‘We’ve seen this before in cricket’ – Windies U19s happy as controversial run-out seals win against Zimbabwe

first_imgCHITTAGONG, Bangladesh (CMC): West Indies stormed into the quarter-final of the Under-19 World Cup with a dramatic two-run win over Zimbabwe amid controversy over a disputed run-out at Zahur Ahmed Chowdhury Stadium, Chittagong here yesterday. The Caribbean’s side victory stunned a crestfallen Zimbabwe and is being overshadowed by what is known as the “Mankad” controversy. Windies pacer Keemo Paul broke the stumps and appealed for a run-out against non-striker, Richard Ngarava, at the start of the final over of the innings. Ngarava, whose bat appeared to be on the line as the bails came off, was given out after the umpires referred the situation to video review. “Cricket is a game of glorious uncertainties,” declared the West Indies captain, Shimron Hetmyer. “We’ve seen this in cricket before. It’s probably not in the spirit of the game, but we’re happy to have won.” A blazing half century from Shamar Springer and a destructive four-wicket haul from Alzarri Joseph highlighted the West Indies victory, which at one stage seemed beyond their reach. Springer top scored with 61 from 69 balls, smashing seven fours and two sixes as Zimbabwe, who chose to field, restricted West Indies to 226 for nine from 50 overs. Springer and Tevin Imlach, who scored 31, compiled 45 runs for the fourth wicket to help rebuild the innings, which slipped to 97 for the loss of three wickets. Imlach struck three fours in a patient and stubborn knock in which he also shared an opening stand of 42 with Gidron Pope, who gathered 30. A fiery spell from pacer Alzarri Joseph, four for 30, rocked the Zimbabwe top-order, reducing them to 97 for the loss of three wickets. However, opener Shaun Snyder with a top score of 52 and middle order batsmen Adam Keefe chimed in with 43 as Zimbabwe appeared to be coasting to their target nicely placed at 209 for six with five overs remaining. But when Springer returned to break a 62-run stand between Keefe and Wesley Madhevere in the 45th over the tide turned in favour of the West Indies. Springer, who picked up two for 16 and was named Man-of-the-Match, trapped Keefe lbw and then bowled Madhevere for 21, while Rugare Magarira was run out for a duck to leave the last pair needing 10 more for victory. The young Zimbabwe cricketers inched within three runs of victory, only to have their plans spoiled when Paul removed the bails. “We got so close, no comment about it. I don’t have anything to say right now,” said the Zimbabwe captain, Brandon Mavuta. “No comment.” Although the dismissal was within the rules of the game, departures of this kind tend to revive debate about sportsmanship. Mankadding was named after the Indian player Vinoo Mankad, who removed the bails to claim a run-out against a non-striker in Australia in 1947. Two years ago, Sri Lanka’s Sachithra Senanayake ran out Jos Buttler of England in similar fashion during a one-day international at Edgbaston. SCOREBOARD WEST INDIES U19s G Pope lbw b Magarira             30 T Imlach†          c †Murray b Madhevere            31 K Carty c †Murray b Madhevere            8 S Hetmyer*       run out (Matigimu)                    17 S Springer        st †Murray b Ives                      61 J Goolie            run out (Mashinge/Magarira)                  12 K Paul  c & b Mavuta               14 M Frew lbw b Magarira             7 R John  not out  16 A Joseph          c & b Magarira             0 O Smith            not out  16 Extras   (lb 1, w 10, nb 3)           14 Total    (9 wickets; 50 overs)      226 Fall of wickets 1-42, 2-55 , 3-85, 4-130, 5-164 , 6-171 , 7-188 , 8-191, 9-191. Bowling: Ngarava 5-0-41-0 (3nb, 2w), Mashinge 5-0-26-0 (2w), Magarira 10-1-28-3 (1w), Madhevere 10-0-48-2, Matigimu 6-0-33-0, Mavuta 10-0-34-1 (4w), Ives 4-0-15-1. ZIMBABWE U19s Zimbabwe Under-19s innings (target: 227 runs from 50 overs) S Snyder          lbw b Pope                  52 B Sly    b Joseph                     5 R Murray†         b Joseph                     4 J Ives   c Goolie b Frew            37 W Mashinge      c †Imlach b Joseph                  23 A Keefe            lbw b Springer              43 B Mavuta*         c †Imlach b Joseph                  1 W Madhevere    b Springer                    21 K Matigimu       not out  10 R Magarira        run out (Hetmyer)                      0          – R Ngarava         not out  1 Extras   (b 4, lb 8, w 14, nb 1)     27 Total     (all out; 49 overs)          224 Fall of wickets 1-36, 2-46, 3-97, 4-143, 5-145, 6-147, 7-209 , 8-217, 9-217, 10-224. Bowling: Joseph 10-1-30-4 (1nb, 2w), John 3-0-22-0 (1w), Smith 3-0-24-0 (2w), Goolie 10-2-30-0(1w), Pope 8-0-38-1, Frew 5-0-20-1(1w), Paul 6-1-32-0(2w), Springer 4-0-16-2(1w). Result: West Indies U19s won by two runs. Points: West Indies Under 19s (two), Zimbabwe Under 19s (0) Man-of-the-Match: Alzarri Joseph Toss:Zimbabwe Under 19s Umpires: A Raza, P Jones.last_img read more

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In Your Neighbourhood

first_imgMasters LeagueChristian Ambassadors were one of six winners in the INSPORTS St Catherine FA Masters Football League last Sunday.Christian Ambassadors defeated Flamingo 3-1 in Zone Two, while Maxfield clipped Spanish Town, also in the same zone. DB Basovak tagged Windsor Lion 2-0 and Above Rocks beat McCook’s Pen 2-1 in Zone One, while Eastern Strikers stopped Steadham 2-0 and veteran club Nautica got by Dunbeholden 1-0 in Zone Three. The competition continues tomorrow.Joy for Cedar Grove EstateThe Cedar Grove Estate community is still in a celebratory mood as their football club won its first York Pharmacy-sponsored Portmore Division Two Football League crown at the Dunbeholden playing field last Sunday.Cedar Grove Estate defeated Braeton United 3-0 courtesy of a second half hat-trick from Damion Jackson, that left the Braeton hopefuls in shock. The win saw Cedar Grove collecting one of the most coveted trophy in Portmore football and will now turn their attention to Division One duties next season.”This is pure joy for the community. We had a mini motorcade as we drove back to Cedar Grove Estate,” said Bryan Cunningham, president of Cedar Grove Estate FC.He added that hard work has paid off for his team, noting that Division One will take an extra effort and a high level of commitment for his players and executive body.Church cricket league starts this morningThe Power of Faith Ministries Church Cricket League will officially get under way this morning, after water woes forced its postponement last Saturday.Defending champions Power of Faith International will open their campaign breaking bread with their brother team, Power of Faith Development, in the curtain-raiser of a double-header at the Bridgeport Sports ground this morning, at 10 a.m. Faith Temple New Testament oppose Portmore Gospel Assembly at 2 p.m.The league will be played in a round robin format and the two top teams will advance to the final. Christian Gardens, Greater Portmore in INSPORTS Community League finalChristian Gardens and Greater Portmore Strikers will contest tomorrow’s final of the Portmore leg of the Institute of Sports (INSPORTS) Community Football League at Dunbeholden playing field at 3 p.m.They booked their spot after narrow semi-final victories last weekend at the Cedar Grove community playing field.Christian Gardens came from behind to overcome a stern test from Dunbeholden to win 5-4 on penalties, after playing to 1-1 stalemate after regulation and extra time. Jevonne Munroe (64th) scored for Christian Gardens and Ricardo Boothe (21st) netted for Dunbeholden.It was also another nail-biting battle in the feature game of the afternoon as Greater Portmore Strikers edged East West Strikers 6-5 on penalties, after both sides remained inseparable at 1-1 following full and extra-time. Mario Wilson (49th) equalised for Greater Portmore, after Jevoh Robert (30th) had given East West Strikers the lead.INSPORTS St Catherine FAlast_img read more

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Fires in Brazil’s Amazon have devastating consequences

first_imgAmazon Conservation, Amazon Rainforest, Climate Change, Deforestation, Featured, Fires, Forest Fires, Forests, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Tropical Rivers Article published by Genevieve Belmaker Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img According to Brazil’s space agency, INPE, the number of fires between Jan. 1 and Aug. 20 of this year is up 85 percent from the same period last year.It will take from decades to centuries for the forests to recover, and the impact on wildlife specifically is uncertain.What’s clear, though, is that the region’s hydrological and climatic status will change drastically if the situation continues to worsen. A dense layer of pollution has plagued the Brazilian cities of São Paulo, Manaus and Cuiabá for days on end, rolling in from the large number of fires burning mainly in the southern Amazon.The country’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE) revealed that this year has seen the most fires since measurements began in 2012. The institute recorded 74,155 fires between Jan. 1 and Aug. 20, 2019, an increase of 85 percent compared with the same period last year. The states most affected are Mato Grosso, with 14,000 fires, Pará (9,818), Amazonas (7,150), Tocantins (5,776) and Rondônia (5,604).Experts consulted by Mongabay Latam say that what is happening in Brazil is very serious and exceeds all forecasts, especially in a year that is not particularly atypical in terms of extreme weather events such as droughts. “This situation has been caused by humans who wanted to take advantage of the Amazon at any cost and it has got out of hand like never before,” said Dolors Armenteras, a biologist and professor at the National University of Colombia who has studied hotspots and fires in the Amazon biome for several years.DevastationIt took the blanketing of major urban centers before the world woke up to the gravity of what was happening in the Amazon, considered the lungs of the world and one of the most biodiverse regions on the planet.The cloud of pollution that covered the skies of cities such as São Paulo last week was the main trigger, when winds carried particulate matter from the Amazon jungle. Foster Brown, an environmental geochemist at the Woods Hole Research Center in Massachusetts, said the high levels of PM2.5 (the smallest particulate matter which can cause serious health problems when trapped in airways) was most concerning.Using data from PurpleAir, a monitoring platform for particulate matter, he showed that along the Peru-Brazil-Bolivia border in the Brazilian state of Acre, the concentration of PM2.5 exceeded 600 micrograms per cubic meter (µg/m³) on Aug. 16 and was close to 500 µg/m³ on Aug. 19. The maximum level recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is 25 µg/m³.“We have a high record of fire outbreaks and it’s taking up a large area of the Amazon. And not only there, but also in the Cerrado and Pantanal biomes,” said Carlos Durigan, the Brazil country director for the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). According to Durigan, this is very serious as the dry season has only just started, and can last until early November. August and September are the most critical months.Concentrations of PM2.5 on the Peru-Brazil-Bolivia border for Aug. 22 at 3 p.m. Image courtesy of Purpleair.com.Durigan said that what is happening is not just due to heat. “It’s also due to a weakening of environmental policies and the crisis of government monitoring agencies. We’re going through a very tough period,” he said.Liliana Dávalos, a biologist and researcher at Stony Brook University in New York, agrees. “Environmental regulations are not being complied with, in some cases they have even been repealed, and regional and national guidelines have been pointed out as openly benefitting land speculation, livestock and industrial agriculture. Policy changes represent an opportunity to transform the rainforest.”Dávalos acknowledged that this phenomenon occurs every year during the dry season and immediately increases the frequency of fires thereafter. However, she said that this year the fires have increased disproportionately by more than 60 percent from last year. That’s well below INPE’s estimate of an 85 percent increase, yet still alarmingly high.Indices of particulate matter PM2.5 at one of the monitoring points for the state of Acre, Brazil. Image courtesy of Purpleair.com.Armenteras emphasized the gravity of the situation.“There have been about 10,000 active outbreaks [of fire] in the last week,” she said. “A very general approximation would show that an active hotspot could be associated with affecting 100 hectares,” or around a million hectares (2.5 million acres) in that week.“This means we are talking about 7.5 million hectares potentially affected so far this year in Brazil,” Armenteras said — an area greater than the size of Ireland.“This is outside the checks that had been completed in the country to reduce deforestation and associated fires,” she added. “It’s very serious. We will have to wait a long time to have official figures on the areas that have burned.”In addition to this, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions increased exponentially after Aug. 10 “in an exaggerated manner,” Armenteras said, which is why the high levels of air pollution have become evident in Brazil’s rural areas and large cities.Biodiversity on high alertDurigan said there is a criminal element to the fires being set to clear huge areas for expanding large-scale agriculture and livestock operations, mainly in the southern Amazon. There is a great arc of deforestation there where protected natural areas and indigenous territories are being impacted.An image of the Amazon from space, blanketed by pollution. Image courtesy of Lauren Dauphin/NASA Earth Observatory, using MODIS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview and VIIRS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview, and the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership.Biodiversity is being hit hard. “We know that land-use change is one of the causes of biodiversity loss and that a million endangered species mentioned in the last IPBES report are at greater risk with events such as this,” Armenteras said, referring to the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services.Some species with low mobility, such as insects and vertebrates including turtles, lizards and amphibians, are unlikely to escape the fires. Armenteras said the consequences for fauna are yet to be well measured. In terms of vegetation, very old forests are being lost, which is generating more carbon emissions, which will be impossible to capture again.She said the huge problem is that much of the forests will not recover, even if they are not completely burned. “Scientific studies still don’t tell us how many years it will take to recover, but it takes decades, even centuries, for them to recover to just a little of what they were, so they won’t be the same again,” she said.Microbiota, soil microorganisms, are also lost, which is an issue that requires a lot more research, according to Armenteras.Winds carry ash to Brazilian cities far from the Amazon. Image courtesy of Lauren Dauphin/NASA Earth Observatory, using MODIS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview and VIIRS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview, and the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership.The increase in deforestation and the number of fires is something that should not be viewed in isolation from what may happen in the Amazon in the future. Dávalos said that that every fire dries up and exposes more soil, and leaves new areas of forest unprotected, making them easier to continue being cut down. “There are studies that show that the Amazon is entering a new regime of greater drought and will require more time for natural regeneration,” she said.Experts say that what is currently happening in Brazil should not be underestimated. If deforestation and fires continue, the effects will be devastating not only in Brazil, but in all Amazonian countries.Among other impacts, Dávalos said, the flow of water into the basins that comprise the Amazon will decline, affecting fishing and agriculture, deepening the threat crisis to species — from bromeliads and fungi to big cats and tapirs — and worsening regional and global climate change. “At this moment it is indispensable to grow the Amazon, to restore forests and jungles in order to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. By burning and cutting down forests, we are moving towards a near future of lower agricultural productivity, less food security and more social and economic instability,” she said.Satellite images show the displacement of pollution generated by fires in the Amazon. Image courtesy of NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS).Other organizations, including WWF, have also expressed concern about the fires in the Amazon. Ricardo Bosshard, director of WWF Chile, said this is not only a tragedy for the Amazon countries, but for the entire world, and that as the host country of the next climate change summit, he hopes Chile can “put the urgency of taking measures to strengthen policies against deforestation, as well as plans to reforest and restore native forests strongly on the agenda, as these are key issues for preventing forest fires and mitigating emissions.”Marina Silva, Brazil’s former environment minister, who participated in an event held in Bogotá on Aug. 22 by the Center for Sustainable Development Goals for Latin America and the Caribbean, said the environmental crisis is related to the ethical and political crisis in Brazil. “Principles and values must be clear so that policies are lasting,” she said.She added that the Amazon is being destroyed under a regressive government system that is ignoring the environment. “We have to mobilize for the Amazon. Resources of thousands of years cannot be sacrificed for the profit of a few decades. We need to think of a new model.”last_img read more

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As climate crisis deepens, wildlife adapts, maybe with lessons for us

first_imgAdaptation To Climate Change, Animal Behavior, Animals, Arctic Animals, Birds, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Mammals, Orangutans, Wildlife Shifts in the timing of lifecycle events, like reproduction or migration, are widely thought to be the most common response of wildlife to global warming.In recent years, pikas have been observed modifying their foraging habits in ways that may be behavioral adaptations to a changing climate.A long-term study in Kutai National Park on the island of Borneo in Indonesia has shown how extreme weather, brought by the intensifying El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle, is affecting the behavior, habitat requirements, feeding ecology and birth intervals of orangutans.Researchers have discovered that African penguins, may be falling into a sort of “ecological trap,” one that humans created through overfishing and climate change. Recent studies of Twitter posts have shown that people can be quick to shrug off extreme weather as normal. However, researchers are also finding that some wildlife — maybe better attuned to changes in the natural world around them — are adapting successfully to climate change.As the United Nations prepares to convene for the 2019 Climate Action Summit on September 23 in New York City, and for Climate Week (Sept. 22-29), Mongabay has gathered here some of our reporting, showcasing how three animals: the American Pika, orangutan and penguin are shifting their behaviors to face the challenges of a rapidly altering world.The American Pika beats the heatIt may be a tiny tailless mammal, but the American pika could teach humans a thing or two about adapting to the impacts of global climate change.Shifts in the timing of lifecycle events, like reproduction or migration, are widely thought to be the most common response of wildlife to global warming, and according to research in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, the scientific literature on the subject mostly bears that assertion out. Since behavioral responses were most noticeable in species with a lifespan of at least three years, the American Pika (Ochotona princeps) provides an apt example to explore.American pikas can alter their body temperature somewhat via posture, squeezing into a fluffy ball, a body posture with minimum surface area, to hold in heat during winter, or stretching out the surface area of their bodies to cool down in summer. In recent years, pikas have also been observed modifying their foraging habits in ways that may be behavioral adaptations to a changing climate. Photo Credit: J. Jacobson, from figure 4 of Beever et al (2017). doi:10.1002/fee.1502.Pikas don’t dig burrows and typically make their homes in alpine rockpiles at the base of cliffs, known as talus slopes, at high-elevations in western North America’s mountains. These relatives of rabbits and hares inhabit an expansive range as a species, but individuals don’t typically stray more than a kilometer from their stony habitats. And that has led to several distinct populations, which makes the pica an especially good species to study — population comparisons offer us a better understanding of localized responses to quick changing environmental conditions.For example, one population of more malleable pikas turned out not to be home bodies, but instead appear willing to seek out new cooler places to live as temperatures rise. They give up their old, hotter rockpiles and seek out new favorable and cooler microclimates nearby. This move allows the animals to remain more active during the daytime when ambient temperatures at their original talus habitat — frequently subjected to full sun — had turned much higher.Scientists think that pikas capable of adapting their behavior in this manner might have better chances of surviving as global warming advances.Another important area of adaptation that’s been observed in American pikas is thermoregulation. In the more northern parts of the species’ range, freezing temperatures in winter are severe. In response, pikas moderate their body temperature to some degree through posture — squeezing into a fluffy ball, a pose with minimum surface area, to hold in heat during winter; or stretching out their body surface area to cool down in summer.Read more at: The American pika: A case study in wildlife acclimating to climate changeOrangutans adjust their birth cyclesA long-term study in Kutai National Park on the island of Borneo in Indonesia has shown how extreme weather, brought by the intensifying El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle, is affecting the behavior, habitat requirements, feeding ecology and birth intervals of orangutans.Kutai’s protected habitat is one of the driest regions on the island and also the driest, least productive rainforest where orangutans can be found — in fact, it is the least wet of all current orangutan research sites. In this part of Borneo, the ENSO cycle is marked by periods of drought, interspersed with periods of normal rainfall and unusually heavy rains.Researchers found that the ENSO cycle influences the lives of Kutai’s orangutans in a surprising way. Much like humans, orangutan females don’t ovulate when their bodies are malnourished, especially during an El Niño drought, so bear no young during such periods.Interestingly, El Niños occur every six years on average, and Kutai orangutans possess an average inter-birth interval of 6.1 years — roughly in sync with the ENSO cycles. In comparison, orangutans in Sumatra reproduce every 8.75 years, and every 7.7 years in wetter central Borneo, meaning that orangutan mothers are still caring for their previous infant when the next El Niño comes along. This phenomenon is known as infant stacking and is rarely recorded in orangutans.Female and infant orangutan in Kutai National Park. The morio orangutans of east Borneo are usually much darker than their Sumatran cousins. Image by Orangutan Project Kutai.Because the Kutai great apes live in the most challenging and variable conditions of any orangutans, these findings could help conservationists understand how orangutans are currently adapting to difficult climatic conditions — a potentially invaluable insight as the human-caused climate crisis escalates in future.Read more at: For orangutans affected by El Niño, change unfolds over timePenguin survival depends on following food and breeding cuesThe emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) is the largest of all living penguin species and the only one that breeds during the Antarctic winter. A recent study gives a sneak peek into how the penguins might respond to disappearing stable sea ice conditions brought by climate change — for good or ill.Female emperor penguins lay their single eggs early in the Antarctic winter, around May, then take turns with their partners incubating the eggs and subsequently raising the chicks through the extremely cold winter months. That’s to ensure chicks are ready to leave their nesting ground by the summer months of January or February.Emperor penguins are the only known bird to never breed on dry land, preferring to hatch and rear chicks on frozen sea. But in 2016, following abnormally stormy weather, the sea ice of the emperor penguin colony at Halley Bay on the Weddell Sea broke up in October, long before the chicks had fledged and were ready to go out to sea. In 2017 and 2018, too, the ice broke up early, leading to the likely death of all the chicks at Antarctica’s second-largest colony of emperor penguins.But it’s not all gloom. Between 2016 and 2018, satellite images picked up a massive increase in the numbers of emperor penguins at the nearby Dawson-Lambton Glacier colony, located 55 kilometers (34 miles) to the south of Halley Bay. While the estimated number of adult penguin pairs at Dawson-Lambton had steadily decreased from 3,690 in 2010, to 1,280 in 2015, those numbers jumped up to 5,315 pairs in 2016; 11,117 in 2017; and 14,612 pairs in 2018 — a surprise to scientists.“It appears that many of the birds from Halley Bay have relocated to Dawson-Lambton, with the rest remaining at Halley Bay, but not breeding successfully,” the authors explained.So it seems that some penguins are using migration successfully as a fundamental climate change strategy. But alter surroundings too much or too quickly, and suddenly such adaptations might point organisms in the wrong direction. For example, across the ocean from Antarctica, on the southern tip of Africa, researchers have discovered that African penguins (Spheniscus demersus), an Endangered species according to the IUCN, may be falling into a sort of “ecological trap,” one that humans created through overfishing and climate change.Emperor penguins need intact sea ice until the chicks are ready to leave their nesting grounds. Image by Christopher Michel via Flickr (CC BY 2.0).Penguin numbers in South Africa’s Western Cape have plummeted by around 80 percent in recent decades. Biologists chalked this decline up to the disappearance of their favorite prey species, anchovies and sardines, from the Western Cape, the penguins’ preferred feeding ground to the west of their nesting sites. Overfishing and water chemistry changes — knock-on climate change effects — pushed breeding shoals of these fish eastward or wiped them out entirely.In the past, penguins in search of their favorite foods adapted by picking up on cues, such as the chemicals that plankton release and water temperature, to tell them where to find food. But now, when they follow cues to formerly reliable feeding spots, they’re more likely to find jellyfish and low-calorie gobies, rather than energy-dense sardines and anchovies. Without the right cues, they go hungry.Researchers used satellite monitoring to follow the movements of young penguins as they left their breeding grounds in Namibia and South Africa and headed into the open ocean to feed. The data revealed that the fledgling penguins’ behavior wasn’t flexible enough to accommodate the change to their environment, and instead led them to a subpar food source.Again, there could be a lesson here for humanity: escalating climate change is complex, and it may take ongoing trial and error to find the right survival response — with some individuals making viable choices, and others not.Read more at:Large emperor penguin colony suffers ‘catastrophic’ breeding failureEcological trap ensnares endangered African penguinsBanner image caption: Emperor penguin colony. Image by IIP Photo Archive via FlickrThis story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 news outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Willie Shubertlast_img read more

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Pan Borneo Highway development endangers the Heart of Borneo

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Conservation, Deforestation, Development, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Infrastructure, Logging, Mammals, Mining, Poaching, Poverty, Rainforests, Roads, Saving Rainforests, Sustainable Development, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation The construction of the Pan Borneo Highway in the Malaysian state of Sabah could disrupt the connections between wildlife populations and appears to run counter to the state’s conservation commitments, according to a new study.Passages under the highway and the rehabilitation of key forest corridors could lessen the impacts of the road, but the authors of the study caution that these interventions are expensive and may not be effective.They argue that planners should consider canceling certain sections of the road with the greatest potential for damaging the surrounding forest. A planned highway network in the Malaysian state of Sabah on the island of Borneo threatens the forests protected as part of the Heart of Borneo agreement made with Indonesia and Brunei, a new study has found.The goal of the agreement was to ensure the survival of continuous rainforest in central Borneo that houses wildlife populations, helps to mitigate climate change and fosters the island’s unique biology. But the construction and expansion of roads for the Pan Borneo Highway project could carve up the core of this ecosystem, the researchers who wrote the paper say.“We just know that these [roads] are going to have really severe effects in some of the last, sizable intact tracts of forest in Borneo and in the world,” William Laurance, a tropical ecologist at James Cook University in Australia and the study’s senior author, said in an interview.Construction for the Pan Borneo Highway in Sabah. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.The team’s research, published Sept. 18 in the journal PLOS ONE, plotted out the series of new and expanded roadway construction that’s part of the multi-year Pan Borneo Highway project in Sabah. The researchers compared these plans with the locations of intact forests, parks and reserves in the state, and then they modeled the repercussions on surrounding forests.“Some of the planned highways are relatively benign, but several are flat-out dangerous,” Sean Sloan, the study’s lead author and an ecologist at James Cook University, said in a statement. “The worst roads, in southern Sabah, would chop up and isolate Sabah’s forests from the rest of those in Borneo.”In particular, a planned stretch between the towns of Kalabakan and Sapulut near Sabah’s southern border with the Indonesian province of North Kalimantan would slice through the Heart of Borneo conservation area.The cross-border initiative covers some 220,000 square kilometers (85,000 square miles), and since its inception in 2007, Sabah has more than doubled the area of forests protected under state law. But to succeed, the Heart of Borneo requires transnational cooperation, as it spans parts the three countries with territory on the island.Constructing parts of the highway in sensitive areas of Sabah is tantamount to “plunging a dagger into the heart of Borneo’s endangered forests and wildlife,” Laurance said. In the researchers’ view, plans for the Pan Borneo Highway project should incorporate not just the impacts on parts of Sabah, but on the broader — and still relatively intact — ecosystem that the Heart of Borneo was designed to protect.The incursion of roads into previously untouched or lightly used forest often leads to a rise in deforestation, hunting, illegal mining and other damaging effects to the surrounding ecosystem.A Bornean elephant in the Kinabatangan River in central Sabah. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Borneo is home to some of the oldest rainforests on the planet, which have existed for 130 million years. In that time, the island’s unique species have flourished, evolving alongside a unique set of ecological dynamics.Laurance pointed to the mast fruiting of the towering dipterocarp trees that anchor the island’s forest ecosystems. Every few years, bunches of these trees fruit in a synchronized pulse, resulting in a cornucopia of food for bearded pigs (Sus barbatus), sun bears (Helarctos malayanus), orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) and a host of other hungry species. Some animals track these migrations across routes that extend for hundreds of kilometers.Sun bears follow the mast fruiting of dipterocarp trees on the island of Borneo. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.“That is a really important part of the Borneo story,” Laurance told Mongabay. “The migration was absolutely critical to Borneo.”But the construction and expansion of roads throw up potential hurdles to these migrations, as well as the movement of animals like Borneo’s dwarf variety of elephant, that are integral to the biology of the island, he said.Planners have proposed stitching together patches of rehabilitated forest to serve as corridors and building underpasses that would allow animals to move from one side of the road to another without endangering themselves or motorists. But Laurance and his colleagues question how effective they’ll be in maintaining meaningful connections between populations.“These proposed mitigation measures for these highways are very likely to be grossly inadequate,” Laurance said.Bearded pigs historically migrate to take advantage of mast fruiting. Image by Rufus46 via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).Forest rehabilitation and underpass construction are expensive, the researchers note. They calculated that a set of underpasses at eight proposed sites along the highway’s routes could cost $38 million or more, a figure that’s larger than the state’s annual budget for the Heart of Borneo initiative.The team’s analysis also suggests that Sabah’s plans miss crucial corridors that would help secure the links that are vitally important to the health of wildlife populations — if the animals choose to go along with these remedies, that is.“We also know that wildlife are often doggedly uncooperative in using these things,” Laurance said.Whether these strategies are successful also hinges upon the quality of the habitat that the corridors or underpasses stitch together.“When you build a new road you typically get a lot of forest destruction and fires, along with poaching, and that means vulnerable wildlife will largely avoid the area,” Mohammed Alamgir, an ecologist at James Cook and one of the paper’s authors, said in the statement. “Relying on underpasses to reduce road impacts is like trying to treat cancer with a band-aid.”Highway construction cuts through a mangrove in northwestern Sabah. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.The researchers suggest rethinking or canceling the parts of the highway with the most potential for causing damage, especially the Sapulut-Kalabakan section. If the Pan Borneo Highway goes forward there as planned, it’s likely to “cut off the head of the Heart of Borneo,” Laurance said, irreversibly altering one of the world’s critical repositories of biodiversity.“This a very obvious and dramatic existential threat to some of the last surviving intact forests” in Borneo, he said.Banner image of a Bornean orangutan by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonEditor’s note: William Laurance is a member of Mongabay’s advisory board.Citation:Sloan, S., Campbell, M. J., Alamgir, M., Lechner, A. M., Engert, J., & Laurance, W. F. (2019). Trans-national conservation and infrastructure development in the Heart of Borneo. PLOS ONE, 14(9), e0221947. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0221947FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Barnes tops Cridland Memorial

first_imgReigning national shotgun champion Shaun Barnes showed imperious form to hit a High Overall (HOA) score of 94 and win the 2016 Bernard Cridland Memorial Sporting Clays tournament at the Jamaica Skeet Club last Sunday.The five-time national shotgun champion dominated a field of 98 shooters, finishing two points ahead of runner-up Bruce Duquesnay, 92, and A Class first, Ruel Chung, 92.Barnes, who won the 2016 National Shotgun 200 sporting clays in July this year, returned after a three-month break to win again, convincingly, like he never left.The event witnessed a turnout of 98 shooters, and according to Jamaica Skeet Club president Khaleel Azan, this was “10 per cent more than 2015, it’s great for the sport and the Jamaica Skeet Club joins the Friendly Lodge 239 in thanking all the participants for their support”.He noted that the consistent performance of Barnes “must be congratulated”.Azan added that Oneal Brown and his team was setting a course totally on their own for the first time.”The consensus was that it was an excellent first attempt that satisfied the wide cross section of shooters; A to Hunters’ Class, Ladies, Juniors and Sub Juniors,” he noted.Meanwhile, there were class promotions for Omar Francis, to C Class and Jonah Subaran (13 years) to D Class.Matthew Morin was promoted to the E Class, while winners in the C, D and E classes all shot in the 80s.WinnersHOA Shaun Barnes 94R/U Bruce Duquesnay 92A ClassRuel Chung 92Robert Yap Foo 89Errol Ziadie 89B ClassKingsley Chin 87Nicholas Benjamin 87Jordan Thwaites 84C ClassBrandon Laing 84Matthew Josephs (Jr) 84Mark Harris 83D ClassOmar Francis 83Jordan Samuda 79Danzell Knight (Jr) 79E ClassJonah Subaran (sJr) 81Cameron Phang Sang (Jr) 80Mark Benjamin 77HuntersMatthew Morin 78Zaniel Knight (sJr) 72Nikolai Azan (sJr) 70LadiesRenee Rickhi 74Marguerite Harris 68Isabelle Chin (Jr) 63JuniorsMatthew Josephs 84Peter Mahfood 82Cameron Phang Sangh 80Sub JuniorsJonah Subaran 81Mark Desnoes 79Roman Tavares-Finson 79last_img read more

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GT Bank Seeks Legal Action to Recover US$76K from Ex-Minister

first_imgSeveral banking institutions are now seeking legal action to recover millions of United States dollars that they gave out as loans to individuals, including former government officials.One such person is the former Deputy Commence Minister Alphajour Ahmed Bah and his wife Mouna Cooper-Bah, who the Guaranty Trust Bank (GT Bank) claimed it disbursed the amount of US$60,000 for the completion of their unfinished building project on Marshall Highway, Margibi County, on the basis of a tripartite mortgage agreement. The couple and the bank entered into the Time Loan Agreement on April 13, 2015 for a 12 percent per annum interest, with a period of twenty-four months (2 years).But the bank, in its complaint to the Commercial Court, alleged that the defendants defrauded the loans, and is seeking the court’s intervention to hold them responsible to repay an amount of US$76,751.25, including any other costs of recovery consistent with the agreement.The project, the bank further said was about 40 to 50 percent completed when the Bahs requested for the loan.Madam Bah, who resides at 27 Hampton Street, Manchester, in the USA, consented to mortgage their building through a Power-of- Attorney, in favor of her husband, according to the document.Being serious about the loan, the Bahs also mortgaged their 10.5 lots of land situated in Ben Town, Schiefflin, Margibi County. They again promised to domicile rental proceeds from the properties as additional collateral for the loan.Despite the terms and conditions of the agreement, the court records claimed, the defendants (Bahs) left the country, without any knowledge of the financial institution and have neglected to repay said loan.Besides, the bank further claimed that it made several demands to the Bahs, in an effort to recover the money, but to no avail.The court is a legal alternative to recover the money, including other expenses. However, the Bahs are yet to respond to the GT Bank’s claim.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Nigerian Investors on Exploratory Investment Mission at NPA

first_imgNPA management and the Investment Delegation. -Ready to add value to the operations of the portA high power investment delegation from Nigeria has held talks with the management of the National Port Authority for possible investment in the port industry of Liberia.The head of delegation, and Chief Executive Officer of R.G. Holding International Limited, Ian Roche, said his team’s visit to Liberia is meant to explore business and investment opportunities that would help create jobs and add value to the operations of the port.Roche said Liberia has great investment potential where raw materials should be processed into finished products to generate more revenue and enhance growth and development.“We are here for an exploratory investment mission with a hope of adding value to the port through a legitimate win–win agreement where necessary,” Roche told the NPA management.NPA’s Deputy Managing Director for Administration, Celia Cuff–Brown, and Deputy for Operations Christopher Wisner, welcomed and briefed the investment delegation on the operations of the port following a tour, and expressed the management’s preparedness for investments that “must” impact the lives of the ordinary people.Madam Brown and Wisner informed the delegation about President Weah’s pro–poor agenda, adding that the government’s campaign for change remains paramount to the development of the country so as to improve the living condition of the citizens.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Leeds poised to land defender on two-year deal

first_img Souleymane Bamba in action for Leeds 1 Leeds United are poised to complete the signing of Souleymane Bamba from Palermo.The Ivory Coast international spent the second half of last season at Elland Road, making 19 appearances for the Yorkshire club.And now, according to Tuttomercatoweb, Leeds have made contact with Palermo to try and negotiate a permanent deal.It is thought that Bamba is pushing for the transfer to go through and will sign a two-year contract with the Championship side.last_img read more

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Watford eye shock Balotelli deal as Liverpool outcast targets Premier League stay

first_img Mario Balotelli 1 Liverpool flop Mario Balotelli wants to remain in the Premier League this season.The Italian forward has been linked with a move back to his homeland, with Sampdoria leading the chase to secure his signature.But according to Sky Italia, Balotelli wants to either stay and fight for his place at Anfield or move to another club in the top-flight.Watford are reported to be interested in the 25-year-old and Balotelli is thought to have a good relationship with the club’s Italian owners.Liverpool would prefer to sell Balotelli before the window closes but may be forced into negotiating a loan deal as clubs will find it difficult to match the player’s wage demands.last_img read more

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