La Mosquitia: Dangerous territory for scarlet macaws in Honduras

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Endangered Species, Wildlife, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by Maria Salazar Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The scarlet macaw (Ara macao), with its iconic red, blue and yellow plumes, is the national bird of Honduras. It inhabits forests from northern Central America to the southern Amazon, but the northern subspecies (A. m. cyanoptera) is particularly imperiled.“Ecotrafficking,” the term for wildlife trafficking in Honduras, is a major problem in La Mosquitia, the part of eastern Honduras, near the border with Nicaragua.Today, around 600 scarlet macaws inhabit the pine forests of Gracias a Dios, the Honduran department where Mabita is located. Anaida Panting and her family oversee 38 scarlet macaw nests and 30 great green macaw (Ara ambiguus) nests. MABITA, Honduras — When the clock strikes four in the afternoon, Anaida Panting bangs the pots full of food that she’s prepared for her scarlet macaws. Dozens of the birds descend from the pine trees when she calls them. Panting has cared for these animals for so long that she can’t remember when she started.It’s a dangerous job. “Ecotrafficking,” the term for wildlife trafficking in Honduras, is a major problem in La Mosquitia, the part of eastern Honduras, near the border with Nicaragua, where Mabita is located. The Honduran government has a light footprint here — so light, that the area has become a hub of various illegal trades, including the trade in scarlet macaws.The scarlet macaw (Ara macao), with its iconic red, blue and yellow plumes, is the national bird of Honduras. It inhabits forests from northern Central America to the southern Amazon, but the northern subspecies (A. m. cyanoptera) is particularly imperiled, classified as endangered by the IUCN. Its population has declined precipitously due to poaching. The bird is sold as a pet within Honduras and on the international market.Today, around 600 scarlet macaws inhabit the pine and broadleaf forests of Gracias a Dios, the Honduran department where Mabita is located. Anaida Panting and her family protect 38 scarlet macaw nests. The birds subsist on a diet of rice, beans and dry dog food.Panting, an indigenous Miskito woman who co-directs the Rescue and Liberation Center of Mabita along with her spouse, Santiago Lacuth, coordinates a community-led initiative to rehabilitate macaws that have been confiscated from traffickers and reintroduce them into the wild. Every day at 4 p.m., the birds come and eat from the pots and, sometimes, right from Panting’s hands.One of the macaws, her favorite, is so old that no one knows its exact age. “It’s the only one that stays after lunch,” she says after stopping a fight between her special macaw and another one that ventured too close to her. “The rest leave after they’ve eaten, but this one stays with me.”Protecting the macaws, though, also means guarding an animal sought by traffickers.“There are two types of threats: threats to the species and threats to the community,” says Héctor Portillo, a researcher with the Foundation of Science for the Study and Conservation of Biodiversity (INCEBIO), a local NGO. “Illegal trafficking often happens within the communities, and people who take the animals are locals. But traders and final consumers are outside the country, usually in Jamaica or the Cayman Islands.”Trafficking in La MosquitiaLocals in La Mosquitia are constantly waiting: waiting for help, waiting for good news. But what comes, they say, are people with bad intentions who take advantage of the neglect in this part of the country.In Mabita, locals have taken matters into their own hands, setting up patrols to guard the macaw nests. Currently, these community members receive a daily fee under a project supported by One Earth Conservation, a nonprofit.However, some members of this remote community — where school only goes to sixth grade, there is no health care center, no electricity and no drinking water — may see an opportunity in selling an animal, even if they know the buyer will flip the creature for much more on the international market.A source in the Honduran public prosecutor’s office told Mongabay that wildlife trafficking in the area generates thousands of dollars in revenues per trafficker every month. A scarlet macaw can be illicitly sold on the international market for $1,000; a great green macaw can fetch up to $3,000. The nation’s environmental prosecutor investigated illegal trade routes for timber and wildlife in the area and identified the one that starts in the nearby community of Caukira as among the most profitable. This route passes through Honduras’s Ceiba and Bay islands and ends in Jamaica.One of the scarlet macaws seized in December 2017 in Puerto Lempira. The rescued animals were relocated to Mabita. Image by anonymous.Caukira is a colorful town, visibly more developed than Mabita. Saturation divers catch lobsters and sea cucumbers, a dangerous business that has crippled more than 5,000 men in La Mosquitia due to decompression sickness from using makeshift gear. Caukira is also a hub of various illegal trades: cocaine, Jamaican marijuana and wildlife, according to a source from the prosecutor’s office.These businesses are so lucrative that trying to dismantle them can mean death for people who live in this area where, as Portillo says, the lack of state control is alarming.The risk of fighting wildlife trafficking in La MosquitiaIn December 2017, after barely 10 months in the position, an environmental prosecutor in Puerto Lempira, the Gracias a Dios capital, who had taken action against timber and wildlife traffickers, had to flee due to an attack on his house.When the prosecutor first arrived, he started to work with the military, the only clear and evident presence of the state in La Mosquitia. At one point, unidentified people shot at the gate, door and windows of the prosecutor’s apartment. For his safety, the prosecutor was transferred to another office elsewhere in the country. No one was charged over the attack.Anaida Panting’s shelter hosted the species seized in December 2017. Image by Martin Cálix/Contracorriente.“Sometimes law enforcement is not appropriate,” says Marleny Zelaya of the Institute of Forest Conservation (ICF), a government agency. “At the ICF we find ourselves between the authorities in the prosecutor’s office, the soldiers and the communities.” She added that the fact that the prosecutor’s office went from zero scrutiny actions to a heavy-handed approach against trafficking in illegal goods, including timber, without considering that many poor communities use the resources rationally, if not legally, was not the best way to enforce the law.Anaida Panting has welcomed the animals that are now recovering in Mabita, even if the community has to care for them. She says the national institutions only show up so that they see their faces and then disappear. The prosecutor’s office leaves the animals there, and the ICF assists in the transportation of the animals, but then they leave. Zelaya contends that they do their best, but sometimes they need to serve as mediators to prevent bigger problems.Panting says there will always be problems. She explained that weeks ago a young man stole a parrot egg, which can be sold in Nicaragua for 1,500 lempiras. Hunger also drives locals to become traffickers.Panting has built a strong link with the birds she looks after and tends to. Image by Martin Cálix/Contracorriente.Trafficking increases when foreigners arrive in Mabita to buy macaws. Investigations by the public prosecutor’s office show that different birds have been traded along the route that takes in the villages of Mocorón, Rus Rus and Leimus, and that a Chinese national was paying locals to steal hatchlings and eggs from the nests. The exchange means little money for locals and a lot for traffickers who sell the species in Europe, Asia and at home in Honduras. Locals who want to take care of the species are facing dangerous people.“Here if they kill a Miskito it’s as if they’d killed a chicken,” says a resident of Rus Rus, a Miskito village in Gracias a Dios. Some residents here have worked to protect the macaw, but they know that if they are threatened and killed so that trade can continue, their deaths won’t make the news.For the Maya peoples of Mesoamarica, the scarlet macaw is the forest protector, the incarnation of the sun. But today in the cities, the birds can only be seen in cages, and witnessing a macaw flying is almost a miracle. In Mabita, the miracle happens daily. Panting receives them and kisses them. Apu pauni pree palisa — “Scarlet macaw, fly free” — is written in Miskito language in signs around this community that barely receives visitors. The scarlet macaw flies free and returns to the arms of the people who rescued it.The yellow-naped parrot, the great green macaw, and the scarlet macaw find their last free territory in La Mosquitia, but wildlife trafficking in the area threatens the conservation of these species. Image by Martin Cálix/Contracorriente.Banner image: a scarlet macaw in Mabita. Image by: Martin Cálix – Contracorriente.This article was first published by Mongabay Latam. Edits by Philip Jacobson.last_img read more

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Deadly virus detected in wild frog populations in Brazil

first_imgResearchers have detected the first case of ranavirus infection in both native frog species as well as the invasive American bullfrog in the wild in Brazil.While the study cannot attribute ranavirus as the cause of death for the observed American bullfrog tadpoles, the findings suggest that ranavirus is spread in the wild, the researchers say.Ranavirus infections could be far more widespread in Brazil, and may have simply gone unnoticed until now, the researchers add. In November 2017, Joice Ruggeri and her colleagues came upon a pond with several dead tadpoles and a few dead fish in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, in southern Brazil. All the dead and dying animals had skin ulcers, with signs of hemorrhaging and edemas.When the researchers analyzed some of the dead tadpoles, they found that the animals were infected with ranavirus, a pathogen known to have contributed to mass die-offs of amphibians, fish and reptiles across the world. In Brazil, though, ranavirus infections have been linked to mass die-offs of only farmed tadpoles of the North American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeiana).A new study has now recorded the first case of the deadly virus in wild frog populations in the country, researchers report in the Journal of Wildlife Diseases.“There are not many reports on dead frogs in the wild, at least in Brazil, and I personally don’t recall of any report on a mass mortality event,” Ruggeri, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Campinas and lead author of the study, told Mongabay. “However, as ranavirus infection usually leads to a quick death, I wonder how many events like this one we have been missing.”Two killer diseases have been wiping out amphibians across the world. The chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has contributed to the decline of more than 500 amphibian species. And now, ranavirus is emerging as yet another deadly threat to wildlife; the virus is known to infect at least 175 species of amphibians, reptiles and fish.The American bullfrog, a species native to North America and introduced to more than 40 countries, has been implicated in the spread of both chytrid and ranavirus around the world.Brazil is a major producer of the bullfrog, with most farms located around the Atlantic Forest between Rio de Janeiro and Rio Grande do Sul. Several farms were abandoned in the early 1990s, however, and numerous captive bullfrogs are said to have escaped into the environment. Ruggeri and her colleagues suspect that feral bullfrog populations could be spreading ranavirus to frogs in the wild.After they chanced upon the pond with dead tadpoles, the researchers collected 18 seemingly healthy tadpoles of native species and four American bullfrog tadpoles — two dead and two lethargic individuals — from two separate ponds, and found that both the native and bullfrog tadpoles tested positive for ranavirus DNA. But whether the virus is definitively harming the animals is hard to say.“Our findings indicates that ranavirus is spread in the wild,” Ruggeri said. “But, no, we cannot attribute ranavirus as the cause of death [in case of the bullfrogs] without histopathologic examination.”Moreover, while the researchers detected the presence of ranavirus in tadpoles of native species, nothing is known about how susceptible they are to ranavirus infection. “We still have a lot to investigate in order to understand the real threat of ranavirus in Brazil,” Ruggeri said.Amanda Duffus, an associate professor and ranavirus expert at Gordon State College, who was not involved in the study, said the sample size of tadpoles analyzed was small but “diverse in terms of what families of amphibians were found to contain ranavirus DNA.”“It is not uncommon to find multiple species infected with ranavirus in an amphibian community and I am not surprised by this finding,” Duffus told Mongabay. “It is likely that ranavirus infections in Brazil are far more widespread and are potentially causing mortality events that are going unnoticed. Ranaviruses are globally distributed infections and with the global trade in amphibians, fish, and reptiles, no area is likely to be truly safe from this group of pathogens.”Ruggeri agreed that ranavirus infections may have gone undetected until recently because no one was looking for them. “Especially as chytridiomycosis has been the major concern to conservationists worldwide,” she added.Ruggeri and her colleagues are examining their samples in greater detail and hope to have some answers soon. “This ranavirus lineage could potentially be native to Brazil, which might explain why we detected low viral copies on native specimens,” she said. “We are working on genotyping some samples to see its phylogenetic position in the group.”Despite the small sample sizes in the study, the results are useful, Duffus said.“A high prevalence of Ranavirus in invasive populations of bullfrogs is a problem,” she said. “Ranavirus infection can lead to severe disease. It has been likened to ebola for ectotherms. In amphibians, the emergence of this infection can lead to population declines and even has the potential to lead to extinctions. This is something that needs to be taken quite seriously, as we are only beginning to understand the full extent of the effects of ranavirus infections and disease, and their potential interactions with other disease causing agents.”Researchers say that American bullfrogs that escaped from captivity in Brazil could have something to do with the spread of ranavirus in wild populations of frogs. Image by Carl D. Howe via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.5).Citation:Ruggeri, J., Ribeiro, L. P., Pontes, M. R., Toffolo, C., Candido, M., Carriero, M. M., … Toledo, L. F. (2019). First case of wild amphibians infected with Ranavirus in Brazil. Journal of Wildlife Diseases. doi:10.7589/2018-09-224 Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amphibians, Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Diseases, Environment, Forests, Frogs, Infectious Wildlife Disease, Research, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

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Orangutan habitats being cleared in areas near palm oil mills, report finds

first_imgArticle published by mongabayauthor Agriculture, Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Green, Logging, Mammals, Orangutans, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife A new study identifies the palm oil mills in Indonesia with the most clearance of orangutan habitat happening around them.The top 10 mills are all on the island of Borneo and are producing palm oil that makes its way into the supply chains of consumer goods giants such as Nestlé, Procter & Gamble, Kellogg’s, General Mills, Avon, Mars, Mondelēz and more ⁠— companies that promised long ago to stop buying palm oil linked to deforestation.Just because deforestation is happening around a palm oil mill does not mean it is being done by an entity supplying that mill with palm fruits. But it is a strong red flag that this may be the case.Several of the consumer goods giants contacted by Mongabay said they were either actively investigating the deforestation or suspending trading with the mills. Others were more vague in their responses. Rainforest clearance during the month of May destroyed orangutan habitat near 144 different palm oil mills in Indonesia, according to a report by MapHubs, an open-data platform and technology company that monitors natural resources.The top 10 mills, all located on the island of Borneo, lost an average of 104 hectares (257 acres) each. Among the companies that source their palm oil from these mills are household names such as Avon, Colgate-Palmolive, General Mills, Hershey, Kellogg’s, Mars, Mondelēz, Nestlé, Pepsico, Procter & Gamble, PZ Cussons, Reckitt Benckiser and Unilever.“The report is a risk analysis,” said Leo Bottrill, the founder and CEO of MapHubs. It’s intended to “highlight that both major traders and buyers with NDPE [no deforestation, no peat, no exploitation] policies, are buying from mills located in high risk areas for orangutan habitat clearance.”The 10 palm oil mills in Indonesia with the most orangutan habitat being destroyed around them are circled in red. Image courtesy of MapHubs.Just because the forest clearance takes place near a palm oil mill doesn’t mean it is being done in order to supply that mill, or even to plant oil palm. While some major buyers of palm oil have mapped out their supply chains to the mill level, untangling the ever-shifting networks of farms, plantations and brokers that sell to third-party mills is something no large firm has yet managed to do. But achieving this “full traceability” is critical if palm oil users are to prove their supply chains are free of deforestation and other ills.While some of the deforestation identified in the report occurred on lands licensed out to oil palm planters, others are happening in the surrounding forests, making it difficult to track who is responsible. Many mills process palm fruits sourced from smallholder plantations where ownership and land management agreements are often unclear.However, given that palm fruits begin to spoil within 24 hours of harvest, most are processed by mills within a 25-to-50-kilometer (15-to-30-mile) radius. Therefore, there is a high degree of probability that those responsible for clearing the forest, if they are doing so to plant oil palm, are banking on being able to sell their product to nearby mills. By identifying those mills now, the entities engaged in deforestation will learn that there is no nearby market for their crop, since most major consumers purchasing from those mills have established strongly worded zero-deforestation commitments that apply to their entire supply chain.In practical application, however, the level of engagement in the process — and response to allegations — varies significantly among the companies buying palm oil from these mills. While some rely on third-party certifications, other companies have signed on with monitoring systems that give them direct oversight of their entire supply chain. This additional step, they say, allows them respond more quickly and effectively to reports like this one.A palm oil mill in Indonesia. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Colgate-Palmolive, Nestlé, PZ Cussons and Reckitt Benckiser have each signed on with Starling, a service that uses satellites and remote sensing to monitor a company’s supply chain. Each of these companies told Mongabay they were actively investigating the deforestation, using their own satellite data to directly engage suppliers and clarify what actions will be taken.Nestlé said it had suspended trading with two of the mills, and was investigating the others named in the MapHubs report. PZ Cussons said it had already stopped sourcing from two mills, and was speaking with its suppliers about the others. Both Colgate-Palmolive and Reckitt Benkiser also said they were verifying the reports, and would terminate business with any company falling short of their no-deforestation commitments.While several other companies may not have the benefit of live monitoring, they did indicate they were actively responding to the MapHubs report. Unilever said it had already suspended one of the mills as a supplier due to previous violations, and was conducting further investigations to ensure the other mills are complying with its zero-deforestation commitment. Procter & Gamble also previously ended trading with three of the mills identified by MapHubs, but said it would look more closely at the others it still deals with. PepsiCo said it would thoroughly investigate the issue.Meanwhile, Kellogg’s responded to the report by simply reaffirming its commitment to sustainable palm oil, while General Mills said that since it had no evidence that the mills it sources from owned the concessions where deforestation was occurring, it did not consider the problem to be part of its supply chain.Avon, Mars and Mondelēz did not respond to Mongabay’s inquiries, while Hershey said it needed time to look into the issue.Palm oil producers Bunge, Musim Mas and Fuji Oil confirmed they were actively investigating the areas of deforestation identified in the report, and a few had entered the concerns into their formal grievance processes.Sime Darby, Bunge and Archer Daniels Midland each told Mongabay that while they had already suspended some of the mills for previous violations, they would make sure that those in proximity to these deforestation areas were not trading with third-party suppliers who were not in their tracking systems.An adult male Sumatran orangutan in Mount Leuser National Park. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Palm oil giant Wilmar said that any deforestation activities occurring on land directly within its supply chain were already being addressed as part of Wilmar’s grievance procedure, but that the firm could not be reasonably expected to investigate deforestation occurring near its mills without a clear understanding of land ownership and management oversight of an area.“As there continues to be a leakage market,” a spokesperson for Wilmar said, “where there is no scrutiny on those purchasing these excluded volumes, we will continue to see deforestation happening. This is not something that Wilmar alone can influence or stop.”Wilmar also said MapHubs’ reliance on mill proximity was “highly erroneous and misleading,” differing from its own monitoring program provided by Aidenvironment, a nonprofit consultancy that works with large firms.Golden Agri-Resources was also skeptical of the “guilty by proximity” link, pointing out that an area with a 25-kilometer radius was nearly three times the area of Singapore.“The result is predictable,” a spokesperson for Golden Agri said, “numerous incidents of deforestation will be detected around these mills. Investigating every single incident detected is neither practical nor a productive exercise.”While this sentiment may not be shared by every company, it gets at the heart of the issue: tracing the supply chain to just the mills is not sufficient. The web of middlemen, smallholders and interconnected companies makes it difficult but vital that palm oil consumers ensure accountability for the product from seed to shelf. And although mill proximity is a useful indicator for high risk of non-certified product leaking in, using proxies can shift focus from achieving true accountability.For example, PT Jabontara Eka Karsa (PT JEK), a mill located in Indonesian Borneo that supplies nearly all of the companies named above with palm oil, has the greatest amount of orangutan habitat in its vicinity. The MapHubs report flagged PT JEK due to the 442 hectares (1,092 acres) of forest that have been cleared this year by a nearby plantation owned by the Palma Serasih Group. PT JEK’s parent company, Kuala Lumpur Kepong, stringently denies that it sources palm oil from anyone but its own concessions, which finished their forest clearing in 2015. This leaves open the question of who Palma Serasih intends to sell its fruits to.Although there are limitations to using proximity as a proxy for responsibility, Bottrill said that since some 40 percent of oil palm fruits are supplied by smallholders, establishing direct links can be virtually impossible. However, he said he wishes that more companies with source data would be transparent about where their oil palm is being grown.“Companies and their consultants such as Aidenvironment have accurate concession data,” Bottrill said, yet “few, if any, have made this concession data publicly available, citing [intellectual property] concerns.” Palm oil producers Socfin and Neste have both publicly released concession maps, a trend Bottrill hopes catches on.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Amazon indigenous groups feel deserted by Brazil’s public health service

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon People, Controversial, Environment, Environmental Politics, Featured, Forests, Green, Health, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Public Health, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Until recently, hundreds of Cuban doctors staffed many remote indigenous health facilities in the Brazilian Amazon and around the nation, an initiative funded by the More Doctors program set up by President Dilma Rousseff in 2013.But far-right President Jair Bolsonaro radically restructured the program, and Cuba — calling Bolsonaro’s demands unreasonable — pulled its doctors out.That withdrawal heavily impacted indigenous groups. Of the 372 doctors working within indigenous communities, 301 were Cuban. The Ministry of Health says 354 vacancies have since been filled by Brazilian doctors, but indigenous communities say many new doctors are unwilling to stay long in the remote posts.Bolsonaro has hindered rural health care in other ways: 13,000 indigenous health workers have remained unpaid since February or April, depending on the region, after the Brazilian Minister of Health stopped providing resources to the 8 NGOs contracted to provide health services to 34 Special Sanitary Indigenous Districts. A deadly Amazon bushmaster (Lachesis muta) showing its fangs. Poisonous snakes present one of the greatest health hazards in the Brazilian Amazon, and yet some remote indigenous health centers lack the doctors and antivenom needed to treat snakebite. Image by Dick Culbert licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.Last February, a Mongabay reporting team travelled to the Brazilian Amazon, spending time with the remote Sateré-Mawé, documenting their culture and long-time conflict with mining companies and land grabbers. This series looks at new threats imposed on the Sateré and indigenous groups across Brazil as they’re threatened by the ruralist-friendly policies of President Jair Bolsonaro. The trip was funded by the Rainforest Journalism Fund in association with the Pulitzer Center and Mongabay. It was 10 o’clock in the morning when he felt the bite. Now, 20 minutes later, Raimundo, a Sateré indigenous man, lies ill at the foot of a copaiba tree and realizes the great danger he is in. Incapacitated within the vastness of the Amazon rainforest, medical help is many miles and hours away.“He saw [the snake] out of the corner of his eye, not long enough to see it properly, but thought it was a pit viper,” a deadly venomous snake, says his father-in-law.Raimundo lives in the indigenous village of Kuruatuba, within the Andirá-Marau indigenous reserve, on the banks of the Andirá River bordering Pará and Amazonas states. Most days Raimundo is up early, awaiting the first rays of sunlight before immersing himself in the forest, carrying on his back a jamanxim, a woven straw basket.He only returns home after filling the containers in his pack-basket with amapá milk and copaiba oil — fluids tapped from trees native to the Amazon basin, Copaifera and Brosimum, respectively. Copaiba oil is used by the perfume industry as a fixative, and in alternative medicine due to its anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties. Amapá milk is widely utilized regionally to treat gastritis and respiratory problems.But now Raimundo is in trouble, and could soon be dead.A boat used by an Amazon health care team. Image by Matheus Manfredini.Disappearing indigenous rural healthcareThe snakebite incident occurs deep in the forest, just as Raimundo is about to start work. The poison spreads rapidly throughout his body, making it difficult to walk. He realizes that, all alone in the forest, he may die. But, staggering down the path toward home, he is found by a relative. Together they get to the village by late afternoon.Kuruatuba is one of five villages possessing health centers along the upper reaches of the Andirá River. Cuban doctors used to staff these facilities, funded by the More Doctors program set up by the Dilma Rousseff government in 2013.But the program was radically restructured by President Jair Bolsonaro, who took office in January, and Cuba pulled its doctors out.Now the only facility staff are nurses and nursing assistants. The center is also short of drugs and doesn’t have snake antivenoms, as these have to be kept refrigerated, and the energy supplied by a diesel generator is intermittent. This is the reality, despite the fact that snakebite is one of the great risks of living in the remote Amazon.The nurses treat Raimundo as best they can. Then he sets off at dark with his father-in-law, a nursing assistant, and a pilot in a fast, motorized canoe on a 10-hour trip downriver to the nearest hospital at the port of Parintins on the Amazon River.He knows he could die on the way.Passengers aboard the ambulancha transporting Raimundo downriver were forced into the water to help move the boat past a fallen tree. Image by Matheus Manfredini.A dangerous journeyThe trip doesn’t go as planned. It’s dangerous to travel at night along Amazon rivers, something only done in emergencies.The boat hits a submerged obstacle, capsizes and sinks. The men struggle ashore. While the pilot and nursing assistant set out for help in Vila Nova, the nearest village, Raimundo and his father-in-law wait in the dark on the riverbank. They’re cold, bitten by mosquitoes and fearful of further encounters with poisonous snakes.“At this time of year, when the river is in flood, snakes generally stay on river banks at night,” explains the father-in-law. Raimundo feels his odds of survival sinking.Meanwhile, the pilot and nursing assistant make slow progress. There’s no path by the river, so they tread through the shallows, and swim when the water gets too deep. They spot another pit viper, this one in the water, but luckily escape without accident.They reach Vila Nova at 6am, then rush upstream by motorized canoe to rescue Raimundo. He’s still alive. They take him to another health center, where he’s transferred to a faster boat, an ambulancha, for transport to Parintins. But even then, the journey isn’t easy; passengers must at one point jump in the water and push the boat over a fallen tree.Finally, the ambulancha arrives at the hospital. It is mid-afternoon, almost 30 hours since Raimundo was bitten.Raimundo arrived at the hospital after a harrowing journey by boat through the Brazilian Amazon. It remains to be seen if the long delay before treatment will leave him permanently disabled. Image by Matheus Manfredini.Lack of healthcare can lead to disability — and self-sufficiencyRaimundo survives, but his chances of making a full recovery are remote. “In these cases, even when patients don’t die, they usually have to have a limb amputated or lose the use of a limb,” explains Daniel dos Santos, the pilot of the motorized canoe that took Raimundo on the first leg of his journey from Vila Nova to Parintins.This is what happened to Sônia Miquiles, who lives in Campo Branco, a small village on the banks of the Mariaquã River outside the boundaries of the Andirá-Marau indigenous reserve. While working away from her village at a subsistence farm plot, Sonia was bitten by a bushmaster, one of the Amazon’s deadliest snakes. She spent two months in hospital in Parintins. Against the odds, she survived, but her right hand was permanently paralysed.In the face of her daunting disability, Sonia taught herself ingenious methods for carrying out daily activities with one hand.Midwife Sonia Miquiles shows her hand, which was paralyzed due to a bushmaster snakebite. Image by Matheus Manfredini.It was with this hand that she personally birthed Christopher, the youngest of her children. As she worked the village’s plot early one morning, the infant’s time to be born arrived. When her contractions intensified, Sonia crouched down, and pulled the baby out of her own womb, cut the umbilical cord, then walked back to the village — her sixth child in her arms.Sonia’s mother had helped her when her first child was born, and she taught Sonia indigenous tricks for facilitating childbirth. Employing this ancient knowledge, Sonia was able to deliver her other children on her own.Her fame as a midwife grew and over the years she helped many other babies — the children of nieces, neighbors, daughters-in-law and others — to enter the world. Sonia explains a few techniques: sometimes she needs to invert the baby in the womb so that its head faces down, ready to arrive. She uses warm water to gently massage a pregnant woman’s belly, then it’s just a matter of waiting, she says. “Doctors don’t know any more how to turn a baby in the womb and they don’t like waiting.” This is why so many women must have C-sections, she maintains.Sonia doesn’t need doctors for childbirth, but she fears her children will die in a health emergency.“There is no health post here, no transport.… If someone gets seriously ill or has an accident, all that can save them is good luck,” she laments.Erasmo Batista de Oliveira, president of an indigenous health association active in the upper Andirá River basin. Image by Matheus Manfredini.Bolsonaro policies impacting indigenous medical careAccording to Erasmo Batista de Oliveira, president of an indigenous health association active in the upper Andirá River, the dire healthcare situation in rural areas isn’t much different in the five villages that possess heath centers. “With the withdrawal of the Cuban doctors, it’s become very difficult to help patients,” he says.The Cubans left the More Doctors program in November of last year when president-elect Bolsonaro proposed changes to the healthcare program that Cuba refused to accept. The ending of the program was widely expected, because Bolosnaro had frequently declared during his presidential campaign that he would “expel” the doctors, whom he denounced as “communist propaganda agents.” The Cuban health ministry says that, once in office, Bolsonaro questioned the qualifications of their doctors, demanding that they all acquire Brazilian diplomas and then be contracted individually — conditions that he must have known would be unacceptable to Havana.Indigenous villages felt the impact immediately. Of the 372 doctors working within indigenous communities, 301 were Cuban. According to the Ministry of Health, 354 vacancies have now been filled by Brazilians. But the Sateré-Mawé of the upper Andirá River say this isn’t their experience, as no doctors have filled their vacant health posts.Even when Brazilian doctors take up the jobs, they find it hard to adapt to the tough Amazonian way of life. As a result, many indigenous people say that the availability of care has declined. “The Brazilian doctors who replace the Cubans won’t stay here,” says Batista de Oliveira.“The Cubans came and spent 15 to 20 days here, without leaving,” explains Daniel dos Santos, who has provided transport for patients and health professionals for eight years. The Cubans “would go out of their way, at any time of day or night, to help a sick person. The Brazilian doctors who came to replace them spend two or three days here and became desperate to leave.”Daniel is one of 13,000 indigenous health workers who have remained unpaid since February or April, depending on the region, after the Brazilian Minister of Health, Luiz Henrique Mendetta, stopped providing resources to the eight civil society organizations contracted to provide health services to 34 Special Sanitary Indigenous Districts (DSEIs). For a few health workers, the budget freeze occurred back in October 2018.According to the health workers, along with their inability to pay their employees’ wages, some DSEIs don’t have the money for medication, fuel, medical tests, vaccinations and patient transport.The minister justified the drastic step of freezing resources by making vague unsubstantiated references to “corruption,” claiming that a great deal of money was spent on indigenous health, compared with the outlay on the rest of the Brazilian population, and that the system had to be restructured.As a result, it is alleged that at least three children died in the space of 11 days in April due to a lack of adequate care inside the Xingu Indigenous Park, located in Mato Grosso state, according to Repórter Brasil. In a press release, the Catholic Church’s Indigenous Council (CIMI) blamed Bolsonaro directly for the deaths, saying that it was unacceptable, in the name of policy reformulation, to allow more indigenous people to die — this being the minority group who, throughout the country’s history, had suffered most from the Brazilian state’s genocidal policies.On 1 August, the health ministry finally launched a new program to replace More Doctors; the ministry says it will be contracting 18,000 doctors,13,000 of whom will be sent to inaccessible municipal districts.Some analysts say the loss of the Cuban doctors and freezing of funds are part of a government plan to dismantle existing federal indigenous healthcare programs, and point to several pieces of evidence:Since taking office, minister Mandetta has pressed for the decentralization of indigenous healthcare. As part of that process, he initially planned to shut down SESAI (The Special Secretariat for Indigenous Health), forcing municipalities to take on the responsibility for indigenous healthcare in their areas.However, he withdrew this plan after more than 30 indigenous protests erupted in different parts of the country. But, to date, Mandetta has only partly fulfilled his promise to keep SESAI alive. Decree 9,795, issued by Bolsonaro in May, restructured the body, abolishing its democratic and participatory nature.Mandetta critics note that he is a ruralist, part of the lobbying group that has historically pushed for rural elites to take over indigenous lands in order to profit from expanded agribusiness and mining. Those critics point out that the loss of healthcare services weakens indigenous communities, potentially forcing them to rely on favors from companies and landowners for services that they should have as a right.“What we are seeing is a return to the policies of assimilation of the 1960s and 1970s, when the policy was to dismantle services, leaving these people in an extremely vulnerable situation, to make it easier to open up indigenous territory to mining,” says Roberto Liebgott, CIMI’s Southern Region coordinator.Dézio Barros operates a commercial boat service running between the town of Parintins and the Sateré-Mawé reserve. Image by Matheus Manfredini.Reshuffling healthcare agencies and prioritiesCurrently, Bolsonaro adiminstration officials are touting the “integration” of SESAI with the SUS, Brazil’s national health system. As part of this integration, the responsibilities of the federal indigenous health service would potentially be handed over to municipal governments, which, according to many analysts, would cause indigenous needs to be deprioritized over other populations.The Articulation of the Indigenous Peoples of Brazil (Apib), one of Brazil’s leading indigenous rights organizations, believes that placing SESAI under SUS, is a government strategy for forcing municipalization of healthcare.As policy attacks by the president and minister against the indigenous health service continue, the quality of already precarious medical assistance provided to indigenous people appears to be worsening.Dézio Barros, who runs a commercial boat service from Parintins to the Sateré-Mawé reserve, is in daily contact with indigenous people. He says he has witnessed desperate situations in recent months: “Imagine what it means to remove doctors from areas like this one, where a patient has to travel in a tiny riverboat, sitting in the sun and rain for 15 hours, until he or she reaches us and then has to face a journey of at least another 15 hours to get to a city.”So it is that Raimundo’s ordeal — requiring nearly 30 hours to reach a hospital for critical care — is by no means exceptional. Instead it appears to be emblematic of unfolding Bolsonaro government policies.Health center in Vila Nova village. Remote medical facilities that serve indigenous communities were once staffed by Cuban doctors, but the far-right Bolsonaro administration was suspicious of their “Communist” influence and revamped the system causing Cuba to withdraw its physicians. Image by Matheus Manfredini.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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’Rampant’ fishing continues as vaquita numbers dwindle

first_imgAn expedition surveying the Gulf of California for the critically endangered vaquita porpoise has reported seeing more than 70 fishing boats in a protected refuge.Vaquita numbers have been decimated in the past decade as a result of gillnet fishing for another critically endgangered species, the totoaba, a fish whose swim bladder can fetch more than $20,000 per kilogram ($9,000 per pound) in Asian markets.Local fishing organizations in the region say that the government has stopped compensating them after a gillnet ban, aimed at protecting the vaquita from extinction, went into effect in 2015. Scientists and conservation activists conducting a survey for the critically endangered vaquita in October witnessed more than 70 fishing boats within the porpoise’s protected Gulf of California refuge, according to the environmental NGO Sea Shepherd.“It is heartbreaking that with less than 20 vaquitas left, this small critical area is still impacted by gillnets,” Sea Shepherd campaigns director Lockhart MacLean said in a statement from the organization, which described the fishing activity as “rampant.”A vaquita swims in the Gulf of California. Image by Paula Olson/NOAA via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain).The vaquita (Phocoena sinus) is the smallest and most threatened of the world’s cetaceans, a group that also includes whales and dolphins. A 2019 study published in the journal Royal Society Open Science concluded that no more than 18 individuals survive in the upper reaches of Mexico’s Gulf of California, part of the Sea of Cortez wedged between Baja California and mainland Mexico.In 1997 vaquita likely numbered in the hundreds. But intense pressure on another critically endangered species, a fish called the totoaba (Totoaba macdonaldi), has had a devastating collateral effect on the porpoise. Totoaba swim bladders, prized for their purported medicinal value, sell for up to $20,000 per kilogram ($9,000 per pound) in markets in China and elsewhere in Asia. In the past decade, gillnets set by illegal fishers to feed skyrocketing demand have snagged and drowned countless vaquita.The Mexican government banned gillnets in the vaquita’s habitat temporarily in 2015 and then permanently in 2016. But fishers have continued to use the method in the pursuit of totoaba and other fish species. The 2019 study reports that 10 vaquita are known to have died in gillnets between 2016 and 2019, and the population continued to sink during that period.A vaquita swims near a fishing boat using gillnets. Image courtesy of CONANP/Museo de la Ballena/SEA SHEPHERD.The boats, or pangas, seen by Sea Shepherd and its expedition partners, Mexico’s National Commission on Protected Areas (CONANP) and the Museo de la Ballena, were reportedly using gillnets to go after shrimp, chano and corvina, not totoaba. But the team worried that the end result could be the same.“Unfortunately, these pangas are exactly where we saw the remaining vaquitas during the last sighting voyage,” Octavio Carranza, a Sea Shepherd captain, said in the statement. “This is also where we found a dead vaquita tangled in a gillnet a few months ago.”Local fishermen, however, say they’ve been left with little choice.“We want the United Nations to know that the fishing sector in our community went out fishing without respecting agreements or protected areas as a result of the lack of attention and dialogue the federal Government has given to this issue,” Ramón Franco, the president of a Baja-based fishing cooperative, said in the statement.The expedition’s crew surveys the Gulf of California for vaquita. Image courtesy of CONANP/Museo de la Ballena/SEA SHEPHERD.As part of the ban, the Mexican government was supposed to compensate fishers who lost income because they could no longer use gillnets. But those payments reportedly stopped by early 2019, Sea Shepherd said. That’s led to frustration among law-abiding fishers, as those willing to flout the rules continue to profit from gillnet fishing, said Carlos Tirado, the leader of a regional group of fishing cooperatives.“We are between a rock and a hard place: between organized crime and the problems derived from illegal activities in the area, and pressure towards the commercial fishing sector by the government,” Tirado said in the statement. “Those most affected are our fishing organizations that stick to the rules. Those who most benefit are the illegal fishers.”He called on Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador to address the matter immediately. In mid-October, the federal government announced that it would “strengthen surveillance” in the marine reserve, according to the newspaper Excélsior, but the article did not mention whether the government would start handing out compensation payments again.The Farley Mowat, a Sea Shepherd vessel, pictured during the survey in the Gulf of California. Image courtesy of CONANP/Museo de la Ballena/SEA SHEPHERD.Despite the sighting of so many fishing boats carrying nets that could be lethal to the vaquita, the fact that the vaquita is persisting in the area has buoyed hopes for the survival of the species. In September, crew members spotted vaquita pairs on three different occasions.“Under the current circumstances, the most important piece of information right now is that there are still vaquitas surviving,” Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho, one of the expedition’s chief scientists who leads marine mammal research at CONANP, said in the statement. “[H]opefully we can track the lives of these few fit individuals and protect them exactly where they are.”Banner image of a fishing skiff, or panga, in the Gulf of California courtesy of CONANP/Museo de la Ballena/SEA SHEPHERD.Citations:Findley, L. (2010). Totoaba macdonaldi. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, 8235, 8. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2010-3.RLTS.T22003A9346099.enJaramillo-Legorreta, A. M., Cardenas-Hinojosa, G., Nieto-Garcia, E., Rojas-Bracho, L., Thomas, L., Ver Hoef, J. M., … Tregenza, N. (2019). Decline towards extinction of Mexico’s vaquita porpoise (Phocoena sinus). Royal Society Open Science, 6(7), 190598. doi:10.1098/rsos.190598Rojas-Bracho, L., & Taylor, B. L. (2017). Phocoena sinus, Vaquita. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, e.T17028A5, 12. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2017-2.RLTS.T17028A50370296.enFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Animals, China wildlife trade, China’s Demand For Resources, Conservation, Crime, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Crime, Fish, Fishing, Gillnets, Green, Illegal Fishing, Mammals, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Crisis, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Mammals, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Overexploitation, Overfishing, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Traditional Medicine, Wildlife Crime last_img read more

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The fight is on to save the last clean waterway in Brazil’s Manaus

first_imgJó Farah, president of Mata Viva, a local NGO, fights to save a stream called Água Branca, which means “white water,” that he says is the last clean waterway, or igarapé, in the city of Manaus, the capital of Brazil’s Amazonas state.Once used for leisure, navigation and fishing, almost all of the 150 igarapés in Manaus are totally polluted, with experts saying it could take up to 30 years for them to recover, while others are considered “dead.”Igarapés are important for natural drainage during rainy season, experts say. They warn the problems of flooding will only get worse over time, especially with climate change and related extreme weather conditions, if the issue not addressed properly. MANAUS, Brazil — At the heart of the Brazilian Amazon, Jó Farah wades knee-deep through the crystal water of a stream that he claims is the last clean one in the city of Manaus, the capital of Amazonas state.A stream or a little river is called an igarapé in the Amazon region, and this specific one  is known as Água Branca, which means “white water” and stretches over Manaus’s Tarumã neighborhood.“What keeps an igarapé clean? It needs forest, an area of 100 meters [330 feet] of each side in order to keep the water springs alive,” said Farah, the president of Mata Viva, a local NGO working in the region for 19 years. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Karla Mendes Jó Farah, president of NGO Mata Viva, taking care of the Igarapé Água Branca, the last clean stream in Manaus, the capital of Amazonas state, in the Amazon region. Image by César Nogueira.But this condition hasn’t been respected, he said.With a population of more than 2 million, Manaus is the most populous city in the Brazilian Amazon, surrounded by the world’s greatest tropical forest and connected by tributaries to the mighty Amazon River.Once used for leisure, navigation and fishing, today, almost all of the city’s 150 igarapés are totally polluted with trash and other waste, according to activists, residents and the local government.Overview of Igarapé Educandos, in the Southern area of Manaus. Image by César Nogueira.Experts say that it will take to at least 20 to 30 years for the waterways to recover; some, referred to as “dead igarapés,” are nearly beyond saving as their springs have been blocked with trash or soil.“The dead igarapés of Manaus, they died silently. [But] this igarapé has a voice,” Farah said.Farah, a former journalist, maintains a website that updates and monitors the state of the igarapé Água Branca, a form of online activism that he says helps keep the igarapé “alive.”Today, as a result, the igarapé has attracted researchers from across the city and is monitored remotely by the Federal University of Amazonas (UFAM), which keeps track of its water levels.Disordered growthManaus’s population grew rapidly from the 1970s with the opening of its free-trade zone and thousands of factory jobs. Lacking housing options, many migrants built their homes on the edges of the city’s igarapés.Today, perhaps the city’s most emblematic example is the Igarapé Educandos, which flows into the Rio Negro, Manaus’s main river and source of water. During the dry season, the Educandos recedes and it’s possible to see all of the trash that has been dumped in it.Another is the Igarapé do 40, which last year was photographed and published in the local media with what was described as a “carpet” of garbage floating on top.“Apart from the natural beauty, we are losing opportunities for transport and tourism by not caring adequately for the igarapés,” said Marcos Castro, a professor of geography at UFAM.Marcos Castro, a professor of geography at the Federal University of Amazonas (UFAM), poses for a photo in the riverbank of Igarapé Educandos in the city of Manaus. Image by César Nogueira.Igarapés are important for natural drainage during rainy season, experts say. According to Castro, flooding in the city will only get worse over time, especially with climate change and related extreme weather conditions, if not addressed properly.“This will lead to greater public health problems in the long run,” he said, citing diseases that proliferate with dirty waters.Castro’s statement rings true for Manaus resident Cristina Santos, who lives in a favela community in the Raiz neighborhood, an hour’s drive from Manaus’s famous Amazon Theatre.Santos, 35, is one of thousands of manauaras — as people from Manaus are called —living in precarious dwellings such as stilt homes by the edges of the city’s igarapés.Each year during the Amazon’s rainy season from November to April, her wooden shack floods as the igarapé fills and overflows.“People’s belongings get damaged … it’s very dirty and full of animals: snakes, frogs, and rats … our health suffers, and we get sick,” Santos said.“We residents have to be more aware and not throw stuff into the igarapé,” she said, pointing the riverbanks covered in trash, “but we need the government’s help too.”Manaus resident Cristina Santos poses for a photo in the favela community where she lives, in the Raiz neighborhood, an hour’s drive from Manaus’s famous Amazon Theatre. Image by César Nogueira.Housing shortfallManaus has a chronic shortfall of affordable housing, and as the richest city in the Amazon it continues to attract thousands of rural migrants from far-flung interior towns, as well as recent waves of Haitians and Venezuelans fleeing civil strife.Many of the poorest end up living in informal settlements like Cristina’s, or setting up new ones, that lack adequate sewage and waste disposal infrastructure.“Each year in Manaus, the number of informal settlements grows,” said Antonio Nelson de Oliveira, the city’s secretary for the environment and sustainability. “This causes great damage to the igarapés.”Polluted igarapé in the Raiz neighborhood, in the outskirts of Manaus. Image by César Nogueira.But in many poor neighborhoods of Manaus, residents have more immediate concerns than keeping the igarapés clean.The night before Mongabay visited Cristina’s neighborhood, residents said, there was gunfire and rumors that a young man had been killed in a drug gang dispute.Manaus is trapped in an ongoing drug war, commanded from the city’s notorious prisons and mainly fought in the city’s poorer communities, between gangs vying for control of local markets and trafficking routes.Opposite the favela where Cristina lives, low-income buildings built under a state government program to rehouse residents living by the edges of the rivers eject domestic sewage, untreated, into the igarapé.“This is the scenario of Manaus,” said Sergio Bringel, a water expert with Brazil’s National Amazon Research Institute (INPA).But it’s not just poor neighborhoods that pollute the igarapés. According to experts, the vast amount of Manaus’ sewage goes untreated.“Factories and luxury condominiums also pollute the igarapés,” said Castro, the UFAM professor.The result, Bringel says, is both organic and chemical contamination. “This leads to the creation of new bacteria … viruses which can be deadly, especially for children, have already been detected,” he added.Increasing threatsPolluted igarapés also threaten livelihoods, especially in a city that relies on water for many leisure activities, residents say.Dorio Farias, 59, the owner of a natural swimming bath that charges for entranceon the northern outskirts of the city, said he was worried pollution encroaching into his pool.“I don’t know how much longer we will be able to stay open here,” he said.Just a 10-minute drive from igarapé Água Branca, the Tarumã waterfall provides a frightening contrast.Used by Manaus residents up until the 1990s as a leisure option, today it is polluted, foul smelling, and the preferred spot for the disposal of dead bodies by criminals, according to residents.“They built a road directly over the waterfall’s spring. I don’t think anywhere else in the world they would do this,” Farah said.Overview of the Igarapé Água Branca, the last clean stream in the city of Manaus, the capital of Amazonas state, in the Amazon region. Image by César Nogueira.With the construction of the road, he said, came the formation of irregular settlements in the surrounding region, which polluted the water.“If a heritage site like this with all of its tourist potential doesn’t survive the city,” Farah said, “what hope does igarapé Água Branca have?”Banner image caption: FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Deforestation, Environment, Flooding, Forests, Green, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon last_img read more

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‘Rediscovered’ after 100 years, Gurney’s pitta is in peril once again

first_imgCitations:Shwe, N. M., Sukumal, N., Grindley, M., & Savini, T. (2019). Is Gurney’s pitta Hydrornis gurneyi on the brink of extinction? Oryx, 54(1), 16-22. doi:10.1017/s0030605318001242Eames, J. C., Hla, H., Leimgruber, P., Kelly, D. S., Aung, S. M., Moses, S., & Tin, U. S. N. (2005). Priority contribution. The rediscovery of Gurney’s Pitta Pitta gurneyi in Myanmar and an estimate of its population size based on remaining forest cover. Bird Conservation International, 15(1), 3-26. doi:10.1017/s095927090500002xRound, P. D., & Treesucon, U. (1986). The rediscovery of Gurney’s Pitta. Forktail. 2, 53-66.Update January 08, 2020: the IUCN Red List recently uplisted Gurney’s pitta from Endangered to Critically Endangered, in part due to the study’s results. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Interns, Logging, Plantations, Rainforest Destruction, Research, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Article published by Shreya Dasgupta The last remaining habitat of the rare Gurney’s pitta in Myanmar is fast disappearing, a new study has found.Between 1999 and 2017, more than 80% of the bird’s habitat in Myanmar’s southern Tanintharyi region was lost, mostly due to clearance for oil palm plantations.The researchers also found no evidence of the bird’s presence in 101 of 142 local sites where it had previously been observed.The study calls for the IUCN to reclassify Gurney’s pitta as critically endangered. Gurney’s pitta may be running out of time.The tiny, vibrantly colored bird, first described from the Tanintharyi region of Myanmar in 1875, was thought to have gone extinct when it wasn’t recorded by scientists for more than a century. But in 1986, researchers found a population of Gurney’s pitta (Hydrornis gurneyi) in Thailand. Then in 2003, the IUCN downlisted the bird from critically endangered to endangered after a preliminary survey estimated the population in Myanmar was at least double the 11 pairs previously assumed. For a while, things looked hopeful for the pitta.Today, however, the Thai population of Gurney’s pitta is all but wiped out, researchers say. And the Myanmar population is also in trouble, thanks to deforestation clearing one of the bird’s last remaining habitats, a new study has found.Named after the British politician and amateur ornithologist John Henry Gurney in 1843, the pitta is locally known as the black-belly bird in Thai (นกแต้วแร้วท้องดำ). In addition to its distinctive black stomach, the attractive male pitta has lemon-yellow sides and a crown of bright blue plumage — features that earned it the title of the “most wanted bird in Thailand” in 2008 from birdwatchers.The pitta’s bright plumage has also made it a victim of the international pet trade. Prior to the 1980s, when the scientific community thought the species was extinct, animal dealers reported to scientists that up to 50 pittas were being sold annually into the pet trade. The researchers used this information to find the Thai population in 1986.“Hunting and poaching remains a significant problem,” Anuj Jain, the Asia coordinator for extinction prevention at the U.K.-based BirdLife International, who was not involved in the new study, told Mongabay in an email. “Local villagers hunt for subsistence but armed Thai poachers enter the area to poach indiscriminately.”Gurney’s pitta is typically not a poacher’s main target, Jain added, but since it’s a ground-dwelling bird feeding mostly on earthworms, it can get trapped in ground nets intended for other species like pangolins.Female Gurney’s Pitta in Thailand. Image by Francesco Veronesi via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.0).But poaching isn’t the only threat to the pitta’s existence. Deforestation, particularly to make way for oil palm plantations, has been wiping out the bird’s habitat. In the Tanintharyi region of Myanmar, at least 10 percent of the total land area has been set aside for oil palm cultivation.In the latest study, researchers found that in 1999, when oil palm expansion into the region began, there was around 3,225 square kilometers (1,245 square miles) of potential habitat for the pitta in south Tanintharyi, an area the size of Yosemite National Park. By 2017, there was only 656 km2 (253 mi2) of suitable forest habitat left — a decrease of 80%.“The major cause of habitat loss in Myanmar — as previously in Thailand — has been the expansion of commercial plantations,” Nay Myo Shwe, lead author of the study, told Mongabay in an email. “Especially oil palm, which targets and clears the lowland forest habitat on which this species depends.”From January to October 2016, Shwe and his team also visited 142 sites where researchers had previously observed Gurney’s pittas. The birds are highly secretive, with each individual occupying a territory of only 0.04 km2 (0.015 mi2). They do, however, respond to call playback during mating season, which the researchers used. The team also tried to capture images of the pittas with remote camera traps and used tiny radio tracking collars to document the range of individual birds.“The species covers a large area, most of which can be reached and surveyed only on foot,” Shwe said. “The bird is very elusive and field observations are therefore very rare, even when attracting it by playing the mating call.”The survey results were telling. The team found suitable forest and detected the pitta in only 41 locations. At 101 of the sites, the researchers saw no sign of the pitta or the forests it had once inhabited; the areas had been logged, degraded, or otherwise cleared of the closed canopy forest that the pitta prefers. The bird seemed to be absent from 71 percent of its former range.“While working in southern Tanintharyi in 2015 and 2016, it was devastating to see the extent of habitat loss and to realize so many Gurney’s pitta have probably been lost, along with countless other species,” Shwe said.Palm oil plantation abutting natural forest (for representation only). Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.The southern Tanintharyi region is also home to species such as the Malay tapir (Tapirus indicus), Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica), and Lar gibbon (Hylobates lar). These endangered and critically endangered animals are also at risk if rapid deforestation continues.The politics of the Tanintharyi region complicates conservation efforts.“Our last hope of protecting the species is in the Lenya and Ngawun forest landscape in the Tanintharyi region of Myanmar,” Jain said. “The situation is exacerbated by the fact that the area is not a protected area with different areas being managed by the Forest Department and the Karen National Union (KNU).”The KNU is a political entity seeking greater autonomy for the Karen ethnic group from the Myanmar government, having previously waged an armed conflict for independence. Although both groups signed a cease-fire agreement and peace negotiations are ongoing, some tensions remain. In 2018, the Guardian reported that the U.K.-based conservation group Fauna & Flora International (FFI) had attempted to create a protected area in Tanintharyi without prior consultation with the KNU and met opposition from villagers fearing displacement and loss of access to their ancestral lands.But despite their ambivalence toward protected areas implemented by foreign NGOs, groups such as the Conservation Alliance of Tanawthari (CAT), a coalition of Karen community organizations, are dedicated to protecting their environment.“Without [indigenous] communities, the globally important forests of Tanintharyi region would have disappeared long ago,” the CAT said in a recent report.“It is very challenging, but the engagement work we have undertaken means the local stakeholders — including the government and Karen forest departments and civil society groups for example — are all in agreement that protecting this species from extinction is important,” Shwe said.In late 2018, working with its in-country partner, Biodiversity And Nature Conservation Association (BANCA), BirdLife updated the Gurney’s pitta conservation action plan. This is to be followed by a three-year project to protect the bird by developing a joint management agreement for the Lenya Reserve Forest with both the Myanmar government and the KNU, aligning with the new plan. The project will also attempt to halt the expansion of any large-scale plantations into the Lenya and Nagawun reserve forests, with a focus on community resource management. Lenya and Nagawun are dense evergreen rainforests with extremely high biodiversity, among the last contiguous spans of forest of this type in mainland Southeast Asia.While BirdLife and BANCA put their project into action, Shwe said he wants to confirm the pitta’s dwindling numbers. The size of the remaining Gurney’s pitta population is unknown, and Shwe’s paper calls for the IUCN to change the bird’s status to critically endangered again. His team will conduct a wider distribution and status survey next breeding season, from March to May 2020, by including interested local community groups, civil society, academia, and bird tour operators. [Update, January 08, 2020: the IUCN Red List recently uplisted Gurney’s pitta from Endangered to Critically Endangered, in part due to the study’s results].“We are currently asking groups if they would be willing to join with us in that effort,” he said.The rediscovery of Gurney’s pitta once renewed hope for the species. With the pitta in peril once again, it remains to be seen whether the new action plan can help halt the decline.Male Gurney’s pitta in Thailand. Image by Michael Gillam via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0)last_img read more

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Import Shane Edwards rescues Ginebra in tune-up win over TNT

first_imgJo Koy draws ire for cutting through Cebu City traffic with ‘wang-wang’ Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina View comments Aguilar shot 11 of his 15 points in the fourth quarter while Mercado posted all of his nine points in that period.The Gin Kings, who are still without the injured Greg Slaughter, also overcame a 33-point effort by KaTropa import Jeremy Tyler, who dominated the paint.Terrence Romeo added 17 points for TNT while Troy Rosario and Jayson Castro scored 13 and 12 points, respectively.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next P16.5-M worth of aid provided for Taal Volcano eruption victims — NDRRMC Scientists seek rare species survivors amid Australia flames Gilas pool member Edu commits to NCAA D1 school University of Toledo Truck driver killed in Davao del Sur road accident Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Green group flags ‘overkill’ use of plastic banderitas in Manila Sto. Niño feast Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Shane Edwards, who is filling in for Justin Brownlee, scored five of Ginebra’s last six points inside the final minute, including the go-ahead two-handed dunk, 99-98, with 27.5 seconds left.“We knew that Tyler was guarding him so we just try to get him into an isolation situation and beat him to the basket and that’s what he did,” Cone said, recalling Edwards’ game-winning slam.Edwards, who hit a wide-open 3-pointer to trim TNT’s lead down to one with 57 ticks to go, finished with 25 points.“He causes a lot of mismatch problems whether the imports gonna guard him or the locals gonna guard him so and he was very successful here with Alaska and that’s why we got attracted to him,” added Cone.Ginebra also drew significant contributions from Japeth Aguilar and Sol Mercado, who sparked the comeback from nine points down.ADVERTISEMENT The Kings played catchup nearly the entire second half before outplaying the KaTropa down the stretch to win, 100-98, before a packed crowd at Upper Deck gym. Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ MOST READ Edwards blows past Tyler for the go-ahead dunk, 99-98, with 27.5 ticks left. Ginebra crowd here at Upper Deck erupts. #PBA pic.twitter.com/5OdqCGRFos— MG (@MarkGiongcoINQ) April 14, 2018Barangay Ginebra coach Tim Cone was in a frown, his lips were curled and shook his head repeatedly for the most part of the Gin Kings’ tune-up game against TNT on Saturday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownCone, however, still had a reason to smile about.ADVERTISEMENT Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

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Speech Marking the Induction of Officers, Professional School of Journalism, Thomas P….

first_imgSchool Authorities; Students; Newly Inducted Leaders; Guests; Ladies & Gentlemen:Participating in this activity is very special to me for two reasons – It is aimed towards making better journalists in Liberia – the primary responsibility I have as president of the Press Union of Liberia; and 2- to provide admonition for young people who are taking up leadership roles in this critical period in our country. I hope we can generate a useful conversation.We often repeat the rhetoric of Liberia being a post-conflict society. This couldn’t be further from the truth. However, we believe this should not be the end of the road. We must go forward. That leads us to the obligation of reconstructing, developing and safeguarding ourselves from going down memory lane to repeat what we lost out on.The truth is – we see a number of construction activities going on. But do they really and conclusively define our post-conflict reality? I leave the answer for a continuous process. We should, however, be more interested in ensuring the appropriate legal and operating environment that permits us free space for impartial governance, opportunities for citizen participation and evolution of the society based on the needs and aspirations of the people.Specifically, the legal reforms in our country are expressed through the ongoing constitution review process. Many of us see the current constitution through our parochial lenses – identifying issues that affect our views and at times ignoring those that do not directly affect us – though they may be hurting others.The challenge here is for all Liberians to begin to think beyond our current and comfort zones – and to consider for a moment:Why some people opt to run motorcycle taxis for a living?- despite unlawful and thoughtless restrictionsWhy others walk for miles on end daily selling cheap wares? – simply to raise some money to afford food for their kidsBoth issues relate to poverty, and none of us can doubt that. The obligation therefore, is for each of us to recognize that poverty is not necessarily the outcome of laziness, but there are instead inherent practices and actions by those in high and powerful positions that effectively keep others on the margins of life. Until we address these imbalances, we cannot expect to make Liberia better.Moving forward with this is greatly tied to the structures we have in place to enhance democracy and development in our country.Reference the constitution review process, I like to note that our current laws were an attempt to provide more integration in Liberian society, but unfortunately there remain many sections of the law that still point at exclusion – the same situation that informed the need for a constitution in the first place. The Constitution Review process must therefore take steps to reduce exclusion from our national polity. That is – reduce specters of conspiracy and strengthen our drive to prevent future conflicts. That includes preventing the renewal of any laws that unduly limit people in the exercise of their choices and freedom. Lest we forget, limiting freedoms may end up limiting creativity and innovation that are necessary for fueling development – and growing wealth.Added to these are laws that criminalize dissent – thus the need to rework our country into a clear and present democracy. We can however be hopeful that more persons are now enlightened and determined to be heard and to participate in the Liberian processes.Mr. President & Officers, Ladies & Gentlemen:The development programs – on the other hand – are reflected through a number of measures, including the administration led Poverty Reduction Strategy and the Agenda for Transformation; the Central Bank enhanced microcredit programs; the County Development Fund and even the proposed District Impact Funds. As flawed as we may consider several or all of these plans, we must however accept that they also include inherent benefits, which can be better understood through dialogue.That is why we believe that regardless of the faults of anyone’s ideas, criticism, engagements, etc. – once they do not call for and or drive towards outright war and destruction, they must be allowed the space. As offensive as their comments may seem, they should not be discounted at face value or the proponents punished on account of their propositions. This is because we must all accept that life (including Liberia) must be viewed as a kaleidoscope that works effectively with all components engaged.This drives us to the key purpose of this gathering – the induction of officers of a journalism students’ leadership.Leaders must maintain a constructive dialogue with the people they serve, so that the legacy of their leadership will reflect the needs and aspirations of the people – members – customers – occupants – employees – subjects – citizens, etc. Anything other than that is a waste of precious time.This is true irrespective of any such leadership being in a village, academic community, business organization or even at the supra national level.Specifically – at the student level, like in your case – the onus is on you a lot more to engage with your colleagues in driving programs that will make your educational pursuit and leadership experiences meaningful and productive. We challenge you to do just that! You will learn later, and must already be witness to the fact that maintaining such dialogues in leadership inspires the trust and confidence of your people.Reference the other part of this activity – the journalism development segment – we will note that journalism is a professional and noble service that thrives on reporting truth. When a journalist loses sight of the truth, his worth has been washed out and he should perhaps seek out another vocation – i.e- do anything that you consider worthwhile. I at times sarcastically say to others – become a tailor or mason. Truth however is once the people you work for lose faith in you, they will find other tailors or masons.Truth, however, is obviously quite easy. We however and often ignore it on account of our selfishness, greed, dishonesty, disregard for the rights and opportunities of our compatriots, and in fact a total lack of nationalism and patriotism. Journalists must avoid such circumstances.On the other hand, journalism is a human right – informed by various national and international instruments which guarantee our right to freely express ourselves on issues and choices – irrespective of the conditions and circumstances.While various countries try to place caveats to limit the space for journalists to operate, there are still a lot of forward thinking people who maintain that attempts to limit this right should only be restricted to extreme security circumstances. Notwithstanding, there are various professional ethics that guide people in the practice of this craft – towards keeping activities in good taste. Among other issues in media ethics are keeping solidarity with others who aspire to enjoy free expression; providing others reasonable opportunities to respond to issues involving their roles, characters, etc; protecting subjects from scorn and respecting the choices of all.This is necessary because a professional journalist has the obligation to provide space for all, and that cannot be easily possible, if you have a case against certain people, practices or concerns.The Press Union of Liberia is dedicated to supporting your group as it strives to produce professional journalists. As a freedom of expression organization, we are determined to stand up with all to freely express themselves, help secure the space for the enjoyment of this right, and help improve their professionalism.We welcome the establishment of the journalism training program, and we invite you to partner with us in helping to make your programs conform with best practice. We note that once you are determined to participate in journalism, you can go on and achieve laurels, whether we like it or not. Therefore, we have made our role one that will partner with all, and help you become more professional.Also, we invite you to seek membership in the Press Union of Liberia – to strengthen your solidarity in media practice, and to improve your confidence and professionalism as journalists.Over the coming period, we commit to assisting in the review of your curriculum, methodologies, students and diversity – in the hope that you will grow into a more professional program.Thank You!Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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BYC in 4th Position at WAFU Tourney

first_imgIt was Ghana League Champions Wa All Stars that beat Barrack Young Controllers 2-1 to claim 3rd Place (bronze) at the just ended West African Football Union (WAFU) invitational tournament in Dakar.The Liberian Champions finished in the 4th position. The Ghanaian side lost 3-0 to Ivorian Champions, AS Tanda, in the semi-finals and came back to defeat Barrack Young Controllers for the 3rd Place.It was BYC that surprisingly knocked Kotoko out of the CAF Champions League in 2014. They were behind 1-0 in the first half and got the equalizer in the second half through David Tweh’s strike after a clever play from Sam Jackson.But the Ghanaian side came back to snatch the winner with a late goal.The four-team tournament which also featured US Goree from Senegal was sponsored by FOX Sports TV Network of Los Angeles, United States.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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