Audio: New CITES head on next COP, reining in online wildlife trafficking, and more

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast we speak with Ivonne Higuero, secretary general of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora — better known by its acronym, CITES.Signatories to CITES will meet later this summer for the eighteenth meeting of the Congress of the Parties (or COP). The meeting was originally to be held in Colombo, Sri Lanka last May, but a series of terrorist bombings in the South Asian country during Easter services in April forced CITES officials to postpone the meeting until August and move it to Geneva, Switzerland.On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, Huigero, the first woman to ever serve as CITES secretary general, discusses how her background as an environmental economist informs her approach to the job, how CITES can tackle challenges like lack of enforcement of CITES statutes at the national level and the online wildlife trade, and what she expects to accomplish at the eighteenth congress of the parties to CITES. On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast we speak with Ivonne Higuero, secretary general of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora — better known by its acronym, CITES.Listen here: Just about every country on Earth has signed on to CITES, a multilateral treaty meant to ensure that international trade in wildlife does not threaten the survival of species in the wild. Trade in about 36,000 different species is currently regulated under CITES.Signatories to CITES will meet later this summer for the eighteenth meeting of the Congress of the Parties (or COP). The meeting was originally to be held in Colombo, Sri Lanka last May, but a series of terrorist bombings in the South Asian country during Easter services in April forced CITES officials to postpone the meeting until August and move it to Geneva, Switzerland.Despite the setback, Ivonne Huigero hopes to see much progress made at this year’s COP. “We are approaching some very critical times in terms of species loss, if you have seen the IPBES report talking about a million-plus species that could be lost if we continue with business as usual,” she says. “We all have to really focus and concentrate on the work ahead of us to avoid that from happening, from having this major species loss. And for CITES it’s related, of course, to making sure that international trade is sustainable, and we have to do everything we can that that is the case.”On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, Huigero, the first woman to ever serve as CITES secretary general, discusses how her background as an environmental economist informs her approach to the job, how CITES can tackle challenges like lack of enforcement of CITES statutes at the national level and the online wildlife trade, and what she expects to accomplish at the eighteenth congress of the parties to CITES.Here’s this episode’s top news:Arctic sea ice extent just hit a record low for early June; worse may comeNearly 600 plant species have gone extinct in last 250 yearsSumatran rhinos to get a new sanctuary in Leuser EcosystemWould you like to hear how Mongabay grew out of its founder’s childhood adventures in rainforests and a fascination with frogs? Or how a Mongabay editor reacted to meeting one of the world’s last Bornean rhinos? We now offer Insider Content that delivers behind-the-scenes reporting and stories like these from our team. For a small monthly donation, you’ll get exclusive access and support our work in a new way. Visit mongabay.com/insider to learn more and join the growing community of Mongabay readers on the inside track.If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.An elephant in South Africa’s Kruger National Park. There are numerous proposals on the table to either up-list or down-list elephants at this year’s meeting of the Congress of the Parties, according to CITES Secretary General Ivonne Higuero. Photo by Rhett Butler.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki China wildlife trade, conservation players, Economics, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Economics, Environmental Law, Global Trade, Illegal Timber Trade, Illegal Trade, International Trade, Interviews, Ivory Trade, Law Enforcement, Pet Trade, Podcast, Saving Species From Extinction, Timber Laws, timber trade, Trade, Wildlife Trade last_img read more

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Salvadoran fishermen ditch blast fishing for artificial reefs

first_imgBlast fishing has taken a toll on both the fishermen and marine life of El Salvador’s Jiquilisco Bay Biosphere Reserve.Some residents have lost limbs or eyes or suffered bad burns. And populations of mangroves, fish, and critically endangered hawksbill sea turtles have declined.Over the last decade, officials have made rooting out the practice a top priority, placing their bets on a creative alternative that a local fisherman suggested in 2009: the creation of artificial reefs to replenish marine life.Today blast fishing has declined by 90 percent and the communities are trying to market their seafood as “clean fish” at a premium price. To read an interview with the man who sparked the artificial reefs of Jiquilisco Bay, see the companion piece to this article:Bringing back the fish: Q&A with a repentant blast fishermanJIQUILISCO BAY, El Salvador — With no police patrol in sight, a young fisherman named Jose Salvador Soriano kneeled into his long, narrow boat and began preparing an explosive with the power to bring in nearly an entire day’s catch. The explosive contained sulfur, benzoate, chlorate and sugar, packed into a tube of newspaper with a wick made from a bicycle-brake hose.The best spot to throw an explosive was under the long, spider-like roots of the mangroves lining both sides of the estuary, as fish gather there in large numbers to lay their eggs. But this time, Soriano miscalculated. Before he could toss the explosive — the wick quickly burning down — it went off in his hand, leaving him amputated up to the high wrist.Soriano, now 47, got away easy compared to many other residents of the 35 fishing communities along El Salvador’s Jiquilisco Bay Biosphere Reserve, a 241-kilometer (150-mile) wetland that contributes approximately 2 tons of fish to the country’s seafood markets every day. Some residents have been badly burned, lost an eye or — because explosives are normally packed with the tube held between the thighs — their legs and genitals.But blast fishing has also taken a toll on Jiquilisco Bay’s marine life. Populations of yellowfin snook (Centropomus robalito), hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) and Pacific red snapper (Lutjanus peru), as well as six kinds of mangrove trees, have shown noticeable declines since nearby communities began using explosives in the 1980s.Over the last decade, officials have made rooting out the illegal practice a top priority, placing their bets on a creative alternative that a local fisherman suggested in 2009: What if an artificial reef could be dropped into the bay where they normally fish? Done correctly, it might allow for both an easy catch and a sustainable way of bolstering biodiversity.Fisher Juan Jose Amalla said on a good day he brings in about 30 fish from the artificial reef he fishes in Jiquilisco Bay. Image by Max Radwin for Mongabay.“It may not have been as good as blast fishing,” said José Maria Argueta, program director for the local NGO the Mangrove Association, “but we argued that it was also sustainable and not dangerous. You could relax and catch fish and not worry about running from the police.”It is now the 10th anniversary of the artificial reef project’s inception, and a dozen local cooperatives have installed more than 20 artificial reefs — collections of logs and hollow concrete structures — for line-and-pole fishing. But officials say blast fishing continues in some areas, and managing the reefs has become its own challenge.“It’s a sustainable way to catch fish,” Argueta said. “It also allows people to fish without damaging the environment or themselves. But we need a plan to manage the artificial reefs.”Blast fishing: ‘It’s just not a good idea’The transition from blast fishing to artificial reefs has been, and continues to be, a slow one. Even after Soriano lost his hand in 1997 — before the reefs were even an idea — he kept using explosives for another five years, resisting officials’ attempts to persuade him to switch to traditional fishing methods.Like most fishermen in the area, Soriano was looking for the most efficient way to bring in the largest possible catch. Given the cost of gas, bait, boat rental and fees to his local fishing cooperative, line fishing before the era of artificial reefs didn’t make much sense. It only brought in about 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) of fish on a typical outing, sold for between $1 and $2 per pound. Explosives, meanwhile, with a radius as large as 80 feet (24 meters), sometimes brought in upwards of 40 pounds (18 kilograms) — and in a fraction of the time.Luis Gonzalez Benitez lost an arm while blast fishing and now splits his time between using nets and line fishing on the reef. Image by Max Radwin for Mongabay.For other fishermen, explosives were all they knew. Their fathers never taught them how to line-fish. Or the nets they’d used in childhood were abandoned in the wake of the country’s civil war.Politically motivated violence throughout the 1970s saw tens of thousands die at the hands of right-wing death squads, igniting a left-wing guerrilla movement and drawing in the U.S. through to the war’s end in 1992.Many residents around Jiquilisco Bay joined the People’s Revolutionary Army and the Farabundo Martí Liberation People’s Force guerrilla groups. In the 1980s, they had decided to fight a war of attrition, carrying out sniper attacks, ambushes and land mine bombings. One hour from the shores of Jiquilisco Bay, the 400-meter (1,300-foot) Golden Bridge was destroyed by guerrilla-made dynamite.Still other residents fled to other parts of Central America, such as Panama. Upon returning later in the war, they allegedly encountered two military officers who showed them how to make explosives. Today, no one knows the names of those two officers, but they are still talked about in various fishing communities, even mentioned vaguely in government reports, almost as myth: the bringers of explosives to Jiquilisco.By the 1990s, the bay was showing a noticeable drop in marine life. Though there was little data taken in that time period, fishermen recall returning from trips with smaller and smaller catches.“At first it was a good way to fish, but after a while not so much because we killed everything,” said fisherman Luis Gonzalez, 47, of Puerto El Flor. “More than anything else, this was business. It starts to get expensive when you’re coming back without fish.”Other marine life suffered, as well. Critically endangered hawksbill sea turtles occupy approximately 37 kilometers (23 miles) of nesting habitat in and around Jiquilisco Bay. But between 2004 and 2008, the Zoological Foundation of El Salvador reported 18 fatalities caused by blast fishing — the hawksbills’ leading cause death during that period.Due to the bay’s thousands of acres of mangrove trees, it was declared a Ramsar site— an international recognition for wetlands — in 2005. Mangroves are not only important breeding grounds for marine life; they’re also a key player in preventing coastal soil erosion. Officials suspect that human activity, including blast fishing, has contributed to a 10 percent loss in the bay’s mangrove cover.“When it comes to blast fishing,” Gonzalez added, “it’s just not a good idea. It means putting an end to all the fish.”last_img read more

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Connecting an island: Traveling the Pan Borneo Highway

first_imgThe Malaysian states of Sarawak and Sabah are in the midst of building more than 2,000 kilometers (1,200 miles) of the Pan Borneo Highway.The goal is to boost the states’ economies and connect them with the Indonesian provinces on the island of Borneo as part of the Trans Borneo Highway.Advocates of the highway, including many politicians, say the upgraded, widened and in some places entirely new stretches of highway will link markets and provide a jolt to the promising tourism sector in Malaysian Borneo.But skeptics, including scientists and conservationists, argue that parts of the highway cut through ecologically sensitive areas and that planning prior to construction didn’t adequately account for the damage that construction could cause. This is the first article in our six-part series “Traveling the Pan Borneo Highway.”MIRI, Malaysia — Tucked under the sweep of green that blankets parts of Malaysian Borneo is a unique mix of nature, culture and outdoor adventures matched by few other places in the world. It’s true that in recent decades the country’s two states on the island, Sabah and Sarawak, have suffered significant deforestation, largely for timber and oil palm. But in a single week, a visitor can still scuba dive in the Celebes Sea, camp with Penan hunter-gatherers in the Baram River watershed, boat along the wildlife-rich Kinabatangan River, and trek through untouched primeval forests in Danum Valley and Maliau Basin.But despite those attractions, the tourism industry in these states “has not really flourished,” Malaysia’s federal works minister, Baru Bian, told Mongabay.A stork-billed kingfisher (Pelargopsis capensis) along the Kinabatangan River in Sabah. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Baru sees the lack of “connectivity” between these sites as a brake on both the development of tourism and broader expansion of Borneo’s economies. And judging by the funding that politicians earmarked for the Pan Borneo Highway early in the project’s development — some 27 billion ringgit, or about $6.4 billion — Baru is not alone in his belief that the lack of roads is holding these states back.In 2013, Najib Razak, Malaysia’s prime minister at the time, revived a long-nurtured plan for a Pan Borneo Highway that would connect the two states. The goal at the time was to build more than 2,000 kilometers (1,200 miles) of mostly divided four-lane highway by 2021 to spur a scale-up of tourism and other economic activities. Current projections put the final completion date in 2025. It would also link up with the Trans Borneo Highway, connecting Malaysian Borneo to the Indonesian provinces and Brunei on the world’s third-largest island, with more than 5,000 kilometers (3,100 miles) of roadway.last_img read more

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As wildfires roil Sumatra, some villages have abandoned the burning

first_imgAgriculture, Community Development, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Environment, Farming, Fires, Fishing, Forest Fires, Forestry, Forests, Governance, Green, Haze, Indigenous Peoples, Mangroves, Plantations, Rainforests, Rivers, Southeast Asian Haze, Sustainable Development, Tourism, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Devastating fires and haze in 2015, as well as the threat of arrest, have prompted some villages in Sumatra to end the tradition of burning the land for planting.The villages of Upang Ceria and Gelebak Dalam also been fire-free since then, even as large swaths of forest elsewhere in Sumatra continue to burn.Village officials have plans to develop ecotourism as another source of revenue, as well as restore mangroves and invest in agricultural equipment that makes the farmers’ work easier. UPANG CERIA/GELEBAK DALAM, Indonesia — Boat drivers sometimes decide not to work when the smoke is thick on the Musi River out of fear of a dangerous collision. For the last three months wildfires here in South Sumatra have enveloped much of the province in a dense haze. The smoke sticks to your clothes and makes it difficult to see the way forward.“The fires make life hard for us,” Abdul Hamid, the head of Upang Ceria, a village on the Musi River outside Palembang, the provincial capital, told Mongabay in early September. “The haze makes us sick and it’s difficult for us to move around.”In September the national aviation authority rerouted scores of domestic and international flights as visibility fell to only a few hundred meters at the airport in Palembang. Schools closed for several days in the city, costing children class time soon after the beginning of the new school year.Satellite data on fires from the World Resources Institute (WRI) indicate there were more than 22,000 fire alerts in September in South Sumatra, 9.3 percent of the total number of alerts throughout the Indonesian archipelago. Fires here have burned on and off ever since the dry season began more than three months ago.The fires spread easily across Indonesia’s vast peat swamp zones, which have been widely drained and dried for agriculture. Many planters also use fire to clear and fertilize the land, though the practice is illegal.However, a handful of villages in the province have managed to stay free from fires since the catastrophic El Niño weather event in 2015, when more than half a million Indonesians were sickened by haze due to a prolonged dry season.“For three years we have been free from any fires,” said Abdul Hamid. “Almost everyone has given up burning grass and straw.“Now they compost it to make fertilizer.”Upang Ceria sits mostly on peat soil and its 2,500 inhabitants occupy an area of 25 square kilometers (10 square miles). The village is located on the banks of the Musi River, which flows out to sea toward the tin-mining island of Bangka off Sumatra’s eastern coast.Many people here used to set fires to clear land to replant crops and trees, but Addul says fear of arrest by the police or military has changed that behavior.One knock-on effect of wildfires is the pressure placed on local food supply chains. But the absence of fires near the Musi River in Upang Ceria means the community can still fish in mangrove swamps on the riverbanks.Residents of Upang Ceria fish in the mangroves by the Musi River. Image by Nopri Ismi for Mongabay.The village of Gelebak Dalam lies around 50 kilometers (31 miles) downstream of Upang Ceria. Its 2,000 or so inhabitants live surrounded by rice fields and rubber plantations.Hendri Sani, the village chief of Gelebak Dalam, also sees clear changes in the way the community perceives the risks caused by fires to clear land. Since the catastrophic 2015 Southeast Asia haze crisis, Hendri told Mongabay, people here have begun to warn their neighbors against any open burning.“We must turn our backs on this tradition because it is bad for the environment,” Hendri said. “Things are different now and it’s been banned by the government.”Hendri explains how fire was an ingrained practice among farmers in Gelebak Dalam until only relatively recently.However, better access to the heavy machinery required to work the land more productively means the community is increasingly able to bury grass, straw and other agricultural surplus into a makeshift landfill.“We just pile it all into a hole using an excavator,” he says.Upriver in Upang Ceria, the elders are drawing up plans to market the village as an ecotourism destination with support from the Banyuasin district government. Abdul Hamid wants to highlight to visitors the recent environmental initiatives, as well Upang Ceria’s history as one of the oldest continually inhabited places from the Srivijaya kingdom, which flourished here a millennium ago.“We’re going to focus on tours of the Demang Lebar Daun River as well as Sekoci Island,” Abdul says.Another idea is to restore mangrove trees along the Musi River.“Most of the mangroves here are gone, so we’re going to replant them with help from the Banyuasin district government,” Abdul says.The local government in Gelebak Dalam also wants to designate itself as an ecotourism destination — while continuing to make progress on reforming local agricultural practices.“Our agriculture will actually be more advanced and free from using fire if farmers can be helped with technology and science,” Hendri says. “Because of this I’m determined to buy an excavator on credit to help the community.”This story was first reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and published here on our Indonesian site on Sept. 25, 2019.Banner: A resident of Upang Ceria displays a shrimp he caught in the Demang Lebar Daun River, a tributary of the Musi. Locals hope to attract tourists to their villages via river tours and other activities. Image by Nopri Ismi for Mongabay Indonesia.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by mongabayauthorlast_img read more

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#KicksStalker: LeBron wears ‘Equality’ sneakers on opening night

first_imgJake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ LATEST STORIES LeBron James has never been the person to shy away from protests.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smogThe four-time NBA MVP has always used his stature as one of the most recognizable athletes as a platform to demand social justice.ADVERTISEMENT View comments And in Cleveland’s home opener to the 2017-2018 season, James wore a player exclusive version of his LeBron 15 sneaker with the a gold “Equality” emblazoned on the all black shoe. Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson MOST READ “I just wanted to keep the conversation going,” said James in an ESPN.com report. “We know what we’re going through. We know what we went through as a nation, as a world.”“I had an opportunity to use a platform for the greater good and keep the conversation going. Why not?”James’ message was in accordance with the protest in the NFL where players take the knee during the playing of the national anthem of the United States.Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick started the peaceful protest in 2016 to demand the end to police brutality and raise racial equality.James, back in 2014, wore “I can’t breath” t-shirts during the Cavs’ shootaround before their game against the Brooklyn Nets.ADVERTISEMENT Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ ‘I’m done, I’m done’: Lin bursts into tears after injuring knee in Nets loss Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ The words “I can’t breath” were the last ones Eric Garner, an African-American, spoke before dying in a confrontation with a New York Police Department officer.James, also, has always been vocal of his opposition with US President Donald Trump.The Cleveland superstar defended Golden State point guard Stephen Curry’s decision to not visit the White House for what was supposed to be the Warriors’ honorary presidential visit.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

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‘Weah Managed Economy ‘Fairly’ under 6 Months,’ Survey shows

first_imgRelease of Afrobarometer’s Round 7 data in Liberia, October 24, 2018But 56% of Liberians approve of the President’s job performance; Afrobarometer RevealsTwenty-four percent (24%) of one-third of the Liberian population have said the George M. Weah administration has performed “fairly” in managing the economy under six months of his administration, according to a survey by Afrobarometer.In the same survey, Liberians have also rated the government poorly on economic management, but 10% of one-third of the population said the government performed very well.Afrobarometer is a pan-African, non-partisan research network that conducts public attitude surveys on democracy, governance, economic conditions, and related issues in Africa. Six rounds of surveys were conducted in up to 37 Africans countries between 1999 and 2015, and Round 7 surveys are being completed in 2018. Afrobarometer conducts face-to-face interviews in the language of the respondent’s choice with nationally representative samples.Led by the Khana Group, The Afrobarometer team in Liberia interviewed 1,200 adult Liberians in June 2018. A sample of this size yields country-level results with a margin of error of plus or minus (+/-) 3 percentage points at a 95% confidence level. Previous surveys have been conducted in Liberia in 2008, 2012, and 2015.Most prioritized problems affecting LiberiansFormally released on Wednesday, October 24, 2018, at a local resort in Monrovia, the new Afrobarometer survey — which made up the Afrobarometer Round 7 Data in Liberia — reveals that the Weah-led government ‘failed’ in the wake of chronic inflation and hike in prices of goods and services, during the period of the survey, between 19 June to 16 July 2018.The Afrobarometer showed that 22% said the government failed to create jobs, while 12% said jobs were created; 17% said there was no improvement for the living standards of the poor, while 6% said there were improving living standards of the poor; and 16% said there was not enough food to eat, while 10% said the government was ensuring enough to eat.The survey further showed that 56% of Liberians approve of President Geroge Weah’s overall job performance since he assumed office on January 22, 2018.A majority of citizens say he is doing a good job on national security, domestic policy, and foreign policy issues, the survey suggests. Citizens give the government a passing grade on providing infrastructure and basic services but failing marks for its economic performance and efforts to address the country’s most important problems.Meanwhile, three panelists, Cllr. Dr. Yarsuo Weh Dorliae, Cllr. Ruth Jappah and Augustus M. Zayzay supported the results of the Afrobarometer survey.68% of Liberians want land ownership to be an exclusive right of a LiberianAccording to Cllr. Dorliae, the well-founded fear still exists among Liberians regarding the citizenship and negro clauses in the Constitution. Cllr. Jappah, however, said the survey showed that while younger Liberians are disappointed in the President’s performance, the older ones are still patient.  She maintained that the government needs to resolve the issues concerning land for development and land for citizenship.For his part, Mr. Zayzay said the research is a spillage for the former Government’s performance, bad or good, and the President’s passing grade is because of his resounding message.The political leader of the United People’s Party (UPP), Mr. Macdonald Wento, said Liberians are afraid and weak to invest and compete with ‘white businessmen’, so, “for that reason we are afraid to make them citizens.”Earlier, Mr. Daniel Armah-Attoh gave a general overview of  Afrobarometer Africa and stressed the importance of ‘Afrobarometer Round 7 Data in Liberia.’The former Assistant Minister for Vocational and Technical Training and Managing Researcher for the Center for Policy Action and Research (CePAR), Boakia Jaleiba, hailed the Afrobarometer survey and said the current passing grade is encouraging.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Teen placed in psychiatric hospital after attempting suicide

first_img…says conditions inhumane, NGOs outragedReports that a 15-year-old girl who attempted to take her own life has been placed in the National Psychiatric Hospital at Canje, Region Six (East Berbice-Corentyne), has sparked outrage from several agencies.National Psychiatric Hospital at CanjeThe teenager has since said that she cannot live under those conditions and is pleading for assistance.She was reportedly placed there with only a piece of sponge to sleep on, which she said is smelly and the surroundings are unsanitary and inhumane.Only recently British High Commissioner Greg Quinn renewed calls in support of the decriminalisation of attempted suicide. In Guyana, suicide or attempted suicide is considered a criminal offence with punishment ranging from five to ten years’ imprisonment.It was in July that the British High Commissioner made the call as he noted that suicide was removed from the list of criminal offences in England and Wales since 1961 and such actions should follow through for Guyana as well because it eliminates the stigma for surviving family members. In Guyana, there is a holding centre for criminal juvenile offenders but none for juveniles who have issues in association with suicide attempts.Meanwhile, following several attempts at suicide, Police took the teenager to the National Psychiatric Hospital where she was admitted.According to a source close to the institution, it is the protocol to have persons on suicide watch placed in a ward without anything but a mattress to sleep on. In this case, the mattress is just a piece of sponge.According to the teenager, she attempted to take her own life on numerous occasions because she was sexually molested but relatives did nothing to help her.“I am not going to be able to live here. I can’t live under these conditions,” she said.The Caribbean Voice, an NGO which focuses on anti-violence with a specific focus on mental health issues inclusive of suicide and social justice, has expressed outrage.Managing Director Bibi Ahmad told this publication that the teenager would have been diagnosed by a medical person at the National Psychiatric Hospital.“They had to do an assessment of her before they put her into that facility and her mother would have signed a consent form before she could have been placed there.”However, Ahmad said that if there are reports of sexual assault, the psychiatric hospital should investigate further and get the Child Care and Protection Agency involved.“The Child Care and Protection Agency should be involved because it is a minor,” Ahmad explained.Director of the Child Care and Protection Agency, Ann Green when contacted told this publication that she was unaware of the situation but promised to investigate.Meanwhile, weighing in on the issue, head of the Humanitarian Mission Guyana Inc, Suresh Sugrim noted that there are no centres for underage persons who need special attention, noting that there is a huge stigma attached to the National Psychiatric Hospital.“These are teenagers who are in need, should be handled and taken care of differently from adults. The human rights activists need to be called in to remove that child from that institution immediately. I was offering the Mission’s facility at Port Mourant for full-time counselling for adolescents, and because of politicians in the region and their self-interests, it was shut down,” Sugrim said.The Mission, two years ago, had given a section of the building at Port Mourant to the Public Health Ministry for that purpose.“Without proper sleep, attention and professional medical help, nothing is going to change in the mental state of these adolescents! Isn’t a mental institution partly medical? Why is this place dirty and smelling? Why is it lacking the proper necessities a mental institution should have?” he questioned while noting that such situations could be one of the contributory factors of the region having such a high suicide rate.Efforts to get a comment from the National Psychiatric Hospital were futile. (Andrew Carmichael)last_img read more

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City Council talks Capital Budget designation

first_imgThe Capital Budget is an accumulation of Federal and Provincial funds, mainly money from the Fair Share Agreement with the province. This budget is different from the Operating Budget, which is funded by municipal taxes. Only a handful of people attended the very brief Public Capital Budget Meeting Monday at City Hall.The short meeting saw only six people in attendance, who sat in while City Council discussed the designation of its $32,449,131 Capital Budget.- Advertisement -Pavement of city roads was a prominent issue discussed at the meeting. As discussed at last weeks Council meeting and reiterated again on Monday, Council wants to push back the extension of 90th Street to 112th Ave and instead, will move forward with improvements to 106th Street, North of C.M. Finch School. A project that would cost roughly $2.3 millions dollars of the City’s Capital Budget.Victor Shopland, Director of Infrastructure and Capital Works, says only 17 km of road remain unpaved in Fort St. John and they are working to finish paving these roads in the near future.Another issue that was discussed regarding the budget is converting the Kids Arena in to a dry floor arena. That procedure would cost the City roughly $214,000.After going through the Capital Budget, the floor was opened to the general public. Only one person took advantage of the opportunity to speak Monday.Advertisementlast_img read more

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Exclusive – Former England star issues Sterling with international warning

first_imgAlvin Martin has warned Raheem Sterling he risks losing his England place if he tries to pick and choose his matches.The Liverpool forward claimed he was too tired to start in the Euro 2016 qualifier against Estonia on Sunday, leading to a backlash among fans of the Three Lions.Sterling has been an ever-present throughout Liverpool’s disappointing start to the Premier League this season and played 45 minutes in England’s 5-0 win against San Marino on Thursday.However, former England defender Martin has told the 19-year-old that deciding when to play for the Three Lions will only provide opportunities for rival players in his position.“If Sterling wants to pick and choose games, you’ve got someone like [Adam] Lallana and other players in the England team who are more than capable of taking on the mantle as the attacking creator of the team,” the West Ham legend told the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast.“There’s no problem with players saying they’re not 100 per cent, but it’s very difficult when you play for England because people are going to look at it in a certain way. There will be lots of football supporters questioning why he’s too tired at this stage of the season.”After omitting Sterling from the starting line-up, Roy Hodgson opted for Liverpool’s Lallana and Martin was quick to praise the former Southampton captain’s contribution.“Lallana is somebody I’m starting to get really excited about because he wants the ball in the areas where a lot of players can’t receive it,” he added.“He can receive it on his left or right foot, he gets himself on the turn and when he does run with the ball he’s hard to deal with.”last_img read more

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‘He’s the real deal’ – Man Utd fans urge Van Gaal to give starlet a chance

first_img1 If you managed to miss it, Manchester United midfielder Andreas Pereira scored a stunning solo goal in the Under-20 World Cup final for Brazil on Saturday.Although the 19-year-old, who signed a new contract at Old Trafford earlier this year, ended up on the losing side, his exploits have got Red Devils fans a tad excited.talkSPORT has compiled the best reaction to the teenager’s strike below, and it looks like Louis van Gaal will have a selection headache on his hands next season. Andreas Pereira last_img read more

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