Breaking: “You Cannot Hurt Religious Sentiments”:Supreme Court Refuses Interim Protection To Makers Of Tandav Against Multiple FIRs

first_imgTop StoriesBreaking: “You Cannot Hurt Religious Sentiments”:Supreme Court Refuses Interim Protection To Makers Of Tandav Against Multiple FIRs LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK27 Jan 2021 2:24 AMShare This – xThe Supreme Court on Wednesday issued notices on a plea filed by the Director, Producer, Writer and Actor of the web series Tandav seeking for clubbing and transferring of criminal proceedings which have been initiated against them in various cities for allegedly hurting religious sentiments. A Bench comprising of Justices Ashok Bhushan, R. Subhash Reddy and MR Shah refused to grant…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Supreme Court on Wednesday issued notices on a plea filed by the Director, Producer, Writer and Actor of the web series Tandav seeking for clubbing and transferring of criminal proceedings which have been initiated against them in various cities for allegedly hurting religious sentiments. A Bench comprising of Justices Ashok Bhushan, R. Subhash Reddy and MR Shah refused to grant any interim protection to the accused persons apprehending arrest from Police departments of six states. “We cannot use the power under Section 482 CrPC. We are not inclined to grant interim protection,” the Bench said. The bench also said that it was rejecting the prayer for quashing of the FIRs.It however clarified that the pendency of the petition in the Supreme Court will not prejudice the right of petitioners to seek appropriate remedies from concerned courts for bail or quashing of FIRs. Delete [BREAKING] #Tandav Series Row : Supreme Court issues notice on the prayers for transferring and clubbing of FIRs.Bench rejects the prayer for granting of interim protection from arrest. Grants liberty to petitioners to seek bail in concerned courts.#SupremeCourt #PrimeVideo https://t.co/YrQBZC2Pm3— Live Law (@LiveLawIndia) January 27, 2021 The Petitioners were represented by Senior Advocates Fali Nariman, Mukul Rohatgi (for Amazon India Creative Head Aparna Purohit) Senior Advocate Sidharth Luthra (for producer Himanshu Mehra, director Ali Abbas Zafar and writer Gaurav Solanki) and Senior Advocate Siddharth Agarwal (for actor Mohammed Zeeshan Ayyub).The petitioners’ lawyers persuaded the bench for interim protection by referring to similar orders granted in ‘Arnab Goswami’ & ‘Amish Devgan’ cases. They submitted that refusal of interim protection will lead to “havoc”, as the petitioners will have to file bail applications in different districts in different states. However, the bench was not inclined to grant the prayer. The bench also orally remarked during hearing that religious sentiments cannot be hurt. COURTROOM EXCHANGE Plea for interim protection from arrest The Petitioners’ Advocates insisted that they be granted interim protection from arrest. “We also need protection. We will be arrested by six different state polices,” Rohtagi submitted. He referred to Arnab Goswami’s case where a Division bench of the Supreme Court granted interim protection during hearing of the matter. Senior Advocate Sidharth Luthra submitted that in the Amish Devgan case, though FIRs were refused to be quashed, the Court allowed the continuation of interim protection from arrest. It also permitted clubbing of FIRs and transferred the case to Ajmer. [Note: As many as 7 FIRs were filed in Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Maharashtra & Telangana against Devgan on the basis of alleged derogatory remarks that he made against Sufi Saint Moinnuddin Chisti on his prime time show, telecast on June 15, 2020.] Nothing survives in complaints as objectionable content is removed Senior Advocates Fali Nariman and Mukul Rohatgi submitted that nothing survives in the matter as the objectionable parts of the series, that hurt the “so-called religious sentiments” of people, had been removed. He submitted that the Petitioners were being harassed by filing of FIRs/petitions in different states and urged that the Top Court protect their fundamental right to freedom of speech and expression. On being inquired as to why they had not approached the High Court first, Narmian submitted, “FIRs are filed in 6 states. And it’s increasing everyday. There’s some sort of concert in this and we want to avoid it. Now we have 7 in the last 5 days.” Why not approach the High Court? Nariman insisted that the question involved herein pertains to rights under Article 19(1)(a) of the Constitution, that was protected even in Arnab Goswami’s case, without relegating him to the High Court. He submitted, “People are now offended by everything ! The Petitioners reside in Bombay. Why will they go to different States. In Arnab Goswami, your Lordships stated that violation of 19(1)(a) could allow us to approach SC.” Progressing this argument, Rohtagi urged the Top Court to at least club all the FIR together so that the Petitioners do not have to defend themselves in different High Courts. He referred to the MF Husaain’s case where a similar relief was granted. Rohtagi added, “Even though we admit that we have not done anything wrong. It is a political satire. If people are so sensitive in everything, then art, cinema, TV, all will be destroyed. Article 19(1)(a) is the most jealously guarded right. It must be protected. This was also held in Arnab Goswami. This is a genuine innocent case. We have done no wrong. Every day there is a new FIR. Where will a man go? Can he go to every state and argue? Your lordships may at least club the FIRs.” Luthra also submitted that even though the right to freedom of speech and expression is not absolute, the Petitioners should not be subjected to this kind of harassment. “Look at the FIR. Look at the kind of language. Is this the kind of FIRs that can be registered in this country?. Learned senior (Rohatgi) has said the same. We cannot be dragged from state to state,” Luthra argued. He referred to the Supreme Court’s verdict in Narayanan Rajendran & Anr. v. Lekshmy Sarojini & Ors. and in TT Antony v. State of Kerala & Ors., to state that there cannot be more than one FIR if the ‘substratum of allegations’ is same. ‘This is persecution not prosecution’, he added. In TT Anthony case, the Top Court had held, “It is quite possible and it happens not infrequently that more informations than one are given to a police officer in charge of a police station in respect of the same incident involving one or more than one cognizable offences. In such a case he need not enter every one of them in the station house diary and this is implied in Section 154 of Cr.P.C.” In this backdrop, Luthra contended that even assuming that the FIRs are legitimate, as per principles in TT Antony Case, registration of multiple FIRs on same cause of action is impermissible. No offence made out Luthra also contended that Sections 66/67 (Publishing of obscene content in electronic form) of IT Act and Section 153A IPC (Promoting enmity between different groups) are not attracted in the case. He submitted, “The series is an analytical series about political issues, social issues. Even though there was no objectionable content, we removed them after complaints. People when they see the series on the OTT platform, they consent to see it.” Other arguments Appearing for actor Mohammed Zeeshan Ayyub, Advocate Siddharth Agarwal argued that views of a character depicted in the series cannot be ascribed to the actor’s personal views/ beliefs. The Bench however did not seem inclined to entertain this aspect in an Article 32 petition.”You cannot play a role hurting religious sentiments of others”, Justice MR Shah told the counsel.Justice Ashok Bhushan also remarked during the hearing that freedom of speech was not absolute. Delete Agarwal : The statements of the character cannot be attributed to the actor. Justice Shah : You accepted the contract after reading the script. You cannot hurt religious sentiments.#Tandav #SupremeCourt— Live Law (@LiveLawIndia) January 27, 2021 Read full updates from the case here.BACKGROUNDFiled by Director Ali Abbas Zafar, Producer Himanshu Mehra, Writer Gaurav Solanki, Actor Mohammed Zeeshan Ayyub and Amazon India Originals Head Aparna Purohit, the plea, apart from praying for the quashing of the proceedings, also seeks for the multiple FIRs that have been filed against them to be clubbed and transferred to a single police station. Last week, the Bombay High Court had granted transit anticipatory bail to Tandav web series director Ali Abbas Zafar, producer Himanshu Mehra, Amazon content head Aparna Purohit and writer Gaurav Solanki enabling them to seek regular pre-arrest bail from Uttar Pradesh. The three-week anticipatory transit bail was granted by Justice PD Naik days after the Hazratganj Police in UP booked under several sections of the Indian Penal Code and Information Technology Act for allegedly portraying Hindu gods in a bad light in the web series ‘Tandav’, which released on streaming platform Amazon Prime. In fact the UP Police had reached Mumbai to investigate the case. Senior advocate Aabad Ponda and Advocate Aniket Nikam have argued that their clients were wrongfully implicated in the present FIR without any role being assigned to them independently and therefore they should be granted four weeks of transit pre-arrest bail. They were booked under Sections 153-A, 295, 505(1)(b), 505(2) and 469 of Indian Penal Code, 1860 and under Sections 66, 66F and 67 of Information Technology Act, 2000, however none of the sections in the FIR actually apply to them. Senior official of Amazon was represented by Mr. Fali Nariman and Mr. Mukul Rohatgi, Senior Advocates and briefed by a team comprising of Sai Krishna Next Storylast_img read more

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Expanded Cup of Nations has new look but clouded by concerns

first_imgThe Africa Cup of Nations gets underway in Egypt on Friday sporting a fresh new look but the 32nd edition is clouded like none before by security concerns and the foibles of the game’s administrators.A switch to mid-year hosting and an expansion to 24 teams hold out high hopes that the continent’s showpiece sports event will continue to enjoy growing international attention.However, the changes come hot on the heels of a crisis of confidence for the game in Africa, where leading officials stand accused of corruption.Controversy raged for years over the event’s previous timing in January, when top African players were forced to leave their European clubs mid-season to play in the tournament, and the change to mid-year has been universally welcomed.The decision to expand to 24 teams produced a more sceptical reaction given that many of the past tournaments have been characterised by the poor standard of matches and further dilution of the field might exacerbate that problem.But the success of UEFA’s expanded European Championship in France three years ago emboldened the Confederation of African Football to follow suit. It means three new faces in this year’s lineup although Burundi, Mauritania and Madagascar are not expected to make much impact.NO FAVOURITESBut this is not a tournament with any clear favourites.Hosts Egypt are seeking a record-extending eighth title but much of their hopes rest on the form of Liverpool’s Champions League winner Mohamed Salah.He has been given time off to go on holiday after a long season, only joining up with his team mates last Wednesday, but there will be questions over whether mental and physical fatigue will affect his potential for another talismanic performance. The same is true for club mate Sadio Mane, who leads a credible challenge from Senegal.Mane will miss his country’s first Group C game against Tanzania in Cairo on Sunday as he is suspended because of an accumulation of yellow cards in the qualifiers.Nigeria return after missing the last two finals and are always contenders, while Ghana continue their quest for a first title since 1982.Ghana have reached at least the semi-finals in the previous six Cup of Nations finals, going back to 2008, but have fallen short of the winners’ podium — losing the 2010 and 2015 finals.Cameroon were surprise champions at the last Nations Cup in 2017, when they beat Egypt 2-1 in the final in Gabon, and they are in a similar position this time with mediocre form since that triumph leaving them as outsiders to retain the title. STRICT CONTROLEgypt get the tournament underway on Friday against Zimbabwe at the Cairo International Stadium, rarely used over the last seven years since strict controls were imposed on football crowds in the country.Most games have been played either behind closed doors or with restricted attendance to forestall any political dissent that might flow from the terraces.Supporters of Cairo’s top clubs were prominent in the Tahir Square demonstrations during the Arab Spring of 2011 when Egyptians launched a historic uprising for democracy.But since the military resumed control in 2013 when Mohamed Mursi was deposed, a tight lid has been placed on dissent. Mursi, who was briefly the first democratically elected head of state in Egypt’s modern history, died on Monday from a heart attack after collapsing in a Cairo court while on trial on espionage charges.Heavy security is expected around the tournament, which follows quickly on the heels of turmoil in the ranks of the continent’s Confederation of African Football (CAF).The president of African soccer’s governing body Ahmad Ahmad has been accused of corruption by his own general secretary Amr Fahmy, who has since been fired after his whistleblowing.Ahmad was briefly detained in France earlier this month and is now the subject of an ethics investigation by world soccer’s governing body FIFA.Ahmad, who is also a FIFA vice-president, did not respond to requests by Reuters for comment on the allegations against him.last_img read more

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Curtis Cup players in England’s Euro challenge

first_img Three members of the winning GB&I Curtis Cup team will represent England in the European Ladies’ Team Championship in Iceland next month. Alice Hewson, Bronte Law (Image © Leaderboard Photography) and Meghan MacLaren will be joined by Emma Allen, Lizzie Prior and OIivia Winning. The championship will be played at Oddur Golf Club, Iceland, from 5-9 July. The European Girls’ Team Championship will be played simultaneously at Oslo Golf Club, Norway, and the team is Louisa Brunt, Sharna Dutrieux, Lily May Humphreys, Emily Price, Isobel Wardle and Amelia Williamson.  All six are new caps at this level. Women’s team: Emma Allen, 19, (Meon Valley, Hampshire) had four top ten finishes in her freshman year at the University of Missouri. Last season she won the Sir Henry Cooper Junior Masters, was runner-up in the English girls’ championship and third on the England Golf Girl’s Order of Merit. She was in England’s successful team at the girls’ Home Internationals, winning all six of her games. Alice Hewson, 18, (Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire) made her Curtis Cup team debut in the winning team at Dun Laoghaire earlier this month. Last year she was individually second in qualifying at the European team championship and was in England’s winning teams at the girls’ and women’s Home Internationals and the European Young Masters. She has won twice since starting at Clemson University in South Carolina last year.   Bronte Law, 21, (Bramhall, Cheshire) is the world number four and won all five of her matches in the Curtis Cup, becoming only the second player to achieve the feat. She is a student at the University of California, Los Angeles, and has just won the Annika Award as the top female US collegiate golfer, having already been named as the PING Player of the Year by the Women’s Golf Coaches Association. She has been English women’s amateur champion for the past two years. Meghan MacLaren, 22, (Wellingborough, Northamptonshire) scored the winning point for GB&I at the Curtis Cup. She is a past British and Irish stroke play champion and has won eight times on the US college circuit where she is a student at the Florida International University. She represented Europe in this season’s inaugural Patsy Hankins Trophy against Asia Pacific.  Lizzie Prior, 18, (Burhill, Surrey) won her first event after starting university in the USA and returned to successfully defend the Critchley Salver at Sunningdale. She won the England girls’ order of merit for 2015 after winning the girls’ title at the Fairhaven Trophy and finishing runner-up three times, in the English girls’ championship, the Sir Henry Cooper Junior Masters and the English women’s amateur. Olivia Winning, 21, (Rotherham, Yorkshire) won the Helen Holm Scottish open stroke play championship for the second time this year and tied 12th in an LET Access Series tournament in Spain in May. She has also had top ten finishes in three prestigious scratch events and was 12th in the Welsh stroke play. She was an England girl international. Girls’ team Louisa Brunt, 17, (Royal Birkdale, Lancashire) has had top 20 finishes in the German girls’ open and the St Rule Trophy, with other strong finishes in both the Irish and Welsh women’s open stroke play championships. Sharna Dutrieux, 17, (Wrotham Heath, Kent) tied second in the Critchley Salver, was third in the Hampshire Rose and was leading amateur in the Roehampton Gold Cup where she was fourth overall. She shared eighth place in the Scottish girls’ championship. Lily May Humphreys, 14, (Channels, Essex) is the English U14 girls’ champion. This season her results include winning the Fairhaven Trophies, taking fourth place in the recent WPGA one-day event at Little Aston, finishing runner-up at the Critchley Salver and third in the Frilford Heath Salver. She is currently second in the England Golf Girls’ Order of Merit Emily Price, 16, (Cleobury Mortimer, Worcestershire) currently leads the England Golf Girls’ Order of Merit after a spectacular run of three wins in a week before taking a break for exams. She won the Scottish open girls’ championship, the Leveret and the Whittington Ladies’ Trophy. She is a past English U15 girls’ champion and was third in the U16s last season. Bel Wardle, 16, (Prestbury, Cheshire) was eighth in the St Rule Trophy, 16th in the Welsh women’s stroke play and made the cut in the Portuguese women’s amateur championship. Last season she was 10th in the British women’s stroke play and was fourth in both the Liphook Scratch Cup and the Pleasington Putter. Amelia Williamson, 15, (Royal Cromer, Norfolk) was runner-up in the Fairhaven Trophies, third in the Scottish girls’ championship and 12th in the German girls’ open. Last year she won the West of England U16 stroke play and three English schools’ titles: the national, U16 and the South East championships. Click here for details of the men’s and boys’ teams. 20 Jun 2016 Curtis Cup players in England’s Euro challenge last_img read more

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The Action fail to gain any ground on Innkeepers, play to 1-1 draw

first_imgThe Action failed to gain any ground on defending league champion Innkeepers as the two front runners played to a 1-1 draw in Leo’s Men’s Open League play Tuesday evening at Lakeside Pitch.The Innkeeper currently sits on top of the standings with a four-point bulge over The Action.Each team has only one loss this season.In the other game on the night Kootenay Co-op got past cellar dwelling Kootenay F.C. 2-1.Co-op sits in third spot in league standings, seven points behind Innkeepers.West Kootenay and Kootenay F.C. are tied for fourth spot, each with four points.In the lone game Friday West Kootenay United meets The Action at 6:45 p.m. at Lakeside.The Action will be missing Byron Rokeby-Thomas for the game Friday. The speedy striker went down with a knee injury and had to be taken to hospital in an ambulance.Tuesday Innkeepers face Kootenay F.C. and West Kootenay United meets Kootenay Co-op.Jackson’s tops Jackson’sJackson’s Hole is the lone undefeated team in the Jackson’s Hole Men’s Master 35-plus league.Jackson’s currently sits on top of league standings, three points ahead of 2010 winner Bia Boro.Real Nelson is in third place followed by Club Inter.Ted Allen’s Jewelry is fifth with Red Dog alone in the basement, winless in six attempts.In action Thursday, Red Dog meets Ted Allen’s, Real Nelson attempts to knock off Jackson’s Hole and Bia Boro battles Club Inter.Dirty leads Finley’sDirty Dozen is undefeated after five games of the Finley’s Ladies Red Soccer League.The five wins puts Dirty Dozen six points in front of second place Red Dog.Finley Jiggers and Lily Whites are tied for third, each with six points. Selkirk Eyecare is fifth with three points.Friday Dirty Dozen look to make it six in a row when the team meets Lily Whites at Lakeside Pitch.Monday, Finley’s Jiggers meet Dirty Dozen while Selkirk Eyecare plays Red [email protected]last_img read more

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New honeyeater species described from Indonesia’s Alor Island

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Deforestation, Dry Forests, Environment, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Land Use Change, New Discovery, New Species, Species Discovery, Tropical Deforestation, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Scientists have described a new bird species found only on the island of Alor in eastern Indonesia.The Alor myzomela is easily distinguished from other known members of the Myzomela genus of honeyeater birds thanks to its unique call and paler upper wings.A growing human population on the island is already fragmenting the species’ only known habitat, prompting the researchers to recommend it be considered endangered on the IUCN Red List.The bird’s scientific name, Myzomela prawiradilagae, is a tribute to prominent ornithologist Dewi Malia Prawiradilaga from the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI). JAKARTA — Scientists have described a new bird species found only on the Indonesian island of Alor, where a growing human population is already encroaching on the bird’s volcanic habitat.The description of Myzomela prawiradilagae — named after prominent ornithologist Dewi Malia Prawiradilaga from the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) — is a culmination of field observations by different research groups between 2002 and 2016, according to a paper published in the Journal of Ornithology on Oct. 5.“The presence of an endemic species of Myzomela honeyeater on Alor is of great biogeographic significance,” the authors write.Google Earth images of Indonesia and, inset, Alor Island.The habitat of the Alor myzomela. Image courtesy of Philippe Verbelen.The Alor myzomela is known to inhabit only eucalyptus woodland at elevations above 1,000 meters (3,300 feet) on the island, showing more pronounced differences in ecological preferences and lifestyle than other honeyeaters in the genus. It’s closely related to the crimson-hooded myzomela (M. kuehni) from the nearby island of Wetar, down to the red head, but differs in other physical characteristics and in its calls. These include dusky brown upper wings that are much paler than the black upperwings of other Myzomela species, and a call that researchers have transcribed as “tssip” or “vick.”“The whole team was excited to have scientifically described the new bird species from Alor,” Mohammad Irham, a scientist with LIPI and the lead author of the paper, told Mongabay in an email.He said the team spotted about 20 individuals of the new species during a single observation, but getting a full population estimate for the Alor myzomela will require further research.The field visits were important in collecting a specimen, getting sound recordings and photographs, and characterizing their habitat use, the authors write. They used DNA sequencing to confirm the species is new to science.The Alor myzomela (Myzomela prawiradilagae). Image courtesy of Philippe Verbelen.A population estimate will be critical to assessing any threats to the species. The researchers note that its habitat is undergoing fragmentation by a growing human population on the island, which has prompted them to recommend it be considered endangered on the IUCN Red List.Frank Rheindt, a scientist with the National University of Singapore’s Department of Biological Sciences and co-author of the paper, said most tribes on Alor built their villages on hilltops, from where it was easier to cultivate the surrounding slopes.“The population of these hilltop villages has been steadily increasing with high modern reproduction rates following increasing development,” Rheindt told Mongabay in an email.“Burgeoning human populations will exert ever more pressure on the remaining woodlots in this area,” he added.While the locals have long known of the species, Rheindt said it was a generally small, inconspicuous member of the local birdlife that the villagers didn’t pay much attention to.“Awareness about its existence was a necessary first step to ensure it does not silently go extinct,” he said.In Indonesia, all species in the genus Myzomela are protected under the country’s 1990 Conservation Law and a 1999 government regulation on wildlife.The researchers said the description of the Alor myzomela as the latest species endemic to the island of Alor should elevate the island to the status of an “endemic bird area.”“This status can be a reference for the local government to highlight Alor as an important island for wildlife, especially birds,” Irham said.“The reference hopefully can be a foundation for conservation management there, considering that [species endemic to] small islands have a much higher risk of extinction than big islands, and also for other potential [initiatives] that support the economy, such ecotourism.”The Alor myzomela (Myzomela prawiradilagae). Image courtesy of Philippe Verbelen.Irham, M., Ashari, H., Suparno, Trainor, C. R., Verbelen, P., Wu, M. Y., & Rheindt, F. E. (2019). A new Myzomela honeyeater (Meliphagidae) from the highlands of Alor Island, Indonesia. Journal of Ornithology. doi:10.1007/s10336-019-01722-2FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Basten Gokkonlast_img read more

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Lift-off for first African vulture safe zones

first_imgCoverdale, who works for Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife, a South African government conservation body, stressed the vital roles that vultures play in ecosystems. By swiftly stripping the flesh from dead animals, they reduce the spread of disease as well as the number of animals scavenging at rotting carcasses.“We really can’t afford to lose them. In nine minutes they can clean up an entire carcass,” Coverdale said.There are several reasons for the decline of African vultures, but deliberate or accidental poisoning is the biggest peril.Gareth Tate, the Birds of Prey Programme manager for the Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT), says poison accounts for about 60 percent of vulture deaths in the Southern Africa region.Some poisoned bait is laid by livestock owners to kill predators, like jackals. Vultures feeding off the carcasses subsequently die, often in significant numbers. Others are poisoned deliberately to harvest body parts for making muthi, traditional medicine potions.In one of the worst mass-poisoning cases on record, at least 540 vultures were killed near Botswana’s Chobe National Park earlier this year after feeding on elephant carcasses spiked with a potent poison by wildlife poachers, in an apparent effort to conceal illegal activities from rangers.In this case, the carcasses were not removed for two to three weeks, resulting in an extended cycle of death as more vultures and other scavengers arrived to feast.A dead vulture next to a dead elephant in southern Mozambique. The carcass had been laced with toxic farm poisons. Image courtesy Andre BothaVultures are also poisoned deliberately for the traditional medicine trade. The misconception that these carrion birds have psychic powers, or can ‘see into the future’ has led to a demand for vulture’s heads and other body parts.Andre Botha, EWT’s Vultures for Africa Programme manager, said that while it was hard to quantify the numbers of vultures killed for belief-based use, recent studies estimated that direct persecution of vultures either for muthi or food was about 29 percent of all vultures killed in Africa.While Botha was not at this year’s symposium, he said the  belief-based use of vultures was a significant and growing threat to  the continent’s vultures”. This, he said, needed to be openly discussed “with the same degree of vigour as is the misconceptions associated with the use of rhino horn” in Asia.“It is an inconvenient truth that must be addressed,” added Botha.Accidental drownings in farm water reservoirs have also been reported, and research has flagged lead bullet fragments in animal carcasses as an increasing concern.But BirdLife South Africa vulture project manager Linda van den Heever said many landowners and game ranch owners seemed resistant to halt the use of lead ammunition on their land, complaining that lead-free ammo is less effective and more expensive.At the symposium, several researchers outlined the results of recent partnerships to arrest the growing decline of vultures in Southern Africa.One initiative involves creating “vulture safe zones” — large areas where landowners commit to managing their land in ways that will provide safe havens for existing vulture populations.According to EWT, the emphasis of the vulture safe zones will be to encourage positive action, “focusing less on prohibition and negative messaging, and more on sound environmental practices that could provide landowners with reputational and economic benefits.”In support of the program, participating landowners have agreed to stop baiting carcasses with poison, and modify concrete water reservoirs to reduce the risk of accidental drowning. Africa’s vulture populations face the prospect of collapsing in much the same way as vulture species in Asia, experts warn, having already declined by an average 62 percent over the past three decades.Key threats include poisoning by ranchers and poachers and for belief-based use, as well as accidental drowning in farm water reservoirs and ingestion of lead ammunition.To address the threats, managers of conservation areas and private game reserves in South Africa have agreed to create “vulture safe zones” that will do away with these practices to provide safe havens for existing vulture populations.Conservationists say it’s also important for managers in South Africa to work with their counterparts in neighboring countries that are part of the vultures’ range, and to tackle the trade in vulture parts used in traditional medicine practices. Howick, SOUTH AFRICA – The first of at least five new “vulture safe zones” in Southern Africa are about to take off as private landowners and other partners join the battle to save Africa’s imperilled carrion clean-up birds.Africa’s vulture populations have declined by an average of 62 percent over the last three decades – with seven species crashing by 80 percent – mirroring the dramatic collapse of several Asian species.These were among findings of recent research presented by leading animal scientist Brent Coverdale at the Conservation Symposium, one of South Africa’s biggest annual gatherings of conservationists, environmental scientists and wildlife experts.“We need to think globally and act locally,” Coverdale told attendees at the event, held this year in the town of Howick from Nov. 4-8.“We all know of the Asian vulture crisis, where we had vulture declines of 90-95 percent in the early 1990s. It’s something that drives us. We do not want to be sitting in the same boat, where one day people will ask, so what were we doing when the crisis was happening?” Gyps genus at India’s Soheldev Wildlife Sanctuary. Image by Rajat Bhargava.Into the 1980s, there were large numbers of vultures across India and southern Asia. They played a particularly important role in the ecosystem, consuming the remains of the millions of cows in carcass dumps; India has 500 million cows raised for milk, but not eaten by the majority Hindu population. In the early 1990s, vultures started dropping dead. Hundreds of thousands died before scientists identified a culprit: diclofenac, an anti-inflammatory used by vets. Vultures feeding on carcasses containing the drug died swiftly of kidney failure. Conservation India says around 40 million vultures perished.last_img read more

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Illegal hunting a greater threat to wildlife than forest degradation

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored In a recent study, researchers used camera-trapping records to show that illegal hunting may be a bigger threat mammals and ground-dwelling birds than forest degradation in Southeast Asia.They chose Borneo and the Annamite Mountains on the Southeast Asian mainland, two rainforest study sites that have similar habitats.While widespread logging has degraded many forests in Borneo, the island has faced less hunting.By contrast, the Annamites have experienced exceedingly high illegal hunting, but its forests are structurally more intact. The world has long associated plummeting populations of Southeast Asian wildlife with news of forest degradation and poignant images of deforested lands. Recent studies, however, bring to light another human practice that’s been driving the decline of wildlife numbers in these ecosystems.Researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin, in cooperation with WWF-Vietnam, WWF-Laos and the forestry department of the state of Sabah in Malaysian Borneo, carried out a study showing that illegal hunting may be a bigger threat to mammals and ground-dwelling birds than forest degradation. The research, published Oct. 30 in the journal Communications Biology, compares camera-trapping records from logged forests in Malaysian Borneo with a protected eco-region in the Annamite Mountains of Vietnam and Laos where illegal hunting is rampant. The results show a more precipitous loss of species and wildlife populations in the Annamites than in Borneo.Researchers chose the two rainforest study sites as they have similar habitats. Their recent history, however, has a few noteworthy differences. While widespread logging has degraded many forests in Borneo, the island has faced less hunting. By contrast, the Annamites have experienced exceedingly high illegal hunting, but its forests are structurally more intact.A forest ranger removes a snare in central Vietnam. Hunters are increasingly using easy-to-construct snares to hunt mammals and ground-dwelling birds in the Annamite Mountains in Vietnam and Laos. Image by Andrew Tilker.Both forest degradation and hunting threaten wildlife, but the latter has reached extreme heights in recent years.“In one protected area complex, the Hue and Quang Nam Saola Nature Reserves, in central Vietnam, forest rangers collected more than 110,000 wire snares over the course of a few years,” Andrew Tilker, one of the lead authors of the study, a Ph.D. student at Leibniz-IZW and Asian species officer at the NGO Global Wildlife Conservation, said in an email.“[T]his didn’t lead to any noticeable reduction in the overall snaring pressure. It is possible to collect hundreds of snares in a single day’s walk through the forest. In one protected area that we worked in, people have hunted out almost all mammals larger than a rat or squirrel and now busy taking out the last small mammals. It is complete faunal collapse.”Snaring has pushed many species that live only in the Annamite Range, such as the antelope-like saola (Pseudoryx nghetinhensis) and the Annamite striped rabbit (Nesolagus timminsi), to the brink of extinction.Snares are as rife as they are easy to construct, most commonly using cheaply available material like motorbike and bicycle brake cables. Hunters come from local communities, larger regional towns and the bigger cities alike to supply the thriving illegal wildlife trade in the region.“There is little, if any, subsistence hunting in the Annamites,” Tilker said.Hunters and wildlife traders may send a few high-value species, like pangolins, to major cities or export them to foreign markets. But most of the animals that are captured go to local wildlife markets or are sold directly to restaurants as bushmeat.“Bushmeat is something of a status symbol in Vietnam and Laos,” Tilker added. “Put simply, if you are a wealthy upper- or middle-class person in Vietnam, and you want to show off to your friends, you go to a bushmeat restaurant and order wild meat.”Researchers say that hundreds of snares can be collected in a single day’s walk through the Annamite forest. Through snaring alone, the Annamites are facing grave defaunation. By comparison, Borneo’s forest lands that come under logging concessions are safer for similar species. Image by Andrew Tilker.Confirming and adding to related studiesPrevious research in Southeast Asia has similarly warned that hunting is a more severe threat than deforestation and that the use of snares is driving species to extinction. The current study, in which the researchers quantified the severity of the threats, confirms these results.“Our camera-trapping effort, which scales across 1,000 square kilometers [386 square miles] in both [the Annamite Mountain and the Bornean] landscapes, is much larger than the spatial scale of earlier studies,” Andreas Wilting, a scientist at Leibniz-IZW and co-author of the study, said in an email. “[T]his really helped us to assess biodiversity across entire forest reserves and protected areas.”Data from such large areas allowed the researchers to estimate which species are either completely missing in a region or occur at such low numbers that they could be considered locally extinct. Wilting added that the study also shows that species that are more resistant to hunting have lower populations in the hunted landscapes than in the logged landscapes.“From an ecological perspective,” Wilting said, “both findings are equally important as they show that it is impossible for more resistant species to take over the ecological role of the ones which disappeared, as the resistant species are also negatively impacted by the hunting.”In addition, the study also shows that habitat-related elements that are observed for comparison, such as canopy cover, are not accurate predictors for species occurrences in hunted regions. That means that some species might occur even in habitats for which they’re only marginally suited — if they are protected from hunting, Wilting said.Forest degradation in Deramakot, Malaysian Borneo, one of the study sites. Researchers gathered data from large areas in both the Annamites and Borneo. Image by Andrew Tilker.“Conceptually and scientifically, this is an important finding,” he said, “as we often assess species distributions based on suitable habitat (that is, forest cover) and hunting related factors are ignored, partly because they are very difficult to capture and are region specific.”“These results show that logging concessions can be safe havens for mammal and bird communities, particularly if sustainable forest management protocols are applied, following principles of forest certification standards,” Mashor Mohamad Jaini, director of the Sabah Forestry Department, said in a statement.Equal attention to deforestation and huntingCo-author Benjamin Rawson, conservation director of WWF-Vietnam, advocates an immediate reduction of anthropogenic pressure on wildlife, especially snaring.“Clear policy directions and high-level political commitment in relation to wildlife crime, be it high-value wildlife products such as ivory and rhino horn for international trade, or bushmeat trade within the country, needs to be secured to ensure long-term persistence of these species,” Rawson said in an email.Tilker said the complex problem of snaring needs to be addressed from multiple angles. The crisis calls for a reduction in demand for wildlife products, strengthening enforcement in protected areas, and conducting education and outreach activities to raise awareness among the general public.Snaring has pushed many species endemic to the Annamite Range, such as the antelope-like saola and the Annamite striped rabbit, to the brink of extinction. It is common to find the heads of animals, like the Annamite muntjac (Muntiacus truongsonensis) pictured here, hanging in houses in villages around the region. Image by Andrew Tilker.“However, I believe that an argument could be made for a fundamental paradigm shift within the conservation community, in which combating poaching is treated with the same level of urgency as protecting tropical forest habitat,” he said. “For decades, the conservation community has emphasized protecting tropical rainforest habitat as a primary means of protecting biodiversity.“[O]bviously, this is important,” Tilker added. “But maintaining forest cover is, by itself, not enough. It is possible to have pristine but nonetheless empty tropical rainforest.”Wilting agrees. “We need to see a shift within the large-scale development aid and governmental funds from ‘forests/habitat protection’ to actual biodiversity protection,” he said.Banner image of forest degradation through selective logging by Andrew Tilker.  Nanditha Chandraprakash is a writer with a passion for wildlife, climate change and environmental conservation. Find her on Instagram: @ayellowmoon.Citation:Tilker, A., Abrams, J. F., Mohamed, A., Nguyen, A., Wong, S. T., Sollmann, R., … Wilting, A. (2019). Habitat degradation and indiscriminate hunting differentially impact faunal communities in the Southeast Asian tropical biodiversity hotspot. Communications Biology, 2(1), 396. doi:10.1038/s42003-019-0640-yFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Animals, Biodiversity, Bushmeat, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Hunting, Illegal Logging, Illegal Trade, Logging, Over-hunting, Poaching, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Snares, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking last_img read more

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Mongabay editor has now been detained 6 weeks in Indonesia

first_imgMongabay editor Philip Jacobson was detained in Indonesia on December 17, 2019 over an alleged issue with his business visa.Jacobson was formally arrested on January 21 and was incarcerated in Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan through January 24.Jacobson is currently under ‘city arrest’ without his passport and is prevented from leaving Palangkaraya.This is a press release from Mongabay about a developing situation and may be updated. Mongabay editor Philip Jacobson has now been detained for 42 days in Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan over an alleged violation of his business visa.“Phil is still under ‘city arrest’ in Palangkaraya, six weeks after immigration authorities seized his passport,” said Mongabay Founder and CEO Rhett A. Butler. “We’re eager to see this issue resolved and Phil allowed to leave the city.”Jacobson, 30, was first detained on December 17, 2019 after attending a hearing between the Central Kalimantan parliament and the local chapter of the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN), Indonesia’s largest indigenous rights advocacy group.He had travelled to the city shortly after entering Indonesia on a business visa for a series of meetings. The day he was due to leave, immigration authorities seized his passport, interrogated him for four hours and ordered him to remain in the city pending their investigation.On January 21, more than a month later, Jacobson was formally arrested and taken into custody. He was informed that he faces charges of violating the 2011 immigration law and a prison sentence of up to five years. Jacobson was held at Palangkaraya Class II detention center in a cell with six inmates for four days before being transferred back to ‘city detention’, allowing him to leave prison. He’s been prevented from leaving Palanglaraya until further notice.Philip Jacobson.The transfer from prison to city detention came after U.S. Ambassador to Indonesia Joseph R. Donovan met with the Indonesian Coordinating Minister for Political, Legal, and Security Affairs (Kemenko Polhukam) Mohammad Mahfud MD, and a delegation from the U.S. embassy did a welfare check on Jacobson. Minister Mahfud MD was subsequently quoted in Indonesian media as saying he would order Jacobson to be deported from Indonesia “immediately.”“We are grateful that authorities have made this accommodation,” said Butler. “We have seen the media reports and stand ready to move forward on the appropriate next steps.”“We’re amazed by the outpouring of support we received from the public on Phil’s case,” added Butler. “Beyond the thousands of messages via social media, people ranging from top business leaders in Singapore and Europe to Indonesian-American investors and entrepreneurs to members of U.S. Congress have reached out to express their concern.”Sampling of some of the protest art that has emerged on social media since Jacobson’s arrest.Chronology of Jacobson’s caseSummary: Philip Jacobson is an employee of Mongabay, a non-profit environmental science and conservation news organization. Jacobson is an editor for Mongabay and splits his time between Indonesia and his native U.S. This document outlines events culminating in Jacobson’s detention in the Indonesian city of Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan on the island of Borneo.December 14: Jacobson, traveling on a multiple-entry business visa, arrived in Palangkaraya, the capital city of Central Kalimantan province, to meet with the local chapter of the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN), an indigenous rights advocacy group.December 16: Jacobson attended a dialogue at the parliament building between the Central Kalimantan parliament and the local chapter of AMAN.December 17: Jacobson was scheduled on a flight out of Palangkaraya, but before he could leave for the airport, immigration officers went to his guesthouse and confiscated his passport. The officials ordered Jacobson to come in the next day for questioning. It later became clear that someone had photographed Jacobson at the parliament building and reported him to immigration.December 18: Jacobson was interrogated at the immigration office about his activities. Authorities took an official statement, known as a BAP, and ordered Jacobson to remain in Palangkaraya while they continued their investigation.December 24: Jacobson missed his international flight out of Indonesia.January 9: Jacobson was summoned to the immigration office, where he received a formal letter saying he was suspected of committing a visa violation and was being investigated. Authorities stated that as long as Jacobson remained cooperative, he would remain under city arrest, rather than detained in an immigration cell.January 21: Immigration officers appeared at Jacobson’s guesthouse room and instructed him to pack his belongings and come with them. Following another round of questioning, he was taken into custody and transferred to a detention center.January 22: Jacobson and his colleagues were honored with the Fetisov Journalism Award for their work on an investigative report, produced in collaboration with Indonesia’s Tempo magazine, Malaysiakini and The Gecko Project, about a plan to create the world’s largest oil palm plantation on the island of New Guinea. Jacobson had been expected to attend the awards ceremony in Switzerland before he was barred from leaving Palangkaraya.January 24: Coordinating Minister for Political, Legal and Security Affairs Mahfud MD told reporters in Jakarta that he would order Jacobson to be deported from Indonesia “immediately.” Later that day, Jacobson’s local lawyers negotiated his transfer from prison back to “city arrest,” and he was allowed to return to a guesthouse.January 26: Jacobson, still prevented from leaving Palangkaraya, turns 31.Statements from Journalism NGOsCommittee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) [January 22]:  “The longer journalist Philip Jacobson remains held in detention, the more damage Indonesia does to its reputation as a democracy with a free press,” said Shawn Crispin, CPJ’s senior Southeast Asia representative. “Indonesian authorities should release Jacobson immediately and cease pursuing a criminal case against him.”Reporters Without Borders (RSF) [January 22]: “Phillip Jacobson’s totally disproportionate arrest clearly amounts to intimidation,” said Daniel Bastard, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk. “The Central Kalimantan immigration officials have massively overstepped their powers. We call on the Ministry of Law and Human Rights, which oversees the Directorate General of Immigration, to ensure that this journalist is immediately released in accordance with the rule of law.”The International Press Institute (IPI) [January 22]: “Indonesia should immediately release Philip Jacobson and drop any travel restrictions against him”, IPI Director of Advocacy Ravi R. Prasad said. “The harassment of journalists is unacceptable in Indonesia, which claims to be a democracy that respects press freedom.”Society of Environmental Journalists (SEJ) [January 22]  “Employees of the news media should be free to work in Indonesia without fear of arbitrary detention,” SEJ President Meera Subramanian said. “Actions like those taken against Mr. Jacobson harm the health of Indonesian democracy and the country’s global reputation.”Komite Keselamatan Jurnalis [January 22]: Komite Keselamatan Jurnalis mengecam penahanan dan pemidanaan Philip Jacobson, editor Mongabay, atas masalah administrasi … Komite Keselamatan Jurnalis menilai penahanan dan penetapan status tersangka Philip Jacobson sangat berlebihan dan mencoreng demokrasi di Indonesia.Alliance of Independent Journalists (AJI) [January 23]: “The criminalisation of Jacobson is an excessive action . . . The immigration office had no authority to detain and treat him like a criminal offender following the allegation of violating an administrative matter.”International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) [January 23]: “The detention of Jacobson is unjust and excessive. This appears to be a retaliatory attempt to silence media reporting on sensitive topics. Journalism is not a crime and we strongly condemn attempts to criminalise journalists in Indonesia.”PEN America [January 25]: “While we are relieved that Philip has been temporarily released, we remain concerned that he is being targeted for his work in an attempt to send a warning signal to those journalists and news outlets who undertake investigative reporting on sensitive topics in Indonesia,” said Karin Karlekar, director of Free Expression at Risk Programs at PEN America. “Even if there is evidence of a visa-related violation, it should be handled as an administrative rather than a criminal matter and be resolved as quickly as possible, and we call on the authorities to allow both Indonesian and foreign journalists to work freely and without fear of retaliation.” Environment, Environmental Journalism, press release Article published by Rhett Butlercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Takeaways: Hertl hurting, Burns slumping as huge homestand awaits Sharks

first_imgThey play five straight games at home … NASHVILLE — The Sharks flew back to San Jose on Wednesday morning in nearly the same predicament they were in six weeks ago when they got back home after a dismal road trip.In need of goals, a spark and plenty of wins.This time, though, going on a run figures to be a tougher task.After their 3-1 loss to the Nashville Predators on Tuesday, the Sharks are 15-16-2, five points out of a playoff spot and in sixth place in the Pacific Division.last_img

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Ben Klick, Sept. 25

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest We have some neighbors on the east side of the county and they started cutting last week. We have beans that will go but we are not ready yet. We just finished filling a silo yesterday and we have one more to do in a week or so. We are hoping to be rolling by the end of the week harvesting the beans. We have some cattle to move the next couple of days.We just finished up our last cutting of hay. Some of my dairy buddies are thinking about making one more cutting of alfalfa yet. It has been really dry. It has been over a month since we had a decent rain. The fields are rough. It is like concrete out there. There was some hay we left because it was a first year seeding and we were afraid to ruin it with its limited root system.A neighbor at Canal Fulton cut some beans over the weekend and had a variety in the low 50s and a second variety was in the high 50s and low 60s. The top pods are there but there is nothing in them. I am afraid my double-crops are not going to amount to much as dry as we’ve been.We have our wheat seed ordered and it should be coming in during the next few days. We are bumping our wheat acres back a little to plant 45 acres of barley. We are growing that to use for grain in the steer rations. Our nutritionist told us that feeding one-third of our ration of ground barley helps put a hard glazed top on the carcass and improves the grade a little. It saves us a little corn and lets us cut back on wheat and still get straw. The barley comes off a couple of weeks earlier than wheat and lets us get our double-crops in sooner. We’re going to try it and see if it works. I am hoping for some more heat units to dry this corn. We only have about 2.5 weeks worth of corn left to feed and then we are going to have to shell some.last_img read more

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