McDermott secures contracts for two ethylene crackers in Russia

first_imgThe ethylene steam cracking process developed by Lummus Technology is widely applied for the production of polymer-grade ethylene Image: McDermott will construct two ethylene cracking facilities. Photo: Courtesy of LEEROY Agency from Pixabay. US-based engineering solutions provider McDermott has secured a technology contract from Baltic Chemical Company (BCC) and an extended basic engineering (EBE) contract from China National Chemical Engineering No. 7 Construction Company (CC7).The company has been contracted for the ethane cracking project, owned by Baltic Chemical Complex, a subsidiary of RusGazDobycha.Under the contract, McDermott’s Lummus Technology will provide both the process design package (PDP) engineering and the license for its olefin production and recovery technology.The ethylene steam cracking process developed by Lummus Technology is widely applied for the production of polymer-grade ethylene, representing approximately 40% of the world’s capacity, said the company.Lummus Technology senior vice president Leon de Bruyn said: “Lummus Technology has been present in Russia for many years where we have been—and will continue to be—a reliable partner to our many clients here.“We are excited to be selected for two world-scale ethylene plants by BCC and bring our reliable, high-yield and energy-efficient steam cracking technology to a project that has so much visibility in the petrochemicals industry.”McDermott will construct two ethylene cracking facilitiesThe company said that the project is located near Russia’s shores at the Gulf of Finland, and marks the largest ethylene integration project in the world.The natural gas processing chemical plant is planned to comprise two ethylene cracking facilities, each with 1.4 million tonnes annual capacity.McDermott intends to primarily execute the extended basic engineering work from its downstream centres of excellence in The Hague and Brno, in Czech Republic.The company said that it has previously worked together with CC7 on the Afipsky Hydrocracker project and the ongoing Lukoil Delayed Coker Unit project.Furthermore, the company is expected to start the works at the project immediately and will include the award of the contract in fourth quarter 2019 backlog.McDermott Europe, Africa, Russia and Caspian senior vice president Tareq Kawash said: “McDermott’s end-to-end infrastructure and technology solutions are an important differentiator for operators in Russia.“The potential future pull-through opportunities related to the Lummus Technology portfolio make us uniquely positioned to execute this phase and future phases of the project.”last_img read more

See More

75 Years Ago, a Storm of Epic Proportions

first_imgHundreds of Ocean City houses were destroyed and thousands of others were damaged by the 1944 Great Atlantic Hurricane. (Photos courtesy of ocnjimages.com) By TIM KELLY“It was one hell of a blow,” John Loeper said of what became known as the “Great Atlantic Hurricane” of 1944, which tore through Ocean City 75 years ago this FridayLoeper, president of the board of directors of the Ocean City Historical Museum, was less than two years old at the time. Though a bit young to actually remember the hurricane, Loeper could imagine what it must’ve been like.“Ocean City was awash,” he said, referring to the bay meeting the ocean and a miles-long path of destruction in between. “The entire town was underwater.”In the era before hurricanes were given human names, what the media would dub the “Great Atlantic Hurricane” carved out its own niche as Ocean City’s first “superstorm.”“Ocean City had never ever seen anything like it before,” local historian Fred Miller said, “and Ocean City wouldn’t see anything like it again until the ‘March Storm’ of 1962.”The hurricane, described in different published reports as a category 3 or a category 4 storm, packed sustained winds of 75 miles per hour and gusts in excess of 100 miles per hour for approximately four hours.Wednesday, Sept. 13, 1944, dawned as an extremely humid day, reports said, but gave no hint as to what was to come.“There was no TV at the time and radio reports were wrong,” Miller said of forecasts predicting landfall in the Carolinas and stating the hurricane’s path would take it more than 100 miles out to sea when it traveled past Ocean City.Further distraction from the advancing storm resulted from the fact the United States was still in the throes of World War II.“People were more worried about reports that German U-boats were prowling the seas off Ocean City than weather reports,” Loeper said.Around mid-day, the rain began to fall and the wind picked up.“Then all hell broke loose,” an eyewitness said, according to the Associated Press.Many cars floated down the streets and were crushed when they smashed into homes and buildings.Ocean City’s Boardwalk was lifted off its moorings and the wooden planks were strewn about like toothpicks, witnesses said.“The entire Boardwalk sustained heavy damage and much of it was destroyed,” Miller said.“The section of Boardwalk north from St. James Place to East Atlantic Boulevard was wiped out,” he continued, “and it was never replaced.”Cars were lifted off streets and driveways and floated freely until they collided with homes, buildings, telephone poles and other cars.The entire event blew into and out of town in approximately four hours, according to reports. That was long enough to turn Ocean City into a soggy mess.Reports said hundreds of homes were completely lost and thousands were damaged. Entire blocks of homes were washed out to sea, reports indicated.Astoundingly, of the 12 New Jersey deaths attributed to the Great Atlantic Hurricane of 1944, none took place in Ocean City.“It’s a miracle no deaths were reported,” Miller said. “We were lucky in several respects. The storm took place after Labor Day.”“In those days, the town really emptied out after the season. We weren’t as much of a year-round community. There probably would have been deaths had it hit over the holiday weekend,” Miller maintained.He also said the hurricane’s appearance during daylight hours probably played a role in avoiding loss of life.Still, the event was of such a magnitude that it is still being discussed and compared with the ’62 March Storm and Superstorm Sandy in 2012.The 1944 storm was further bolstered by the fact that the storm surge hit simultaneously with high tide.“The town was underwater, in some places as much as six feet,” Miller said.At Fifth Street, just a few planks and scattered debris remain where the Boardwalk was. In the background is the old Ocean City High School.According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the storm produced some of the highest water levels ever seen and recorded in the state. Reports claimed that some waves were more than 30 feet high off local beaches.In typical Ocean City fashion, the town responded to protect its citizens and property. Miller said police, fire and Beach Patrol personnel all assisted in removing stranded people from their flooded homes and ushering them to safety.“People who evacuated their homes or who lost them were sheltered at City Hall,” he said.He noted that the American Red Cross was on hand to aid victims, as was a cadre of volunteers from the town.The next day at low tide, Ocean City officials and residents were finally able to survey the extent of the damage, estimated to be almost $400 million when adjusted for inflation to 2019 dollars.“There was still another miracle to come, the town’s recovery from the hurricane,” Miller asserted.“It seemed like everyone worked together to get things back in order before the start of the 1945 summer tourism season,” he said.Yet it would take years for some homes and businesses to be rebuilt and some never would be, he added.“That didn’t stop Ocean City, which recovered nicely and quickly,” Miller said. “By the time the summer season of 1945 arrived, there were very few visible scars from the storm.”Today, three quarters of a century later, the Great Atlantic Hurricane is still remembered and discussed as one of the most impactful weather events in Ocean City history.“Ocean City was awash,” Historical Museum Board President John Loeper said. “The entire island was underwater.”last_img read more

See More

News story: £10 million research competition launched to tackle antimicrobial resistance

first_img Antimicrobial resistance may seem like a distant threat, but people are already dying needlessly in their thousands across the world, including in this country, because they have a drug-resistant infection and we do not have effective drugs to treat them. This problem is only getting worse – we urgently need to find solutions. More research is critical, which is why the UK government is calling on some of the country’s brightest minds to come up with new ways to prevent, control and combat these infections in the future. I know there are exciting projects needing support in this area – this competition presents a fantastic opportunity for the UK to lead this work. The Department of Health and Social Care is announcing the launch of a £10 million research competition to fund innovations to tackle antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in humans.AMR, which includes bacterial resistance to existing antibiotics, is on the rise and poses a significant threat to health across the world. Without a better understanding of how to tackle and prevent AMR, treatable infections could become life-threatening and the advancements made in modern medicine over recent decades are at risk of being reversed.The competition follows the announcement of £30 million to fund research and development projects as part of the Global AMR Innovation Fund (GAMRIF) in May 2018 with CARB-X, the Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND), the Argentinian government, and Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC).The £10 million will be made available in research grants funded through a Small Business Research Initiative (SBRI). It is being run by Innovate UK on behalf of the Department of Health and Social Care, with the aim of supporting the implementation of the UK Five Year Antimicrobial Resistance Strategy.In 2016, a government-commissioned review by Lord Jim O’Neill highlighted the need for more research and development to reduce the global threat of AMR – prompting the government to commit to an additional investment of up to £55 million over 5 years from 2016/17 towards promoting excellence in AMR research and development in the UK.Today’s competition, which makes available a maximum of £10 million in funding to successful bids, forms part of funding announced in October 2017 at the global ‘Call to Action’ conference by the Wellcome Trust, the UN Foundation, and the UK, Ghanaian and Thai governments, to accelerate action in this area.Chief Medical Officer, Professor Dame Sally Davies, said:last_img read more

See More

Scottish Bakers publishes Covid best practice guide

first_imgAs lockdown measures ease, Scottish Bakers has launched a guide designed to help bakers reopen.The trade group said the guide had been compiled to help bakers ‘Plan, Prepare and Pilot’ their approach to restarting or increasing production and retail operations while doing everything possible to limit the spread of the coronavirus.It brings together elements of the official advice and guidance into a single document. Topic areas include risk assessment, practical considerations, distancing in retail shops, appropriate PPE, what to do when staff display symptoms, and a list of essential resources.Scottish Bakers pointed out that the bakery sector employs 12,000 staff across Scotland and that 80% of members had furloughed staff, while many had closed for business.“The pandemic brought unprecedented pressures to bear on our members as restrictions on the economy took effect,” said Scottish Bakers chief executive Alasdair Smith.“While the majority of our members were able to continue production during this time, we know many closed completely or limited production because of the challenges of implementing the required social distancing measures and concern for the wellbeing of their staff and customers.“As restrictions begin to ease, more of our members are looking to restart or increase production and retail operations, which is why we’ve brought together the essential elements of the official advice and guidance into this document for members.”The Craft Bakers Association has also developed a guide to health and safety during the pandemic.last_img read more

See More

Crew chief named for Kennedy’s Bristol ride

first_imgChris Carrier named crew chief of Turner Scott Motorsports’ fourth Truck Series entry WATCH: Logano celebrates Michigan win “I look forward to the opportunity to compete again in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series,” said Carrier. “I enjoy working with young talent, and I think Ben Kennedy and Cale Gale have what it takes to be successful in this sport. We have a great team behind us at Turner Scott Motorsports, and I am looking forward to getting to work and joining the truck series this week at Bristol.”Carrier, a NASCAR Sprint Cup, Nationwide and NCWTS veteran, has served as crew chief for 329 events throughout the three series, earning five wins, 24 top fives, 52 top 10s and seven poles. Carrier’s most recent work in the NCWTS includes serving as crew chief on the No. 30 last season, leading Nelson Piquet Jr. to two wins, nine top fives, 15 top 10s and four poles. The Tennessee native earned his first career win with Harry Gant in 1994 at Atlanta Motor Speedway.The organization has also named Pat Tryson as crew chief for the No. 30 NASCAR Nationwide Series entry. Tryson will take over the crew chief duties for Piquet Jr. starting in the August 23 race at Bristol.”I am very excited about the opportunity to join Turner Scott Motorsports and the No. 30 team,” said Tryson. “I am really looking forward to working with Nelson Piquet Jr. and the rest of the team. Nelson is a very talented, hard-nosed competitor and I think we will work very well together. The pieces are in place at Turner Scott Motorsports to have a championship caliber team, and I am looking forward to helping this team get to victory lane. I would like to thank [co-owners] Steve Turner and Harry Scott, Jr. for giving me the opportunity to join their organization, and I am looking forward to getting to work this weekend at Bristol.”Tryson, a NASCAR Sprint Cup, Nationwide and Camping World Truck Series veteran has served as crew chief for 516 events, earning a total of 10 wins, 66 top-five, 139-top 10s and four poles throughout the three series. The Malvern, Pa. native earned his first career win with Elliott Sadler in 2001 at Bristol Motor Speedway.READ MORE: READ: Full coverage from Michigan, Mid-Ohio WATCH: Johnson out early at Michigancenter_img FULL SERIES COVERAGE• View all articles • View all videos • View all photos WATCH: Dillon spins in Stewart’s No. 14 Turner Scott Motorsports announced Monday that the team has named Chris Carrier as crew chief of the team’s fourth NASCAR Camping World Truck Series entry.Carrier and his TSM team will be at Bristol Motor Speedway Wednesday night providing support for Ben Kennedy Racing’s No. 96 entry in the Camping World Truck Series UNOH 200. Carrier will also be on the pit box and calling the shots for the No. 96 at Iowa, Chicago, Martinsville and Homestead-Miami Speedway. The team will run a limited schedule for the remaining portion of the year with Kennedy and Cale Gale behind the wheel.last_img read more

See More

EXCLUSIVE: Delicate Steve Talks About His Psychedelic Guitar Stylings Praised By NPR And Paul Simon

first_imgLive For Live Music: Delicate Steve, are you a delicate man?Delicate Steve: Yes.L4LM: If you had a dime for every time somebody asked you that, would you be a wealthy man? Delicate Steve: Yes!L4LM: Well, now that we have that settled, the first thing that caught my attention when listening to your band, as I’m sure goes for most people, was the absence of lyrical content. Was the decision to be entirely instrumental made intentionally or has singing just never been something that you’ve done? Delicate Steve: I don’t think of myself as a lyricist, so I’m just playing to my strengths as a guitar player who is interested in making songs, writing songs, and producing pop music. I know that I’m good at the guitar, so I decided that that would be the focus of the music instead of trying to write lyrics.L4LM: In regards to that topic, would you say that when you listen to music, you’re more immediately attracted to the beat of a song rather than to the lyrics?Delicate Steve: No, I like lyrics, I would say that’s what I like most. I’m definitely paying attention to singers when I listen to music.L4LM: That’s interesting to me. But you probably wouldn’t say that one is more important than the other, would you? Delicate Steve: No, you just need to have a lot of strong elements in the song and that could come from anywhere. It could be the beat, it could be the melody, it could be the lyrics; but a good song has to have at least one of those things happening.L4LM: When you made the decision to venture off as a predominantly instrumental band, you had to have known that it would be difficult to break into any sort of a mainstream market. Did that notion ever intimidate you? Or was that never a concern of yours?Delicate Steve: Well, I was just making this music in my room, so I wasn’t really thinking of anything external. So this was just sort of what I would do if I was uninhibited by thoughts about where it would end up or how it would do in the world. So that’s how the first album came to be.L4LM: How old were you when you made the first album? Delicate Steve: I think I was 22 or 23.L4LM: So you were just making music to make music, it wasn’t intended for anybody but yourself? Delicate Steve: Not exactly. It was for friends, and it was for bands that I was inspired by.L4LM: Were you playing shows anywhere at that time? Delicate Steve: Not with this music until after it was recorded.L4LM: Once this music was recorded, and you started performing live and writing new music. Did you notice any changes in your creative process as you were probably beginning to take certain external factors into account? Delicate Steve: It’s changed; it’s definitely different now. I take into account where I am, which isn’t just in my bedroom anymore. It’s in the world in some way. I like to be conscious, as much as I can be when I’m making music, so I’m not just thinking about myself.L4LM: Do you think that you’ve ever compromised your creative independence when writing a song in order to guarantee success?  Delicate Steve: No. It’s easier to do whatever you want; it’s harder to make something that you think will be successful. If you’re not bound by that, then you can make anything, and no one is going to yell at you. In some ways, it’s easier to experiment freely than it is to make a pop song. So in some ways, I think it strengthens my creative muscle to try and make music that other people will want to listen to.L4LML: I imagine that many bands who compose songs without lyrics can have a difficult time engaging an audience. I have to say that for myself personally, at the two shows that I attended of yours, the lack of singing went almost entirely unnoticed, and I think that’s because I felt like, in a way, your guitar was doing the singing. Is that a reaction that you often receive?Delicate Steve: Yeah (laughs). I don’t know, I don’t know how it looks to other people, but people do say that.L4LM: Is that a reaction that you try to provoke in people?Delicate Steve: No, I don’t think I need to try so much—that just sort of feels natural for me to do all that stuff when I’m up there playing.L4LM: Do you think you play your guitar differently or more eccentrically than someone who would be singing and playing at the same time? Delicate Steve: I think that I play my guitar differently and more eccentrically than most of the guitar players that I see, if they’re singing or not, just because of how I grew up, and what I think is cool or not cool. I combine all those thoughts in my own head, and I’m kind of doing what I think is really cool and what I’m not seeing a lot of in the world.L4LM: Many musicians use their lyrics to express themselves, whether it be in relation to a personal experience or a more global topic. Is it ever frustrating that you can’t share those opinions or stories with your audience?Delicate Steve: No, I feel like I’m doing that when I’m playing. I think people are getting a sense of who I am through my music, even though it doesn’t have words. It’s just like when people listen to groups from around the world and even though they can’t understand what’s being said, they can still connect to it.L4LM: Are the musicians that accompanied you on your most recent tour considered to be the official band (Max Jaffe, Jon Wiley and Jessica Pavone), or are those members continuously rotating?Delicate Steve: It’s the official band right now. It’s changed over the years, but those who are playing now have hopped on over the past year or so.L4LM: The title of your album, This is Steve, is seemingly blunt. Is the meaning behind that name quite so obvious or is there a bit more of a story behind it? Delicate Steve: I would leave it to the person checking out the music. In one way, it serves as a glimpse into who I am as a person through this music, and I felt like this third album was the time to call an album This is Steve.L4LM: Do you think this album is the most accurate representation of yourself as an artist? Delicate Steve: They’re all different mirrors, but this one was set up in a way that was the most welcoming in some way. L4LM: Any exciting things on the horizon for you and your music? Delicate Steve: I’m just keeping busy all the time in New York—producing bands, working on music with a bunch of different artists, and playing guitar. I just want to be known, so I just want to keep doing my thing, and the world will catch up eventually. Sometimes I get a little impatient, but I also know that I’m doing something special, and that I’m not going to stop anytime soon. So I’ve just got to harness my patience and just keep making music. L4LM: One final question, under what circumstance does Harsh Steve come to town? Delicate Steve: Harsh Steve is always there; he could come out at any minute (laughs). Everyone has got a harsh side, so not more than anybody else do I have one, but I’m definitely capable of those emotions. Steve Marion, better known by his stage name Delicate Steve, is a musician who’s been around the block, performing on NPR’s Tiny Desk Concert and having worked with big names like Paul Simon, Tame Impala, Dirty Projectors, and more. However, the eccentric guitarist has been in a state of evolution throughout his career, as evidenced by the musical progression across his albums, with his latest album, This Is Steve, coming out earlier this year. Growing from writing his fully instrumental songs for himself and friends in his bedroom to writing in consideration of the followers he’s been rabidly gaining, Delicate Steve continues onward and upward with guitar-driven, psychedelia-tinged pop rock songs leading the way.Live For Live Music was recently able to chat with the guitarist, who gave us a taste of his musical philosophy, stage personality, and future industry aspirations. Read the interview below, and check out more information about Delicate Steve along with his upcoming tour dates on his website here.last_img read more

See More

Newport Folk Announces “Mavis & Friends” Concerts To Celebrate Mavis Staples’ 80th Birthday

first_imgFamed singer Mavis Staples will get the opportunity to celebrate her upcoming 80th birthday a little early this year, as Newport Folk has announced a run of three concerts set to take place in New York, Los Angeles, and Nashville in mid-May. The run of shows is being branded as Mavis & Friends: Celebrating 80 Years of Mavis Staples, and will feature performances from Staples and special guests who have yet to be announced.The three celebratory concerts will take place at the famous Apollo Theater in New York, NY on May 9th; Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, TN on May 15th; and the Theatre at Ace Hotel in Los Angeles, CA on May 22nd. A portion of the proceeds from tickets sold for each of the three shows will go to benefit the Newport Festivals Foundation. All three shows will lead up to Staples’ 80th birthday on July 10th this summer. Jones is scheduled to co-headline Red Rocks Amphitheater in Colorado a few days following her birthday alongside Norah Jones on July 16th.Related: Luck Reunion Announces 2019 Lineup: Willie Nelson & Family, Mavis Staples, Steve Earle, More“I must be the happiest girl in the world,” Staples mentioned in a statement about the upcoming birthday shows. “After all this time, I still do what I love … I never thought I would still be singing at my age, and people seem to really want to hear me, they know me, they give me love—I’m just overwhelmed, really.”Newport Folk did not state whether or not Staples would also be one of the performers at this year’s Newport Folk Fest, although organizers have already begun revealing part of their 2019 lineup, which includes Billy Strings & Molly Tuttle, Gregory Alan Isakov, Kacey Musgraves, Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy, and Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band, just to name a few.Tickets to all three shows will begin general on-sale on February 15th at 1 p.m. EST. Fans can head here for more info on the upcoming shows.last_img read more

See More

The green escape

first_imgOnce the door closed, participants had 25 minutes before flood waters swept them away.At least, that was the scenario three Harvard College first-year students walked into on Monday when they entered the sustainability-themed escape room created by the Office for Sustainability’s Undergraduate Resource Efficiency Program.The room ran April 22‒24 in recognition of Earth Day and as a part of the Office of Sustainability’s month-long events celebrating Harvard’s commitment to sustainability and a healthier planet. It presented participants with puzzles they had to solve to stop sea level rise from submerging parts of Cambridge and devastating Harvard’s campus.“We thought this would be a really cool way to get people to directly engage with some of those [environmental and sustainability] issues,” said Rosie Wigglesworth ’19, one of the students who organized the room.Their thinking was spot-on. The room attracted more than 100 Harvard community members, mostly undergraduates, and ran about 14 times a day over a three-day span in the Smith Campus Center. It was a fun, interactive way to test their puzzle-solving skills while learning simple steps they can take to mitigate climate change.In recent years, escape rooms have become increasingly popular outings for groups of friends. There are now more than 2,000 in the U.S., and a psychological horror film called “Escape Room” was released this year.In the game, participants are “trapped” inside a room from which they can “escape” only by completing a series of challenges. The rooms tend to follow one of two approaches, or a mix of both. Some have participants solve riddles and puzzles to earn their freedom; others are more physically demanding, making participants navigate a sort of obstacle course.Harvard’s escape room focused on the mind. It presented participants with a series of puzzles embedded with sustainability lessons on topics such as recycling, waste management, fridge defrosting, and phantom energy waste.“Because the mission of [the Resource Efficiency Program] is to encourage sustainable lifestyle shifts,” said Meaghan Townsend ’21, another member of the sustainability office’s program, “all the tasks are centered around changes that students could make, specifically in a dorm-room-type set-up on campus.”In the room, there were mini-refrigerators, wooden furniture, books, surge protectors, and, of course, a snarky roommate — played by Beverly Ge ’20 — who every once in a while said something helpful.,“I think starting with No. 1 seems reasonable,” she told the three first-year students —  Michael Cheng, Jena Lorman, and Tyler Morris — as they unsuccessfully scoured the room for a place to start. In their initial frenzied search, they had missed the glaring clue hanging over a surge protector. The label, with the number 1 written on it, marked it as the first puzzle.“I feel like we have to unplug some things,” said Cheng, looking at all the cords in the surge protector.His teammates agreed. But the question — and the point of the lesson — was what to unplug?With another clue from Ge, participants figured out that the letters taped onto each of the plugs spelled a word. They then saw that they needed to unplug the cords that were not powering anything, because though they weren’t being used they were still drawing electricity from the outlet, a thing known as vampire or phantom energy waste.Other tasks in the room involved sorting waste into the proper trash, compost, or recycling bins; consolidating two fridges; turning off unused lights; and finding a lock combination using a black light and clues from a rising thermometer.While participants worked, a monitor displayed the time remaining and projection maps (provided by the city) showed how much of Cambridge had flooded in the elapsed time, driving home the time crunch involved.“We think of this escape room as not identical to reality but as a sort microcosm,” said Wigglesworth. “It has stakes. You need to do these things in order to reach this certain goal, and you need to do these things quickly because there’s a time limit. That was what we liked about the escape room; it was going to communicate this sense of urgency and also that [change is] within people’s reach.”Participants found it surprisingly informative.“Hearing the setup of it, I didn’t think that I was going to be receiving any new knowledge,” said Morris. “It made me aware to how many things I didn’t know when it came to environmental sustainability. Like the vampire power; I’d never heard of that.”Students from the Resource Efficiency Program have been working on the escape room since early fall, consulting with cities and universities that have run sustainability-themed escape rooms in the past and connecting with a local one, Red Fox Escapes, for advice on ensuring their narrative delivered the sense of urgency they sought. Students also connected with representatives from Cambridge’s Community Development Department, who, along with their high school interns from Cambridge Rindge and Latin School, are working on creating a similar room for the city in the fall. As a group, the interns and city employees led a beta test of the room. The results led to some final tweaks, like extending the escape time from 20 to 25 minutes and making certain clues clearer.“Having made the puzzles and designed the rules, we had no idea whether the level of difficulty was correct, how long it would take, and whether [the puzzles] were intuitive or not,” said Kalena Wang ’20. “The beta testing helped a lot with the small details of connecting the tasks in the room, but it also helped a lot with the broader framing.”Those small refinements ensured participants would have fun but also learn something. “It’s all put in a way that will make me remember it,” Morris said. “It will click for me next time, as opposed to just receiving just a flyer or a handout.” Related Inside Harvard’s green labs Friendly rivalries raise the bar for researchers as they cut waste A gold star for going green Arboretum gets a solar boost Harvard Climate Leadership Conference award recognizes sustainability efforts 1.2-acre project to power research building is ambitious sustainability initiative last_img read more

See More

ND adds study abroad locations

first_imgNotre Dame’s Office of International Studies announced they will offer three new opportunities for students to study abroad this spring. The programs will take place in South Korea, Spain and Switzerland beginning in 2014. Kathleen Opel, Director of the International Studies department, said these programs were chosen at new sites to offer opportunities in locations where Notre Dame did not previously have study abroad programs. “Students are offered new opportunities in engineering, physics and a wide array programming at a top research university in Korea,” she said. “Additionally, students on campus will benefit from the participation of international exchange students in their classes and residence halls. A press release from the International Studies department stated that Notre Dame will partner with Yonsei University in Seoul, South Korea to begin a bilateral exchange program. The program will be open to undergraduates in all majors. In South Korea, students will be able to choose from a range of courses including Korean language, Korean studies, business economics, politics, sociology, engineering, sciences, and human ecology, the press release stated. The press release said the program does not require knowledge of the Korean language, since all courses will be taught in English. “In [the] exchange program at Yonsei University in Seoul, several students from Yonsei will be able to study here while several of our students can take classes in the many disciplines offered at Yonsei,” Opel said. Notre Dame also partnered with the Polytechnic Institute of Valencia in Alcoy, Spain and will begin a bilateral exchange program in Spring 2014, the press release stated. The program is designed for sophomore or junior engineering majors, specifically those in chemical, electrical and computer science engineering, it said. “Polytechnic Institute of Valencia in Alcoy, Spain offers engineering study programs that complement engineering studies here on campus,” Opel said. “As an exchange program, several students from Alcoy will study engineering here at ND while several of our students may study there.” The program is open to only those students who have completed at least two semesters of college-level Spanish or the equivalent. In Spring 2014, students will also have the opportunity to study at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland, the press release said. The program is made possible through Boston University’s Geneva-Physics program, it said. Opel said the program in Geneva, Switzerland would provide students with the outstanding opportunity to study physics at the University of Geneva and work with some of the worlds leading physicists at CERN. The program will combine coursework in quantum physics and electrodynamics at UNIGE and directed research at CERN, the press release stated. Students majoring in physics who have completed at least two semesters of college-level French or the equivalent are eligible for the program. The press release said students would be required to complete a specifically designed French-language tutorial before studying in Geneva. “All three programs are starting with relatively few competitively selected students,” Opel said. “Our goal is to provide more opportunities in different disciplines and geographic areas.”last_img read more

See More

Payday lending eyed in March 26 CFPB field hearing

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr CFPB announced it will host a field hearing on payday lending at noon Eastern March 26 in Richmond, Va. NAFCU Regulatory Affairs Counsel Alexander Monterrubio will attend.CFPB Director Richard Cordray will deliver remarks during the event. Panelists have yet to be named, but the bureau says consumer groups, industry representatives and members of the public will participate.During a House Financial Services Committee hearing earlier this month, Cordray told panel members that a proposal on payday lending is expected to be out “soon.”Credit unions are authorized by NCUA to offer small-dollar, short-term loans to their members. The NCUA rules set strict limits on the amount, duration and number of loans that can be provided to a single member at any one time. continue reading »last_img read more

See More