FIFA denies Russia’s exclusion from the Qatar World Cup

first_imgFIFA denied on Wednesday that a final decision has been taken on the exclusion of Russia from the Qatar World Cup in 2022 in line with the four years of international isolation ordered by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) against Russian sport by doping. “We have no new information after the statement we made in December,” a FIFA spokesman told local agencies.FIFA insisted in its statement that it is in permanent contact with WADA to “clarify” the decision of its executive committee regarding Russian football.A source from the BeIn Sports channel had reported this morning that Russia had received the communication that its national team cannot participate in the next World Cup, something that the Russian Football Union and the Russian anti-doping agency, RUSADA, have categorically denied.The local press has already speculated on this possibility when WADA sanctioned Russian sport on December 9 for doping, but Russian sports authorities have always hoped that competitions organized by FIFA would be outside the penalty.In fact, The AMA sanction does not affect the celebration in 2020 of Eurocup matches in St. Petersburg or the Champions League final – both organized by UEFA – which will also host the former Tsarist capital in 2021. When announcing the sanction, the head of the AMA Compliance Review Committee, Jonathan Taylor, warned that the sanction does affect such soccer competition and warned that, even if the Slavic country qualifies for the tournament, a team representing Russia “cannot participate.” Although, he clarified that, as in the cases of other sports disciplines, if FIFA starts up the corresponding mechanism with the AMA in which Russian soccer players can request their participation in the World Cup as neutral, then they can do so. “But there will be neither flag nor anthem,” he said.The Vice President of the Duma or Chamber of Deputies, Igor Lébedev, said that, from the legal point of view, the decision on the presence of a country in a World Cup must be taken by FIFA and not by WADA.“Each federation has the right to ignore the recommendations of the AMA … I believe that today this statement confirms once again the intention to instigate tension and create panic,” he claimed. And he recalled that, in any case, it is “premature” to talk about the exclusion of Russia when the qualification phase has not even begun.“If we qualify with our national flag and with the name Russian Selection, then FIFA will make a decision, let us compete in the championship or not, with flag or as neutral,” he said.Russia qualified for the quarterfinals of the last World Cup – it fell in the penalty shootout against Croatia – after eliminating Spain in the second round from eleven meterslast_img read more

See More

Researchers discover right whales singing for the first time ever

first_imgRight whales — three species of large baleen whales in the genus Eubalaena — have never been known to sing. As far as scientists knew, right whale vocalizations consisted entirely of individual calls, as opposed to the repeated, patterned phrases of true whale songs.But according to a study published in The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America this month, the extremely rare eastern North Pacific right whale appears to use its gunshot calls in a repeating pattern — the first instance ever recorded of a right whale population breaking into song.A research team with the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) analyzed 17-years’-worth of data from autonomous recorders deployed in the Bering Sea and documented four distinct right whale song types at five different locations between the years 2009 and 2017. Whales like humpbacks are famous for their mellifluous calls, typically referred to as whale songs. But right whales — three species of large baleen whales in the genus Eubalaena — have never been known to sing. As far as scientists knew, right whale vocalizations consisted entirely of individual calls, as opposed to the repeated, patterned phrases of true whale songs.Gunshot calls — loud, concussive bursts of noise — are already known to be part of the North Pacific right whale’s vocal repertoire, as well as what are known as screams, upcalls, and warbles. But according to a study published in The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America this month, the extremely rare eastern North Pacific right whale appears to use its gunshot calls in a repeating pattern — the first instance ever recorded of a right whale population breaking into song.Jessica Crance, a marine biologist with the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the lead author of the study, said that she and her colleagues first detected “a weird pattern of sounds” while doing a summer field survey in the southeastern Bering Sea in 2010.“We thought it might be a right whale, but we didn’t get visual confirmation,” Crance said in a statement. “So we started going back through our long-term data from moored acoustic recorders and saw these repeating patterns of gunshot calls. I thought these patterns look like song. We found them again and again, over multiple years and locations, and they have remained remarkably consistent over eight years.”An eastern North Pacific right whale. Photo Credit: NOAA.Two summers ago, Crance and team were again working in the Bering Sea when they were able to visually confirm that the repeated patterns of gunshot calls were indeed coming from eastern North Pacific right whales.“We heard these same songs during a summer survey in 2017, and were able to localize the songs to male right whales” in real-time using sonobuoys that can record audio underwater, Crance said. “We can now definitively say these are right whales, which is so exciting because this hasn’t been heard yet in any other right whale population.”There are two groups of North Pacific right whales: in addition to the sub-population in the eastern North Pacific/Bering Sea, there is also a larger western population of 100 to 200 individuals in the Sea of Okhotsk. The roughly 400 North Atlantic right whales that still survive live mostly in the western North Atlantic Ocean, while the more abundant Southern right whale can be found mostly in the Southern Ocean.All of the singing North Pacific right whales whose sex could be determined were male, according to the study. Crance and team analyzed 17-years’-worth of data from autonomous recorders deployed in the Bering Sea and documented four distinct song types at five different locations between the years 2009 and 2017.You can listen to a couple of the recordings Crance and team made below, thanks to Gizmodo’s Earther: Article published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Bioacoustics, Environment, Mammals, Marine Animals, Marine Mammals, Oceans, Research, Whales, Wildlife “Each song type consists of a hierarchical structure of 1–3 different repeating phrases comprised predominantly of gunshot sounds; three of the four songs contained additional sound types (downsweep, moan, and low-frequency pulsive call),” Crance and the NOAA team write in the study. “Songs were detected annually (July–January); all song types remained consistent over eight years. Two different songs often occurred simultaneously, produced by different individuals; the same song was never detected simultaneously at the same location. The same song type was detected on the same day and time at two distant locations, indicating multiple individuals can produce the same song.”NOAA Fisheries scientist Jessica Crance deploys a sonobuoy to acoustically monitor for North Pacific right whale calls. Photo Credit: NOAA.These findings raise a number of new questions, Crance said: “Why is this population of right whales singing? Do the other populations also sing, and it just hasn’t been documented yet, or is this unique to our population?”Working in the vast, remote expanses of the Bering Sea will make getting answers to those questions difficult, Crance noted, especially given that there are believed to be fewer than 30 whales left in the eastern sub-population of North Pacific right whales. The subspecies is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List as a whole, but the eastern sub-population has been assessed independently and listed as Critically Endangered.We have very little data on the vocalizations of female right whales, Crance said, but lone male right whales have been found to make gunshot calls more frequently than females. Now that we have direct evidence that male right whales turn their gunshot calls into a song, Crance and team suspect that this behavior may be solely exhibited by males as a sort of reproductive display.“With only 30 animals, finding a mate must be difficult,” Crance said. “Perhaps the 2:1 male ratio in the North Pacific has led to our males singing to attract females. But we may never be able to test that or know for sure.”The NOAA team says that their next step is to look at the evolution of the newly discovered whale songs over time and to determine whether or not they’re seasonal and if certain songs are produced at specific times. “We also want to find out whether these songs contain individual-specific information,” Crance said. “There is so much I would love to know.”An eastern North Pacific right whale, the world’s most endangered great whale. The V-shaped exhale is unique to right whales. Photo Credit: NOAA.CITATIONS• Crance, J. L., Berchok, C. L., & Keating, J. L. (2017). Gunshot call production by the North Pacific right whale Eubalaena japonica in the southeastern Bering Sea. Endangered Species Research, 34, 251-267. doi:10.3354/esr00848• Crance, J. L., Berchok, C. L., Wright, D. L., Brewer, A. M., & Woodrich, D. F. (2019). Song production by the North Pacific right whale, Eubalaena japonica. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 145(6), 3467-3479. doi:10.1121/1.5111338FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

See More

Reef fish are faring fine in eastern Indonesia, study suggests

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Coral Reefs, Environment, Fish, Fishing, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Marine Animals, Marine Conservation, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Overfishing, Protected Areas, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A new study examines the health of reef fish populations in the lesser Sunda-Banda seascape, a part of the Coral Triangle, which overlaps with Indonesian waters in the western Pacific.In remote areas far from large human populations, reef fish are generally doing well, the researchers found.The researchers propose turning one area in Southwest Maluku, Indonesia, into a marine protected area. The coral reefs of the lesser Sunda-Banda seascape in southeastern Indonesia host some of the planet’s most biodiverse marine ecosystems, which remain relatively untouched even as overfishing ravages sea life to the country’s west and all over the world. New research suggests reef fish inhabiting understudied sections of the lesser Sunda-Banda are doing well overall in terms of species present and total numbers.“This study seems to be the first assessment ever of all species of consumable reef fishes for this area in the peer-reviewed scientific literature,” said Hawis Madduppa, head of the Marine Biodiversity and Biosystematics Lab at the Bogor Institute of Agriculture (IPB), who was not affiliated with the study.“It’s not all bad news for Indonesian marine conservation. We still have hope for good, sustainable reef fisheries.”The paper, published in IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science, intends to inform reef management in the far-flung lesser Sunda-Banda seascape, which lies in the Coral Triangle, a vast region of the western Pacific that’s home to the highest diversity of corals and reef fishes anywhere on the planet.From 2014 to 2015, the researchers conducted three expeditions involving underwater surveys of reef fish communities in the Indonesian districts of East Flores, Alor and Southwest Maluku, where people catch a vast variety of fish to feed their families or sell at markets. The census covered 1,800 square kilometers (695 square miles) throughout 62 spots at a depth of 10 meters (33 feet). Divers collected and classified exploitable reef fish into 5-centimeter (2-inch) intervals of length, from 3 to more than 50 centimeters (1 to 20 inches). Then the scientists derived fish biomass figures by means of known relationships between the size and weight of the species they observed.In this way, lead author Fakhrizal Setiawan and his colleagues recorded 176 reef fish species that support the livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of Indonesians. More than half the fish the team encountered were plankton-eating dark-banded fusiliers (Pterocaesio tile), but they concluded that the ranges and counts of species in the reef systems were generally sound and balanced.“Southwest Maluku has the highest biomass and quite a lot of abundance, very different from Alor and East Flores because pressure in fisheries is very low there,” said Fakhrizal, who at the time of the research was working as a reef fish ecologist for the Wildlife Conservation Society. Fakhrizal collaborated on the study with researchers from WWF-Indonesia and the Fisheries Diving Club at IPB.“Many islands in Southwest Maluku are very remote, so fish live happy and healthy with little contact with humans,” he said.A school of dark-banded fusilier of the coast of northern Sulawesi, Indonesia. Image by Bernard Dupont/Flickr.The lowest stocks occurred in East Flores, which has been subject to intensive reef fishing associated with a larger human presence. The harvested fish community in Alor looked stressed as well, a condition possibly resulting from harmful extraction methods, including potassium cyanide poisoning.The wealth of reef fish in Southwest Maluku, where fishers typically practice old-style, low-impact handlining, makes this place ecologically significant, so Fakhrizal proposed turning it into a marine protected area (MPA) to bolster biodiversity throughout the lesser Sunda-Banda. Because diversity is comparable across the three regions, he said, Southwest Maluku can “give fish to the areas with high-pressure fishing and supply spillover fish to sustain the ecosystem.” Hawis added that with MPA designation, “the important spawning and nursery area can be protected, and the degraded area can have a chance to recover.”There are, however, limits to reef fish resilience that could devastate the local fishing industry and national economy dependent on it, Fakhrizal noted.“When one area is open to more and more destructive fishing, at some point, it cannot recover from pressure,” he said. “Fishermen get more money using poison or bombing to get a lot of reef fish, but maybe their children cannot get fish from the area, move far away, then need money for fuel. An area like Southwest Maluku with small fisheries may not be high-value, but it’s economically sustainable enough for long-term opportunity. In Alor and East Flores, there could be a decrease in fisheries in a few years.”A scorpionfish in Alor, Indonesia. Image by prilfish/Flickr.Fakhrizal’s paper echoes monitoring work completed in 2017 by Reef Check Indonesia, a nonprofit based in Bali. It also determined that fusilier fish were the most abundant ones in East Flores and Alor, since upwelling transported plentiful nutrients to this species there.Altogether the current findings provide reason for optimism, said Hawis. “In Indonesia, the farther east you go, the higher the abundance and biomass due to the remoteness,” he said. “I’m very glad we still have an area with a high abundance of natural fish stock, more than 2,000 kilograms per hectare,” or about 1,800 pounds per acre.To maintain stocks, strong multi-scale laws should be established and enforced to prohibit damaging fishing equipment and the removal of breeding or developing fish, said Sila Sari, data and knowledge coordinator with Reef Check Indonesia. Alongside intensifying surveillance to reduce offenses in Southwest Maluku, she recommended enhancing rules with traditional knowledge that has for millennia moderated fishing and preserved Indonesian reefs.“Eastern Indonesia is rich with different local wisdoms that can be engaged through management and protected area regulation,” said Sari, who was not involved in the study. “It’ll be great to see changes between each area and between inside or outside the MPA and assess how effectively it works by assessing fish stocks. Each year or two, we need to repeat the same survey at the same sites.”Hawis emphasized the broad research on lesser Sunda-Banda marine biodiversity required to safeguard the target reef fish, too. To create an MPA, he said, biologists must investigate connectivity across islands or populations by harnessing molecular mechanisms, such as environmental DNA and population genetics, and evaluate the relatedness of organisms in reef ecosystems.“Mostly, people in Indonesia want faster, easier reef restoration,” Fakhrizal said. “But to be conserved effectively, coral reefs need time to recover without human disorder. We should give reefs in the lesser Sunda-Banda time to rebuild with MPAs.”Citation:Setiawan, F., Muhidin, Agustina, S., Pingkan, J., Estradivari, Tarigan, S. A., . . . Sadewa, S. (2019). Stock estimation, species composition and biodiversity of target reef fishes in the lesser Sunda-Banda Seascape (East Flores, Alor and South West Maluku regencies), Indonesia. IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science, 278, 012070. doi:10.1088/1755-1315/278/1/012070Banner: A bluestreak fusilier fish. Image by Rickard Zerpe/Flickr. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by mongabayauthorlast_img read more

See More

Ban on destructive fishing practice helps species recovery in Indonesian park

first_imgEnvironment, Environmental Policy, Fisheries, Fishing, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Illegal Fishing, Law Enforcement, Marine, Marine Conservation, Oceans, Overfishing, Regulations, Saltwater Fish, Sustainability Article published by Basten Gokkon In 2011, a destructive fishing practice known as muroami was banned in Karimunjawa National Park off Indonesia’s Java Island.In 2012-2013, the overall biomass of herbivorous fish species in the park had more than doubled from the 2006-2009 period, researchers have found.They attribute this recovery to the muroami ban and have called for it to be implemented in other marine parks across Indonesia. JAKARTA — Fish stocks in a marine national park in Indonesia increased significantly in the years after a ban on the use of coral-destroying nets was imposed, a recent study has found.The overall biomass of herbivorous fish species in Karimunjawa National Park more than doubled in 2012-2013 from the 2006-2009 period, signaling a recovery in fish stock, the researchers write in their study published in July in the journal Ecological Applications.They attribute the increase in biomass, which is key in conserving reef fish biodiversity, to a complete ban in 2011 on muroami fishing. This particular practice, common across Southeast Asia, uses large, non-discriminatory nets in combination with pounding devices to smash into coral reefs to flush out fish. Local fishermen also use compressor-and-hose diving equipment, putting their own lives at risk.Muroami fishermen haul in their catch. Image courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).A muroami fisherman inspects a net as it’s pulled up. Image courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).The paper notes that the imposition of the muroami ban met with minimal resistance from local fishermen as they already understood that the practice was unprofitable and endangered their lives.In addition to biomass doubling rapidly following the ban, the variety of fish species recorded, or taxonomic richness, also increased by 30 percent, the authors write. Co-author Shinta Pardede, a researcher with the Wildlife Conservation Society’s (WCS) Indonesia marine program, called Karimunjawa “the last frontier of coral reefs ecosystem in the Java Sea.”“The reefs in the Karimunjawa chain provide high marine biodiversity and reef fish fisheries that mainly support both local and national fisheries resources,” she added.Declared in a marine reserve in 2001, the park today spans 1,100 square kilometers (425 square miles) and encompasses 22 islands that are part of the Karimunjawa Archipelago. A patchwork of zoning policies allows artisanal fishing in certain areas, as well as tourism and research activities.The island chain is one of seven marine national parks in Indonesia, and is renowned for its coral reefs. Nearly 500 species of reef fish thrive in the waters around Karimunjawa, and the park is a popular tourist attraction for divers and snorkelers.A muroami fisherman in Karimunjawa marine national park. Image courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).Muroami fishing is destructive to coral reefs. Image courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).A muroami fishing net covers a coral reef. Image courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).The impact of the muroami ban in Karimunjawa bolsters the case for having similar policies in other marine parks across Indonesia, particularly in areas where there’s poor compliance with existing regulations, the researchers say.“It underlines the importance of these regulations for breaking cycles of resources depletion, habitat destruction, and low compliance to zoning, thus alleviating threats to food security and ecosystem integrity,” the researchers write.Shinta said the lessons learned from Karimunjawa’s fisheries management had been successfully replicated at other sites nationwide, including in the provinces of West Nusa Tenggara, North Maluku, North Sulawesi, and Aceh.“Karimunjawa fish catch data have been used in many scientific papers that enhance comprehension on practical fisheries management yet support marine conservation program in Indonesia and worldwide,” she said.Muroami fishing boats. Image courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).Citation:Bejarano, S., Pardede, S., Campbell, S. J., Hoey, A. S., & Ferse, S. C. (2019). Herbivorous fish rise as a destructive fishing practice falls in an Indonesian marine national park. Ecological Applications, 0(0). doi:10.1002/eap.1981FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

See More

Madagascar’s bold reforestation goal lacks a coherent plan, experts say

first_imgAfforestation, Agroforestry, Community Forestry, Drones, Forestry, Invasive Species, Lemurs, Reforestation, Sustainable Forest Management, Trees, Tropical Forests Article published by malavikavyawahare Madagascar’s president is pushing an ambitious plan to plant trees on 40,000 hectares (99,000 acres) of land every year for the next five years.But conservation experts point to shortcomings in the plan, including the use of disincentives and imposition of targets to compel NGOs and other organizations to get on board.There’s also the very real risk that in racing to meet the target, fast-growing non-native species will be prioritized, including acacia and pine, over slow-growing endemic species.Conservationists have called for a more collaborative approach to the replanting initiative to seek community buy-in and ensure the long-term effectiveness of the program. RANOMAFANA and ANTANANARIVO, Madagascar — While many U.S. travelers dream of the fabled forests of Madagascar, for Malagasy conservationist Mahandry Hugues Andrianarisoa, 28, it was the verdant landscape of upstate New York that took his breath away.“That is what I want for my country,” Andrianarisoa said on a July afternoon, eyeing a balding patch of woodland near Ranomafana National Park, one of the last refuges for Madagascar’s astonishing biodiversity.His vision for a greener Madagascar appears to be shared by the country’s president, Andry Rajoelina, even if they don’t quite see greening the same way. About half of the country’s forests vanished between 1953 and 2014, much of it to make way for farmland and to produce charcoal, baring its rusty red earth and raising fears that the world’s oldest island could be stripped of all its natural forests within decades.This March, Rajoelina declared that Madagascar will reforest at least 40,000 hectares (99,000 acres), an area about the size of Ranomafana, every year for the next five years. “If we called Madagascar the red island, now it will be the green island thanks to our national reforestation plan,” he said in March at the One Planet summit in Nairobi. To mark Madagascar’s 60th year of independence next year, the president announced in October that the country will plant 60 million seedlings in one day on January 19th.But stakeholders say that the lofty ambition is not underpinned by a considered plan. To outpace the runaway deforestation, planting drives must beget forests. Instead, forest experts told Mongabay, there is a risk of the vast island, spanning 59 million hectares (146 million acres), being overrun by fast-growing invasive tree species like pine, eucalyptus and acacia that are planted to be harvested.Rajoelina has launched a highly publicized campaign, but a top-down approach with a singular focus on meeting the 40,000-hectare will by itself not ensure the return of forests, the experts said. Yet the president, they recognized, is faced with the unenviable task of steering the Malagasy people onto a path of development not dependent on devouring wood while at the same time meeting their most pressing needs. Racing to plant trees Andrianarisoa, who hails from Kiranomena town in central Madagascar, has observed the destruction of forests firsthand. His grandparents, early settlers in the area, would narrate stories of lemurs that lived there, but these creatures remained almost mythical for him until he came to work at Ranomafana in the southeastern part of the country. The park hosts 13 lemur species, primates that are found only in Madagascar, and more than 370 plant species. On every return home Andrianarisoa saw the forests surrounding his hometown recede, a fate he hopes the moist evergreen forests of Ranomafana will escape.Though the pace of forest loss across the country is uneven, following the president’s declaration the environment ministry asked all 22 regions, the second tier of administration in Madagascar, to reforest 2,000 hectares (4,900 acres) per year. Regions are relying on local governments, schools, NGOs and the private sector to meet their goal. When asked where the government intended to plant the trees, environment minister Alexandre Georget told Mongabay “everywhere” in July, suggesting that the plantings would happen on public as well as private lands. Although the minister said that these would all be endemic species, it appears that agroforestry projects and monoculture plantations using non-native and even invasive food and timber species are being included. The minister did not respond to recent attempts to clarify the government’s position.What is evident is that the campaign is hurtling along at breakneck speed. Madagascar allocated about $684,000 in its budget for the drive this year and is actively seeking foreign aid. It is rounding up seeds on a war footing, distributing seedlings free of cost to people, and planning to bombard remote areas with seeds using drones and planes. By year-end, 85 percent of 2019’s 40,000-hectare target will be achieved, Georget told Mongabay in July.Pushing for forests with sticks The seed of a ramy tree. Image by Malavika Vyawahare/MongabayTo achieve their planting targets, regions are leaning heavily on NGOs that collect seeds, maintain nurseries and organize transplantation drives. One of these is the Centre ValBio (CVB) research station at Ranomafana National Park, where Andrianarisoa works. CVB helps Madagascar National Parks, a quasi-governmental agency, manage Ranomafana, a common arrangement for overseeing the country’s protected areas.One of the sticks the government wields is linking permissions to reforestation targets. As part of the greening campaign, the environment ministry has asked NGOs that manage protected areas to reforest 1 percent of the area they manage every year or risk losing their management contracts. In his July interview with Mongabay, Georget suggested that government authorization for NGOs to accept foreign funding could hinge on their achieving their reforestation targets as well, though the government has not issued any directive to that effect.“The president said we are going to do this, but there is no plan,” Nicolas Naina Rasolonjatovo, 31, who heads the reforestation program at CVB, told Mongabay. “We do not want a perfect plan, but we want something.” Other conservation-focused NGOs echoed the view that they are seeking a clear roadmap, not threats.In the Mongabay interview, the environment minister alleged that NGOs are misusing their funds, and this has not helped matters. “Managing a protected area is itself challenging, and we don’t have enough resources for that,” said Nanie Ratsifandrihamanana, country director at WWF-Madagascar, which manages four protected areas. “The budget we have for reforestation we use it to train villagers, help them maintain nurseries and monitor plants.”For the private sector, too, the government is making permissions contingent on meeting reforestation targets. Gaëtan Etancelin, president of Syndicat Malgache de l’Agriculture Biologique (SYMABIO), a trade group representing producers of organic products, told Mongabay that companies were struggling to meet their reforestation requirements. Etancelin said private players are looking for better incentives. “They don’t have time, it is not their job,” he said, referring to the reforestry efforts. Companies that do have experience planting trees are looking to meet their requirements in ways that contribute to their business goals. A representative of Imperial Tobacco Madagascar, which participated in a recent reforestation event in northwest Madagascar, told Mongabay that the company’s planting target is determined by its demand for wood, which it burns to cure tobacco. The company, part of U.K.-headquartered Imperial Brands plc., already plants trees on its own land but will expand onto 100 hectares (247 acres) of land identified by the government in 2020 where it plans to plant both exotic and indigenous species. “Although it is challenging, it is a business requirement,” the representative said in an emailed response.Mahandry Hugues Andrianarisoa at one of CVB’s reforestation sites near Ranomafana National Park. Image by Malavika Vyawahare/ MongabayTrees: Slow-growing capitalAndrianarisoa attends to the young plants in his care with the watchfulness of a guardian. At Akopa, a reforestation site bordering Ranomafana, he pinpointed individual plants from a messy green spread, cautiously avoiding treading on saplings, including a ramy plant that barely reached his knee. Ramy refers to 33 tree species in the genus Canarium, all endemic to Madagascar.Last year, CVB planted 26,000 saplings around the park as part of its long-standing reforestation program. The saplings spend about eight months at nurseries managed by CVB and local villagers before being transplanted to designated reforestation sites.To reforest 40,000 hectares per year, the Rajoelina government estimates that 40 million saplings will have to be planted annually by 6 million people. Even those massive numbers might not be enough, though, so the government is looking at dropping seed balls from planes and drones. Nurturing and then transplanting seedlings from nurseries appears tedious in comparison, but evidence about the success of aerial reforestation is meager. At nurseries, bad seeds and weak seedlings are weeded out, ensuring higher odds of survival.Ramy plants in the background at the Tanamboa nursery. Image by Malavika Vyawahare/MongabayThe CVB team knows from experience that tree planting involves more than just dropping seeds and watching beanstalks rise. The survival rate of plants, even from a nursery, can be as low as 40 percent. If it persists, the puny ramy sapling in Akopa could grow into a billowing deciduous tree reaching heights of 20 meters (66 feet), or three giraffes tall. To do so it must stand its ground in the face of natural calamities, humans and foraging animals, and compete with banana and pine trees that are sprouting all around. It will be at least two decades before it starts bearing fruit.Once it does, the ramy tree could attract aye-aye lemurs (Daubentonia madagascariensis), the largest nocturnal primate in the world. It could, that is, if there are any left in the wild; aye-aye, whose diet includes insect larvae and ramy seeds, are one step away from being declared critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN).One of the peculiarities of this elfin lemur is an elongated middle finger, with which it knocks rapidly on dead wood in search of cavities that hold insect larvae. If its flappy ears pick up a hollow, it gnaws an opening in the bark, inserts its long, skeletal third digit, and then impales and extracts its prey. Its sharp, rodent-like incisors also help bore into the fruit of the ramy tree to feed on its fleshy seed. However, in degraded forests in and around Ranomafana these trees are few and far between. The reforestation campaign could change this, but slow-growing ramy are not the trees of choice for villagers living around the park.An aye-aye feeding on a coconut. Image by Rhett A. Butler/MongabayThe fruits of reforestationAt a village-managed nursery in Tanambao village near Ranomafana, fledging ramy seedlings shared space with invasive acacia trees (Acacia mangium) that are native to Australia, New Guinea and Indonesia. “I don’t know why they are here,” Andrianarisoa said, concern sweeping his youthful face. “We did not ask them to plant these.”He may have been concerned, but he was not entirely surprised. The nursery sits atop a knoll, with mud-and-wood houses scattered around, interspersed by muddy rice fields. Like more than three-quarters of the Malagasy population, villagers here don’t have access to electricity. Wood pervades life; it builds homes, warms hearths, cooks meals. Acacias grow quickly; in favorable conditions young ones can grow 5 meters (16 feet) every year, making them an ideal source of fuelwood and building material.Clerizia Andre, 17, the daughter of the nursery owner, had never heard of the president’s reforestation campaign, but she was enthusiastic about planting trees. “From trees we get clean air, water, they help prevent erosion,” she said, “and they are used for building houses.” When asked which trees should be planted, she replied promptly: “Eucalyptus and pine trees.”Clerizia Andre, 17, who helps her father manage the nursery. Image by Malavika Vyawahare/MongabayThe aspiration for a green Madagascar is not new. The French, who colonized the country from 1896 until its independence in 1960, undertook a zealous tree-planting program that installed large plantations of fast-growing non-native species like eucalyptus and pine. Since independence, every year during the November-to-April rainy season, the country embarks on a tree-planting campaign launched in the capital, Antananarivo.The Rajoelina government has tried to re-energize and scale up existing efforts, laying down targets for regions and districts and focusing on reporting, which hasn’t happened before. But the shadow of past planting drives hangs over the current campaign, according to Christian Kull, a professor with the Institute of Geography and Sustainability at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland, who has worked on forestry issues in Madagascar for more than 20 years.“The reforestation drive in my opinion is problematic,” he said, explaining that regional and local government offices and NGOs implement tree-planting drives in ways that are “easy and familiar” to them. “What species do plant nurseries have available? What species do people have 100 years of experience how to plant? Eucalypts and acacias and pines,” he said.“Even the ministry uses these [non-native] species; we have to explain the importance of endemic species to them,” said Andrianarisoa, who also organizes workshops for government officials. A ministry publication seen by Mongabay talks about how pinède restoration, using pine species, would be part of the reforestation effort. At a recent reforestation event in Mahajanga province in northwest Madagascar attended by the president, seeds from various trees species including Acacia mangium were on display.Nurturing forestsA fully-grown ramy tree near Ranomafana National Park. Image by Malavika Vyawahare/MongabayTo scale up reforestation efforts, plantings are happening on both public and private lands, but each comes with its own set of problems. On public lands, trees fare poorly without supervision, which is impractical, if not impossible, at the scale at which the Rajoelina government is planning reforestation. On private lands, people need incentives to plant trees that don’t immediately benefit them.A pilot project launched by Seneca Park Zoo in upstate New York to monitor trees using satellites, GPS and blockchain technology brought Andrianarisoa to the U.S. in 2017. While he sees the value of technology to track trees, he acknowledged that people’s cooperation in securing trees is key to the success of any reforestation project. Money goes a long way in a country where about three-quarters of the population lives below the poverty line — something he can attest to because CVB regularly monitors the progress of its reforestation sites on both private and public lands. “What I see in the village is that once you have money to pay to take care of the trees, it works,” he said.In Madagascar, NGOs use their own funds for reforestation, and appear unwilling to channel more resources into the government’s campaign without having a bigger say in it. Imposing targets is not the way, according to Rasolonjatovo at CVB. “First, discuss with the local community about where we will do the reforestation, why we do it there, and who owns the tree?” he said. “That is a good start.”The collaborative approach has met with some success elsewhere. A recent report assessing progress made on the New York Declaration on Forests commended El Salvador for developing restoration and sustainable development plans with the help of local communities, the private sector, NGOs, small farmers, local governments, and indigenous peoples.Tree survival is not the only concern. Such large-scale plantings alter landscapes and could have unintended consequences, like skewing the risk of forest fires. “If the reforestation drive were to focus on areas where forests used to grow, for example recently deforested areas in the east and west rather than in the fire-adapted open grasslands,” Kull said, “then the reforestation drive would make sense and be worthy of strong support.”Not everybody sees the absence of a fleshed-out plan as a hurdle. “The details are still being worked out, but sometimes that is the way politics works and it is not necessarily a bad thing,” said Tim Christophersen, a senior U.N. Environment Programme official and chair of the Global Partnership on Forest and Landscape Restoration. “What is positive in Madagascar is that it is linked to the head of state which has a lot of advantages. One of them being that all the ministries who are involved need to pull in the same direction.”Food being cooked in a household in Anosy region of Madagascar. Image by Malavika Vyawahare/MongabayThe government is also supporting its reforestation campaign with efforts to reduce the country’s reliance on wood. During his March announcement Rajoelina said the government would provide a million cooking stoves each year for the next five years to reduce dependence on firewood. He has also pushed for a shift toward ethanol, a biofuel, in place of charcoal for cooking, and the government is developing a policy promoting renewable energy sources as part of a multi-sectoral effort called Initiative Emergence Madagascar.“What it takes is three things: political will and leadership, good planning, and money,” Christophersen said of a successful reforestation campaign. “We should welcome this new enthusiasm [for planting trees] and help guide it in the right direction instead of saying: it is complicated leave it to the experts.”At the time of publishing, the president’s office and Madagascar’s ministry of environment had not responded to requests for comments.Editor’s note: Mongabay founder and CEO Rhett Butler is a member of Centre ValBio’s advisory board.Malavika Vyawahare is the Madagascar staff writer for Mongabay. Find her on Twitter: @MalavikaVyFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.(Editor’s note: The article has been updated to clarify that Madagascar will be hosting a large-scale planting drive on January 19, 2020 to mark 60 years of independence, not on its independence day in June.)center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

See More

Dam that threatens orangutan habitat is ‘wholly unnecessary’: Report

first_imgBanner image: A Tapanuli orangutan in the Batang Toru forest in northern Sumatra, Indonesia. Image by Matt Senior.  Animals, Climate, Climate Change, Conservation, Deforestation, electricity, Endangered Species, Energy, Environment, Forests, Gas, Great Apes, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Hydroelectric Power, Natural Gas, Primates, Rainforests, Renewable Energy, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. A controversial hydropower dam that threatens the only known habitat of the world’s rarest orangutan species is unnecessary from both climate and economic aspects, a new report says.The report, commissioned by a group campaigning against the Batang Toru dam in Indonesia but drawing on official government data, says the dam will do little to connect the few remaining isolated communities in the region to the grid.It also says the region’s power needs will be better met, and at lower cost, by a slate of other projects already in the works, including expansion of existing gas turbine plants.The report says the dam developer’s claims of an overall reduction in Indonesia’s CO2 emissions are “significantly overstated,” and that builder Sinohydro has a track record of faulty dam construction in other countries. JAKARTA — Proponents of a hydropower plant to be built in the only known habitat of a critically endangered orangutan species say it’s important for meeting the future energy needs of northern Sumatra. But a new report says this region of Indonesia is already almost fully electrified, and that the new plant will do virtually nothing to improve that.The report from energy consultancy Brown Brothers Energy and Environment (B2E2) was commissioned by various NGOs, including environmental advocacy group Mighty Earth, which has been a vocal opponent of the dam. It cites official data to show that North Sumatra province, home to the Batang Toru forest where the dam and power plant are to be built, already has one of the highest electrification rates in Indonesia: nearly 96% of the population had basic and stable access to electricity in 2016, compared to the more developed major provinces of East Java (89%) and Bali (92%).Of the 319 wards in North Sumatra still without grid electricity, nearly half are on the island of Nias. The island’s electricity infrastructure was knocked out by a series of devastating earthquakes and tsunamis in 2004 and 2005, and authorities continue to struggle to get it running properly. Without a working grid, any power generated by the dam project would be immaterial to Nias, the new report says.Residents of Nias “will remain unaffected no matter how much power generation is added in the mainland of North Sumatra,” David Brown, the report’s author, said in Jakarta.Tapanuli Orangutans found near YEL’s orangutan study camp in the Batang Toru forest. Image by Aditya Sumitra/Mighty Earth.‘Inflated’ emissions reductionConstruction is already underway on the 510-megawatt Batang Toru dam. The project site falls within the habitat of the Tapanuli orangutan (Pongo tapanuliensis), a species that was only described in 2017, and was immediately declared critically endangered and the world’s rarest great ape species.Only 800 of the animals survive in a tiny tract of forest less than one-fifth the size of the metropolitan area that comprises Indonesia’s capital, Jakarta. Conservationists estimate that a loss of more than 1 percent of the population per year will be disastrous for the species, which has a low reproduction rate and is highly sensitive to disruptions in its habitat. Construction activity for the dam has already driven some of the orangutans out of the project area and into nearby oil palm plantations.When the project was proposed in 2012, North Sumatra was experiencing frequent power shortages and rolling blackouts. But that changed just a few years later.“The availability of electricity began to surpass peak demand in 2017,” Brown said. “And this new surplus greatly reduced the number of blackouts.”A major factor in that turnaround was the arrival of a ship-mounted power plant, or powership, that the Indonesian government rented from Turkish company Karadeniz. The ship, featuring a 240 MW gas-fired generator, has been contracted to power Medan, the North Sumatra capital, through 2022.The B2E2 report also identifies 80 other power plants — ranging from geothermal to coal to mini hydro — planned for North Sumatra province alone that would render the $1.6 billion Batang Toru plant “wholly unnecessary to meet North Sumatra’s electricity demand in the future.”These other projects include three new turbines at a planned gas-fired power plant that are expected to come online between 2022 and 2028, and that will generate a combined 800 MW.Proponents, including project developer PT North Sumatra Hydro Energy (PT NSHE), say bringing the Batang Toru plant online will cut Indonesia’s carbon dioxide emissions reduce emissions by 1.6 million to 2.2 million tons per year. But the report says that “even the smallest estimate of greenhouse gas reductions promised by Batang Toru’s backers are inflated on the order of 33 to 55 percent.”Brown said the claim was based on the assumption that the hydropower dam would replace the average carbon output of all utilities nationwide. “The problem is that the idea of Batang Toru replacing an average of all power plants in Indonesia is an imaginary construction,” he said. “What is real is that Batang Toru, if built, would replace specific power plants in North Sumatra.”“My report contends that it is better for PLN to build or expand any of these other 80 because, in contrast to Batang Toru, these other 80 do not directly threaten the low elevation nursery forest of the Tapanuli orangutan.”The three new gas turbines, in particular, would cost a third the price of the dam to build, produce more peak power, not harm orangutan habitat, and keep CO2 emissions low through more efficient turbine technology, the report says.“Bottom line,” it says, “Batang Toru’s backers are significantly overstating its greenhouse gas emissions benefits.”The Batang Toru River, the proposed power source for a Chinese-funded hydroelectric dam. Image by Ayat S. Karokaro/Mongabay-Indonesia.‘Plagued with faulty construction’The report also highlights the track record of Sinohydro, the Chinese state-owned company contracted to build the dam.“Dams built by them have been plagued with faulty construction,” Brown said. “Sinohydro was caught on film watering down cement when constructing the Bakun dam in Sarawak, Malaysia.”The Coca Codo Sinclair dam that it built in Ecuador also had construction problems, with more than 7,000 cracks appearing in its machinery within months of completion. An official report by the Ecuadoran government was critical of Sinohydro’s “irresponsible and incomprehensible” use of substandard building materials and construction methods.“The Chinese used bad-quality steel and fired inspectors who said to change it,” Ecuador’s former energy minister, Fernando Santos, said in 2018.Part of the structure may have to be demolished and rebuilt, at a cost of hundreds of millions of dollars. Santos said the $2.8 billion dam was overpriced and of poor quality, and had left the country in debt to China.The Coca Codo Sinclair dam is also located near an active volcano, and geologists warn an earthquake in the area could have devastating effects.In Indonesia, activists and scientists have raised similar alarms about the Batang Toru project, which sits near a known tectonic fault. Earthquakes are a common occurrence in Indonesia generally, and in northern Sumatra in particular. In 2008, a magnitude 6 quake struck just 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) from the site of the dam.Officials from developer PT NSHE have acknowledged the earthquake risk, but critics say there are no mitigation plans based on this risk included in the environmental impact analysis submitted to authorities.Map of the Batang Toru ecosystem, home to the Tapanuli orangutan (Pongo tapanuliensis) in Sumatra.‘Huge waste of money’PT NSHE has responded to the report by questioning Brown’s credibility, saying he isn’t an expert in Indonesia’s energy sector. (Brown served as an adviser to BHP Billiton, the world’s biggest mining company, when it operated in Indonesia; was the World Bank’s senior adviser on the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, or EITI; and has consulted on Indonesia’s natural and extractive resource sectors for the Asian Development Bank and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, among others.)“He’s only asked to voice the opinion of his client, Mighty Earth,” PT NSHE spokesman Firman Taufick said as quoted by local media. Firman also criticized Mighty Earth, saying the campaign group did not have Indonesia’s best interests at heart.“Anyone knows who they are, their motivation and interest … What’s clear is that their interest is not for Indonesia,” he said.Mighty Earth great apes program director Amanda Hurowitz refuted the claim, saying it has worked for years to highlight the importance of protecting Indonesia’s environment and supporting the development of its economy. She said the Batang Toru dam, however, was “a huge waste of money that threatens local communities and would primarily … benefit a Chinese construction company with a terrible record.”With the dam being such a risky project, the hydropower plant would not only be bad for the Tapanuli orangutan, but also for Indonesia’s reputation, Hurowitz added.“The dam company is out of arguments to defend this wasteful project, so the only thing it can do is attack those who expose the disingenuous marketing behind this project,” she said.Brown, meanwhile, defended his report by saying he relied on official Indonesian government data, primarily from state-owned utility PLN, to analyze the claims of the dam’s proponents.“My report would not have been possible if I had not been able to use PLN’s plans to see into North Sumatra’s energy future,” he said. “The findings of my report are built almost entirely upon PLN’s most recent 10-year planning document, the 2019 RUPTL.“My report says, in essence, that PLN got it almost entirely right, and that out of the 81 power plants that PLN has proposed for construction or expansion in North Sumatra in the coming decade, only one needs to be removed from that list: Batang Toru.”center_img Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

See More

Finale de basket : Etzella remporte la 3e manche face au T71

first_imgFiche techniqueEtzella – T71 : 105-95 (58-52)ETZELLA : 44 paniers dont 9 à trois points, 8lancers sur 10, 17fautes dont 1antisportive: McNutt (20e).P. GUTENKAUF11, I. DELGADO11, J. DELGADO29, MCNUTT11, COLEMAN35 puis F. Gutenkauf3, Polfer5 et Benseghir.T71 : 37paniers dont 11 à trois points, 10lancers sur 14, 16fautes.SCHUMACHER15, JEITZ17, JACKSON-CARTWRIGHT18, MULLER15, LOGWOOD21 puis Hurt6 et Sunnen3.Arbitrage de Mme Weiwers et MM. Mouton et Glod. 965 spectateurs.Évolution du score : 5e 20-11, 10e 32-19, 15e 42-34, 25e 69-61, 30e 78-75, 35e 91-87. Au retour des vestiaires, les Nordistes repartent de plus belle, avec Jairo Delgado en tête de file. Et les affaires vont encore davantage se compliquer pour Dudelange, qui va perdre son capitaine, Tom Schumacher, après moins de trois minutes (voir ci-contre). Dans la foulée, Etzella reprend ses aises (+12). Mais alors que l’on se dit que les coéquipiers de Philippe Gutenkauf vont marcher sur les Dudelangeois, ces derniers font front. Comme si la blessure de Schumacher les avait galvanisés. Le T71, que l’on croyait perdu, revient de loin. Et quand Sunnen et Hurt réussissent leurs tirs de loin, le suspense de cette troisième manche est total. À une minute de la fin du match, deux petits points séparent les deux formations… mais Jairo Delgado, à 46secondes de la fin du match, plante son cinquième (sur dix tentatives) panier à trois points. C’est bien Etzella qui aura une première balle de match, samedi, au Grimler.LES CLEFSComme durant la première rencontre, Etzella a réussi à dominer la raquette mais de manière moins flagrante que lors du premier match, puisque les Nordistes remportent la bataille des rebonds par 40 à 32.L’autre clef est également en faveur d’Etzella, qui s’est montré plus performant que son rival. Par exemple, alors que Jairo Delgado tourne à 50% à 3pts, Miles Jackson-Cartwright rend une copie bien plus faible avec un piteux 22% à 2/9. Si on prend Tim Coleman, l’Américain plante ses 35points avec un superbe 13/16 à deux points ce qui permet à Etzella d’afficher une réussite globale à deux points de 72% contre 59% à Dudelange.Les deux équipes se seront livrées un très bon combat durant cette rencontre, certains diront une belle publicité pour le basket national. Proche une de l’autre au niveau statistique, à part au rebond et à deux points, des détails auront fait la différence. Vivement samedi pour une quatrième confrontation qui risque d’être intensive jusqu’au bout.LE JOUEURLors de cette troisième manche, on peut sortir deux joueurs du lot. Le premier est incontestablement Tim Coleman, auteur de 21pts à la pause. Il aura mené la vie dure à Muller et Logwood dans la raquette et termine avec 35pts et 12rebonds. Le second est bien sûr Jairo Delgado, l’homme indiscutable de cette seconde période. Alors qu’il a regagné les vestiaires avec seulement sept points, le cousin de Nelson va se déchaîner après la pause pour terminer avec 29pts à 85% à deux points et 50% à trois points, sans oublier 4rebonds et 5passes. Sacré match de sa part!Alexandre Adam À l’issue d’un match très serré (105-95), mercredi, les Nordistes s’en sortent face à un T71 désormais le dos au mur. Et qui a peut-être perdu Tom Schumacher.LE SCÉNARIOCette troisième manche démarre tambour battant côté local, avec un 17-7 d’entrée pour les joueurs de Kreso Basic. Face à la seule équipe à leur avoir fait mordre la poussière cette saison, les Ettelbruckois n’ont pas envie de se faire peur. Si Coleman se montre très à son avantage, Dudelange peut compter sur Tom Schumacher, auteur de huit points en cinq minutes, pour empêcher le bateau T71 de prendre totalement l’eau. Malgré tout, c’est bien Etzella qui vire en tête avec +12 à l’issue du premier quart. Par la suite, les visiteurs montrent une réaction et l’avance fond à six points dans un match où les défenses ne sont pas franchement au rendez-vous. Les nombreux spectateurs qui ont fait le déplacement en ont pour leur argent, avec pas moins de 110 points inscrits lors d’une première période (58-52).center_img Partagerlast_img read more

See More

House Probes Chevron’s Social Development Funds

first_imgThe House of Representatives has launched an investigation into US$10 million in Social Development funds from oil giant Chevron.Plenary Tuesday, June 3rd, mandate its Committees on Public Accounts, Lands Mines and Energy, Contracts and Monopolies to open a probe into financial transactions between the National Oil Company of Liberia (NOCAL) and Chevron relating to the status of monies from the company’s social engagement to the Liberian people.Lofa County Representative Clarence Massaquoi’s motion to launch said inquiry was overwhelmingly supported by his colleagues who expressed concerns over how social commitments from concessionaires are expended.The House’s decision was prompted by Montserrado County lawmaker Acarous Gray’s letter addressed to Plenary demanding full disclosure of how much was delivered by Chevron, which official(s) took delivery of the monies, and how the monies were expended.In his communication, Rep. Gray described transactions between both parties as “questionable.”“The addendum to the Production Sharing Contracts (PSC) for Blocks LB-11, LB-12 and LB-14 which came into effect in 2010, call for Seven Hundred Thousand Dollars (US$700,000) per year for the PSC, and should be for a social development program mutually agreed and managed with the government, limited to maximum of five (5) annual contributions, provided that exploration period for at least one of the PSCs remains effective.“The five annual contributions will be made available within thirty days of full ratification of this addendum to the PSCs being published in handbills. Subsequently, such contributions will be made each calendar year on the anniversary date of the first contribution,” Rep. Gray declared.Judging from the agreement in the PSCs, the CDC lawmaker indicated that over the period of five years the three oil blocks owned and operated by Chevron should be contributing from its corporate social responsibility programs in the sum of US$10 million.Now that the Chevron agreement is four years old, Gray maintained; “It means that a total of US$8.4 million should have been spent on social development programs mutually agreed and managed by the government of Liberia.”In his letter endorsed by plenary, Gray demanded that NOCAL provide the matrix of such spending, name of Chevron denominated corporate social responsibility projects or programs in Liberia, location of the projects and the cost including implementers along with information relating to names of those that approved said spending.Mandated committees are expected to begin their investigation shortly and make full report to plenary.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

See More

Commerce Auctions Smuggled Gasoline

first_imgThe Ministry of Commerce and Industry, Nimba Office, has carried out an auction of over 450 gallons of gasoline seized from the smugglers in Ganta recently.According to the Commerce Inspector in Nimba, Roosevelt Gbormie, the goods were seized at the border on the 12th July 2014 aboard a Guinean truck in which the consignment was concealed under other goods destined for Guinea.“On the same day we arrested the petroleum product,” said Inspector Gbormie, “we also arrested 15 bags of rice aboard another truck  from the same concernee, in person of Suah Bility.”On July 13, said Inspector Gbormie, Amadou Kromah was arrested with 93 gallons of gas, while A.B. Saysay was arrested with 79 gallons of gas.  Also arrested was Seakou Jabateh, with 5 bags 25kg rice,  along Lasso Domoyah who was arrested with 9 25kg bags  rice.The total of the petroleum products arrested is about eight drums, plus 15 gallons which are over 450 gallons in all.Inspector Gbormie said his Ministry was auctioning the rice at L$700 per bag from the actual price which is L$ 1100 in Ganta; while the gasoline was auctioned at L$300 per gallon from the actual price which is L$ 420.“Upon the auctioning of these goods, the money will be deposited at the government revenue to serve as a deterrent and the original flag receipt will be given to the owners,” he added.The Commerce Inspector also informed the public that rice, cement and gasoline are banned goods that are not supposed to leave the country.The prices of a 25kg bag of rice and gasoline had in recent times escalated in Ganta and surrounding towns and villages in Nimba.  Citizens believed this was due to weakness of the security assigned at the various border points, especially in Ganta.Observers were surprised to see some of the seized gasoline  concealed in battery cartoons, under the guise of being batteries.“Some of the smuggling gasoline was concealed in battery cartoons so we can take them to be battery cartoons, but as a security, we managed to discover it at once,” Sam Kouh, Commerce Inspector at the Ganta Border pointed out.Last year the Ministry of Commerce in Nimba auctioned over 2000 bags of 25kg rice that were seized from smugglers at various locations in Nimba, but the heaviest auction was at the Ganta Border where over 1300 bags were auctioned the same day.The Ganta Border is manned by sections of the Joint Security representing, some of the line ministries, including the Justice Ministry and its Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization, Ministry of Commerce, the Ministry of Finance and its Customs Service, the National Security Agency (NSA) and the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI).Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

See More

Klopp urges Liverpool fans to ‘enjoy the journey’

first_img0Shares0000Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp has signed a contract extension that will keep him at the Premier League club until 2024 © AFP/File / Paul ELLISLONDON, United Kingdom, Dec 13 – Jurgen Klopp said Friday he signed a contract extension keeping him at Liverpool until 2024 to project an image of security and stability for future potential transfer targets.Klopp, who became Liverpool manager in 2015, guided them to Champions League glory in June and they are currently eight points clear at the top of the Premier League. The German’s previous deal was due to expire in 2022 and while he said extending it was not a priority for him, he felt it could be a key factor when it came to persuading new recruits to join.If he sees out the contract he would be the club’s longest-serving manager since Bob Paisley.“The club was asking for a while already if we could talk about an extension and I thought it makes sense before things are getting a bit intense — not now, I was completely calm — but maybe in the summer we would have started again,” Klopp said at his pre-match press conference.“With new players when you want to bring them in they ask ‘How long is the manager going to be here?’ We all wanted to avoid that so it’s done and I am really happy about that.“I thought it was positive and good that people know I will be here a bit longer. It gives us stability.”Klopp, 52, striving to win Liverpool’s first top-flight title for 30 years, has revolutionised the club’s fortunes since his arrival at Anfield and said they were in a “good place”.“Four-and-a-half years from now sounds like forever in football,” he said. “It would be then nine years, the longest spell I’ve ever been at a club.“It was not too bad till now but we don’t feel that it could not be better, so let’s try to make the best time of our lives. Enjoy the ride, enjoy the journey.”– Liverpool ‘powerhouse’ –A statement from owners the Fenway Sports Group (FSG) said Liverpool had taken “giant strides in re-establishing themselves as one of world football’s powerhouses” under the German.During Klopp’s first campaign at Anfield, Liverpool reached the finals of both the League Cup and Europa League but ended the season empty-handed.They lost 3-1 to Real Madrid in the 2018 Champions League final but regrouped and became European champions for a sixth time after a 2-0 win against Tottenham in Madrid this year.Liverpool lost just one match in the Premier League last season, racking up 97 points — the best total in the club’s history — but missed out on the title by a solitary point to Manchester City.So far this season, Klopp has overseen Liverpool’s surge to the top of the Premier League, where they currently sit eight points clear after 15 wins from their opening 16 matches.Liverpool, who host bottom club Watford on Saturday, are chasing their first English top-flight title since 1990, and their 19th overall.They reached the knockout stages of the Champions League with a 2-0 win against Salzburg on Tuesday and will play in the Club World Cup in Qatar later this month.Klopp, who won two Bundesliga titles with Borussia Dortmund, is reportedly close to signing Red Bull Salzburg playmaker Takumi Minamino for a bargain £7.25 million ($9.7 million) but would not be drawn on the impending January arrival of the Japan international.“A very good player, I can say that, but I saw a few very good players on the Salzburg team, much more than I wanted,” he said, before giving the game away by telling a Japanese journalist: “Maybe we will see you more often now.”Hours after details of Klopp’s new deal emerged, Liverpool announced that veteran midfielder James Milner had also signed a new contract which will keep him at the club until 2022.The 33-year-old joined from Manchester City on a free transfer in the summer of 2015.“Obviously the gaffer waited to sign his dependent on whether I signed mine, so that makes me a feel bit more important,” Milner joked to liverpoolfc.com.0Shares0000(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

See More