.”This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Seeking justice against palm oil firms, victims call out banks behind them

first_imgIndividuals from Indonesia and Liberia embroiled in land disputes with oil palm plantations have visited the Netherlands to call on the Dutch banks facilitating these companies’ operations to take action.The companies in question are PT Astra Agro Lestari in Indonesia and Golden Veroleum Liberia, both of which are owned by conglomerates based in secrecy jurisdictions and which have financial links to Dutch banks ABN AMRO and Rabobank.The banks say their relationship with the companies is only indirect, and as such they say there is little they can do to influence them.Friends of the Earth, which arranged for the affected individuals to go to the Netherlands, is pushing for the European Union to adopt more stringent regulations that would disincentivize banks and other institutions from investing in environmentally and socially unsustainable businesses. AMSTERDAM — Hemsi has been in jail three times since 2006 and filed pleas with 13 government institutions in Indonesia during that period — all in an effort to fight off the oil palm company he alleges is stealing his land.A farmer from Indonesia’s Central Sulawesi province, Hemsi has also traveled to the capital, Jakarta, three times to call on the government to protect him and his family. Each time, his pleas have gone unanswered.His last arrest was in December, a day after his wife gave birth to their third child, when he was detained for allegedly stealing palm fruit from his own land — land that PT Mamuang, a subsidiary of plantation giant PT Astra Agro Lestari (AALI), claims as its own.“I’m terribly disappointed with the government because I’ve reported my case with complete evidence and yet they’ve ignored my case and I got sent to jail again,” Hemsi told Mongabay. “I’m frustrated but I’ll keep fighting for my rights because it’s my only hope to provide a livelihood for my family.”Hemsi’s remarks came during a trip to the Netherlands in early October, facilitated by the Dutch environmental NGO Milieudefensie, the Dutch chapter of Friends of the Earth. He reckons that since he can’t get justice back home, he’ll hit the company where it hurts: its funding. In AALI’s case, these would be the Dutch banks ABN AMRO and Rabobank, both of which have financial ties to the Indonesian company.ABN AMRO was the underwriter for AALI’s initial public offering in 1997. More recently, according to Milieudefensie, in 2018 the bank sold shares in PT Astra International, the parent company of AALI and the largest listed company in Indonesia. PT Astra International is in turn a subsidiary of Jardine Matheson Holdings Limited, a conglomerate based in the secrecy jurisdiction of Bermuda and listed on the Singapore exchange.Milieudefensie says Rabobank twice facilitated syndicated loans for PT Astra International in 2010 — loans provided by a group of lenders that Rabobank organized but may not necessarily have contributed to. Milieudefensie says the Dutch banks aren’t informing customers about all the companies whose operations they’re facilitating, with some of that activity labeled as “sustainable” despite benefiting companies with a track record of environmental and social violations.“I’m asking them to stop funding PT Astra Agro Lestari, which is operating in my village, because that company has criminalized me and sent me to prison three times,” Hemsi said. “The company has robbed me of my land, the only hope for my family. I hope my rights can be restored and there’s no more criminalization.” Activism, african palm oil, Conflict, Environment, Finance, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Social Conflict Banner image of  Hemsi, a farmer from Indonesia (right), and activists from Liberia embroiled in land disputes with oil palm plantations standing in front of ABN AMRO headquarters in Amsterdam before filing their complaints with the bank. Image by Hans Nicholas Jong/Mongabay.Editor’s note: The reporter traveled to the Netherlands as a guest of Milieudefensie. Milieudefensie does not have any editorial influence on this or any other story Mongabay produces.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Hemsi, a farmer from Central Sulawesi, accompanied by activists from the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), in front of ABN AMRO headquarters in Amsterdam. Image by Hans Nicholas Jong/Mongabay.‘Enough is enough’Hemsi isn’t the only one who feels aggrieved by the disruptions wrought by the Dutch banks’ links with a palm oil company. Also making the trip to the Netherlands were Terry Doegmah Panyonnoh and Harriet Sayee Saylee, Liberian activists who have also lodged complaints to ABN AMRO and Rabobank over their financial ties to Golden Veroleum Liberia (GVL). They allege the palm oil company is involved in land grabbing in the Liberian counties of Sinoe and Grand Kru.Their activism earned them the same fate as Hemsi: Panyonnoh and 16 other young members of his community were jailed for a year after they protested against GVL.“GVL came with big promises for development, but today we lost our land and we ended up in poverty,” Panyonnoh said. “Farming is difficult. Almost no jobs. The forest we used to find medicine, fish and clean water is destroyed. People are intimidated and harassed with the support from GVL.”GVL is owned by Verdant Fund, based in the Cayman Islands, another secrecy jurisdiction. The sole investor in the fund is Singapore-listed Golden Agri-Resources Limited (GAR), the world’s second-biggest palm oil producer, whose subsidiaries have received loans from both ABN AMRO and Rabobank in recent years.Evert Hassink, from Milieudefensie, told Mongabay that the decision to bring these community members over to the Netherlands to confront the banks directly was in response to a statement by ABN AMRO earlier this year.“ABN AMRO called on the victims of their clients this February to come and report about the abuses,” he said. “Well, here we are. Even though it is of course crazy that they have to come all the way to make their point.”Hassink added that, “After years of challenging and bringing complaints to the companies in Liberia and Indonesia, these land rights defenders say ‘enough is enough.’ Today, Terry, Harriet and Hemsi are here to confront the banks in the Netherlands and hear what they really do to get their clients to improve.”An area cleared of trees at the GVL concession in Tajuowon district. Photo by Jennifer O’Mahony for Mongabay.A responsibility to actThe banks say there’s little they can do about companies with which they’re not directly connected.“The link is often very, very indirect,” said Johan Verburg, an official in Rabobank’s sustainability department. “Where we can, we try to indirectly influence. There is a much, much higher leverage in a direct relation. Indirectly, we can talk, but there’s not much pressure we can put otherwise.”Verburg said Rabobank steers clear of directly financing any problematic companies. He added that Rabobank’s direct clients in the palm oil industry, of which there are around 20 worldwide, must be members of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), the leading certification body for the industry. (GAR is an RSPO member company; AALI is not.)“We would ensure that concern is on the radar of other stakeholders, companies, banks, roundtables, who can put direct pressure on that case,” Verburg said. “So in this particular case, and similar cases, we will monitor what the RSPO monitor panel is doing, and what the RSPO member in this case is doing. It’s typically a situation where we will be very cautious to have a direct investment relation at all.”Richard Kooloos, the head of sustainable banking at ABN AMRO, said he couldn’t immediately confirm Milieudefensie’s claim that the bank sold PT Astra International shares, but that even if true, it’s an indirect relationship. (ABN AMRO was the underwriter for PT Astra Agro Lestari’s initial public offering in 1997.)“I don’t know it by heart. The fact that they say the relationship with ABN AMRO is through stock, for me that indicates that there’s only this relationship,” Kooloos said.But if the finding is confirmed, and Hemsi’s case is deemed severe enough, then ABN AMRO will engage with the company, Kooloos said.“If we are aware of misdoing, not minor, but major misdoings over a long period of time, [and] if that happen from thousands of companies globally that our clients can invest in, then we will start engaging,” he said.“And if this is not addressed, then we can remove that company from our universe, that means that our clients cannot buy that stock anymore through us. That’s the ultimate step. But you usually see the issue is being addressed indeed and your influence has an impact.”Similar to Rabobank’s Verburg, Kooloos said ABN AMRO would have more influence in the matter if PT Astra International was a direct client of the bank, such as being a loan recipient.“It’s a different type of influence because we don’t have a relationship with this company. We don’t know the company, we haven’t analyzed the company,” Kooloos says. “But if a company is a client of us, we know everything. We also have private information. But if it’s through this stockholding, we only have public information. But nevertheless, we are linked in our value chain to that company, so we have a responsibility to act.”Protesters demand farmers from Polanto Jaya village in Donggala district, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia, to be released from jail during a rally. The farmers were jailed after they were accused by PT Mamuang, a subsidiary of PT Astra Agro Lestari, of stealing palm fruit. Photo courtesy of Walhi Central Sulawesi.More stringent financing rulesBeyond the PT Astra Agro Lestari and Golden Veroleum Liberia cases, Milieudefensie wants rules in place that would prevent banks and investors from profiting off the destruction of forests, human rights violations, climate-polluting oil extraction, and child labor.The organization launched a petition three months ago calling on the Dutch finance minister to raise the issue before the new European Commission.The Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), the country’s largest green group and an advocate for Hemsi, says the European Union should have a regulation that holds financial institutions such as banks accountable for the impact of their financing to palm oil companies.Walhi climate justice campaigner Yuyun Harmono, accompanying Hemsi to the Netherlands, said Dutch banks were far too reliant on existing sustainability certification schemes such as the RSPO, and also lack a mechanism to remedy the impact of companies whose operations have been facilitated, directly or indirectly, by the banks.He cited the case of Rabobank, which he said provided loans to PT Astra Agro Lestari at a time when the company was already embroiled in the land dispute with Hemsi.“These financial institutions seemingly wash their hands clean after these companies are no longer their clients,” Yuyun said. “There’s no accountability for their past mistakes.”He said the EU had a responsibility to better regulate its financial institutions in light of its decision to phase out palm oil-based biodiesel by 2030.“On one hand, they want to phase out palm oil because of climate change,” Yuyun said. “But on the other hand, they also keep investing in Indonesia’s palm oil industry. It’s a double standard.”Bas Eickhout, a member of the European Parliament for the Netherlands, said he was fully aware of this conundrum.“We have to make sure that that [financial] policy is consistent with what we are doing with our policies on palm oil for example,” he told reporters at the European Parliament in Brussels. “And that’s not fully consistent yet. I’m fully aware [of] that, so there’s work that needs to be done also on the financial rule. But that’s the next discussion we’re having, absolutely.”Yuyun said Walhi had approached Indonesia’s financial regulator, the OJK, to call for stronger regulations on sustainable financing. But progress has been slow, he said. Abdul Haris, the head of the Walhi chapter in Central Sulawesi, Hemsi’s home province, said he had filed a report on Hemsi’s case to the OJK in 2016.“But to date there hasn’t been any follow-up,” he said.As for Hemsi himself, the fight is far from over. While he was in the Netherlands, the Indonesian police questioned his family back home.“My parents were visited by the local police asking for information. My wife was also visited by police at night. She was asked to take them to the site where I was accused of stealing [palm fruit],” he said.He added he believed the police visits were linked to his trip to the Netherlands — an effort to “hinder the process of the filing of my complaints.”But Hemsi said he wouldn’t be intimidated into giving up.“Even if I have to go to jail again, I’ll do that, as long as my land rights are acknowledged,” Hemsi said. “I want to show other farmers who are criminalized that we can’t afford to stop fighting and that we should fight together.”center_img Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Illegal hunting a greater threat to wildlife than forest degradation

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored In a recent study, researchers used camera-trapping records to show that illegal hunting may be a bigger threat mammals and ground-dwelling birds than forest degradation in Southeast Asia.They chose Borneo and the Annamite Mountains on the Southeast Asian mainland, two rainforest study sites that have similar habitats.While widespread logging has degraded many forests in Borneo, the island has faced less hunting.By contrast, the Annamites have experienced exceedingly high illegal hunting, but its forests are structurally more intact. The world has long associated plummeting populations of Southeast Asian wildlife with news of forest degradation and poignant images of deforested lands. Recent studies, however, bring to light another human practice that’s been driving the decline of wildlife numbers in these ecosystems.Researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin, in cooperation with WWF-Vietnam, WWF-Laos and the forestry department of the state of Sabah in Malaysian Borneo, carried out a study showing that illegal hunting may be a bigger threat to mammals and ground-dwelling birds than forest degradation. The research, published Oct. 30 in the journal Communications Biology, compares camera-trapping records from logged forests in Malaysian Borneo with a protected eco-region in the Annamite Mountains of Vietnam and Laos where illegal hunting is rampant. The results show a more precipitous loss of species and wildlife populations in the Annamites than in Borneo.Researchers chose the two rainforest study sites as they have similar habitats. Their recent history, however, has a few noteworthy differences. While widespread logging has degraded many forests in Borneo, the island has faced less hunting. By contrast, the Annamites have experienced exceedingly high illegal hunting, but its forests are structurally more intact.A forest ranger removes a snare in central Vietnam. Hunters are increasingly using easy-to-construct snares to hunt mammals and ground-dwelling birds in the Annamite Mountains in Vietnam and Laos. Image by Andrew Tilker.Both forest degradation and hunting threaten wildlife, but the latter has reached extreme heights in recent years.“In one protected area complex, the Hue and Quang Nam Saola Nature Reserves, in central Vietnam, forest rangers collected more than 110,000 wire snares over the course of a few years,” Andrew Tilker, one of the lead authors of the study, a Ph.D. student at Leibniz-IZW and Asian species officer at the NGO Global Wildlife Conservation, said in an email.“[T]his didn’t lead to any noticeable reduction in the overall snaring pressure. It is possible to collect hundreds of snares in a single day’s walk through the forest. In one protected area that we worked in, people have hunted out almost all mammals larger than a rat or squirrel and now busy taking out the last small mammals. It is complete faunal collapse.”Snaring has pushed many species that live only in the Annamite Range, such as the antelope-like saola (Pseudoryx nghetinhensis) and the Annamite striped rabbit (Nesolagus timminsi), to the brink of extinction.Snares are as rife as they are easy to construct, most commonly using cheaply available material like motorbike and bicycle brake cables. Hunters come from local communities, larger regional towns and the bigger cities alike to supply the thriving illegal wildlife trade in the region.“There is little, if any, subsistence hunting in the Annamites,” Tilker said.Hunters and wildlife traders may send a few high-value species, like pangolins, to major cities or export them to foreign markets. But most of the animals that are captured go to local wildlife markets or are sold directly to restaurants as bushmeat.“Bushmeat is something of a status symbol in Vietnam and Laos,” Tilker added. “Put simply, if you are a wealthy upper- or middle-class person in Vietnam, and you want to show off to your friends, you go to a bushmeat restaurant and order wild meat.”Researchers say that hundreds of snares can be collected in a single day’s walk through the Annamite forest. Through snaring alone, the Annamites are facing grave defaunation. By comparison, Borneo’s forest lands that come under logging concessions are safer for similar species. Image by Andrew Tilker.Confirming and adding to related studiesPrevious research in Southeast Asia has similarly warned that hunting is a more severe threat than deforestation and that the use of snares is driving species to extinction. The current study, in which the researchers quantified the severity of the threats, confirms these results.“Our camera-trapping effort, which scales across 1,000 square kilometers [386 square miles] in both [the Annamite Mountain and the Bornean] landscapes, is much larger than the spatial scale of earlier studies,” Andreas Wilting, a scientist at Leibniz-IZW and co-author of the study, said in an email. “[T]his really helped us to assess biodiversity across entire forest reserves and protected areas.”Data from such large areas allowed the researchers to estimate which species are either completely missing in a region or occur at such low numbers that they could be considered locally extinct. Wilting added that the study also shows that species that are more resistant to hunting have lower populations in the hunted landscapes than in the logged landscapes.“From an ecological perspective,” Wilting said, “both findings are equally important as they show that it is impossible for more resistant species to take over the ecological role of the ones which disappeared, as the resistant species are also negatively impacted by the hunting.”In addition, the study also shows that habitat-related elements that are observed for comparison, such as canopy cover, are not accurate predictors for species occurrences in hunted regions. That means that some species might occur even in habitats for which they’re only marginally suited — if they are protected from hunting, Wilting said.Forest degradation in Deramakot, Malaysian Borneo, one of the study sites. Researchers gathered data from large areas in both the Annamites and Borneo. Image by Andrew Tilker.“Conceptually and scientifically, this is an important finding,” he said, “as we often assess species distributions based on suitable habitat (that is, forest cover) and hunting related factors are ignored, partly because they are very difficult to capture and are region specific.”“These results show that logging concessions can be safe havens for mammal and bird communities, particularly if sustainable forest management protocols are applied, following principles of forest certification standards,” Mashor Mohamad Jaini, director of the Sabah Forestry Department, said in a statement.Equal attention to deforestation and huntingCo-author Benjamin Rawson, conservation director of WWF-Vietnam, advocates an immediate reduction of anthropogenic pressure on wildlife, especially snaring.“Clear policy directions and high-level political commitment in relation to wildlife crime, be it high-value wildlife products such as ivory and rhino horn for international trade, or bushmeat trade within the country, needs to be secured to ensure long-term persistence of these species,” Rawson said in an email.Tilker said the complex problem of snaring needs to be addressed from multiple angles. The crisis calls for a reduction in demand for wildlife products, strengthening enforcement in protected areas, and conducting education and outreach activities to raise awareness among the general public.Snaring has pushed many species endemic to the Annamite Range, such as the antelope-like saola and the Annamite striped rabbit, to the brink of extinction. It is common to find the heads of animals, like the Annamite muntjac (Muntiacus truongsonensis) pictured here, hanging in houses in villages around the region. Image by Andrew Tilker.“However, I believe that an argument could be made for a fundamental paradigm shift within the conservation community, in which combating poaching is treated with the same level of urgency as protecting tropical forest habitat,” he said. “For decades, the conservation community has emphasized protecting tropical rainforest habitat as a primary means of protecting biodiversity.“[O]bviously, this is important,” Tilker added. “But maintaining forest cover is, by itself, not enough. It is possible to have pristine but nonetheless empty tropical rainforest.”Wilting agrees. “We need to see a shift within the large-scale development aid and governmental funds from ‘forests/habitat protection’ to actual biodiversity protection,” he said.Banner image of forest degradation through selective logging by Andrew Tilker.  Nanditha Chandraprakash is a writer with a passion for wildlife, climate change and environmental conservation. Find her on Instagram: @ayellowmoon.Citation:Tilker, A., Abrams, J. F., Mohamed, A., Nguyen, A., Wong, S. T., Sollmann, R., … Wilting, A. (2019). Habitat degradation and indiscriminate hunting differentially impact faunal communities in the Southeast Asian tropical biodiversity hotspot. Communications Biology, 2(1), 396. doi:10.1038/s42003-019-0640-yFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Animals, Biodiversity, Bushmeat, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Hunting, Illegal Logging, Illegal Trade, Logging, Over-hunting, Poaching, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Snares, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking last_img read more

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