Conservation tech prize with invasive species focus announces finalists

first_imgAcoustic, Agriculture, algae, Artificial Intelligence, cameras, Conservation Technology, Drones, early warning, Frogs, Insects, Invasive Species, Monitoring, Oceans, Sensors, surveys, Technology, Turtles And Tortoises, Wildtech The Con X Tech Prize announced its second round will fund 20 finalists, selected from 150 applications, each with $3,500 to create their first prototypes of designs that use technology to address a conservation challenge.Seven of the 20 teams focused their designs on reducing impacts from invasive species, while the others addressed a range of conservation issues, from wildlife trafficking to acoustic monitoring to capturing freshwater plastic waste in locally-built bamboo traps.Conservation X Labs (CXL), which offers the prize, says the process provides winners with very early-stage funding, a rare commodity, and recognition of external approval, each of which has potential to motivate finalists and translate into further funding.Finalists can also compete for a grand prize of $20,000 and product support from CXL. The Con X Tech Prize just announced its second round will be funding 20 finalists each with $3,500 to create their first prototypes. Some 150 teams submitted ideas that use technology to address a conservation challenge. The 20 winners of this first stage of the competition will also compete for a grand prize of $20,000, plus support from CXL on product development and attracting investment.The prize accepts ideas for any conservation problem, with a particular focus on addressing threats from a specific theme. This second round of the prize focused on reducing impacts from invasive species to native species and ecosystems. The first round, sponsored in 2018, focused on ocean conservation.Biotech Steve Orwig removes an invasive Mexican weeping pine (Pinus patula) from the crater of Hawai’i’s Haleakalā National Park. Pines like these grow rapidly, are spread by wind from nearby forest plantings, and disrupt native ecosystems by shading out native shrubs and taking up water and nutrients. Image courtesy of U.S. National Park Service.“We have a range of hardware and software solutions we are funding, including tools in aquatic invasive species, camera traps, ag-tech, human-wildlife conflict, marine acoustics, and many more,” said Tom Quigley, who manages the digital makerspace community at Conservation X Labs, which offers the prize. “It’s a really exciting cohort.”Seven of the 20 finalists focused specifically on designs to address invasive species, while the remaining 13 teams sought to address a range of conservation issues, from wildlife trafficking to acoustic monitoring to capturing freshwater plastic waste in locally-built bamboo traps.The projects specifically addressing invasive species proposed a wide range of ideas to address an equally wide range of associated problems. They include:1. Pig-finding drone-based thermal cameras to conserve critically endangered giant tortoises on Santa Cruz island in the Galápagos by finding feral pigs that dig up tortoise nests and eat their eggs, which has prevented hatching of new generations of tortoises. The camera, equipped with machine learning algorithms, would also detect tortoise nests to help Galápagos National Park rangers find and protect them on the ground.Santa Cruz giant tortoise (Chelonoidis porteri) in Santa Cruz Island, Galápagos National Park, Ecuador. Invasive pigs and dogs destroy nests of giant tortoises, hindering recovery of tortoise populations from prior hunting and habitat loss. Image by Bernard Gagnon via Wikimedia Commons, CC 4.0.2. A mobile machine unit to remove invasive plants that have taken over grasslands in India’s protected areas, facilitated by local wood harvest, leaving elephants in parks without food and thus more likely to approach adjacent human crop fields, causing conflict. The repurposed commercially available charcoal producer would pick invasive plants, crush them into sawdust, and form usable charcoal briquettes from the dust to reduce the demand for fuelwood.3. Helping reduce the lionfish population off the Florida coast by connecting divers with fish processors through an online platform to facilitate processing of the small volumes of this highly invasive predatory fish caught by divers. Demand for the fish beyond Florida exceeds production, so the platform would also encourage more local processors.4. Remote amphibian refuges in Guatemala to attract frogs, using call playbacks, to a small tube-shaped container with a tiny pool and an Arduino computing unit inside. The unit has sensors that notify nearby researchers they’ve caught a frog, so they can identify it and determine if it carries invasive chytrid fungus.A Guatemalan spikethumb frog (Plectrohyla guatemalensis). Finding frogs at night when they are active is difficult, so researchers are seeking to attract them to tiny refuges where they can be identified and checked for invasive chytrid fungus. Image by Josiah H. Townsend, http://calphotos.berkeley.edu, CC 3.0.5. Find that plant, a machine-learning algorithm to detect individual invasive plants from drone-based images and produce geographic coordinates of the locations of plants identified as invasives to inform management decisions.6. Early insect pest detection system integrates low-cost sensors that record images, sounds, and environmental conditions, pheromone and light lures, and species identification algorithms to monitor invasive insect pests of agriculture and forests.7. Floating robots detect invasive marine algae species using image classification algorithms that identify the species and record its location while navigating. The automated identification from images would facilitate monitoring and help researchers detect and eradicate invasive plants before they become well-established.Why focus on invasive species?Humans transport non-native plants and animals from their homes on one continent to new places that often lack the predators or other mechanisms keeping populations of the species under control. Some of these non-native species become invasive, meaning they spread and outcompete or harm native plants and animals or destroy native habitat.The caterpillar of the fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda), which has invaded Africa and Asia from the Americas, destroying maize, sorghum, millet, rice, and other crops. Image by Frank Peairs, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org, CC 3.0.The accelerated spread of invasive species over the past few decades has led to severe reductions, and even extinctions, of some native species, especially on islands.“Over 30 percent of the IUCN Red List species extinctions were caused or impacted by invasives,” Quigley said. “As the world’s population grows and globalization increases, the risk of invasive species introductions increases dramatically. Innovation and new technology solutions are needed to prevent the spread of invasive species and novel emerging pathogens.”Role of tech prizes in conservationQuigley told Mongabay that the early funding and recognition that they have received a prize have been “transformative” for some first-round finalists.“The process provides winners with very early-stage funding, a rare commodity, and recognition of external approval,” Quigley said, “each of which has potential to motivate finalists and translate into further funding.”He added that the opportunity to compete for the prize with a submission deadline can motivate groups who’ve perhaps been considering an idea or design to address a conservation problem to actually develop it into a prototype.A common lionfish (Pterois miles) from the Red Sea. These carnivorous fish native to the western Indo-Pacific region and the related P. volitans invaded the western Atlantic in the 1980s. There, their populations have exploded as they reproduce rapidly, consume more than 50 native fish species, and have no predators in their new home. Image by Magnus Kjaergaard via Wikimedia Commons, CC 3.0.Quigley identified three features that he thought help teams advance their prototype development most effectively:  keeping a strong focus on a discrete problem; partnering with a group that actually faces the problem; and including team members from different disciplines, such as an oceanographer partnering with a camera tech expert and a fundraiser or an engineer with a web developer and a project manager.The Con X Prize strives to bring people from a variety of disciplines to apply their skills to solving conservation challenges and broadening the conservation community.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Sue Palmintericenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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July 2019 was the hottest month ever recorded on Earth

first_imgUN secretary general António Guterres announced that July 2019 was the hottest month on record in a press conference yesterday.In his remarks to the press, Guterres noted that the record-breaking July temperatures follow the hottest June ever recorded, adding: “This is even more significant because the previous hottest month, July 2016, occurred during one of the strongest El Niño’s ever. That is not the case this year. All of this means we are on track for the period from 2015 to 2019 to be the five hottest years on record.”The impacts of global climate change are being felt around the globe, perhaps nowhere more dramatically than in the Arctic, where high temperatures have caused sea ice levels to collapse. June 2019 saw near-record lows in Arctic sea ice extent. In a press conference yesterday, UN secretary general António Guterres announced that July 2019 was the hottest month on record.Data for the month is still being collected, but July 2019 temperatures already appear to have been as high as if not slightly higher than the previous record for the hottest month in history, set in July 2016. According to preliminary data from the World Meteorological Organization, average global temperatures in July 2019 were at least 2.16 degrees Fahrenheit or 1.2 degrees Celsius higher than the pre-industrial average.“We have always lived through hot summers. But this is not the summer of our youth. This is not your grandfather’s summer,” Guterres said.Jean-Noël Thépaut, head of Europe’s Copernicus Climate Change Service, which produced the temperature data cited by Guterres, sounded a similar theme: “As a citizen I am as concerned as anyone else with what is happening,” Thépaut told Rolling Stone magazine. “My children are experiencing extreme weather situations which did not exist when I was their age.” He called the climatic trends on display in July 2019 “very disturbing.”In his remarks to the press, Guterres noted that the record-breaking July temperatures follow the hottest June ever recorded, adding: “This is even more significant because the previous hottest month, July 2016, occurred during one of the strongest El Niño’s ever. That is not the case this year. All of this means we are on track for the period from 2015 to 2019 to be the five hottest years on record.”The impacts of global climate change are being felt around the globe, perhaps nowhere more dramatically than in the Arctic, where high temperatures have caused sea ice levels to collapse. June 2019 saw near-record lows in Arctic sea ice extent.Citing data from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the climate impact tracking platform Climate Signals pointed out that there were 132 all-time-high temperatures recorded around the globe in July 2019, versus just two all-time-lows. “In a stable climate, record high and low temps are about even,” Climate Signals noted. “Human-caused warming is driving this imbalance.”In adopting the Paris Climate Agreement, world leaders pledged to limit global warming to no more than 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit or 2 degrees Celsius, while an additional, aspirational goal included in the agreement would limit warming to just 1.5 degrees Celsius. Climate scientists have repeatedly warned that anything more than 1.5 degrees Celsius of warming could threaten the stability of life on Earth as we know it. But an analysis by the group Climate Action Tracker shows that, under current climate policies, the world is on track for 3.3 degrees Celsius of warming or more by 2100.“This year alone we have seen temperature records shatter from New Delhi to Anchorage — from Paris to Santiago — from Adelaide to the Arctic Circle,” Guterres said. “If we do not take action on climate change now, these extreme weather events are just the tip of the iceberg. And that iceberg is also rapidly melting.”Arctic sea ice is in retreat as the climate crisis deepens. Photo via Pixabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Big Data, Climate Change, data collection, Environment, Global Warming, Impact Of Climate Change, Sea Ice, Temperatures last_img read more

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Germany cuts $39.5 million in environmental funding to Brazil

first_imgGermany has announced plans to withdraw some €35 million (US $39.5 million) to Brazil due to the country’s lack of commitment to curbing deforestation in the Amazon rainforest shown by the administration of far-right President Jair Bolsonaro.The funding loss will impact environmental projects in the Amazon, Atlantic Forest and Cerrado biomes.The cut will not, however, impact the Amazon Fund — a pool of some $87 million provided to Brazil each year by developed nations, especially Norway and Germany — to finance a variety of programs aimed at halting deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon.Some experts have expressed concern that Germany’s $39.5 million cut could cause other developed nations to withdraw Brazil funding, and even threaten the Amazon Fund, or the ratification of the recently concluded EU/Mercosur Latin American trade agreement. A wide range of environmental and conservation projects in Brazil are at stake after the government of Germany suspended funds to the country amid the report of alarming rises in monthly Amazon deforestation rates and controversial policies adopted by the administration of far-right President Jair Bolsonaro.On August 10, German Environment Minister Svenja Schulze reportedly announced Germany’s plans to withdraw some €35 million (US $39.5 million) to Brazil due to the Latin American country’s lack of commitment to curbing deforestation in the Amazon rainforest.“The policy of the Brazilian government in the Amazon raises doubts as to whether a consistent reduction of deforestation rates is still being pursued,” Schulze told the Tagesspiegel newspaper.Germany’s move came a week after the head of the Brazilian National Institute of Space Research (INPE), Ricardo Magnus Osório Galvão, was fired, raising concerns over the future of an institution recognized nationally and internationally for its cutting-edge satellite-imaging and deforestation monitoring program.The Bolsonaro administration has intensely criticized deforestation data released by INPE showing a 2019 spike in cleared area. In July, INPE issued an alert identifying deforestation and degradation totaling some 2,072 square kilometers (800 square miles) for the month of June in Legal Amazonia — a federal designation that includes all or parts of nine Brazilian states — detected by DETER, its real-time detection system. A 2018-2019 month-to-month comparison showed Brazil’s Amazonian deforestation in June 2019 was 88 percent greater than for the same month in 2018, while deforestation in July 2019 was 278 percent higher than July 2018.Bolsonaro immediately reacted to Germany’s announcement of funding cuts, saying that Brazil doesn’t need German funding to finance conservation projects in the country. “They can use this money as they see fit. Brazil doesn’t need it,” Bolsonaro told journalists in Brasilia on Sunday.But experts contacted for this story told Mongabay that Bolsonaro’s statements are not accurate, as Brazil has relied for decades on funding from Germany and other countries to finance environmental projects, given the South American country’s budget shortfalls.Giant waterlily (Victoria amazonica). Deforestation threatens terrestrial and aquatic biodiversity. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.The lost German funding not only helped protect the Amazon region, but also financed conservation projects in the Mata Atlântica (Atlantic Forest) and Cerrado savanna biomes, as well as other environmental initiatives such as promoting carbon markets and curbing carbon emissions, in addition to projects supporting indigenous peoples and traditional communities.“Germany’s decision shows that they are really concerned about environmental policies… They do not want to contribute to a government that does not have a clear and objective policy and does not show itself to be committed to reducing deforestation and to good environmental management,” Adriana Ramos, coordinator of the policy program for the Brazilian NGO Socio-environmental Institute (ISA), told Mongabay.“Public budget resources for the implementation of environmental public policies are very scarce. So many programs and initiatives lose out [due to the loss of] these [German] resources, including programs that benefit the Atlantic Forest and Cerrado [biomes] and this will certainly contribute to an environmental vulnerability, illegal actions, and to halting the country’s progress in environmental policies,” explained Ramos, who also represents The Climate Observatory, an NGO.Aerial view of Brazilian Cerrado savanna showing the line where deforestation meets native vegetation. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Knock-on effects?In addition to the lost $39.5 million, the German government currently contributes annually to the Amazon Fund — a pool of some $87 million provided to Brazil each year by developed nations, especially Norway and Germany — to finance a variety of programs aimed at halting deforestation. The Amazon Fund won’t be affected by the just announced cuts, according to the German Environment Ministry.However, the future of the Amazon Fund was recently put in play after Brazilian Environment Minister, Ricardo Salles, on 17 May, unilaterally announced an overhaul of the Fund’s administrative rules due to alleged irregularities amounting to $1.2 billion in spending by NGOs in past years; Salles provided no evidence to back up his charges. His statements were denied by European nations; both Germany and Norway complained that their governments were not notified of the rule changes, nor have they approved them.Brazil’s Ministry of Environment did not respond to requests for comment regarding the future of projects affected by Germany’s cuts and also about the Amazon Fund as of the time of publication.Paulo Barreto, a senior researcher at Brazilian NGO Imazon, said that Germany’s $39.5 million cut could trigger a knock-on effect, leading not only to a potential reduction in Germany’s contributions to the Amazon Fund, but also possibly influencing the funding flowing from other countries, including Norway.“The situation worsened a lot with INPE’s head being sacked and [due to] other issues. Germany’s decision itself is an indication that things got worse. In addition to specific projects, it also further degrades the image and reputation of Brazil in this area, and this may have consequences for the Amazon Fund and other things that Brazil is willing to do, including the EU-Mercosur [Latin American economic bloc] trade agreement [ratification],” Barreto said.“Brazil signed the EU-Mercosur Agreement and Germany was one of the main supporters of that agreement. This type of Brazilian behavior will make it difficult to approve the [trade] agreement… given the increase of representatives in the European Parliament with environmental concerns,” Barreto concluded.Banner image caption: Satellite image from Google Earth of Brazilian Amazon rainforest in the state of Amazonas.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Karla Mendescenter_img Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Controversial, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Featured, Forests, Green, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation last_img read more

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‘Timebomb’: Fires devastate tiger and elephant habitat in Sumatra

first_imgBanner image: Elephant habitat on this peatland is threatened due to fire and land conversion. Photo by Rifky/CIFOR.Editor’s note: This story was powered by Places to Watch, a Global Forest Watch (GFW) initiative designed to quickly identify concerning forest loss around the world and catalyze further investigation of these areas. Places to Watch draws on a combination of near-real-time satellite data, automated algorithms and field intelligence to identify new areas on a monthly basis. In partnership with Mongabay, GFW is supporting data-driven journalism by providing data and maps generated by Places to Watch. Mongabay maintains complete editorial independence over the stories reported using this data.Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Animals, Big Cats, Deforestation, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Featured, Fires, Forest Fires, Forests, Green, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Mammals, National Parks, Oil Palm, Old Growth Forests, Palm Oil, Plantations, Primary Forests, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Tigers, Tropical Forests, wildfires, Wildlife Another heavy fire season in Indonesia has taken a toll on the country’s remaining forest. In Sembilang National Park, on the island of Sumatra, fires raged into primary forest that provides vital habitat for critically endangered Sumatran tigers and elephants.Satellite data and imagery indicate the fires may have had a big impact on tigers in the park. In total, around 30 percent of tiger habitat in Sembilang burned between August and September. The fires also encroached into the park’s elephant habitat.Fires have also reportedly ravaged elephant habitat in Padang Sugihan Sebokor Wildlife Reserve, which lies southeast of Sembilang and serves as a corridor for wild elephants in South Sumatra. One report estimates that half of the reserve has suffered fire damage.Researchers say slash-and-burn clearing techniques likely started most of fires in the area, which were then exacerbated by drier-than-usual conditions and underground peat stores left unprotected by policy rollbacks.s Recent dry-season fires that raged across Indonesia in September and October have taken a toll on forests, even in protected areas. Fires were particularly destructive in southern Sumatra, burning around 8 percent of Sembilang National Park, according to satellite data and local observers.The fires, along with illegal logging in the area and the conversion of secondary forest and shrub land to oil palm plantations, continue to threaten critically endangered wildlife such as the Sumatran elephant, a subspecies of the Asian elephant, and the Sumatran tiger. Endangered Malay tapir, as well as several common primate species, are also known to inhabit the park area.Until recently no known elephant populations existed in Sembilang National Park, but a study published in May in the journal Biovalentia: Biological Research uncovered four individual elephants in the park over six days of observation early early 2019.The study estimates that there are between six and 10 individual elephants in the park area, ranging from north of the Sembilang River to south of the Bungin River and inland toward the west where the park borders the PT Raja Palma oil palm plantation.Wild elephant group in Sebokor Village Forest, part of Padang Sugihan Wildlife Reserve – Sebokor, which is located near Sembilang National Forest. Photo by Faizal Abdul Aziz/CIFOR.Donny Gunaryadi, secretary of the Indonesia Elephant Forum, told Mongabay that the government is currently in the process of finalizing a new 10-year action plan for Sumatran elephant protection that is expected to start next year.The plan will likely concentrate on preserving populations in the provinces of Aceh at the northern tip of Sumatra, Riau in the island’s center, and Jambi, which lies south of Riau and north of the South Sumatra province that is home to Sembilang National Park.“The population is decreasing,” said Gunaryadi, who has been advising on the draft of the policy, estimating that there are now 1,400 elephants in Sumatra, down from 2,400 a decade ago.In the 1980s, when Indonesia launched its massive transmigration program to resettle people from more populous areas of Java to other islands in the archipelago such as Sumatra, there were estimated to be as many as 4,000 elephants still on the island. However, conflicts between humans and elephants over land increased with the influx of settlers, and elephants have been on the decline ever since.“This is a very serious decrease within 10 years,” Gunaryadi said. “Some of the problems are from poaching, but also [the elephant] doesn’t have a secure habitat in many areas.”Tiger, elephant habitat likely affected by recent firesJust how Sembilang’s tiger populations fared during the fires is not exactly known just yet. The Zoological Society of London has staff that follow tiger populations in the region, but they were not prepared to accept an interview at this time.“Though we work on the ground and were impacted by the forest fires like many others, [the staff there] haven’t conducted any specific analysis or monitoring on the forest fires in Berbak Sembilang,” Emma Ackerley, a press officer with ZSL, told Mongabay.However, satellite data and imagery indicate the fires may have had a big impact on tigers in the park. In total, approximately 20,000 hectares (49,400 acres) — around 30 percent — of tiger habitat in Sembilang burned between August and September, according to data from the University of Maryland, NASA, and NGOs WWF and RESOLVE, and imagery from Planet Labs.Satellite data show large areas of fire-caused deforestation at either end of Sembilang National Park. The northern fires have wiped out a portion of its remaining primary forest, which is habitat for critically endangered Sumatran tigers and elephants. Source: GLAD/UMD, accessed through Global Forest WatchSatellite imagery shows fires had advanced well into primary forest as of late October. Source: Planet Labs.The Berbak Sembilang National Park Authority did not respond to several requests to comment on the situation.Yoga Travolindra, one of the researchers for the study that identified elephants in the park from the conservation group Forum Konservasi Gajah, has been on the ground near the park in recent weeks. He told Mongabay that the fires were unlikely to have killed any elephants since they mostly occurred in mangrove areas, which is not the elephants’ primary habitat.Travolindra said that while tigers did use the mangrove area there was no evidence of deaths in recent field observations of that animal either.“The [primary] problem for the Sumatran elephant today is that their habitat and ecosystems are disturbed from the conversion of land from secondary forests and shrubs into oil palm plantations by several companies located around the national park,” Travolindra said.“At the moment the problems in the national park are mainly area encroachment, illegal logging, and use of large trawlers in fishing,” he said.However, satellite data show that while fires were concentrated in and around mangroves earlier in the year, later burns moved into inland forests — including an area that the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations considers elephant habitat.Drier than usual and getting drier stillTravolindra said the fires likely stemmed from fires set intentionally to open up land for farming. Propelled by a drier-than-usual dry season and underground peat reserves, these fires spread out of control, affecting areas much larger than was intended.“In general this year had been much drier compared to the past few years,” Arief Wijaya from World Resources Institute Indonesia told Mongabay. “These areas in South Sumatra host a vast amount of peatlands and are very susceptible to fires, and both [Sembilang and Berbak National Park to the north] are quite dominated by peatlands.”Part of South Sumatra’s Padang Sugihan wildlife reserve area has been damaged by illegal logging and forest fires. Photo by Faizal Abdul Aziz/CIFORIndonesia has vast unground stores of peat, which have built up over hundreds to thousands of years as vegetation died. Normally waterlogged and restricted to swamps, countrywide efforts to drain swamps and make them suitable for farming and logging has dried out many of Indonesia’s peatlands. And when it’s dry, peat is extremely combustible — and peat fires are very hard to control. Indonesia’s 2015 fire crisis that contributed to the premature deaths of more than 100,000 people is largely blamed on wildfires on drained peatlands caused by slash-and-burn agriculture.Bukti Bagja, a land-use accountability manager at World Resources Institute Indonesia, said there was a strong correlation between the recent fires and illegal deforestation activity in and near Sembilang National Park.“The pattern for these fire cases in that area is that it usually happens one or two months before the peak rainy season comes,” Bagja said. “To me this shows that people are preparing the land for the rainy season [when it wouldn’t be possible to clear].”Bagja said the government had been trying to restore those peatlands after the devastating 2015 fires that burned throughout Indonesia, but that restoration has proven difficult. Blocking of drainage canals that had been dug throughout the area had not restored water levels sufficiently due to the particularly intense dry season, and some peatlands had already been claimed and cleared by locals for agriculture and other uses, Bagja said.Fewer than 1,000 Sumatran tigers are living on Sumatra today, with estimates as low as 330. Photo by Steve Wilson via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0).“The main problem is that during the dry season, from what we understand, there is a continuous decrease in the water table,” Bagja said. “When the area faces a long dry season, then the water table decreases 1 or 2 cm per day, and with the current canal system, the question is how to keep the peat area and the cultivation area moist.”Vital habitat corridors under threatFires have also reportedly ravaged elephant habitat in Padang Sugihan Sebokor Wildlife Reserve, which lies southeast of Sembilang and serves as a corridor for wild elephants in South Sumatra.One report estimates that half of the reserve has suffered fire damage. Since elephants in South Sumatra have such wide ranges it can be difficult to determine exactly how populations were impacted by the most recent fires.As with Sembilang, Padang Sugihan is experiencing issues related to peatland draining and forest encroachment by industry and communities. In the past it has been well protected for the most part, even with limited budgets for conservation, according to Michael Allen Brady, principal scientist at the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).This elephant is named Ken. He was born in Padang Sugihan Wildlife Reserve and enjoys swimming in peat swamps, which are threatened due to fire and land conversion. Photo by Rifky/CIFOR.This protection, however, has not helped prevent this year’s damaging fires.“We’re able to confirm there has been a lot of burning in the [Padang Sugihan] reserve the past two months,” Brady said.“One of the reasons it is burning frequently is that they dug canals through it, seven major canals, and hundreds of tertiary canals,” he said. “It was logged over in the 70s and converted to transmigration lands and then they decided not to develop it and turned it back to the forestry ministry. Unfortunately they drained it but they had not cleared the forest, so it was essentially a timebomb, a standing peat forest that had been drained.”Once the area was designated a wildlife reserve, the military herded elephants into the area in the early 1980s and the government recognized the reserve as elephant habitat. Brady said that following this, the government designated an elephant management unit, built an office complex on the border of the park and encouraged public visitation, but the situation “has deteriorated” in recent years to the point where the unit is non-functioning.“Unfortunately there’s been no systematic monitoring of the [elephant] population in the reserve, but clearly it has gone from a population of about 400 to around a dozen,” Brady said.Yusuf Samsudin, an elephant specialist with CIFOR, agrees: “Local rangers say there are only 12 left now.”Two potential steps forward, one definite step backRegulations enacted after the 2015 fire crisis broadly protected carbon-rich peatlands in the hopes of stopping it from happening again. But these were revised in April this year, limiting protection to “peat domes,” or areas where peat layers protrude higher topographically than the edges of the surrounding peatland. Sources say peatland exploitation and fires intensified after the policy rollback.Morning view of South Sumatra’s Sebokor River, sheathed in mist and trees. Photo by Faizal Abdul Aziz/CIFOR.According to Wijaya, longer-term land-use governance issues need to be addressed in areas affected by fires, including increasing clarity about access to protected lands, resolving issues involving overlapping claims, and strengthening spatial planning policies.Bagja recommends educational outreach. He says local communities and law enforcement have been slow to adapt to changing conditions, and need to be more aware that the peatlands are much drier now than they were just two or three years ago.“Our hope in Indonesia is to bring awareness and knowledge about avoiding fires, to bring it to every household all over the country,” Bagja said. “They should understand it and the cost of using fires is much higher than the intangible cost, the externalities are much higher. The fact is that there are still big gaps in that understanding and knowledge.“They think they can control it but this statement is not valid because the situation has changed.” Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davislast_img read more

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Britain’s Tyson Fury ends Klitschko’s heavyweight reign

first_img “I’ve said some stupid things,” an emotional Fury said of his pre-fight talk and antics. “Wladimir, you’re a great champion, and thanks for having me. It was all fun and games in the build-up.” It was Klitschko’s 28th title fight, but the premier heavyweight of this era relinquished the IBF belt he had held since 2006, the WBO title he’d owned since 2008, and the WBA crown he’d had since 2011. The other major belt, the WBC’s, was held by Deontay Wilder of the U.S. That was vacated in 2013 by Klitschko’s older brother Vitali, who was the major of Kiev. Fury was itching to go from the start, and he ran into the first round to put Klitschko off kilter. The Briton took the liberty of goading Klitschko during and after the round. Fury put his hands behind his back in the third round, though the defending champion improved in the next. Fury landed a big right on Klitschko in the fifth, when he opened a small cut under his right eye, and taunted him again. The Briton’s intensity seemed to drop as Klitschko improved, but still he needled him in the seventh, when he urged Klitschko to “come on” and baited him again with his hands behind his back, prompting more jeers. Fury had a point deducted for hitting behind the head in the 11th and both fighters gave their all in a furious final round before raising their arms in celebration. CONCEDED DÜSSELDORF, Germany (AP): Tyson Fury defeated Wladimir Klitschko by unanimous decision to end the Ukrainian’s nine and a half-year reign as heavyweight champion last night and took his World Boxing Association (WBA), International Boxing Federation (IBF) and World Boxing Organisation (WBO) heavyweight titles. After a bruising encounter that ended with cuts near both of Klitschko’s eyes, referee Tony Weeks went to the judges’ scorecards. Cesar Ramos and Raul Caiz Sr scored it 115-112 each, while Ramon Cerdan had it 116-111 in favour of the undefeated Briton (25-0, 18 KO). Fury, 12 years younger than the 39-year-old Klitschko, taunted and baited the champion at various stages, prompting jeers from fans at the 55,000-seat stadium in D¸esseldorf. Klitschko (64-4, 53 KO) was cautious until attempting a recovery in the final rounds, but suffered his first defeat since April 2004.last_img read more

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Azkals face China, Korea in Asian Cup

first_imgView comments Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Guiao blasts Newsome for ‘disrespectful’ last-second shot Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next The top two teams in the six group and the four best third placed will qualify for the knockout stage. But the real test will be against the Chinese and the Koreans, whom the Azkals will face for the first time. China beat the Philippines, 8-1, in a friendly in Guangzhou last June 2017.“I think its a good draw because at least we’ve played two teams in the group before so we know what to expect,” said Azkals skipper Phil Younghusband. FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownGroup A includes UAE, Thailand, India and Bahrain, while defending champion Australia landed in Group B with Syria, Palestine and Jordan. Group D will feature Iran, Iraq, Vietnam and Yemen, while Group E has Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Lebanon and North Korea. Battling it out in Group F are Japan, Uzbekistan, Oman and Turkmenistan. LATEST STORIES MOST READ P16.5-M worth of aid provided for Taal Volcano eruption victims — NDRRMC Green group flags ‘overkill’ use of plastic banderitas in Manila Sto. Niño feast In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Scientists seek rare species survivors amid Australia flames Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding Jo Koy draws ire for cutting through Cebu City traffic with ‘wang-wang’ Truck driver killed in Davao del Sur road accident ‘Stop romanticizing Pinoy resilience’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. The Azkals are in Group C in the AFC Asian Cup next year. Photo by Cedelf Tupas/INQUIRERDUBAI – The Philippines will face powerhouse squads South Korea and China when it makes its debut in the Asian Cup in January next year in the United Arab Emirates.Following the draw held at the posh Armani Hotel here, the Azkals landed in Group C with Kyrgyzstan, a team they have beaten twice in friendly matches two years ago.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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Campbellville man slapped with gun possession charge

first_imgLaurence Ellis of Lot 157 Campbellville Housing Scheme, Georgetown was remanded to prison on Friday by Senior Magistrate Leron Daly after he appeared in the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts slapped with a gun possession charge.Ellis denied the charge which stated that on May 9, 2018, he had in his possession a .38 pistol without being the holder of a firearm licence.The court heard that on the day in question at about 20:00h, Police were on mobile patrol duties in the Campbellville area when they stopped the father of one and a search was carried out on his person. He was at the time on a pedal cycle.During the search, Ellis reportedly took the firearm from his crotch and threw it into a clump of bushes on the parapet.The gun was subsequently retrieved by the Police. The magazine of same was extracted and six live rounds of ammunition were also found. The 32-year-old man was told of the offence and was taken into Police custody where he gave a written caution statement.In his caution statement, he reportedly said he bought the gun for $60,000 almost two weeks ago after he was threatened by someone named “Joshua” who resides in the same area.Bail was refused, and the matter was adjourned to May 25.last_img read more

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Meetings 2/12

first_imgGranada Hills North Neighborhood Council, 7 p.m. Feb. 26, Van Gogh Elementary School, 17160 Van Gogh St., Granada Hills. Call (818) 360-4346 or see www.ghnnc.org. Neighborhood Council Valley Village, 6:30 p.m. Feb. 28, Colfax Elementary School, 11724 Addison St., Van Nuys. Call (818) 346-4892. Canoga Park Neighborhood Council, 7 p.m. Feb. 28, Canoga Park Community Center, 7248 Owensmouth Ave., Canoga Park. Call (818) 346-4892. Chatsworth Neighborhood Council, 7 p.m. March 7, Lawrence Middle School, 10100 Variel Ave., Chatsworth. Call (818) 464-3511 or see www.chatsworthcouncil.org. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Reseda Neighborhood Council, 7 p.m. Feb. 20, Canoas Banquet Hall, 18136 Sherman Way, Reseda. Call (818) 832-7540 or see www.resedacouncil.org. Pacoima Neighborhood Council, 6:30 p.m. Feb. 21 in the community room at 11243 Glenoaks Blvd., Pacoima. Call (818) 425-9976. Studio City Neighborhood Council, 7 p.m. Feb. 21, in the edit building, Suite 6, CBS Studios, 4024 Radford Ave., Studio City. Call (818) 767-6766. North Hills West Neighborhood Council, 7 p.m. Feb. 21 in Building 22 at the Sepulveda VA, 16111 Plummer St., North Hills. Call (818) 893-8613 or see www.northhillswest.org. Panorama City Neighborhood Council (forming), 6:30 p.m. Feb. 22, in the second-floor meeting room at the Mission Community Hospital medical building, 14860 Roscoe Blvd., Panorama City. Call (818) 374-9895. Sherman Oaks Neighborhood Council, 6:30 p.m. today at Sherman Oaks Elementary School, 14755 Greenleaf St., Sherman Oaks. Questions about city of Los Angeles tree trimming and sidewalk repair will be answered by Bill Robertson, director of the Bureau of Street Services; George Gonzalez, chief forester; and Mark Simon, supervisor of the 50/50 Sidewalk Reconstruction Program. Call (818) 503-2399 or see www.shermanoaksnc.org. North Hills East Neighborhood Council, 7 p.m. today in the auditorium at Sepulveda Middle School, 15330 Plummer St., North Hills. Call (818) 891-0060. Sun Valley Area Neighborhood Council, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday in the assembly room at Villa Scalabrini Retirement Center, 10631 Vinedale St., Sun Valley. Call (818) 767-6766. Mission Hills Neighborhood Council, 7 p.m. Tuesday in the auditorium at San Jose Street Elementary School, 14928 Clymer St., Mission Hills. Call (818) 892-2414 or see www.mhnc.org. last_img read more

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Giroud kickstarts Chelsea career with Southampton fightback

first_img“I’ve been through some difficulties in my career, but I always try to come back stronger and it happened today,” said Giroud.“The most important thing is to never give up, believe in our quality, play our game and I am proud of what we have done today.”Defeat is another body blow to Saints’ chances of avoiding relegation as they remain rooted in the bottom three when for so long they seemed set for a first home win in the Premier League since November.Dusan Tadic and debutant Jan Bednarek put the hosts in command, but Giroud struck either side of Eden Hazard’s equaliser to cut the gap on Liverpool and Tottenham in the fight for a top-four finish and Champions League football next season to seven points.“As long as it is mathematically possible we will believe we can reach the top four,” added Giroud. “We have got five finals to play, after that we will see.”The two sides will meet again in the FA Cup semi-finals next weekend, and Southampton will do well to raise themselves for cup glory with their place in the Premier League next season looking ever more precarious.“As has been the case all year apparently we’ve got a soft underbelly,” said Saints boss Mark Hughes, whose three Premier League games in charge have now all ended in defeats. “When the momentum shifts against us we can’t get a platform and wait until the momentum swings our way again.”– Alonso escapes red –Southampton had got off to a perfect start thanks to a former Chelsea player as Ryan Bertrand burst past Cesar Azpilicueta before squaring for Tadic to apply a simple finish.Only a fine save low to his right from Thibaut Courtois denied Saints a second through James Ward-Prowse as Chelsea struggled to create anything of note before the break.“Our first half was very negative,” said Chelsea boss Antonio Conte. “We didn’t show great spirit, desire, will to fight to win this game.“But I saw a great reaction. If you don’t have something in you’re heart, it’s difficult to come back and win this game.”Chelsea’s frustration overspilled as tempers flared late in the first period when Marcos Alonso was lucky to escape unpunished for raking his studs down Shane Long’s calf.“It’s a clear red card and clear intent to hurt Shane,” raged Hughes. “It could’ve broken his leg. There were three officials within five to 10 yards so how each of them missed it is a mystery to me.”Bednarek marked his Premier League debut in style when he half-volleyed expertly across the goal and into the far corner from Ward-Prowse’s free-kick on the hour mark.Conte swiftly responded by hauling off the disappointing Alvaro Morata and Davide Zappacosta for Pedro Rodriguez and Giroud.And Giroud showed what he is capable of with a brave near post header from Alonso’s pinpoint cross to get Chelsea back in the game and spark an incredible fightback 20 minutes from time.Five minutes later Hazard levelled by smashing home Willian’s cross from close range.With Southampton reeling, Giroud then completed Chelsea’s comeback when he pounced on a loose ball inside the area to drive into the bottom corner.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Giroud celebrates scoring his first Premier League goals for Chelsea. © AFP / Glyn KIRKSOUTHAMPTON, United States, Apr 14 – Olivier Giroud hopes to have kickstarted his Chelsea career after coming off the bench to inspire an eight-minute turnaround from 2-0 down to win 3-2 at Southampton on Saturday with his first Premier League goals for the club.The French international striker has largely struggled to make an impact since his deadline day move from Arsenal in January, putting his place at the World Cup at risk.last_img read more

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PREP-JC ROUNDUP South knocks off El Segundo

first_imgBanning 6, Gardena 1: Adriana Garcia won her match, 8-0, and Veronica Trujillo and Kathy Ngo also produced singles wins for visiting Banning (3-1, 2-1). Jessica Vasquez won in singles for Gardena (0-3, 0-3). Carson 5, San Pedro 2: Eleonor Fernandez and Lori Joy Patricio won singles matches for Carson. San Pedro’s Kasey Tate posted an 8-5 win over Jamee Biadora in the No. 1 singles spot, and San Pedro’s Ronnie Bunn also won in singles. Girls volleyball Torrance held off host El Segundo for a 25-20, 25-14, 24-26, 21-25, 15-12 Pioneer League victory. Chelsea Tupuola served six straight points to break an 8-8 tie in the fifth game, and Katie Judd finished the match with a cross-court kill for Torrance (9-5, 1-1). Judd had 16 kills, 15 digs and two blocks. Erica Kim had 10 kills, 10 digs and three blocks. Arianna Holguin had four aces and 29 assists. Jenn Stutzel had 11 kills to lead El Segundo. Also in the Pioneer League … South Torrance 3, Lawndale 0: Neda Ghasourian had eight kills, five digs and two aces in the 25-11, 25-13, 25-12 win for visiting South (2-0). North Torrance 3, Centennial 0: Kristen McNeese had six kills and Ilyanna Hernandez added five kills as host North won, 25-1, 25-2, 25-3. North is 12-3 overall and 1-0 in league. In the Bay League … Mira Costa 3, Palos Verdes 0: Falyn Fonoimoana had eight kills, four digs and two aces as host Mira Costa won, 25-17, 25-13, 25-12. Lane Carico added six kills and 15 digs for Mira Costa (4-0, 1-0). In the Del Rey League … Bishop Montgomery 3, Bishop Amat 1: Kristina Cruz had 56 assists and 14 digs as host Bishop Montgomery won, 25-20, 23-25, 25-14, 25-19. Sarah Prather had 15 kills and 13 digs, and Rachel Clark added 14 kills for Bishop Montgomery (12-6, 1-0). Bishop Amat is 11-4, 0-1. St. Joseph 3, St. Bernard 0: Ashley Thompson had 11 kills, six digs and four blocks in a 25-10, 25-16, 25-15 home loss for St. Bernard (3-4, 0-1). In the Camino Real League … St. Paul 3, Mary Star 0: Robin Skale had nine digs and eight kills in a 25-18, 26-24, 25-16 loss for the host Stars. Charlene Bautista added 15 digs for St. Mary (0-1). Serra 3, Cantwell 0: Merielle Brosmer had 15 kills and four digs in the 25-12, 25-8, 25-16 win for visiting Serra (7-2, 1-0). Christine Barba had 25 assists and five digs. Seini Tukutau added 10 kills, six digs and five aces. In the Marine League … Narbonne 3, Washington 0: Meli Padilla had eight aces and Jackie Diones added 14 assists as visiting Narbonne won, 25-5, 25-6, 25-7. San Pedro 3, Carson 0: Kristiana Tuaniga had 13 kills, three blocks, eight digs and four aces in Carson’s 25-20, 25-21, 25-19 loss to visiting San Pedro (4-1, 4-0). Carson is 4-1, 2-1. In the Prep League … Chadwick 3, Rio Hondo 0: Nikki Lane had 18 assists, six digs, two aces and two blocks as host Chadwick won, 25-19, 25-21, 25-8. Michelle McCarthy had nine kills and five digs, and Casey Reed added eight kills and five digs for Chadwick (6-1, 4-1). Boys water polo Jeff Giery scored five goals to lead Mira Costa to a 13-4 Bay League victory over visiting Peninsula. J.L. Kiss had three goals and Matt Burton added two for Mira Costa (6-6, 1-0). Also in the Bay League … Palos Verdes 27, West Torrance 2: Ryan Ogren, Tucker Hart and Ryan Rule each scored four goals to lift Palos Verdes (6-3, 1-0) over visiting West (0-5, 0-1). Girls golf Torrance had three players with sub-40 scores to beat Palos Verdes, 194-249, in an Ocean League match at Los Verdes Golf Course. Demi Runas had two birdies and shot a 1-under 35 to lead Torrance (4-0, 3-0). Jenny Shin had one birdie in her round of 36, and Rochelle Chan had three birdies and shot a 1-over 37. Emily Chong and Chaewon Park each shot personal-best 43s. Ally Wilcox led Palos Verdes (1-2 in league) with a 46. In the Bay League … Mira Costa 195, West Torrance 282: Meghan Inouye, Lauren Heaverin and Lori Harper shot 2-over 36 at Chester Washington Golf Course for Mira Costa (3-2). Peninsula 192, Chadwick 248: Ayane Itamura shot even-par 35 for Peninsula in the Bay League match at Palos Verdes Country Club. Kristin Coleman shot 36 while her twin sister Jenny shot 38 for Peninsula (5-0). Mallike Tanboli lead Chadwick with a 40. South Torrance 248, Redondo 261: Shani Yokotake shot a 46 at par-36 Alondra Park Golf Course to lift South over Redondo (0-5, 0-5). JC women’s soccer Vanessa Naba scored the goal as El Camino College beat host Long Beach City College, 1-0, in a South Coast Conference game. El Camino is 9-2-1. JC men’s soccer Edson Rivera scored the only goal for Harbor, in the 10th minute, in a 2-1 South Coast Conference loss to visiting Cerritos. Harbor is 0-1-2 in conference. In another South Coast Conference match … Long Beach City 3, El Camino 2: Kenny Geary had both goals for visiting El Camino (5-4-2, 0-2-1).160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! From staff reports South Torrance overcame a stellar effort from Hazuki Onaga to post a 13-5 Pioneer League-opening tennis win Tuesday at El Segundo, seting up an early league showdown with fellow league favorite North Torrance Thursday. Onaga swept her three singles sets, losing just two games. But South’s Leanne Gutierrez and Esther Kim each won two of three singles sets. South took eight of nine doubles sets. The teams of Lauren Gutierrez-Stephanie Giles and Maggie Chiodo-Evelyn Siu each lost just three games in sweeping their sets. The team of Jessica Castile and Yulie Suzuki won two of three sets with its only loss coming in a tiebreaker. Also in the Pioneer League … North Torrance 17, Torrance 1: Ellie Fukunaga, Bea Palileo and Jennifer Watanabe all swept for North Torrance in singles at Torrance. The doubles team of Michelle Kaito and Hannah Cho also swept for North Torrance (6-3, 1-0). In the Bay League … Redondo 15, West Torrance 3: Sisters Della and Elle Taylor swept their three singles sets at love, powering Redondo (9-1, 1-1) at West (2-7, 0-2). Della Taylor improved to 30-0 on the season. Redondo’s doubles team of Alix Politanoff-Romy Vargas also swept three sets. In the Marine League … last_img read more

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