WNBA players wear shirts with ‘bullet holes’ to protest Jacob Blake shooting, racial injustice

first_img Beau Lund August 27, 2020 /Sports News – National WNBA players wear shirts with ‘bullet holes’ to protest Jacob Blake shooting, racial injustice Written bycenter_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPhoto by Julio Aguilar/Getty ImagesBy CARSON BLACKWELDER, ABC News(PALMETTO, Fla.) — The sports world is reacting to the Sunday night shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, but perhaps none more powerfully than the WNBA.The Washington Mystics wore white T-shirts to their scheduled game Wednesday night against the Atlanta Dream. On the front of each were individual letters spelling out the name of the 29-year-old Black man who, according to family, was left paralyzed from the waist down from the incident.On the back were painted bullet holes.All teams scheduled to play Wednesday night — including the Minnesota Lynx, the Connecticut Sun, the Phoenix Mercury and the Los Angeles Sparks — took a knee and linked arms during the national anthem before walking off the court.“This isn’t just about basketball,” Mystics player Ariel Atkins said in a statement. “When most of us go home, we still are Black.”“We’re not just basketball players and, if you think we are, then don’t watch us, you’re watching the wrong sport, because we’re so much more than that,” she continued.Her statement stressed the importance of speaking out “unified as a league” and pointed out the high percentage of Black women in the WNBA.“We matter,” Atkins concluded. “I’m tired of telling people that.”In a statement on behalf of all WNBA players, Dream player Elizabeth Williams said the night’s games would not be going ahead. This came soon after the Milwaukee Bucks staged a walkout for their game against the Orlando Magic, prompting the NBA’s postponement of all Wednesday games.“We stand in solidarity with our brothers in the NBA and will continue this conversation with our brothers and sisters across all leagues and look to take collective action,” Williams said.The WNBA issued a statement announcing that Wednesday night’s games would be postponed and information regarding rescheduling would be provided “when available.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Food inflation stable at 3.5% in March

first_imgThe British Retail Consortium (BRC) has said it expects food inflation to remain steady in the medium-term.It comes as the rate of inflation remained unchanged in March, at 3.5%, while overall shop price inflation rose to 1.4% during the month, in comparison to 1.1% in February.Helen Dickinson, director general of the BRC, said: “Food inflation is unchanged since February, but this is primarily due to a decrease in prices for tinned and packet goods balancing out a fresh food rise. There are still price pressures, which will continue to work through, but I would expect food inflation to remain fairly steady in the medium term. “Total inflation is at its highest rate since December, again reflecting that many retailers went into the New Year with less stock to clear, so discounting is less extensive compared with 2012.”Mike Watkins, head of retailer and business insight, Nielsen said: “With cold weather in March holding back spending across many channels, price reductions have been needed to stimulate demand for food and there was also an increase in price competition at the supermarkets due to Easter promotions, keeping overall food inflation stable.“As discretionary spend for the next few months is expected to remain flat at best, what upward pressure there is on prices is not coming from the consumer at the moment.”Last October, food inflation rose to 4%, a 0.9% rise on the previous month when the rate was at a two-year low. The BRC said it had been affected by poor harvests, rising production costs and commodity price increases.last_img read more

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Real Bread Campaign to launch #SourdoughSeptember

first_imgThe Real Bread Campaign will be running its annual #SourdoughSeptember campaign for its fifth successive year.Fermentalists will be running baking classes, tastings and giving away pots of starter to spread the awareness of buying sourdough from small independent bakeries or making it at home.“What we noticed last year in particular was that people and companies outside the Campaign’s network of supporters were taking notice of Sourdough September,” Real Bread Campaigns coordinator Chris Young told British Baker.“It’s clear from what bakers tell us that there is definitely a growing interest in sourdough. We will carry on repeating our mantra that not all loaves are created equal, helping people understand that there’s a material difference between genuine sourdough and short-process sourfaux.”The Real Bread Campaign recently gave their views on the legal definition for wholegrain, which is part of the campaign’s call for an Honest Crust Act to help shoppers make better-informed choices about the loaves they buy.last_img read more

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John Mayer Pens Grateful Salute To Jerry Garcia Ahead Of Tonight’s Dead & Co Tour Opener

first_imgWhen Dead & Company got their start two years ago, people questioned Mayer’s intentions, questioned his appreciation for the mantle he was taking up, questioned whether he understood just how important it was to so many people out there. But those questions are long gone. John gets “it”, and we’re glad that he’s here.Bob Weir & John Mayer Wish Each Other Happy Birthday In Adorable Instagram PostsFor a full list of upcoming dates on Dead & Company’s 2017 Fall Tour, you can head to the band’s website.[Cover photo: Garcia – Herb Greene; Mayer – Phierce Photo by Keith Griner; Instagram: @phiercephoto] Tonight, Sunday, November 12th, Dead & Company will begin their 2017 Fall Tour with their first of two performances at Madison Square Garden over the next few days. The band–comprised of original Grateful Dead members Bob Weir, Mickey Hart, and Bill Kreutzmann, as well as frequent Dead-adjacent keyboardist Jeff Chimenti, decorated former Allmans bassist Oteil Burbridge, and talented yet somewhat controversial guitarist John Mayer–is coming off a great summer tour, and beginning to truly gel and excel as a unit after roughly two years together.Two Years After Their First Shows, Dead & Co Will Return To The Garden A Band Evolved [Videos]While there are still those who don’t love Mayer filling the hallowed Jerry Garcia “role” in this new band lineup, it’s safe to say that he has won over a large majority of the Dead’s famously skeptical fan base. Just as much as he’s earned the respect of fans through his impressive playing and clearly studious approach to the material, he’s also made an impression on the Dead “Universe” with his humility, gratitude, and genuine appreciation for the significance of the role he’s adopted.Relive John Mayer’s Trip Down The Grateful Dead Rabbit Hole [Videos]In a post on his Instagram page ahead of the band’s tour opener, Mayer spoke about Jerry Garcia, the profound impact Garcia has had on the course of his life, and his undying gratitude and respect for the late legend and his legacy. Read the post below:last_img read more

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Tedeschi Trucks Band Closes The Savannah Music Festival In Top Form [Videos]

first_imgThe Tedeschi Trucks Band, the blues-rock orchestra fronted by the husband and wife guitar duo Derek Trucks and Susan Tedeschi, closed out the two-week Savannah Music Festival with a scintillating set of crowd pleasing, blues drenched tunes. After a solid day of blues and Americana tinged jams from Jason Isbell, Mipso, Gillian Welsh, Brent Cobb and more, the twelve-person ensemble hit the stage and promptly got to rockin’! From what we’ve already seen in this young Tedeschi Trucks tour, the band is in high spirits and in spectacular form–both on and off the stage.While their performance as a unit is the most mind-blowing part of any Tedeschi Trucks Band show, what keeps fans coming back is their impressive ability to give each player a moment to shine, especially in a cast so heavy on star power. In one moment, drummers Tyler Greenwell and J.J. Johnson create thunder so loud the rest of the band stands back for their own safety. The next, sax player Kebbi Williams brings the whole show to down to near silence as he intones a breathy passage on his horn. Williams’ partners in the horn section–trumpeter Ephraim Owens and slide trombone sorceress Elizabeth Lea–keep the high points bright and punchy, while bassist Tim Lefebvre keeps the low end bobbing below sonic sea level.The trio of backing vocalists led by Mike Mattison give a stately, almost revue-esque feel their tonally textured performance. While Mattison came out and nailed a pair of lead vocal turns at Savannah Music Festival, Mark Rivers and Alecia Chakour made their presence known often, including a stellar back-and-forth during a cover of “I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel To Be Free” the protest classic popularized by Nina Simone, who was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame that same evening. With all that firepower at their disposal, Tedeschi and Trucks are truly free to do what they do best, and they clearly relished the opportunity under the bright lights of the Savannah Music Festival’s main stage.Susan Tedeschi commands so much respect with her insane playing and emotional vocals that it’s almost impossible to take your eyes off her. She sings with the passion of a person who has lived through a wide variety of life’s pleasures and pain and draws delicious howls from her guitar all the while. Almost any other guitarist would pale in comparison to her bright light, but Derek Trucks is not just any other guitarist. Since he could stand, Trucks has been knocking people off their feet with his jaw-dropping guitar playing. One of the finest blues slide players of this or any generation, Trucks showed why he is one of the truly great players and time and again over the course of the evening, leaving listeners slack-jawed and incredulous at the fireworks he launched from his fretboard.This festival-closing set was the last hurrah of an over two-week celebration of music and culture for the city of Savannah. The festival hosts shows around town from nearly every genre, drawing in music aficionados of all types and ages for a communal sense of joy. The finale doubled as the inaugural event at the brand new Trustees Garden outdoor performance space, and things went off without a hitch. The smell from the food trucks brought in to serve the crowd was enticing, the craft beer vendors were serving beverages as fast as they could, and children laughed as they chased each other around the fields of green. As civic gatherings go, this was as pure and wholesome as any you could find and refreshing to the mind and soul.We’ve put together a playlist of exclusive videos from the show, including stellar versions of  “I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel To Be Free”, “Don’t Know What It Means”, “Do I Look Worried”, “Midnight In Harlem”, and the kick off clip we have featured for you below a heart-melting “Angel From Montgomery>Sugaree>Angel From Montgomery.” Enjoy!Below you can check out a playlist of exclusive videos from Tedeschi Trucks Band’s headlining performance at Savannah Music Festival. Enjoy!“Angel From Montgomery”, “Sugaree” “Midnight In Harlem”“Don’t Know What It Means”, “Do I Look Worried”View All Videos “I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel To Be Free”last_img read more

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Forthcoming Chris Cornell Documentary To Be Directed By Pete Berg, Produced By Brad Pitt

first_imgA forthcoming documentary on late grunge-era rock guitarist and singer Chris Cornell has been given the green light by the Cornell estate to go into production. The project, which has yet to be given an official title, will be produced by Hollywood actor Brad Pitt and acclaimed director Pete Berg (Friday Night Lights, Lone Survivor). Cornell’s widow, Vicky Cornell, will also come on to the project as a producer. The upcoming film is the first official documentary approved by Cornell’s estate since the Soundgarden singer killed himself following a solo concert in Detroit on May 18, 2017.Pitt was one of the many notable entertainers in attendance at the “I Am the Highway: A Tribute to Chris Cornell” concert event at The Forum in Los Angeles last month. Pitt helped welcome Cornell’s daughter Toni and Ziggy Marley to the stage to perform a lovely duet cover of Bob Marley & The Wailers‘ 1980 ballad, “Redemption Song”. With the confirmation of the documentary on Thursday, there’s a pretty good chance that Pitt’s appearance at the all-star event means that footage of the concert could very well end up in the final cut of the film.Related: Pearl Jam Honors Chris Cornell & Tom Petty, Welcomes Soundgarden & Mudhoney Members In SeattleThe report did not state who, if any, of Cornell’s former bandmates, friends, and industry colleagues may appear as interview subjects in the upcoming film. Considering the fact that Cornell’s family is on board in helping to produce the film, fans should also expect to be presented with never-before-seen archival footage of the famous rock singer prior to his untimely death.The upcoming film is the most recent of numerous tributes which have come into existence in the nearly two years since Cornell passed. A statue of Cornell was recently erected in his hometown of Seattle outside of one of the city’s museums. The Cornell estate also recently helped to plan and release a 62-track, 4-disc box set containing 11 previously-unreleased recordings last November.[H/T Variety]last_img read more

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Harvard Art Museums director named

first_imgHarvard University Provost Alan Garber today announced the appointment of Martha Tedeschi as the Elizabeth and John Moors Cabot Director of the Harvard Art Museums, beginning in July. Tedeschi, currently the deputy director for art and research at the Art Institute of Chicago, succeeds Thomas W. Lentz, who departed in July 2015.“Martha Tedeschi stood out among a pool of exceptional candidates. We are pleased that she will lead the Harvard Art Museums into the future, while building on the superb work of Tom Lentz and the museums’ dedicated staff,” Garber said. “The Harvard Art Museums are among the nation’s largest and most important art collections and are also a critical resource for research, teaching, and learning at Harvard. Martha’s passion for teaching students across all disciplines and experience in training the next generation of scholars, curators, and conservators will enable her to advance the museums’ academic and cultural missions.”In her current role, Tedeschi is responsible for the management of the departments most closely related to the Art Institute of Chicago’s commitment to research and scholarship. Tedeschi directs a staff of nearly 225, including the museum’s libraries and archives, publishing and imaging, academic programs, and conservation and conservation science departments. She oversees the activities of 11 curatorial departments and also serves as the Institute’s academic liaison to local universities and foundations.“We are so pleased to welcome Martha Tedeschi at a moment of remarkable opportunity for the Harvard Art Museums,” said Harvard President Drew Faust. “Her expertise and leadership will elevate our extraordinary collections and integrate them more fully into Harvard’s intellectual life, challenging our community to grow as we seek to interpret and change the world. The arts are essential to the University’s highest purposes, and I look forward to the ways in which they will continue to flourish under her direction.”Tedeschi will take charge of a recently reinvented Harvard Art Museums at 32 Quincy St. in Cambridge. Stunningly redesigned and expanded by Renzo Piano Building Workshop and reopened in 2014, the Fogg, Busch-Reisinger, and Arthur M. Sackler museums invite students, faculty, scholars, and the public into one of the world’s great institutions for arts scholarship and research. In the Harvard Art Museums’ new home, the collections are more accessible than ever before. Visitors are able to explore new research connected to the objects on display and the ideas they generate in the galleries; gain a glimpse of leading conservators at work; and in the unique Art Study Center, have hands-on experiences with a wide range of objects from the collections. Revitalized museums to open Nov. 16 Related Harvard’s new home for art “The Harvard Art Museums have been brilliantly reimagined by the recent renovation and I am exhilarated at the prospect of leading them at this moment to realize their enormous potential,” said Tedeschi. “I look forward to working with the full range of the art collections, the talented staff of the museum, and collaborators across the University and in the community to fully activate the building, nurturing a dynamic and inclusive laboratory for considerations of the visual in our lives.”Tedeschi earned her B.A. from Brown University and her Ph.D. from Northwestern University, both in art history. She is a specialist in British and American art, with a strong interest in the history of printmaking in early modern Europe. She was president of the Print Council of America from 2009 to 2013, currently serves on the board of the Association of Art Museum Curators, and was awarded a fellowship to the Center for Curatorial Leadership in 2012.Tedeschi has written, edited, or contributed to scores of books and scholarly journals in her field. She is the general editor and co-author of “The Lithographs of James McNeill Whistler” (1998), winner of the George Wittenborn Award for excellence in art publishing in that year. She has also organized numerous exhibitions, including “Watercolors by Winslow Homer: A Medium for Modernism” (2008) as well as its sequel, “John Marin’s Watercolors: A Medium for Modernism” (2011), and more recently, “Undressed: The Fashion of Privacy” (2013).“Over her distinguished tenure at the Art Institute of Chicago, as a curator and more recently as deputy director of art and research, Martha Tedeschi has evolved an ever more rich and compelling vision for the expanded potential of the museum as a teaching institution capable of engaging diverse audiences by providing access to the museums’ encyclopedic collections in new and creative ways,” said Douglas Druick, who recently retired as the Art Institute’s president and Eloise W. Martin Director.Tedeschi began her career at the Art Institute of Chicago as a National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) intern in 1982, and became a full curator in 1999. Prior to assuming her current role, she served as longtime curator in the museum’s Department of Prints, where she had previously contributed in numerous other roles since 1982.As a visionary museum leader, she implemented an ambitious Andrew W. Mellon Foundation partnership with the University of Chicago and Northwestern University around teaching graduate students from objects; and oversaw a major pilot project — Mellon’s Undergraduate Curatorial Fellowship Program — designed to offer training and mentoring to students who support the important goal of fostering inclusive, pluralistic museums and increasing the engagement of historically underrepresented groups in the curatorial field. She also spearheaded the Art Institute’s comprehensive assessment and digitization of its permanent collection and led the museum’s pioneering program for producing online scholarly publications.About the Harvard Art MuseumsTogether, the Harvard Art Museums’ internationally renowned collections consist of approximately 250,000 objects from the ancient world to the present and across all media, including objects from the Americas, Europe, North Africa, the Mediterranean, and Asia. The Fogg Museum’s collection is known for its extensive holdings of European and American art. The Busch-Reisinger Museum, the only museum of its kind in North America, is devoted solely to the art of central and northern Europe, with a particular emphasis on art from German-speaking countries, and features significant works of late medieval sculpture as well as German art after 1880. The Arthur M. Sackler Museum contains one of the most significant collections of Asian art in the West, with substantial holdings of archaic Chinese jades, ancient bronzes, Buddhist sculpture, ceramics, Japanese works on paper, and Korean art. The Harvard Art Museums is also home to the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, a world leader in fine arts conservation, research and training, and the birthplace of art conservation and conservation science in the United States.last_img read more

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Laura Michelle Kelly & Carolee Carmello Talk Finding Neverland Audiences

first_imgIt was a mini Scandalous reunion on The Today Show on June 12 as Finding Neverland’s Carolee Carmello, alongside Laura Michelle Kelly, had a chat with Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb. The two, who play mother and daughter in the new Peter Pan-inspired musical, discussed what makes their show soar (after all, the production did win four Broadway.com Audience Choice Awards). “It’s emotional,” Carmello said, “and I think so many shows these days don’t make you feel anything.” Kelly agreed, but also had a very important detail to add: “They love dogs! Audiences love them.” Take a look at the interview below, and catch Carmello, Kelly, Matthew Morrison and Kelsey Grammer in Finding Neverland at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre. </ Finding Neverland Related Shows View Commentscenter_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 21, 2016 Star Files Laura Michelle Kellylast_img read more

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Regional Defense Production Takes Flight With Argentine-Brazil Partnership

first_imgBy Dialogo October 10, 2011 Argentina’s national aircraft maker, Fábrica Argentina de Aviones SA, will soon begin manufacturing parts for the new KC-390 military transport plane made by Brazil’s Embraer. The joint initiative gives the Argentine company an opportunity to boost its income and capacity while solidifying Argentine-Brazilian cooperation in the area of defense production. Last April, FAdeA agreed to provide Brazil’s Embraer parts for its KC-390. Julio César Lombardi, FAdeA’s vice-president, told Air Force officials on Sep. 7 that his company’s factory in Córdoba will produce, among other items, front cabin splitters, front doors and air brakes for Embraer. “This is a very important project for Argentina’s Air Force as it permits us to modernize our aircraft manufacturing capabilities,” explained Brig. Gen. Rubén Montenegro. “Embraer is very demanding when it comes to quality control of manufacturing processes and equipment, which will require FAdeA to invest in improving machinery and training.” The Córdoba aircraft factory was one of the first of its kind in Latin America when it opened in 1927. After decades of operating as a state entity, it was privatized in 1995. In 2009, however, the factory was nationalized by President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, who announced that it would become “a strategic tool for national development.” Today, the state-owned FAdeA mostly provides maintenance for aircraft purchased overseas. But it also continues to produce the AT-63 Pampa, a low-cost advanced trainer and light attack aircraft, as well as another light combat jet, the IA-58 Pucará, for the Argentine Air Force. Indeed, the government insists on ramping up Pampa production, having set the goal for 18 new Pampa jets by 2014. Uruguay, Peru, Paraguay, Poland, Greece and Australia have all expressed interest in acquiring that jet for their respective air forces. Argentina is part of an international consortium that includes Chile, Colombia, Portugal and the Czech Republic. These countries are working with Embraer to produce a prototype of the KC-390 by 2014. Embraer’s goal is to offer a jet-powered medium transport with a cargo capacity of around 23 tons, which can be refueled in the air and can provide refueling services to other aircraft. Embraer has already received commitments to purchase 60 KC-390s, half of which will go to the Brazilian Air Force. Brazil will finance the purchase of its planes from the part-supplying countries. “This isn’t a classic model of international cooperation since Embraer will be purchasing directly from the countries involved and will maintain all ownership rights and profits,” said Raúl Humberto Paz, president of the Cámara Argentina de la Industria Aeronáutica [Argentine Aeronautics Industry Chamber]. “Brazil has come up with a savvy business model whereby it will finance the purchase of its own planes, estimated to cost about $80 million each, from the aforementioned partners,” said Paz. When the two countries’ defense ministers met in Buenos Aires in early September, they reviewed their bilateral cooperation strategy and explored avenues for deepening their strategic relationship. Technological cooperation and defense production were seen as priorities, with specific emphasis placed on the KC-390 project as well as finalization of the Guacho all-terrain vehicle, the development of armored vehicles, cooperation in cyber defense, naval industry collaboration and the synching of norms and catalogs related to defense products. “In Brazil, defense is a matter of state policy,” said that country’s defense minister, Celso Amorim, during his visit to Buenos Aires. He explained that Brazil’s strategy is organized around three objectives: equipping the armed forces, strengthening the domestic defense industry and promoting South American integration, which he insisted is not “just a theoretical element.” Building up defense production capacity has been a key element of Brazil’s economic development model and, subsequently, its military revival over the last several years. Today, the Argentine government appears to be also realizing that reviving its national defense industry could not only create jobs but also spark possibilities for technological advancement. “Currently, there is significant political will to boost Argentina’s national defense industry,” Montenegro said. “This project, along with others like shipbuilding and military equipment production, is being supported by the government to revive this strategic industry.”last_img read more

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No BSE found in first week of expanded testing

first_img The USDA has authorized 12 laboratories around the country to conduct rapid testing of cattle samples for BSE. But so far only five labs have been actively testing, according to McNally. The five labs are among the first seven the USDA said were authorized to run the tests; the other two labs haven’t participated so far because of other priority projects, McNally said. The department plans to test more than 200,000 cattle over the next 12 to 18 months to determine how many more BSE cases, if any, exist in American herds. The decision to expand BSE testing followed the discovery of the nation’s first BSE case in Washington state last December. About 20,000 cattle were tested last year. She said the rapid tests being used are highly sensitive, and any inconclusive results from those tests will trigger confirmatory testing at the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa. “We’d report any inconclusive results on the [Web] site and in addition to that we would do an announcement,” she said. The five additional labs that the USDA has authorized to conduct tests will play more of a backup role, according to McNally. “At this point the ones we have up and running are more than sufficient for what we’re doing,” she said. The USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) posted the test results on its Web site. Andrea McNally, an APHIS spokeswoman in Washington, DC, told CIDRAP News that plans call for posting the results every Monday. The expanded program began Jun 1. An estimated 35 million cattle are slaughtered in the United States annually. USDA officials have said that testing 268,000 animals during the expanded surveillance program would make it possible to detect one case of BSE among 10 million cattle with 99% confidence. McNally said she had no data yet on how many cattle from each of the above categories have been tested so far. Jun 8, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) says 1,127 cattle were tested in the first week of its expanded testing program for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and were found free of the disease. See also: The USDA has said the testing will focus on cattle deemed at increased risk for BSE, including nonambulatory cattle, those with signs of central nervous system disease, emaciated and injured cattle, and cattle that die on farms. Plans also call for randomly testing about 20,000 healthy-appearing cattle over 30 months old. Mar 30, 2004, CIDRAP News story, “Seven state labs to conduct BSE testing”last_img read more

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