Lendoiro proposes a new 2ªB renamed ‘Luis Aragonés’

first_imgLendoiro would baptize that new category as “Liga Luís Aragonés, in tribute to who represents, like no other, street soccer, the same football“And it proposes two options, one with 40 teams divided into two groups (north and south) of 20, among which would be the top ten in each group of the current Second B and which would send Third to all unclassified. another option would go through 20 teams in a single group: the four descended from the Second, the twelve eliminated in the playoffs to the silver category and the four fifths classified from the Second B groups.The former president of Deportivo assures that this “would be the ideal decision if a League close to professionalism is intended.” “With a powerful ‘Luís Aragonés League’ we must recover all the strength of football that we have lost in large capitals, today far from professional football“says Lendoiro. The former president of Deportivo Augusto César Lendoiro has suggested for the Second Division B the creation of the ‘Luis Aragonés League’, which would bring professionalism closer to the bronze category of national football. The former LaLiga ambassador considers in an article sent to Efe that the recent request of 30 clubs to propose to the Royal Spanish Football Federation (RFEF) a restructuring of Second B for the 2020/21 season is illegal. “The admission of what was requested by the G-30 would not hold even the first legal challenge. Lawsuits would rain, and they would win them, not only of the 40 discarded teams of Second B, but also of the 18 that will now ascend from Third “, he warns.Explain what the idea of ​​this group “was born as a result of the ‘decision’ of the RFEF to end” the competition in non-professional leagues, a decision that he sees as “correct due to its majority acceptance, very timely since it was required by COVID-19 and smart in the pre-electoral period by eliminating declines”, but also considers it “incomplete”. “The ‘sine qua non’ condition is the first thing that the G-30 has skipped: the approval by the RFEF Assembly, prior to the start of the season,” says Lendoiro, who maintains that “a new Second B can never be legally launched before the 2021/22 financial year“last_img read more

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Chance rescue turns out to be first record of elusive tortoise species in India

first_imgTwo tortoises that a range officer in Arunachal Pradesh in northeast India rescued from a group of boys turned out to be the impressed tortoise (Manouria impressa), an elusive species that has never been recorded in India before.Researchers who have studied the reptile in Myanmar say the high-elevation habitat in Arunachal Pradesh where the tortoises were found is quite similar to that in Myanmar.Very little is known about impressed tortoises, and researchers and the range officer hope that a long-term survey will be launched to find more individuals of the species in India.For now, the two rescued individuals have been sent to a zoo in the state’s capital. It was a chance encounter. But it turned Bunty Tao’s life around.In mid-June, a group of boys were heading back from a fishing trip to a forest near the town of Yazali in Arunachal Pradesh state in northeast India, when Tao, a range officer with the state forest department, noticed that they had two tortoises with them.“I don’t know why they had taken the tortoises from the forest, whether out of curiosity or something else, but I told them they couldn’t keep the animals,” Tao told Mongabay.Tao took the tortoises away and put them in a small forested plot near his house until the authorities could take a decision on the reptiles. The tortoises had golden-hued shells ⁠— a color Tao had not seen on tortoises from the area before. So he sent photographs of the individuals to an anti-hunting WhatsApp group he’s a member of, hoping someone would help identify the species. The group members forwarded the photos to other experts, and in a few days, Jayaditya Purkayastha, a herpetologist based in the neighboring state of Assam, came back with an answer. The rescued tortoises, he said, looked like the impressed tortoise (Manouria impressa), an elusive species that had never been recorded in India before.Bunty Tao with the rescued tortoises. Image courtesy of Bunty Tao.Purkayastha and other experts, including Shailendra Singh and Arpita Dutta of the nonprofit Turtle Survival Alliance, rushed to Arunachal Pradesh, examined the tortoises in question, and confirmed that the reptiles were indeed impressed tortoises.Until recently, the impressed tortoise has been known from the high-elevation mountainous forests of Myanmar, southern China, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia and Malaysia. There, the reptile prefers the moist forest floor with lots of leaf litter, Singh told Mongabay. “They eat things like mushrooms on the forest floor. They also bury into the leaves and tend to camouflage with the forest floor.”Singh, who has studied the impressed tortoise in Myanmar, said the habitat in Arunachal Pradesh where the tortoises were found is quite similar to that in Myanmar. “So it shouldn’t be a surprise to find more such animals along the Indo-Myanmar border,” he said. “What is surprising is that the tortoises weren’t found before because so many people would have visited the forest in the past.”Tao, however, said the tortoise may have always been in the area, “but before this nobody probably took the initiative to identify it,” he said. “It is like an apple falling from a tree. I’m a range officer, I’m passionate about wildlife, and I was curious to find out what it was, so I posted it for identification. ”The high-elevation habitat in Arunachal Pradesh where the impressed tortoises were collected from is similar to that in Myanmar where the species is also found. Image courtesy of Shailendra Singh.With very little known about impressed tortoises, Singh said he hopes that a long-term survey will be launched to find more individuals of the species in India.“Finding two individuals and identifying them is fine, but the critical thing to do is to go look and see if there is a ecologically viable population residing in that area,” he said. “If that population is there, then we have to collect scientific data on it and try and protect it.”As for the two individuals themselves, they have been sent to a zoo in Itanagar, the state capital. Singh said the species doesn’t do very well in captivity, though. “They need moist environment, a special diet and they are very delicate. They also don’t like too much handling,” he said.Researchers examining the rescued impressed tortoises. Image by Jhonson Tao.Tao, on his way to visit the tortoises at the Itanagar biological park, said that with the identification part of the story now over, research was needed. “But it is for the forest department to decide,” he said.“The IUCN tortoise and freshwater turtle specialist group recently sent us a letter of appreciation, lauding the efforts of the forest department for finding the species,” Tao said. “They even offered their technical support if the department wanted to initiate a conservation effort for the species.”Tao said he hopes the discovery of the tortoise in June and the attention it’s bringing will translate to conservation efforts on the ground.“I feel incredibly happy to be part of this history,” Tao said. “I’m a tribal boy and I feel that we tribal people should be involved in research because we can use our traditional knowledge for conservation. I think we can convert this opportunity to create bigger conservation projects, such as a sustainable ecotourism project that can help protect wildlife and help us earn a livelihood.”The rescued impressed tortoises. Image courtesy of Shailendra Singh.Banner image of impressed tortoise courtesy of Shailendra Singh. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Shreya Dasguptacenter_img Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Herps, Reptiles, Species Discovery, Tropical Forests, Turtles And Tortoises, Wildlife last_img read more

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Bolsonaro’s Brazil unlikely to achieve Paris Agreement goals: experts

first_imgAmazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Controversial, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Forests, Green, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation Article published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Brazil is the eighth largest global economy, and the seventh largest national producer of greenhouse gases, with significant emissions due to deforestation, especially in the Amazon.Under the 2015 Paris Agreement, Brazil committed to cutting 37 percent of its carbon emissions by 2025, and 43 percent by 2030.However, the anti-environmental, climate change and deforestation policies of President Jair Bolsonaro are putting those goals at serious risks, say experts.Environmentalists are especially suspicious of a September deal between Bolsonaro and US President Trump to promote private-sector sustainable development in the Amazon via a $100 million biodiversity conservation fund. Protesters at New York City Climate Strike, September 20, 2019. Brazil’s international image is in tatters since the election of President Jair Bolsonaro and this year’s Amazon fires. Image by Imelda Abano.Brazil is still over a decade away from its pledged deadline for delivering on its Paris Climate Agreement carbon reduction commitments, but it may already be too late for the country to honor its promises, experts interviewed by Mongabay say.The surge in Amazon rainforest fires in August graphically illuminated how Brazil is moving in the opposite direction of its climate change targets, which include, among other criteria, zero illegal deforestation by 2030.“There is no chance, in my opinion, for Brazil to meet [its] Paris Agreement’s goals, both in terms of reducing illegal deforestation and reforesting 12 million hectares [46,300 square miles] of forests,” says Paulo Artaxo, a noted scientist and climate change researcher at Brazil’s University of São Paulo.Deforestation lies at the center of the problem, with President Jair Bolsonaro publicly expressing opposition to many of Brazil’s existing climate policies. Despite backing off from his most extreme campaign pledge of withdrawing from the Paris Agreement, Bolsonaro’s lax environmental stance and his administration’s push to open indigenous reserves and protected areas to mining and agribusiness in violation of the country’s 1988 Constitution, has made achieving Brazil’s Paris pledges more remote, say analysts.Add to that Bolsonaro’s incendiary rhetoric, which critics contend encouraged ruralists to actively deforest the Amazon since the president took office in January, and to burn the cut trees this August to convert large areas to cattle lands – acts that resulted in major fires which caught the world’s attention.US Secretary of State Michael Pompeo (right) meets with Brazil Foreign Minister Ernesto Araújo on September 13, 2019. Image courtesy of the US Department of State.The Bolsonaro / Trump allianceOf particular concern to environmentalists, was a September 13 meeting between Ernesto Araújo, Brazil’s current Foreign Minister, and US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. At that gathering, the Bolsonaro and Trump administrations pledged to promote private-sector sustainable development in the Amazon, and committed to a US $100 million biodiversity conservation fund. Though no agreement details were offered, conservationists expressed worry at the use of the term “development” in connection with the world’s greatest rainforest.The appointment of Araújo, a climate change denier, to the Foreign Minister post, shows Bolsonaro’s dramatic shift away from the country’s previously successful climate and environment policies, according to Andrea Santos, Executive Secretary of the Brazilian Panel on Climate Change (PBMC), a political-scientific organization that synthesizes and discloses information on climate change and proposes actions and solutions for the Brazilian government.Minister Araújo – who almost immediately upon his appointment, abolished the office dealing with climate change within his ministry – firmly stated at the September event held at Washington DC’s Heritage Foundation that “there is no climate change catastrophe.”Santos responded: “Brazil was a global leader on climate change, now it’s seen as a villain. The growth of this anti-science movement is frightening, and this government is irresponsibly moving forward with this agenda.”Her organization (PMBC) was created in 2009 to support Brazil’s government, but is now struggling to find funding; the Ministry of Environment eliminated 95 percent of the budget’s climate change-related activities in May.Now the Panel is out of the conversation and no longer guiding governmental progress toward meeting Paris Agreement objectives. And although Brazil’s Environment Minister Ricardo Salles claimed the country is “doing very well” in its effort to fulfill the accord, the data is kept under wraps and Santos is skeptical: “I would love to know what are the foundations of this argument. From where I can see, we won’t achieve the goals.”Mongabay contacted the Ministry of Environment for comment but did not receive a response.An illegally deforested area on Pirititi indigenous lands in Roraima state is inspected in May 2018 by agents of IBAMA (Brazil’s environmental protection agency). Since taking office, Bolsonaro has largely defunded and disempowered the agency, even threatening its employees if they take action against illegal loggers. Felipe Werneck / Ibama.Paris Agreement goal increasingly unattainableUnder the 2015 Paris Agreement, Brazil committed to cutting 37 percent of its carbon emissions by 2025, and 43 percent by 2030, which means reaching annual total emissions of 1.3 gigatons of CO2 equivalent within six years and 1.2 GtCO2e within 11 years. (GtCO2e, or “gigatons equivalent of carbon dioxide” is a simple way of expressing all greenhouse gas emissions whether from CO2, methane, etc.).To achieve its targets, Brazil, under the accord, intends to adopt measures that include: raising the share of renewable sources in the country’s energy mix to 45 percent; increasing energy efficiency in the electricity sector by 10 percent; achieving zero illegal deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon by 2030 and compensating for greenhouse gas emissions from legal suppression of vegetation by 2030; restoring and reforesting 12 million hectares (46,300 square miles) of forests; and restoring an additional 15 million hectares (57,915 square miles) of degraded pasturelands by 2030 and enhancing 5 million hectares (19,305 square miles) of integrated cropland-livestock-forestry systems (ICLFS) by 2030.According to a civil society organization, Observatório do Clima, or Climate Observatory, Brazil emitted about 2 gigatons of CO2 equivalent gases in 2017, well above the 1.3 gigaton initial goal. This 2 gigatons represents just over 2 percent of all global greenhouse gas emissions, making Brazil the seventh-largest emitter on the planet.The data, released at the end of 2018 shows that almost half (46 percent) of Brazilian emissions were from deforestation (land use), followed by 24 percent of emissions from agricultural activities and 21 percent from the energy and transportation sectors.The Climate Observatory report noted that greenhouse gas emissions slightly dropped in 2017 when compared to 2016 levels, which was celebrated by the Michel Temer government at the time. That milestone reflected the strides Brazil had made in slashing the rate of forest loss.However, since then, Amazon deforestation has been on the increase, and under Bolsonaro’s policies, there is a growing risk of reversion now.Gustavo Baptista, a geographer and satellite-imagery professor at the University of Brasília, warns the country will reach a record high deforestation rate in 2019. He is another skeptic of the country’s potential for achieving its Paris Accord goals: “We have people in charge of the environmental agenda denying anthropic interference. This is just irresponsible.” In fact, even before taking office, Bolsonaro announced his plan to withdraw Brazil’s offer to host COP25 at the end of this year, the most critically important United Nations climate meeting since Paris.Brazilian Minister for the Environment Ricardo Salles (right), President Jair Bolsonaro (center), and Minister for Foreign Affairs Ernesto Araújo (left), at an August, 2019 press conference, just days before the Amazon fires burst into international headlines. Image by Marcos Corrêa / PR, Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.Mr. Salles goes to WashingtonOn September 18th, Environment Minister Ricardo Salles arrived in Washington, D.C. for a series of meetings to discuss the Amazon crisis and bolster Brazil’s sagging image abroad. He was received at the US Chamber of Commerce by protestors who called him a “terrorist” and a “traitor.” He had a meeting scheduled for the 19th with the Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI), a conservative American advocacy group and think tank that has long denied the climate crisis, according to Brazil’s Folha de S.Paulo newspaper. But it ended up being cancelled following the immediate condemnation by environmentalists. After another meeting with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Salles announced the creation of a new investment fund for the Amazon, according to the Brazilian newspaper O Globo. The minister said that the structure of the mechanism is still being studied and did not provide further details such as which countries in the region will contribute and the amounts invested by the private sector.Salles’ visit to Washington precedes the UN Climate Action Summit on Monday, September 23, in New York. But unlike previous years, Brazil will not stand in the spotlight. The country will not have a representative making a speech, said UN Special Secretary-General Luis Alfonso de Alba, because “Brazil has not submitted any plans to increase its commitment to the climate,”The anti-science discourse put forth by the current administration is a “huge setback, and it’s all Bolsonaro’s responsibility,” according to Alfredo Sirkis, director of the Brazilian Climate Center, a think tank. Until May, he was the head of the Brazil Forum for Climate Change, an institution created to formulate the country’s Paris Agreement commitment plan. He was fired by Bolsonaro.“During his campaign, he signaled to environmental criminals that he would dismantle the existing law enforcement structures and he is keeping his promises,” says the environmentalist.Sirkis believes the country is unlikely to meet its greenhouse gas reduction targets if Bolsonaro’s climate policies remain, but says there is still hope: “Right now we are in the total opposite direction, but one of the advantages is that deforestation can be quickly reduced and help Brazil with its emissions reduction targets. We have been able to reduce [deforestation] by 80 percent over 8 years [in the past]. So, it is not impossible to revert it, even after a negative period. It will all depend on the political scenario.”A major outstanding question after the Amazon fires is whether the international community and global consumers will put pressure on Brazil to live up to its Paris promises through sanctions, commodities boycotts and/or delays in ratification of the recently agreed to, but still unratified, mega-trade deal between the European Union and Mercosur, the Latin American trade bloc.The anti-science discourse put forth by the current administration is a “huge setback, and it’s all Bolsonaro’s responsibility,” according to Alfredo Sirkis, director of the Brazilian Climate Center, a think tank. Image courtesy of Brazilian Chamber of Deputies.Beyond the Amazon            Brazil’s carbon emissions reduction pledge goes beyond deforestation, all experts interviewed by Mongabay agree. They stressed the importance of working to reduce emissions in other areas, such as Energy and Transport.“Globally, 10 percent of greenhouse gas emissions are due to tropical deforestation. The other 90 percent of emissions are due to the burning of fossil fuels. If you do not reduce these [fossil fuel] emissions, the planet is lost,” warned scientist Paulo Artaxo.The only way to succeed globally is through international cooperation and coordinated action, said José Marengo, director of the Brazilian Monitoring Center for Natural Disaster Alert (Cemaden), a governmental research institution.“Protecting the Amazon isn’t the only solution,” concludes Artaxo. “If the US and China continue to burn fossil fuels, the Paris Agreement will have no effect at all. It’s like a football game: Brazil is only one player, there are another ten.”Banner image caption: The Amazon rainforest ablaze near the city of Porto Velho, Rondônia state in August 2019. Image by Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace.This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 news outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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Saving Aru: The epic battle to save the islands that inspired the theory of evolution

first_imgIn the mid-1800s, the extraordinary biodiversity of the Aru Islands helped inspire the theory of evolution by natural selection.Several years ago, however, a corrupt politician granted a single company permission to convert most of the islands’ rainforests into a vast sugar plantation.The people of Aru fought back. Today, the story of their grassroots campaign resonates across the world as a growing global movement seeks to force governments to act on climate change. This story was co-published with The Gecko Project. Additional support was provided by Earthsight.I. The movement beginsLate one rainy night in August 2013, a college student named Collin Leppuy arrived at the doorstep of Father Jacky Manuputty, a church minister in the coastal city of Ambon, Indonesia. He had come to ask for help; his homeland was under threat.Collin, then 23, had grown up in the Aru Islands, a heavily forested archipelago in the eastern margins of the world’s largest island nation. He was studying social welfare policy at a university in Ambon, the capital of Maluku province. Collin had recently organized rallies in the city against a corrupt politician who had governed Aru for nearly a decade. Convicted of siphoning off millions of dollars in state funds, the politician had absconded before law enforcers finally caught up with him. Collin had felt proud of the outcome, but this gave way to a renewed sense of urgency when he discovered what else the politician had done before his arrest.For decades, Aru had escaped the attention of the companies clearing Indonesia’s rainforests. But as the jungles of Java, Sumatra and Borneo dwindled, those in search of timber and agricultural land began to look east. Aru now lay in the sights of a company called the Menara Group. Collin had learned that before he was ousted from office, the politician had secretly approved a plan by Menara to plant sugarcane across nearly two-thirds of Aru. If it went ahead, the firm would reap billions of dollars by logging Aru’s forests and replacing them with what could be the world’s biggest sugar plantation. But it would destroy the existing livelihoods and food supplies of tens of thousands of people, including Collin’s friends and family. It would ruin the habitats of Aru’s unique wildlife, of animals like the ethereal birds-of-paradise, and the natural world from which the Aruese drew their identity.Male greater birds-of-paradise (Paradisaea apoda) display their plumage in the Aru Islands. Image by Tim Laman/courtesy of Tim Laman and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.Jacky welcomed Collin into his house and listened to his appeal for help. Then in his late 40s, with closely cropped, curly black hair, a thick mustache and a gentle but stern demeanor, Jacky held a senior position in the Protestant Church of Maluku, which had more than 700 parishes across the region. As a younger man, Jacky had been inspired by the ideas of liberation theology, a Christian movement that emerged in Latin America to aid the poor and oppressed, and by popular uprisings against authoritarianism. He had spent decades helping rural communities in eastern Indonesia fend off unsolicited advances from extractive companies. Now Collin wanted Jacky to do the same for the Aruese.Jacky was wary. He knew how fraught things could get for indigenous groups who resisted government-backed projects. On his home island of Haruku, a short boat ride from Ambon, his own community had fractured when a mining firm tried to gain a foothold. Clashes between neighboring villages for and against the project had turned violent. Jacky’s side had tried to sue the company, but the conflict reached a decisive end only when villagers burned the firm’s camp to the ground. Now, Jacky wondered if the Aruese would be strongly united in their opposition to the sugar plantation, or if he might be walking into a situation that could spiral out of control.As the rain pattered down, Jacky and Collin formed a plan. They would invite Aruese students in Ambon to a candlelight vigil as an act of solidarity. Collin would gather his peers in a classroom at his school, and Jacky would lead them in prayer. Then they would all discuss how best to proceed.The Aru Islands’ total area is 8,570 square kilometers (3,310 square miles), about the size of Puerto Rico.The following night, Collin arrived with a dozen students. During Jacky’s service, they asked if they could sing a folk song that told the origin myth of Aru’s people. Jacky listened as they murmured the lyrics, recounting a quarrel between two brothers over a golden spear with supernatural powers for catching fish. The brothers’ infighting prompted God to strike their island with an earthquake and tidal wave, splitting it in two and forcing its inhabitants to set sail for the archipelago known today as Aru.But Jacky soon cut them off. The song had a deep cultural resonance, but the students sung it as if they were ashamed of their heritage. To Jacky, it spoke of a lack of spirit — spirit that would be direly needed if they were to confront the forces ranged against Aru.“Don’t start this struggle if you’re not proud of your identity as Aruese,” he warned. “If you are not, then the company will come and pay you, and pick you off one by one.“Sing it again,” he said. “More dynamic than you sing the national anthem.”They did, this time with more verve.At the end of the evening, they wrote two words on pieces of paper: SOS ARU.Jacky, center, stands with Collin, third from right, and the other students at the candlelight vigil in August 2013. The signs say, “Pray for Aru!”Over the coming months this phrase, and others like it, would become a clarion call for a grassroots movement that reverberated from Aru to Ambon, to Jakarta, the capital of Indonesia, and far beyond.It brought together indigenous men and women of all ages, a cast of outsiders who rallied to their cause, and supporters from around the globe. At stake were competing visions of development. The company and its political backers told the Aruese they were backward and poor, and that the only way out was to trust their fate to a faceless conglomerate. But the people of Aru took stock of the natural world that surrounded them, and they said no.It would soon become clear they were fighting not just against a plantation, but for something more fundamental — to make government accountable to the people, in a country where business interests have widely co-opted the levers of state power. It was a battle whose outcome would decide the fate of one of the world’s last great tracts of rainforest, and of the people whose lives and culture were entwined with it. Today their struggle resonates across the planet, as a growing global movement seeks to confront the same binary choice between prosperity and the environment that the Aruese decided, to profound effect, was false.But at first, it was just a dozen students, a priest and two words on paper.“That’s the movement starting,” Jacky would later say. “In that room.”II. ‘In the end, it comes down to power’last_img read more

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These rare pigs can dig it. With a tool, that is. And moonwalk too

first_imgArticle published by leilani A viral video shows a family of Visayan warty pigs (Sus cebifrons) using a piece of tree bark or branch to build a nest at a zoo in Paris.Tool use has been widely reported among vertebrates, particularly primates, but this is the first published study and first recorded video of pigs using tools.The study suggests that using a stick is a socially learned behavior, and expands the possibility of tool use and social learning among pig species.There are limited studies on the Visayan warty pig, a critically endangered species in its native Philippines, due to its dwindling population in the wild. PARIS — Priscilla grabs a piece of tree bark and uses it to dig the dirt in front of her. It’s classic tool use, the kind of thing primates are known to do, and it wouldn’t be remarkable, except that Priscilla is a female Visayan warty pig (Sus cebifrons), an endemic and critically endangered species in the Philippines famous for the Mohawk-like tuft of hair on its head and back. Now it’s got a new claim to fame: a penchant for using tools, according to a recent study.The study by Meredith Root-Bernstein, Trupthi Narayan, Lucile Cornier and Aude Bourgeois stems from a video they shot and that went viral of Priscilla and her family digging a nest with a tree branch, a behavior not commonly observed and recorded among pigs. The video was taken at the Ménagerie at the Jardin des Plantes in Paris, which holds several types of endangered species.“What is so exciting about pigs using tools? Pigs have long been maligned in many cultures and used as symbols of dirt, sloth, and avarice,” Root-Bernstein wrote in an email to Mongabay. “Even animal behavior researchers are not too interested in pigs despite recognizing their intelligence.”The study, published in the journal Mammalian Biology last month, details how a family of Visayan warty pigs uses tools during the nest-building process, after Root-Bernstein “observed that the same piece of bark originally used as a digging tool remained visible [but] … the piece of bark was observed at different positions within the enclosure, always lying next to a recently created nest pit” in 2015.The researchers returned to the Ménagerie during nesting seasons in October 2016 and 2017 to observe the family of four warty pigs, which were seen digging, rooting and even “moonwalking” — a backward shuffle in which they drag their feet to pile dirt, leaves and mulch into a mound around their nest, and reminiscent of Michael Jackson’s popular dance move.Priscilla, the innovator of digging with a stick, isn’t the only one capable of manipulating a tool. Her mate, Billie, and their offspring, Beatrice and Antonia, mimicked her with varying results, the researchers observed. The female pigs used the sticks in a rowing motion while Billie attempted to use the stick but wasn’t as prolific. “When used by the females, it altered their digging affordance, and had a specific placement in the nest-building sequence,” the study says.Billie, however, was always the first to initiate moonwalking. Indeed, his hands-on involvement in the entire nesting process was unexpected. “Since it is reported that adult male Sus cebifrons do not normally participate in nest building despite living year-round with females it is surprising that the adult male Billie performed aspects of the tool use behavior as well as participating in leaf collection, layering of leaves in the nest, and moonwalking,” the study says.So how did the warty pigs learn to dig with tools? The study speculates the “excited head tossing” they perform when holding leaves or leafy branches at the beginning stages of nesting could be the origin of this behavior.“Research on this species will help improve their welfare and care,” said Bourgeois, the head veterinarian at the Ménagerie. “Such a major finding is of primordial importance for increasing knowledge about this little known species and to raise awareness about the threats that face Visayan warty pigs and their habitats.”Priscilla and Billie were born in captivity in 2007 and 2009, respectively. Their offspring, later named Antonia and Beatrice for the study, were born in 2012. The Ménagerie is part of a network of zoos under the European Endangered Species Program (EEP) that breeds Visayan warty pigs. There were 1,387 Visayan warty pigs across all EEP-associated zoos in 2015.The species is endemic to six islands in the Visayas group of islands in the Philippines. But hunting for both meat and skin has driven the species to extinction in four islands. Remaining wild populations are limited to the islands of Panay and Negros.Citation:Root-Bernstein, M., Narayan, T., Cornier, L., & Bourgeois, A. (2019). Context-specific tool use by Sus cebifrons. Mammalian Biology, 98, 102-110. doi:10.1016/j.mambio.2019.08.003Banner image of a Visayan warty pig (Sus cebifrons) in Plackendael zoo in Belgium, a part of the European Endangered Species Program (EEP). Image by Ad Meskens / Wikimedia Commons [CC BY-SA 4.0] FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Animal Behavior, Animals, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Research, Video, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Conservation Network last_img read more

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Indonesia zoning plan hurts fishers, favors coal and oil, activists say

first_imgActivists have criticized a draft zoning plan for coastal areas in East Kalimantan province meant to help resolve territorial disputes between local communities and business interests.They contend the plan instead benefits the coal, oil and gas, and plantations industries at the expense of fishing communities.Among its provisions are generous concessions for coal and oil and gas infrastructure that would require land reclamation in coastal waters currently used by traditional and small-scale fishers.The plan also calls for resettling nearly 140,000 households from displaced fishing communities onto an area of land smaller than 50 football fields. JAKARTA — Environmental activists in Indonesia have slammed a proposed zoning plan for coastal areas in eastern Borneo that they say will hurt the livelihoods of local fishing communities in favor of the extractives and plantation industries.The government of the province of East Kalimantan has for the past few years been drafting the plan, referred to as RZWP3K, with an eye to resolving land disputes in coastal areas and small islands. These conflicts typically pit local communities against mining, agriculture and tourism businesses, and part of the plan is to designate areas for fishing grounds, conservation and other maritime purposes.But the latest draft of the plan, presented at a public hearing on Nov. 27, drew criticism from the People’s Alliance for Maritime Justice, a coalition of environmental NGOs.“The zoning plan for East Kalimantan must be rejected because it isn’t drafted for the interests of the people, particularly that of the fishermen,” Seny Sebastian, from the Mining Advocacy Network (Jatam), one of the NGOs in the alliance, said in a statement.The group’s key objections are that the plan, as it stands, would unfairly benefit the coal and oil and gas industries; allow reclamation activities by property developers; and permit the building of infrastructure for large-scale logging and plantation activities.Activists from the People’s Alliance for Maritime Justice express their opposition to the East Kalimantan provincial zoning plan for coastal areas and small islands. Image courtesy of the Mining Advocacy Network (Jatam).In particular, the alliance says the draft plan calls for the development of roads and oil refineries across 752,180 hectares (1.86 million acres) of land in the two coastal cities of Bontang and Balikpapan, Indonesia’s oil hub. That development would involve reclamation activities in waters currently used by local fishing communities, the group says.The draft also allocates 46,758 hectares (115,542 acres) of land in coastal areas and small islands for oil and gas production, and 1.3 million hectares (3.2 million acres) of the province’s 3.7-million-hectare (9.1-million-acre) maritime zone for offshore drilling. More than half of that offshore area, or 719,000 hectares (1.78 million acres), constitutes the fishing grounds of local fishers, according to the alliance.On the coast, the alliance says the draft would allow mining on 65,460 hectares (161,755 acres) of karst landscape. It would also permit the construction of port terminals specifically for coal, oil and gas. Under the draft, these terminals would overlap into two protected areas — Apar Bay Nature Reserve and Adang Bay Nature Reserve — and the ecosystem of Balikpapan Bay.East Kalimantan is already Indonesia’s coal-mining heartland, with an estimated 28 percent of the country’s reserves of the fossil fuel. More than half of the province’s total land area has been allocated for mining concessions. Balikpapan, the province’s biggest city, is home to oil and gas refineries and a busy seaport, while Kutai Kertanegara district, further inland, is Indonesia’s biggest coal producer.A coal barge traveling down the Mahakam River in East Kalimantan. The province holds more than a quarter of Indonesia’s coal reserves. Image by Tommy Apriando/Mongabay Indonesia.At the same time, the activists say, the zoning plan offers little in the way of assistance for the provinces fisheries sector, made up largely by traditional and small-scale fishers. It allocates just 25 hectares (62 acres) of land — an area smaller than 50 football fields — to resettle nearly 140,000 households from displaced fishing communities.The plan would also designate an area of 2.6 million hectares (6.4 million acres) for fishing, but activists say this proposed zone is farther out to sea than traditional and small-scale fishers can reasonably reach.“This means that they will have to compete with big vessels carrying coal,” Seny added.Similar zoning plans elsewhere across Indonesia have also been criticized by activists, who say they end up discriminating against coastal communities. In Sumatra’s Riau Islands province, a reclamation project prescribed in the local zoning plan sparked a corruption investigation earlier this year in which the provincial governor was arrested.Activists have called on local governments to suspend the adoption of zoning plans and review those already passed into bylaws. East Kalimantan is one of 13 provinces in Indonesia, alongside the capital, Jakarta, still drafting their respective plans. Twenty-one other provinces have passed their plans into bylaws as of June this year.“The RZWP3K is supposed to give positive impacts,” said Susan Herawati, secretary-general of the People’s Coalition for Fisheries Justice. “Coastal communities are supposed to be the main actor in the development of coastal areas and small islands.”A tropical rainforest abuts against a coral reef on Maratua Island, East Kalimantan. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Activism, Coastal Ecosystems, Conservation, Environment, Environmental Activism, Environmental Law, Environmental Politics, Fishing, Governance, Islands, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Mining Article published by Basten Gokkoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Amazon’s Mura indigenous group demands input over giant mining project

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored In 2013, Potássio do Brasil, a subsidiary of the Canadian merchant bank, Forbes & Manhattan, began drilling exploratory wells for a giant potassium mine — a highly profitable venture that would allow transport of potash along the Amazon and Madeira rivers. Potash is a vital fertilizer for Brazil’s rapidly growing soy agribusiness industry.One big problem: the company was reportedly drilling inside the Jauary Indigenous Reserve and directly adjacent to other indigenous reserves and communities. Indigenous people said that the ancestral lands being drilled, though sometimes not demarcated as being within their reserves, were vital for hunting and other livelihoods.The mine was licensed in 2015. However, legal irregularities resulted in the project stalling. Finally, a court settlement was reached in which the Mura communities would be given the legal right of consultation — a democratic process of self-determination guaranteed under international law rarely practiced in the remote Brazilian Amazon.How the Mura will vote — and whether that vote will be respected by municipal, state and federal governments; agribusiness; a transnational mining giant; and international investors — remains to be seen. However, analysts agree that the result could have far reaching consequences for rural traditional settlements across the Amazon. Tuxaua (chief) Aldinelson Pavão stands beside an exploratory well drilled by Potássio do Brasil. Image by Thais Borges.Mongabay sent a reporting team to Brazil’s Amazonas state in 2019 to cover an ongoing conflict between indigenous people and a company that wants to put a gigantic potash mine within and next to their Amazon reserves. This is Part 2 of a 2 part story. Part 1 can be found here.AUTAZES, Amazonas state, Brazil — We travelled first by canoe through flooded forest, then afoot, scrambling to keep up with the tuxaua (chief) of Urucurituba village. Aldinélson Moraes Pavão set a brisk pace along a narrow path through thick vegetation, passing clearings for small-scale cattle ranching. In the distance we saw dense tropical forest, where, Pavão told us, the Mura indigenous people hunt.Then we reached the exploratory wells, deep vertical shafts dug into the earth by a mining company, Potássio do Brasil, on property that the Mura claim as ancestral lands, but which the firm contends is common land held by the government. The wells had been securely sealed, covered with concrete plates, and clearly identified as property of Potássio do Brasil.The Mura’s discovery of the drilling, first made in 2013, sparked years of conflict which continue to reverberate today between indigenous communities, Potássio do Brasil, the Brazilian government, and the municipality of Autazes, which straddles the Madeira and Amazon Rivers 100 kilometers (62 miles) east of Manaus, the capital of Amazonas state.Most of the Mura were outraged at the company’s attempt to occupy the land. “I am 47 years old,” Pavão told Mongabay. “I was born here and brought up here. My parents and grandparents too. So I won’t be told by Potássio, that comes from outside, that this land isn’t ours. It is our land and they are the invaders.” The indigenous people say that they have another reason to be angry: they claim the firm drilled other wells inside the Jauary Indigenous Reserve, in an area occupied by a sacred burial ground.“When the [other] indigenous leaders realized what was going on,” people from surrounding communities rushed to aid the Mura, remembered Gilmara Lelis, the tuxaua from Sampaio village. “We are all one people. If they interfere with one village, they’re interfering with all of us.”The drilling only stopped when the indigenous people threatened to set fire to the company’s machinery.The conflict that has consumed Autazes for the past six years isn’t only local, it’s international: Potássio do Brasil is a subsidiary of the giant Canadian conglomerate, Forbes & Manhattan (F&M), a leading private merchant bank with a global focus on the resource, agriculture, technology and telecommunications sectors.The firm says their mining claim is not on indigenous land. Rather, the rich lode of potash ore — invaluable as fertilizer to Brazilian soy plantations — is located about ten kilometers (6.4 miles) from the Paracuhuba Indigenous Reserve, and eight kilometers (4.2 miles) from the Jauary Indigenous Reserve, both of which have been demarcated and recognized by the Brazilian government. The mining claim also lies near two other indigenous communities, neither as yet demarcated: Urucurituba village, ten kilometers (6.4 miles) away, and, closest of all, Soares village, just two kilometers (1.4 miles) from the mine site.The company argues that the land where they want to put the potash mine, being non-demarcated, is open for their use. Guilherme Jácome, Project Development Director at Potássio do Brasil, told Mongabay: “All of the mine and the area where potash ore will be extracted lies outside indigenous land.”However, Carlos Marés, former president of FUNAI, Brazil’s indigenous affairs agency, and one of the nation’s leading authorities on indigenous rights, has a different understanding.He points out that the 1988 Brazilian Constitution enshrines the principle of the original right of indigenous people, providing them with an inalienable right to ancestral lands. He explains that, if any lands are permanently inhabited by indigenous groups, and are necessary for their physical and cultural survival, then they are indigenous.“Indigenous land is indigenous, whether or not it has been demarcated, which is after all only an administrative act of marking out the limits,” Marés concluded.A map showing the overlap and proximity of indigenous reserves and potash mining claims. Image by Mauricio Torres.A flawed licensing processBefore it drilled the exploratory wells in 2013, Potássio do Brasil registered requests for prospecting rights and received authorization from the National Department of Mining Research (DNPM), the government regulatory body then in charge of mining activities.The company plans to open two wells, each seven or eight meters (23 to 26 feet) across and an underground mine about 800 meters (2,600 feet) deep. It will need to build a potash plant, a port on the Madeira River, and a 130 kilometer (81 mile) transmission line to link the company into the national grid.The mining will produce large quantities of potentially damaging salt. Although the company says measures will be taken to prevent the salt leaching into the ground, aquifers, and rivers, the Mura are concerned that contamination could occur regardless, given the heavy rainfall, extensive annual flooding and heat that occurs each year — especially because the region is located in a floodplain.The company has carried out an Environmental Impact Study (EIS), as required by the licensing process. The EIS projected a “very high” number of impacts: putting pressure on public health and public services, changing the landscape, and creating an alteration in the reference points in the Indians’ social and cultural world. Clearly, such massive effects would be felt not only at the mine site, but for many miles around and inside reserves, while also disrupting indigenous activities and scaring off game.To comply with the legal requirement that it present the EIS results, the company held two public hearings, one in Autazes and the other in Urucurituba, but according to the Catholic Church’s Missionary Council (CIMI), few indigenous people attended. Pavão speculated as to why: “At the public hearing they only spoke about what was going to be good for the community. They said nothing about the negative impacts.”Maria José, a teacher in one of the communities, did attend. She remembers that in the beginning the company’s positive spin evoked “potash fever” in the villages, with young people enthused by the possibility of mining company jobs. “We spoke calmly to them, talking, showing videos, telling them what would happen in the future,” she recalled. “We managed to bring down the fever in the villages, but in the [larger] towns it has been more difficult.”Governor José Melo grants Potássio do Brasil an environmental license in July 2015. Image by Tabajara Moreno / SECOM.Licensing irregularities stall projectThe potash mine is an ambitious undertaking, with the EIS describing it as “exceptionally large” and “with great potential for pollution.” As a result, in accordance with the 2011 Complementary Law 140, the Amazonas Institute for Environmental Protection (IPAAM), a state agency which certifies small mining projects, should have handed the project over to IBAMA, the federal government’s environmental agency.But that didn’t happen. Instead, IPAAM issued a prospecting license to Potássio do Brasil in 2015. It did so, even though FUNAI had not yet analyzed the impacts on indigenous communities, an obligatory step in the process. Remarkably, the license that was approved included the Jauary territory, an already demarcated indigenous reserve, which is illegal.Still, with all the needed approvals in place, it seemed Potássio do Brasil would soon get its project underway. Construction of the mining complex was slated for 2016.But that was not to be.The Public Federal Ministry, a group of independent public prosecutors, asked the courts to cancel the license, arguing that the permits were issued in an irregular manner, and to assure that “a full, prior and informed consultation” was held with indigenous communities, as required under International Labour Organization Convention 169, which Brazil has signed.Prosecutor Fernando Soave. Image by Thais Borges.At pre-trial negotiations, Potássio do Brasil agreed to the license cancelation. It also agreed to fund the consultation. And to carry out that plan, it deposited R$350,000 (US$87,500) in an account held by the Amazon Pact Institute, an NGO based in southern Amazonas state.The inclusion of the Jauary reserve in the EIS proved particularly objectionable. A prosecutor involved in the case, Fernando Soave, declared: “Mining cannot occur on fully established indigenous reserves. That is not in dispute. The consultation we are holding is over whether or not mining should be permitted on land outside the reserves, where nevertheless it will have an impact on indigenous land.”Later, Potássio do Brasil excluded the Jauary reserve from the mine area. Which is why the company can say today that it has no plan to mine on indigenous land. But the indigenous communities suspect that if the project goes ahead the company will move onto disputed territory they regard as indigenous but which the company does not; especially Soares village, which the Indians claim is their territory but which hasn’t been demarcated and probably won’t be in the near future, as President Jair Bolsonaro has declared that he will not demarcate a single centimeter during his administration.The current status of Soares was not confirmed for this story by either the MPF or Potássio do Brasil.A house in Urucurituba village. Local indigenous people worry how the potash mine will impact their lives and livelihoods. Image by Thais Borges.The consultation beginsThe consultation as agreed upon by all parties will include all of the Mura villages in the municipalities of Autazes and Careiro da Várzea, as well as all traditional riverine communities that will be affected by the mine and its operation.Before conducting the consultation, the Mura first had to agree to the form they wished it to take. “Potássio do Brasil wanted a consultation without a protocol [an official procedure with rules] to be carried out at a public hearing,” said prosecutor Soave. “But the Indians decided that they wanted an [officially stipulated] protocol.”Anthropologist Bruno Caporrino advised the indigenous communities in the shaping of the protocol. A central task, he said, was to get the Indians to understand their rights as citizens. “The underlying theme in all the discussions was to differentiate public policies from favors, to get [indigenous people] to grasp that they had the right to have rights.”According to Caporrino, the state has never had a strong presence in Amazonia, so it has been the rural elites who have handed out rudimentary public services. With the state still absent in rural areas, it’s hard to change that mentality, he explained: “There comes a point, after having a third child die from malaria, that an Indian begs a company to at least build a health post in the village.”Anthropologist Bruno Caporrino. Image by Thais Borges.In the early days, Potássio do Brasil tried to win over indigenous people by offering old-style, paternalistic favors. According to a report drawn up by the MPF in support of a formal protocol, the company offered various deals and percs, promising to build schools and to give money to leaders, in exchange for project support.However, indigenous leaders rejected the company’s approach and began carefully, in consultation with their communities, to draw up the kind of protocol they wanted. First the people had to decide who among them had the right to vote. After long discussion, they determined that Indians living in towns would be excluded and only those living in villages — and thus the ones to be directly affected — would be authorized to vote. Polling, they determined, would take place at formal meetings with minutes.The affected area would be divided into six regions with three voting cycles. At each level of voting, the Indians would attempt to reach a consensus, but, if after three rounds of balloting, consensus didn’t emerge, then the Indians would accept a majority vote.But — and this is crucial — they agreed that project approval must gain the support of at least 75 percent of voters. “They decided against a simple majority because they feared that, with [as much as] 49 percent of the population unhappy, the community would be riven in two,” explained Caporrino.“Agreeing on the protocol was in itself a victory,” said Pavão, who noted that the democratic process hammered out by all can be used not just once, but again and again in future on other divisive issues.In July of 2019, the indigenous communities handed over their approved protocol to the Federal Justice in Amazonas State. The consultation is now underway.Francisco, the tuxaua of Taquara village. Image by Mauricio Torres.Democracy at workFrancisco, the tuxaua of Taquara village, urged that the indigenous communities finally get their hands on the facts: “The protocol is going to force both the government and the company to talk about what is good and what is bad about the project. The good part is that it will bring jobs. The bad part is the impact it will have on the environment and on our people, because a lot of outsiders will be coming in, who can bring in illness and prostitution.”No one knows exactly how long the consultation process might take. “It could be decided in the first cycle or take five months or even 15 months. But it will certainly be done within a year and half,” Caporrino predicted. And no one knows what their communities will decide.But Potássio do Brasil’s Jácome is confident: “We believe that, once they know the project and the plans and programs that have been drawn up for the Indians, the Mura people in Autazes and Careiro da Várzea will accept the project.” And, even if they turn it down, he believes there is a way forward. “If the Mura people don’t agree, we are open to finding out why and adapting the project, so that we can find a solution that is viable for everyone: the company, the community and the government.”Tuxaua (chief) Yuaka Mura, also known as José Claudio Mura, a coordinator for the Mura Indigenous Culture. Image by Mauricio Torres.Some indigenous leaders say, however, that they will never be convinced. One indigenous chief, commonly known by his Brazilian name, José Claudio Mura, but who prefers his indigenous name, Yuaka Mura, remains adamantly opposed. Yuaka Mura, a coordinator for the Mura Indigenous Culture, a militant indigenous movement, declared emphatically: “We don’t want mining on our land. We have seen the cost of mining in other parts of Brazil. It doesn’t have a future.”Caporrino explains that the people have three voting options: “Yes, No, or Yes if….” That third option would mean that the Mura want the mine to go ahead, but only after certain conditions are met. For instance, the people could demand that all of their ancestral land be demarcated.One nagging doubt hangs over the process: will the result of the indigenous consultation be binding or can authorities simply ignore it?The jurist Carlos Marés noted that the idea behind the consultation is to reach a mutually acceptable settlement. “If the State decides to push ahead [with the mine] without indigenous agreement, it will have to use an iron fist.”This is the first time that the Mura have been properly consulted about their future and it is a landmark in their attempt to halt the takeover of their land by outsiders. But, even if in the end they vote “no,” the people may still face a fierce struggle in getting the powerful forces supporting the potash mine to accept their final decision — going up against a juggernaut of municipal, state and federal governments; agribusiness; a transnational corporate giant; and international capital investors.How the Mura vote — and what happens after that vote — in this remote Amazonian municipality could have far-reaching consequences well beyond the making of a potash mine. What happens here could set a legal precedent for indigenous and traditional communities across Brazil as they face intensifying development pressures, and help rural peoples gain some control over the many unprecedented challenges to their way of life.Banner image caption: A child preparing fish in a Mura community. Image by Mauricio Torres.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Map showing demarcated indigenous lands and non-demarcated ancestral lands claimed by indigenous peoples, as well as potash exploratory wells and the Potássio do Brasil mine. Image by Mauricio Torres.center_img Agriculture, Agrochemicals, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Mining, Amazon People, Amazon Soy, Conservation, Controversial, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Featured, Forests, Green, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Mining, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Mining, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation last_img read more

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Flèche wallonne : Tom Wirtgen a tenu parole

first_img«C’est une belle expérience. Je voulais figurer dans l’échappée matinale et j’y suis allé en faisant mon travail, je ne peux que me montrer satisfait», rappelait Tom Wirtgen à l’issue de la course, mercredi.Le Luxembourgeois de l’équipe Wallonie-Bruxelles souhaitait également terminer la course. C’est ce qu’il a fait, même si sur la ligne, il fut le dernier coureur à arriver, il est parvenu à hisser sa grande carcasse en haut de l’impressionnant mur de Huy.Récit d’une belle épopée : «L’échappée est partie après vingt minutes de course. On s’est regroupés à cinq coureurs (NDLR : K. Brouwman, J. Rosskopf, K. Van Rooy, R. Carpenter), notre avance maximale est montée à un peu plus de cinq minutes. Moi, je suis resté devant pendant près de 130 kilomètres, mais j’ai dû lâcher prise dans la première ascension du mur de Huy. Je ne pouvais plus suivre, mais dès que j’ai été rattrapé par le peloton, je me suis mis à l’abri et je n’ai été lâché que dans l’avant-dernière ascension. Ensuite, je me suis accroché car je voulais finir. C’est que j’ai fait et je suis content de ça…» Partager Ce n’était toutefois pas simple de grimper alors que le public commençait à descendre. «Les policiers me faisaient le passage et j’ai pu aller au bout. J’ai essayé de grimper à ma main, mais en haut t’es quand même à bloc. Au final, ce n’est pas mal pour une première participation. Mes dirigeants étaient contents de mon boulot, c’est le principal», poursuivait ainsi Tom Wirtgen. Il était de retour mercredi soir au Luxembourg. Et dimanche, il sera prêt pour disputer son premier Liège-Bastogne-Liège qui passera pas très loin de Hostert où il réside…D. B.last_img read more

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Discriminatory hiring practices at GECOM

first_imgDear Editor,It is appalling to note that the Guyana Elections Commission (GECOM) seems to be engaged in widespread discriminatory employment practices in this postmodern era. Persons were invited to attend training on October 12 and 13, 2018, but when those who believed that God’s Sabbath is still binding on mankind turned up on October 13 to participate in the training, they were prevented from attending the sessions for that day.How can this be fair? Many persons studied the manual, which was distributed about a week beforehand, knowing it was impossible to attend training on day one. I am sure if they were given a chance they would have done exceptionally well on the remaining evaluations, especially the final one.It is indeed sad to note that in a country like Guyana, where the Constitution clearly prohibits the discrimination of individuals based on their religious affiliation, the rights of persons are still being blatantly violated.The Constitution under the Prevention Of Discrimination Act 1997 clearly states that, “It shall be unlawful for any person who is an employer or any person acting or purporting to act on behalf of a person who is an employer, in relation to recruitment, selection or employment or any other person for purposes of training, apprenticeship or employment, to discriminate against that person based on their religious affiliation….” The training officials seem to be more powerful than the laws of Guyana.One GECOM officer even mentioned that if persons cannot put GECOM first, it makes no sense you attend the training. In the same manual used by the GECOM to train polling day staff, it is noted that no person should be prevented from voting based on their religious affiliation, hence the use of the various holy books for taking oaths on Election Day.Then how can persons be prevented from training and working based on their religious affiliation? Seems like double standards to me. Reading the article by an aggrieved citizen in Wednesday’s KN, I realised that the problem was not confined to one centre. Persons at Cumberland, Vrymens Erven and All Saints were all turned away for the same reasons. More persons need to come forward and let the public know about what is taking place at these training centres.I think the Leader of the Opposition was right when he pointed out that GECOM employs unfair and discriminatory hiring practices.The only thing left for GECOM to do is to state pointedly that Seventh-day Adventists are not welcome to be trained as polling day staff. But you know what; they cannot because that would be illegal.Sincerely,Victim ofdiscriminationlast_img read more

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Sparendaam man fined for larceny

first_imgRoy Alves of Sparendaam, East Coast Demerara was on Friday arraigned before Georgetown Magistrate Leron Daly on two charges of simple larceny. The first charge alleged that, on January 24, he stole one green handbag containing keys and an undisclosed sum of Guyanese currency, property of Ms Chester (only name given). The second charge stated that on February 1 he stole one pedal cycle, property of James Davidson.Alves admitted to the first charge and was fined $60,000 with an alternative of six months’ imprisonment.He, however, denied the second charge and was remanded to prison. The case will continue on March 13.last_img read more

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