Souths Basketball League receives K25,000 boost

first_imgWith an inventiveness of promoting sports in the province and the Legacy of a father who first started the game of basketball in the province, Johnny has taken on the mantle left by his father by supporting the NSBL Association in the city.“This is not for fame but for the love of the game that I am here to support the association. I am also passionate about the game as I used to play when I was young,” said Yawari who is also the newly appointed patron of NSBL said.Yawari also said this initiative is another a milestone to see and bring up young people who have the passion for the game and the talents in playing the game to the next level.“I have seen so many local talents from my village in Kutubu  who are also talented in basketball and this may be the opportunity through the NSBL that we can bring them up. We have already done this through the Southern Flames team who are now participating in the POM Basketball Association and are three times champions of the POMBL,” Yawari said.The young Yawari is also planning on making the Late Yawari Basketball Cup in Pimala and Kutubu a bigger and better one after he first initiated it last year by opening a new basketball court and pledging another two courts for the people.“However, I support this as I see an opportunity in this particular sport  that it will  bring peace and harmony in the community to promote safe and healthy lifestyle for the people,” Yawari said.last_img read more

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Simba’s future depends on putting communities at the forefront of lion conservation (commentary)

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Big Cats, Charismatic Animals, Commentary, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Editorials, Environment, Human-wildlife Conflict, Lions, Mammals, Researcher Perspective Series, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation While Simba and Mufasa’s return to the big screen is good news for Disney and summer movie fans, in the quarter-century since the original animated version of The Lion King was released, Africa’s lion population has declined by roughly half. With only about 20,000 lions remaining in Africa, and their historic range having contracted by over 80 percent, the lion’s future is increasingly uncertain.In the face of these challenges, lion conservation is becoming a more urgent priority, particularly given the important role that lions play in African economies through wildlife tourism. In Tanzania, for example, home to perhaps half of all the remaining wild lions left in the world, lions are a cornerstone of a national tourism industry that earns over $2 billion annually and accounts for roughly a quarter of all foreign exchange earnings.Fortunately, when conservation programs are able to provide people with reasons to support lion conservation, local communities can become key stewards of lions and other wildlife.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. This past weekend, Disney’s newly released version of The Lion King shattered box office records by earning $544 million in theaters around the world. But while Simba and Mufasa’s return to the big screen is good news for Disney and summer movie fans, in the quarter-century since the original animated version of The Lion King was released, Africa’s lion population has declined by roughly half. With only about 20,000 lions remaining in Africa, and their historic range having contracted by over 80 percent, the lion’s future is increasingly uncertain.In the face of these challenges, lion conservation is becoming a more urgent priority, particularly given the important role that lions play in African economies through wildlife tourism. In Tanzania, for example, home to perhaps half of all the remaining wild lions left in the world, lions are a cornerstone of a national tourism industry that earns over $2 billion annually and accounts for roughly a quarter of all foreign exchange earnings.But, although lions bring economic value through tourism, these predators also impose significant costs on local communities living alongside wildlife in rural areas. The economic cost of livestock predation by lions on Kenyan ranchers in some areas is nearly $300 annually — which can amount to over a quarter of herders’ per capita annual income.Community conservancies, where resident people play the lead role in conservation, have played an important role in localized lion recoveries in places like Kenya and Namibia. Photo Credit: Kenya Wildlife Conservancies Association.This illustrates a fundamental challenge for the conservation of lions and other large mammals in Africa today: balancing the economic costs and trade-offs to local people of living with wildlife. When lions and other predators kill livestock, local communities often respond by shooting, spearing, or poisoning the offending animals. This is a central factor in the decline of lions in countries such as Kenya, where there are now probably less than 2,000 lions left. Even in large national parks, lion numbers often decline when animals wander out of parks and come into conflict with neighboring communities.Fortunately, when conservation programs are able to provide people with reasons to support lion conservation, local communities can become key stewards of lions and other wildlife. For example, in both Namibia and Kenya there are a growing number of community-managed ‘conservancies,’ where communities and rural landowners set up their own conservation areas. By entering into agreements with tourism companies, these conservancies generate revenue that creates economic value from lions at the local level. In Kenya’s Maasai Mara, for example, about 17 conservancies now help protect approximately 1,400 square kilometers (about 541 square miles) of some of the world’s best lion habitat. Lion numbers in some of these conservancies have recovered, and are now at higher densities than in nearby government reserves. Similarly, in Namibia, lion numbers increased six-fold in the country’s arid northwest after conservancies were established starting in the late 1990s. The key in both cases is that local communities are able to earn revenue from lions, and are empowered to run their own conservation programs on their lands through the conservancies.Indigenous customs and knowledge can also play a key role in these kinds of locally rooted conservation efforts and support co-existence of people and lions. In Kenya’s southern Rift Valley, traditional Maasai livestock management systems involve setting aside large areas of pasture for grazing only during the dry season and droughts. These customary seasonal restrictions on pasture access help protect wildlife habitat, bolstering prey for lions and other predators. Traditional communities such as the Maasai also have exceptional tolerance of wild carnivores as a result of unique cultural values. Recent research shows that despite lion densities that are some of the highest in Africa, more than 85 percent of residents in this area support lion conservation efforts designed to maintain these numbers.Lion Guardians employs a network of local Maasai warriors to monitor lions and reduce conflicts between lions and people. Photo Credit: Philip J. Briggs.Another initiative embracing indigenous customs to promote co-existence and reduce the costs of living alongside lions is Lion Guardians, also based in southern Kenya. By hiring local Maasai warriors — including those with past history of killing lions in their community — as ‘Guardians,’ they have been able to reduce lion mortalities caused by people by over 90 percent. This has helped the lion population in Kenya’s Amboseli ecosystem more than quadruple over the past decade. This kind of model of community-based conflict reduction has been adapted — and delivered similar results — in other key lion areas, such as Tanzania’s Ruaha ecosystem.For lions to thrive in modern Africa, where human populations, settlements, and infrastructure are all rapidly expanding, these are the kinds of locally driven conservation approaches that need to be supported and scaled up. This means increasing investment in strategies that promote tolerance of people towards lions by increasing local benefits and reducing local costs as a priority across their range.As the The Lion King returns to theaters this summer, it bears noting that one key species is missing from the film’s African landscape, as with many depictions of African wildlife: people. But it is the humans that live near and among lion populations all throughout Africa who hold the key to wildlife’s survival and recovery. Conservation efforts need to genuinely benefit local communities, by empowering them to make key decisions, capture the economic value of lions, and manage the costs of co-existence according to local interests. Only then will Simba’s domain persist and the lion’s future renew through the years ahead.In Kenya’s South Rift community, conservation initiatives have created a model for co-existence between resident communities and high densities of lions in areas such as Olkiramatian Group Ranch. Photo Credit: Guy Western/SORALO.CITATIONS• Elliot, Nicholas B., and Arjun M. Gopalaswamy. (2017). Toward accurate and precise estimates of lion density. Conservation Biology 31(4), 934-943. doi:10.1111/cobi.12878• Trinkel, M., & Angelici, F. M. (2016). The decline in the lion population in Africa and possible mitigation measures. In Problematic Wildlife (pp. 45-68). Springer, Cham. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-22246-2_3• Western, G., Macdonald, D. W., Loveridge, A. J., & Dickman, A. J. (2019). Creating Landscapes of Coexistence: Do Conservation Interventions Promote Tolerance of Lions in Human-dominated Landscapes?. Conservation & Society 17(2), 204-217. doi:10.4103/cs.cs_18_29Fred Nelson is Executive Director of Maliasili, a US-based organization that supports leading African conservation organizations to increase their impact and effectiveness.John Kamanga is Executive Director of the South Rift Association of Land Owners (SORALO), a community association that works across over one million hectares of Maasai land in southern Kenya.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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New toolkit identifies multiple species from environmental DNA

first_imgResearchers have developed a DNA analysis toolkit designed to speed the identification of the multiple species in a biological community by analyzing environmental DNA from a sample of water or soil.To confirm the presence of a species at a site, the tool compares its genetic barcode (short DNA sequence) to barcodes of known species in one of several reference databases.The toolkit’s advantage is its ability to quickly process many barcode sequences, at multiple analysis locations on the gene, that enable it to identify the species of the DNA sequences of many organisms at the same time. Researchers from the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and CALeDNA have developed a toolkit designed to quickly identify the species in a biological community by simultaneously analyzing the environmental DNA (eDNA) from multiple species from a single analysis of a sample of water or soil. Their aim is to eliminate the need for researchers to sort and process multiple eDNA sequences independently, thus saving time and money.They published a description of the open-source software tool, called the Anacapa Toolkit, as well as results of a field test in the kelp forests off southern California.Kelp forest at Anacapa Island off southern California. Image by Dana Roeber Murray via Flickr. CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0.eDNA is the genetic material shed by animals and plants into the surrounding ecosystem, usually water or soil, through their skin, scales, feces or pollen. eDNA has proved increasingly useful for identifying particularly aquatic species found at a given site. A single one-liter (one quart) sample of water can contain eDNA for many species and is a non-invasive means of collecting data.The software toolkit is a series of modules that can analyze DNA sequences from multiple locations (loci) on the genes extracted from the eDNA in the sample and compare them to a customized reference database of sequences of known species. It produces a spreadsheet of all the species found in the sample for which it has a known reference sequence.Lead author Emily Curd said the outputs of eDNA research in the Anacapa toolkit are standardized and eliminate many of the human steps and potential missteps that previous tools include. “When you compare our results against previous studies, we do a lot better capturing the biodiversity that’s out there,” Curd said in a statement.Scientists use genetic barcoding, analyses of short DNA sequences from a specific point on the gene, to identify a species by comparing its barcode to a database of known barcodes. Research teams have since developed metabarcording analyses that allow them to analyze the barcodes of many species at the same time and determine which species are present in the sample.A treefish, a California native, at Anacapa Island. eDNA from water samples allow researchers to detect the presence of individual species from the scales or skin they leave behind, even if the animal is no longer in the area. Image by Dana Roeber Murray via Flickr. CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0.In developing the new tool, the researchers recognized three main challenges to accurately and reliably identifying species using eDNA:eDNA studies often sequence multiple loci on the genes of a given sample because plants, fungi, and various animal species are each best detected using different loci, but researchers currently must process each of these independently;a lack of curated reference databases for all of the loci the researchers want to analyze for all the potential species in a water or soil sample of a given site hinders identification;current metabarcode pipelines (a series of steps, or workflow) often discard large portions of sequence data that are potentially useful for identifying the taxon (e.g. species) of a sequence that doesn’t fully align with reference sequences.To use the toolkit, a research team first collects a water or soil sample and extracts DNA from it using standard techniques that produce genetic sequences of the various life forms in the sample.Marine invertebrates of California’s Channel Islands. The toolkit analyzes the eDNA collected in water samples of the multiple organisms that form a biological community. Image by Ed Bierman, CC 2.0.“It’s amazing how sensitive this technique is,” said co-author Zack Gold, referring to the team’s experience that DNA from fewer than a few dozen cells is enough to detect an organism’s presence in a sample.The users upload these genetic sequences of yet-unknown species to the toolkit, which compares them to a genetic reference library of sequences with known identities. This comparison allows the tool to process the barcode sequences from the eDNA in the sample and identify the species associated with each barcode.The tool customizes the reference database for each analysis using information that the research team provides on the organisms that might be in their sample.The researchers do this by inputting primers for species or higher taxa of interest. A primer is a short nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) sequence from a particular location on the gene that provides a starting point for DNA amplification and synthesis. Synthesis of this existing strand of nucleotides primes, or provides a foundation for, synthesizing the DNA collected in the study sample.The toolkit’s Creating Reference libraries Using eXisting tools (CRUX) module generates custom reference databases based on these user-defined primers by querying public databases, such as GenBank and the European Molecular Biology Lab (EMBL) nucleotide database, to find known sequences for the organisms associated with the user’s selected primers.The toolkit, which is freely available, offers access to several reference databases to complement the user-customized reference database, and users can add their own sequences to their database.The toolkit’s advantage is its ability to quickly process the many barcode sequences, at multiple analysis locations on the gene (multiple loci), that allow it to identify the species of the DNA sequences of many organisms at the same time.Environmental DNA is often dilute or partially degraded, so the toolkit trims and processes sequences, eliminating poor-quality sections and separating sequence files from the various loci within each sample. It categorizes the sequence files by quality, and its classifier identifies the species associated with each sequence by comparing them to the sequences with known identities in the reference database. It produces a spreadsheet of sequences and species, plus reports on the identification.The researchers tested the toolkit on 30 samples of seawater from southern California’s kelp forests and found it captured a greater diversity of sequences and species than published reference databases.The taxonomic assignments (identifications) from the research team’s test samples collected from seawater off southern California, highlighting the Anacapa Island kelp forest vertebrate families identified from the 12S metabarcodes (primers). Families in bold are featured in the photographs. Image is Figure 2 of Curd et al (2019).Although all components of the toolkit are open and available to the public, researchers wanting to use the toolkit must have sufficient DNA analysis experience to select appropriate primers for their research site and to use standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques to copy and extract DNA to produce the sequences that they input into the toolkit.Gold called the new tool a “really big game-changer,” though he recognized it has limitations.Using eDNA, it cannot, for example, determine how many individuals of a particular species are in a certain area, just that a species is present. “It’s not going to replace all of the surveys and monitoring efforts,” Gold said, “but doing an eDNA survey is the most sensitive method to find where species are living.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Sue Palminteri Animals, DNA, Fungi, Monitoring, Oceans, Open-source, Plants, Research, Software, surveys, Technology, Wildtech center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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New report reveals northern Ecuadorian region has lost 61 percent of forests

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The Mache-Chindul Ecological Reserve maintains only 61 percent of its original plant cover. The area’s ecological significance is partly due to its sitting in a transition zone between humid tropical forests and seasonally dry forests.In Cotacachi-Cayapas Park, a high level of conservation success represents a source of hope. Now the challenge is to connect the park to private reserves to guarantee protection of the most-threatened lowland forests. Spanning nearly 3 million hectares (7.4 million acres) along the coast, Ecuador’s Chocó region is known as a biodiversity hotspot with high levels of endemism, among the richest region for plants in the western hemisphere. However, this ecosystem is also one of the most threatened in the world. In Ecuador, it has been one of the most affected by deforestation in recent decades.A recent analysis by the Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP), an initiative of the organization Conservación Amazónica (ACCA), reveals just how much forest has been lost. Overall, 61 percent (1.8 million hectares, or 4.4 million acres) of the Ecuadoran Chocó has been deforested; one-fifth of that loss (365,000 hectares, or 902,000 acres) occurred between 2000 and 2018.The threats are many. According to Carmen Josse, scientific director of Fundación EcoCiencia, in Ecuador, these include industrial oil palm plantations as well as legal and illegal logging and mining. “In the highland areas, on the border of the Cotacachi-Cayapas Reserve, above 1,000 meters [3,300 feet], we are talking about very large mining concessions that have caused controversy among the local population, one of them in the Intag region, very close to the border of the Cotacachi-Cayapas Reserve. A few weeks ago, it was announced that abundant reserves of various high-quality minerals existed in this area.”Endangered forests and the Mache-Chindul ReserveEcuadoran Chocó lowland forest experienced the lion’s share of deforestation, losing 68 percent (1.2 million hectares, or 3 million acres) of its forest cover by 2018. Middle- and high-elevation forests together were reduced by 50 percent (611,000 hectares, or 1.5 million acres), according to MAAP. Its analysis used data from Ecuador’s Ministry of the Environment for years before 2017, and the University of Maryland for 2017 and 2018.Comparison of the original forest and the state of the forest in 2018, using data from MAE, Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA.The analysis found 4,600 hectares (11,400 acres) of Ecuadoran Chocó forest were deforested in 2017 and 2018, mostly in low-elevation forest.According to MAAP’s analysis, only 39 percent of Ecuadoran Chocó forest (1.17 million hectares, or 2.89 million acres) remains. For lowland forest, located mainly in the province of Esmeraldas, only 32 percent  (569,000 hectares, or 1.4 million acres) remains.“This is dramatic because although it is a world biodiversity hotspot, it is one of the least appreciated,” Martin Schaefer, executive director of Fundación Jocotoco, told Mongabay Latam.MAAP’s analysis reveals protected areas haven’t been immune, finding only 61 percent of Mache-Chindul Ecological Reserve retains its original forest.Josse attributed this, to a certain extent, to there already being settlements inside this area from the time of its declaration in 1996. These include, on the one hand, indigenous Chachi communities, and on the other, migrants who moved there to work in agriculture.“The declaration was complex, but it made sense, because it is an area that, although located in areas of low elevation near the coast, has a very rugged topography (consisting of a small coastal mountain range) that should not be used for agricultural activities. On the other hand, it also has high levels of endemism, because it is a transition zone between very humid forests, characteristic of the Chocó, and seasonally dry forests,” Josse said.Deforestation at different elevations, using data from MAAP, MAE, Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA.Josse said deforestation in the reserve has increased with the construction of nearby roads, among other things. “According to the evaluation of forest cover carried out by EcoCiencia in 2017, there are only 76,053 hectares [187,931 acres] of native forest left among the 200,000 [494,210 acres] in the area comprised of the district of Muisne and the Mache-Chindul Reserve,” notes the report “Oportunidades y desafíos en el manejo de los bosques y sus servicios ambientales en el cantón Muisne, Esmeraldas” (Opportunities and challenges in the management of forests and their environmental services in the district of Muisne, Esmeraldas), published by EcoCiencia last year. “If current rates of deforestation continue, in just 25 to 30 years the last remaining forests that exist in the area will be lost.”In its report, MAAP highlights two areas significantly affected by deforestation. The first is a location close to the border with Colombia that lost 380 hectares (939 acres) between 2016 and 2018 “directly to the north of an oil palm plantation, possibly for an expansion.”The analysis also reveals the Chachi Indigenous Reserve lost around 50 hectares (124 acres) of its forest cover between 2016 and 2018.Hope in Cotacachi-CayapasDespite the loss of forest in many areas of the Ecuadoran Chocó, MAAP’s report offers optimism and hope in the high level of conservation of the recently named Cotacachi-Cayapas National Park, first declared protected in 1968 as an ecological reserve. MAAP’s data and images show that 99 percent of the park’s forests were in good condition as of 2018.Schaefer from Fundación Jocotoco said Cotacachi-Cayapas remains important because it still has extensive forest coverage. However, he noted that the majority of land in the reserve is above 500 meters (1,640 feet), while the most threatened habitat in the Ecuadoran Chocó is the lowland forest, at elevations of less than 300 meters (980 feet).The patch outlined in red shows the deforestation of 380 hectares just north of an oil palm plantation, using data from Planet, ESA, MAAPThe patches outlined in red show the deforestation of 50 hectares inside the Chachi Indigenous Reserve, using data from Planet, MAAP.“Our intention is to protect this habitat (of lowland forests) and then connect it to Cotacachi-Cayapas, because there is evidence that the species in the western area are moving their range of altitude upwards as a result of increasing temperatures, due to climate change. In order to facilitate this change in altitude we need this connectivity,” Schaefer said, adding that this is why Fundación Jocotoco is interested in expanding its Canandé reserve to connect it to the national park.The aim is to move quickly, since the land in areas of low elevation is increasingly affected by road projects and “very suited to palm oil plantations,” Schaefer said. He added it is important to work with local communities and businesses that have sustainable models of production and that maintain a certain level of vegetation on their land, also providing a home for threatened species. “We want to demonstrate that there are alternatives for working in the forest without destroying its natural resources.”Conservationists say the protection of the Ecuadoran Chocó has become a necessity due to the increasing pressures it faces.“The area has also been affected by selective logging financed by large timber companies, and so these forests, those from which high-quality wood has been extracted, have gradually become degraded and have been converted to other land uses,” Josse said, adding that this is currently still happening.If this loss of forest continues, Schaefer said, it will destroy a place of enormous biodiversity where “we are losing species, often before even discovering them.”Banner image of forests in the highland areas of the Ecuadoran Chocó by Sebastián Crespo/CONDESAN.es.mongabay.com Article published by Genevieve Belmakercenter_img Agriculture, Conservation, data, data collection, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Land Use Change, Mapping, Rainforests, satellite data, Saving Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests last_img read more

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‘A green desert’: Mammals take a hit in Colombia’s oil palm plantations

first_imgEditor’s note: William Laurance is a member of Mongabay’s advisory board.Citations:Pardo, L. E., Campbell, M. J., Edwards, W., Clements, G. R., & Laurance, W. F. (2018). Terrestrial mammal responses to oil palm dominated landscapes in Colombia. PLOS ONE, 13(5). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0197539Maddox, T., Priatna, D., Gemita, E., & Salampessy, A. (2007). The conservation of tigers and other wildlife in oil palm plantations. Jambi Province, Sumatra, Indonesia. ZSL Conservation Report No. 7. The Zoological Society of London, London. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Maria Salazar Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Interns, Mammals, Palm Oil, Plantations, Research, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Researchers studying oil palm plantations in Colombia found that mammal diversity dropped compared to nearby savanna.Some mammals used plantations for hunting and foraging, but none stayed permanently.With the Colombian government’s pledge to drastically increase its cropland, scientists fear savannas and wetlands could be at threat. As oil palm plantations expand across the world, razing swaths of tropical rainforests in their path, fears about their impact on the environment have also grown. In the plantations of Colombia, a new study has found yet another way they are altering global biodiversity: by impacting the diversity of mammals.“Some species do very well” in oil palm plantations, said Lain Pardo, one of the authors of the study published in the journal PLOS ONE. These include species such as the crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous), jaguarundi (Herpailurus yagouaroundi) and giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).“Our results suggest that even within the terrestrial mammals group there is a lot of variability,” Pardo said.Relatively common species, especially small- to medium-sized predators, likely feed on the rodents and other agricultural pests that abound in oil palm plantations. For giant anteaters, their main food source is also a common denizen of plantations. But most other mammals, including larger rodents such as the agouti (Dasyprocta fuliginosa), spiny rat (Proechimys spp.) and paca (Cuniculus paca) struggle to find food and shelter in the monoculture. Scientists found that these species were rarely present in plantations, if at all. And even those that were frequently found within the plantations were only there to forage, returning to the forests to sleep.Camera trap images of a fox, left, and two giant anteaters captured during the study. Image courtesy of Lain Pardo.The researchers undertook the study in oil palm plantations converted from former pasture in Colombia’s Llanos Orientales region, meaning sensitive species such as tapir (Tapirus spp.) and giant armadillo (Priodontes maximus), both listed as vulnerable by the IUCN, had been driven out long ago.The loss of such large mammals may have made the difference in species richness between the plantations and remaining forest fragments less stark than it would have been in a previously untouched area, according to the study. Scientists only detected puma (Puma concolor), tayra (Eira barbara), coati (Nasua nasua) and collared peccary (Pecari tajacu) — all ecologically important species — in oil palm areas bordering less disturbed savanna and the Meta-Casanare and Alto Rio Meta conservation corridors.The study’s results are supported by a 2007 paper by researchers at the Zoological Society of London, which focused on mammal species abundance in oil palm plantations in Southeast Asia. Researchers found that only four mammals — a mere 10 percent of the species known to exist within the landscape — made use of oil palm plantations. As with the Colombia study, none of the species found within the plantation were a conservation priority.Both studies came to similar conclusions.“These results show that some large-scale palm oil expansion generally has severe impacts on native mammals,” said William Laurance, a co-author of the Colombian study and professor at James Cook University in Australia.But he also acknowledged that maintaining adjacent forest corridors and allowing undergrowth in plantations could substantially increase species diversity.Palm oil plantation with undergrowth, left, and without. Image courtesy of Lain Pardo.“At all costs, we want to avoid ‘sterile’ plantations that have nothing but palm oil trees,” Laurance said. “These are little more than biological deserts.”The researchers chose to survey mammals due to their sensitivity to ecosystem quality and because they serve as an excellent indicator for overall biodiversity.“Vegetation inside the plantations helps to provide more complex environments and therefore promote the presence of other species such as spiders, butterflies, crustaceans, and even other vertebrates (snakes, birds), which attracts other mammals,” Pardo said in an email.The researchers also write that free-roaming cattle negatively impacted the biodiversity within the plantations, suggesting the importance of better livestock management and proper enclosures.An anaconda (Eunectes spp.) killed after the removal of understory vegetation on an oil palm plantation. Image courtesy of Lain Pardo.Palm oil has been a staple crop in West Africa for 5,000 years. But when European traders introduced it to Southeast Asia in the early 19th century, they found the humid climate so suitable that today, Indonesia and Malaysia produce 85 percent of the world’s palm oil.South America currently accounts for just 6 percent of all globally traded palm oil, but experts say this looks poised to change.The Colombian government has pledged to expand the land given over to plantations and other cash crops to 7 million hectares (17.3 million acres) by 2020 — an area almost the size of Ireland. The figure is nearly 14 times the 516,000 hectares (1.3 million acres) of land that Colombia devoted to palm oil in 2017, which in turn was a threefold increase from the 157,000 hectares (388,000 acres) dedicated to oil palm cultivation in 2000.Pardo warns that Colombia’s savannas and wetlands may bear the brunt of this expansion. He said savanna “could be under great pressure” from agriculture, including palm oil, and petroleum companies. It might not be the deforestation commonly associated with palm oil, but it could be just as ecologically devastating.Despite palm oil’s environmental impact, the commodity itself is so widely used that, according to WWF, it’s in almost 50 percent of packaged supermarket products. Odorless and flavorless, it’s a natural preservative, cheaper than other vegetable oils, and is found in products as diverse as instant noodles and toothpaste. Palm oil can be used as a biofuel, and even raises the melting point of ice cream. As a crop, it’s incredibly efficient: an acre of oil palms yields 10 times more vegetable oil than the same area of soybean or coconut crops.Worldwide, oil palm plantations cover a combined 27 million hectares (66.7 million acres). That’s a little larger than the area of New Zealand.Aerial view of monoculture oil palm plantation in Colombia. Image courtesy of Lain Pardo.In 2018, the IUCN concluded that palm oil is “here to stay.” But there are ways, as this study indicates, to reduce its negative impacts.last_img read more

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Amazon deforestation rises to 11 year high in Brazil

first_imgOfficial data published today by Brazil’s National Space Research Institute INPE shows deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon between August 1, 2018 and July 31, 2019 amounted to 9,762 square kilometers, an increase of 30 percent over last year.The increase in deforestation was expected given global attention to large-scale fires that blackened the skies above Brazil’s largest city this past August. Deforestation tracking systems had been showing increased forest clearing throughout 2019.Deforestation in 2019 was the highest since 2008 and represents a doubling in forest loss over 2012.Environmentalists fear that deforestation could continue to accelerate given Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro’s push to open the Amazon to more logging, large-scale mining, and industrial agriculture. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon surged more than 30 percent over the past year according to official data published today by Brazil’s National Space Research Institute, INPE. The data, which confirms the trend detected by multiple deforestation alert systems in recent months, shows that forest clearing in Earth’s largest rainforest stands at the highest level since 2008.INPE’s data, which is preliminary, estimates some 9,762 square kilometers (3,769 square miles) — an area larger than Yellowstone National Park — were cut down between August 1, 2018 and July 31, 2019. That’s over 2,200 square kilometers (849 square miles) more than was cleared the prior year. A final assessment for this year will be released in 2020.Official PRODES data showing annual deforestation (Aug 1-Jul 31 year) in the Brazilian Amazon since 1988.Short-term and long-term deforestation data in the Brazilian Amazon, according to INPE. The short-term data comes from INPE’s DETER deforestation detection system, while the long-term data comes from INPE’s PRODES system.As has been the case every year since 2005, Pará led all states in the Brazilian Amazon at 3,862 square kilometers deforested in 2019. It was followed by Mato Grosso (1,685 square kilometers), Amazonas (1,421 square kilometers), and Rondônia (1,245 square kilometers). Roraima experienced the biggest one-year increase in deforestation, with forest clearance rising 217 percent to 617 square kilometers.Pará has now lost more than 62,000 square kilometers of Amazon forest since 2004, an area the size the nation of Georgia or the U.S. state of West Virginia. The majority of forest clearing in the Amazon is for cattle pasture.The new figures generally exclude areas of forest recently lost to fire, which is potentially significant given the extent and severity of fires in August and September 2019. These fires made global headlines when smoke blackened the skies of Sao Paulo, spurring widespread outcry and calls to boycott Brazilian agricultural products.When fires were at their peak, scientists, conservationists, indigenous rights groups, and environmental activists blamed roll-backs of environmental protections and anti-environmental rhetoric by the Jair Bolsonaro administration for worsening the situation.After initially denying this year’s fires were a problem, and then shifting blame for the blazes to NGOs, Bolsonaro sent in the military to fight fires. But critics say the administration still hasn’t reversed course on its push to cut environmental regulations and encourage conversion of vast swathes of the Amazon for industrial agriculture, mining, and logging. Those complaints suggest that the underlying issues driving the increase in deforestation haven’t been addressed.Aerial view of a large burned area in the city of Candeiras do Jamari in the state of Rondônia. Image by Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace.Scientists have warned that should deforestation continue on its current trajectory, Brazil is unlikely to meet its climate commitments. While deforestation in 2019 only amounted to about 0.3 percent of the forest remaining in the Brazilian Amazon, Brazil’s climate targets are predicated on reducing deforestation. But deforestation has now more than doubled since its low of 4,571 square kilometers (1,765 square miles) in 2012.Researchers are also alarmed that ongoing deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon could have long-term implications for the health of the biome and the wider functioning of critical ecosystem function in the region. Some models suggest the Amazon may be near a tipping point where the combination of deforestation and rising temperatures could trigger a rapid shift in rainfall patterns across vast parts of the Amazon Basin. Such a shift could lead to a die-off scenario where large areas of rainforest could be replaced by a drier woodland savanna akin to the Cerrado ecosystem south and east of the Amazon. Reduced rainfall would affect water availability in southern South America, including the continent’s agricultural heartland and largest cities from Sao Paulo to Buenos Aires.Natural forest covering in the Brazilian Amazon according to data aggregated by MapBiomas. The Brazilian Amazon accounts for nearly two-thirds of the Amazon rainforest. The entirety of this vast biome is shared between eight countries.Header image: Aerial view of a large burned area within the rural portion of Candeiras do Jamari municipality in Rondônia state. Image by Victor Moriyama / Greenpeace. Article published by Rhett Butler Amazon Rainforest, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Green, Monitoring, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, satellite data, Threats To Rainforests, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Forests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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FSC complaint filed against pulpwood firms tied to Indonesia’s richest man

first_imgFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Banner image: An Acacia plantation in Indonesia. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Logging, Plantations, Pulp And Paper, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests Article published by Hans Nicholas Jongcenter_img An NGO that linked two pulpwood companies to Indonesia’s wealthiest man has alleged continued deforestation by the companies, in violation of sustainability commitments.The companies are owned indirectly by cigarette and banking tycoon Robert Budi Hartono, and supply, among others, paper and pulp giants APP and APRIL.APP has denied responsibility for the wood sourced from one of the companies, even though it acknowledges having “significant influence” over the mill that bought it.APRIL says the supplier hasn’t violated its own sustainability commitment — but part of the reason is that that commitment isn’t retroactively applicable to existing suppliers. JAKARTA — An Indonesian NGO has filed a complaint with the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), alleging deforestation carried out by pulpwood firms linked to Indonesia’s wealthiest individual and supplying two of the world’s biggest paper and pulp companies.In its letter dated Dec. 4, the environmental group Auriga Nusantara says pulpwood plantation companies PT Fajar Surya Swadaya and PT Silva Rimba Lestari cleared 320 square kilometers (123 square miles) of forests in East Kalimantan province between 2013 and 2017.Official records show both companies are owned indirectly by Robert Budi Hartono, a cigarette and banking tycoon who first made his fortune with the Djarum tobacco company and is now the richest person in Indonesia. Other members of the Hartono family are also indirect shareholders of the two companies.Robert also directly and indirectly controls a 51 percent stake in PT Bukit Muria Jaya, a paper and packaging processor. While not implicated in the alleged deforestation, PT Bukit Muria Jaya is certified by the FSC — which, under the council’s rules, means its majority shareholder can be deemed “indirectly involved” in the “unacceptable activities” of other companies in which they hold shares or sit on the board, according to Auriga.Syahrul Fitra, a researcher with Auriga, said that despite his organization and other NGOs having documented the deforestation in a report published in August 2018, with a follow-up report in October 2019, the FSC had failed to act on the findings. That’s what prompted Auriga to lodge the complaint with the FSC, he said.“We don’t want any further clearing of natural forests, whether it’s inside the concessions or outside,” Syahrul said. “Enough is enough. FSC doesn’t allow the clearing of natural forests to make plantations.”Land-cover maps from the government show substantial areas of natural forest still standing in five pulpwood concessions held by PT Fajar Surya Swadaya, PT Silva Rimba Lestari and other companies linked to the Djarum group, according to Auriga.Data from Global Forest Watch indicates that forest clearing has already occurred in several of these concessions. Publicly available records of timber royalty payments indicate the companies have harvested significant volumes of natural forest wood, including protected species like ironwood.Auriga called on the Djarum group to immediately adopt a policy of “no deforestation, no peatland and no exploitation of local communities,” known in the industry as NDPE.“We push Djarum to comply [with NDPE policy] because they don’t have a sustainability policy,” Syahrul said.Deforestation in the concessions of PT Fajar Surya Swadaya, from 2001-2012 (in purple) and from 2013-2017 (in red). Sources: Forest cover from Indonesia’s Ministry of Environment and Forestry land cover maps from 2000 and 2015, tree cover loss from Hansen et al. 2013 with updates for 2017 from Global Forest Change.APP: No ownership or controlThis isn’t the first time the two Djarum-linked companies have come under scrutiny. In its 2018 report as part of an “anti-forest-mafia coalition,” Auriga identified PT Fajar Surya Swadaya, PT Silva Rimba Lestari as supplying wood to paper giants Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) and Asia Pacific Resources International Holdings Limited (APRIL).The report alleged those purchases would have violated APP and APRIL’s respective zero-deforestation commitments. Both companies denied the allegations, with APRIL saying at the time that the wood was sourced from areas outside high conservation value (HCV) forest, and APP saying it received the wood after an administrative lapse and had since quarantined the shipment.But a follow-up report published this past October alleges APP and APRIL continued to buy wood from PT Fajar Surya Swadaya in 2018, with APRIL doubling its purchase volume from 2017. Specifically, the report identified shipments of wood from PT Fajar Surya Swadaya going to PT Sarana Bina Semesta Alam, an APP-affiliated chip mill, in both 2017 and 2018.In response to the earlier report, APP denied responsibility for the wood purchased by PT Sarana Bina Semesta Alam, saying it APP didn’t own or control the company and had “no legal or financial connections or influence” over it.However, in a recent independent assessment by APP to clarify its links with pulpwood suppliers in Indonesia, APP categorized PT Sarana Bina Semesta Alam as a “partner.” It defines its partners as “plantation companies where APP companies have significant influence.”The NGO coalition has also identified PT Sarana Bina Semesta Alam’s ultimate controlling shareholders and sole commissioner as being current or former employees of APP or parent company Sinar Mas Forestry. Three of the holding companies for PT Sarana Bina Semesta Alam use the address of APP’s Jakarta headquarters, according to corporate profiles submitted to the Ministry of Law and Human Rights.“It means they indeed control PT Sarana Bina Semesta Alam,” Syahrul said. “Besides being described to have significant influence, PT Sarana Bina Semesta Alam also supplies APP’S pulp mill in China.”That would be Hainan Jinhai Pulp & Paper, to which PT Sarana Bina Semesta Alam exported more than $20 million worth of wood chip in 2017 alone, according to trade records.In response to the follow-up report, APP said all the allegations had been clearly addressed by the company in its reply to the coalition’s previous report.A pulpwood plantation in Indonesia’s Riau province. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/MongabayAPRIL: No sustainability violationsSeparately, APRIL has confirmed that PT Fajar Surya Swadaya has been one of its suppliers since June 2017. Throughout 2018, including the period after the NGO coalition raised the deforestation allegations, APRIL actually doubled the amount of wood it sourced from PT Fajar Surya Swadaya, buying about 10,000 truckloads’ worth for its mill in Sumatra.APRIL denied that the supplier had violated its own sustainability policy, saying it had commissioned the Netherlands-based Tropenbos International to conduct an assessment and found that the wood was sourced from outside HCV areas.APRIL also denied that the development of PT Fajar Surya Swadaya’s plantations violated community rights, saying it found that appropriate procedures for resolving land conflicts had been put in place.But those findings haven’t been fully disclosed, according to the NGO coalition. Following demands from the coalition, in May 2019 APRIL uploaded a black-and-white photocopy of an executive summary of the HCV assessment to its updated supplier list. The coalition noted that the copy of the map included in the summary was blurry and not in color, making it impossible to denote specific HCV areas.“We can’t analyze the map,” Syahrul said. “We’ve asked APRIL for the colored version, but they haven’t responded yet.”APRIL said it would update the black-and-white copy of the map with a higher-quality reproduction in time.The coalition is also pushing for APRIL to show that the areas from where the wood was sourced are not high carbon stock (HCS) areas. APRIL’s sustainability policy commits the company to not sourcing wood from suppliers who cultivate in HCV or HCS areas.But APRIL says that HCS prohibition applies only to new suppliers and is not retroactively applicable to existing suppliers, including PT Fajar Surya Swadaya.“There is an ongoing debate about the need to carry out retrospective HCS assessments, and we continue to be part of that discussion,” APRIL said. “In terms of our policy, HCS applies to new development and this is existing plantation supply so it does not apply.”The company added it had no plans to cease sourcing wood from PT Fajar Surya Swadaya.“Suspension and/or cessation of supply arrangements is considered as a last recourse and only if there clear unwillingness to address a confirmed non compliance with our policy,” APRIL said. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Despite foreign aid, Colombia struggles to rein in Amazon deforestation

first_imgAmazon Rainforest, Deforestation, Foreign Aid, forest degradation, Forests, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests Colombia is grappling with rampant deforestation in the Amazon, which was up 97% in 2018 from 2016, when the country’s former largest illegal armed group, the FARC, demobilized.After providing $85 million since 2015, Norway, Germany and the United Kingdom renewed a pledge for $366 million to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD+) and promote sustainable development in Colombia.The government has not provided a domestic policy agenda to support the goals outlined by the international agreement. Authorities, who have undertaken military operations against forest clearing in national parks, have yet to dismantle the organized crime groups that are allegedly behind the large-scale deforestation.High rates of forest loss are particularly concerning for a critical biological corridor and watershed between the country’s Andes, Amazon and eastern savanna biospheres, where deforestation has been particularly severe. Three European countries have put up $366 million in foreign aid to fight deforestation in Colombia’s Amazon. The region’s rate of forest loss remains stubbornly high, up 97% since the 2016 demobilization of the FARC rebels.The Colombian government signed a landmark peace agreement with the formerly largest rebel group, the FARC, ending a half-century of conflict in 2016, but also creating a power vacuum that allowed small and large-scale landholders to engage in rampant land-grabbing and forest clearing in the Amazon region.In 2019, the country’s meteorological institute, IDEAM, released a report based on satellite images showing 138,176 hectares (341,440 acres) of Colombia’s Amazon rainforest were cut down in 2018, a 97% increase compared to 2016 when the FARC demobilized.Despite the exploding deforestation in the Amazon, Norway, Germany and the United Kingdom recently announced the renewal of an agreement, Joint Declaration of Intent, pledging $366 million to support a reduction of “greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD+) and on promoting sustainable development in Colombia.”The renewed Joint Declaration of Intent agreement aims to cut rainforest clearing back by 21% in 2022, and 50% by 2025. Further, they confirmed a joint commitment to bring Colombia’s natural forest loss down to zero by 2030 as a signatory of the New York Declaration on Forests and the Bonn Challenge.“The goals were reached through a negotiation process with Colombian government. We put funding on the table and the Colombian government proposed new more ambitious, deforestation goals,” said Ole Reidar Bergum, counselor for climate and forests at the Norwegian Embassy in Colombia. “These are ambitious goals, and it won’t necessarily be easy for the Colombian government and civil society actors to reach many of these goals.”The declaration between the four countries was signed for the first time in 2015 during the Paris climate summit. Initially, Norway, the U.K. and Germany pledged $100 million aimed to halt deforestation in the Colombian Amazon by 2020. The funds went to the Ministry of Environment program known as Vision Amazonia, which supported payments for environmental services, forest monitoring, education campaigns, and work with indigenous communities.Broken trees and roots with signs of burns at a deforested site in Colombia. Photo: María Jimena Neira Niño.In June 2019, Bergum told Mongabay the international aid budget was cut back to $85 million because of the increasing rate of deforestation since 2016. Following the renewal of the pay-for-results scheme, Norway, the U.K., Germany and Colombia will set deforestation emission reduction milestones in the first quarter of this year. The European countries will reportedly only make payments for successful reductions.“We are going to sit down with the government to determine annual compliance milestones. Based on these annual compliances we will make payments,” Bergum said in an interview with Mongabay Latam.According to Angelica Beltran, an investigator with the Colombian NGO Association for Environment and Society, deforestation is the most serious environmental problem facing the country. Although deforestation in 2018 dropped slightly for the first time since the country’s historic 2016 peace deal with former FARC guerrillas “the deforestation rate remains extremely high,” Beltran said.Deforestation mapping of Sierra de La Macarena indicates that cattle trails have been an key part of deforestation since its construction in 2001. Photo: María Jimena Neira Niño.“The problem of deforestation doesn’t end with figures on how many hectares were cleared, but rather it deals with the availability of water and many other critical ecosystem services that directly and indirectly affect the lives of everyone,” Beltran said in an interview. Ecosystem services are benefits for humans derived from the natural environment, such as food production and climate regulation.Beltran added the high rate of forest loss is particularly concerning for a critical biological corridor and watershed between the country’s Andes, Amazon and eastern savanna biospheres, where the demobilization of the FARC has led to an explosion of deforestation.Beltran said support from the international community was important to address deforestation, but it was necessary to recognize that the goals set by the first part of the agreement were not effectively met.“The failure to meet the first set of targets should be strong call to the municipal mayors and regional governors, the national government, as well as the international community, that we need to do much more careful and detailed tracking to make sure the actions are working and responding to on-the-ground needs,” she said.Environment Minister Ricardo Lozano told Reuters that the country would increase on-the-ground and satellite monitoring to combat deforestation. So far, President Ivàn Duque has relied on the military to combat deforestation, launching Operation Artemisa in April 2019.According to local media outlet Semana Sostenible, the military has carried out several operations under Operation Artemisa in the national parks such as Chiribiquete, La Paya, Catatumbo-Barí, Los Picachos, La Macarena and Tinigua. The military operations, however, have been criticized for targeting campesino farmers, while the organized criminal groups who appear to be financing the deforestation remain unknown and untouched.Bergum said the military operations would have limited success unless the powerful financiers of these large-scale deforestation activities are held accountable: “It’s only when the urban bosses of the criminal land-grabbing mafias, operating in collaboration with illegal armed groups and corrupt officials, are put behind bars that things will really start to change,” Bergum told Mongabay in June.Sierra de La Macarena National Park in Colombia. Photo: National Natural Parks of Colombia.Oil, drugs and indigenous land rightsIndigenous communities play an important role in protecting forests and ecosystems from extractive projects, illegal mining and logging. The environment minister has asked indigenous communities in the Amazon to make suggestions on ways to spend $7 million to fight deforestation, according to the Thomson Reuters Foundation.At the same time, Andrea Prieto, a social-environmental investigator for the Association for Environment and Society, said the government lacks the political will to protect indigenous communities from the extractive industries and illegal armed groups. Prieto said the indigenous communities are threatened by intensifying territorial conflicts in the region.A report by the Association for Environment and Society found that 37 oil contracts overlapped with 81 indigenous reserves in the Colombian Amazon, primarily in the departments of Putumayo and Caquetá. Prieto also criticized Duque’s announcement of resumed aerial fumigation of glyphosate, which she said would likely increase deforestation and threats to indigenous communities.“There is a lack of inclusivity for Colombia’s indigenous communities living in the Amazon Basin,” Prieto said. “Government-led political and economic projects are generating socio-environmental conflicts that must be addressed.”Banner image: Serranía National Park will soon encompass 4.3 million hectares of protected area. Photo: Amazon Conservation Team. Article published by Genevieve Belmakercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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While Barca struggle, Real getting better

first_imgMADRID, Spain (AP):A day after the Spanish rival was demoralised by Paris Saint-Germain in the Champions League, Madrid produced one of their best performances of the season in a victory over Napoli to move closer to a seventh straight appearance in the quarter-finals.There was more good news for Madrid yesterday, as Gareth Bale practised with the rest of the team and will be ready to make his return to the line-up this weekend after a long injury lay-off.It means the ‘BBC’ trio of Bale, Karim Benzema and Cristiano Ronaldo will be reunited after nearly three months, just in time for the decisive stages of the season.The forwards will likely be playing together when Madrid hosts Espanyol in the Spanish league tomorrow, when they will have a chance to increase their lead over Barcelona and stay on track for their first league title since 2012.POSSIBLY THE BEST PERFORMANCEMadrid, defending their Champions League title, conceded an early goal, but recovered quickly to comfortably earn the victory ahead of the second leg in Italy.”We put in a great performance, possibly our best,” Real Madrid coach Zinedine Zidane said.Madrid have already won two titles this season, the European Super Cup, in a final against Sevilla, and the Club World Cup in Japan. They have a one-point lead over Barcelona in the Spanish league, but with two games in hand, at Valencia and at Celta Vigo.Madrid were eliminated by Celta Vigo in the quarterfinals of the Copa del Rey.COPA FINALBarcelona will play in the Copa final against Sevilla on May 27 at Atletico Madrid’s Vicente Calderon Stadium. They have already beaten Sevilla in the Spanish Super Cup final.Winning a sixth Champions League title will be a long-shot after the resounding 4-0 loss to PSG in France on Tuesday, a result the prompted criticism of coach Luis Enrique and put in doubt his future at the club.”We are a team that has showed in past seasons that we know how to come up with good performances,” Luis Enrique said after taking the blame for the debacle in Paris, one of the worst in the club’s recent history. “We will have a small chance, but it’s still a chance.”Barcelona host promoted Leganes on Sunday in the Spanish league, a competition they have won the last two seasons.last_img read more

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Oladipo scores 38, Pacers rally to beat Nets in OT

first_imgOSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Meralco ‘never the same’ after Almazan injury in PBA Finals “Oladipo, gotta give the guy credit,” Nets coach Kenny Atkinson said. “He is playing elite, elite basketball. He’s one of the best players in the league right now. (And) they were just the more aggressive team to start the third quarter.”An 11-2 run in the second quarter put the Nets ahead by 19 — their largest lead of the game — and Brooklyn led 57-41 by halftime.Indiana went on an 11-0 run to open the second half. Later, Darren Collison made a 3-pointer to cap off a 10-0 run and put the Pacers ahead for the first time since early in the first quarter.Indiana’s slow starts and struggles at home have become a trend. The win snapped a three-game losing streak at home, where the Pacers are 11-7 this season.“We’ve got to figure it out,” Oladipo said. “We’ve just got to do a better job at home. We’re less comfortable at home than we are on the road, honestly. This team’s not perfect and we’ve got a lot of room to grow. But we’re figuring it out. It’s a long season.”ADVERTISEMENT Brian Heruela arrival bolsters Phoenix backcourt, defense MOST READ Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours LATEST STORIES OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew View comments Indiana Pacers guard Victor Oladipo (4) shoots in front of Brooklyn Nets guard Spencer Dinwiddie (8) during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Indianapolis, Saturday, Dec. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/AJ Mast)INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Victor Oladipo dug the Indiana Pacers out of a hole again.He scored 38 points and was perfect from the free-throw line, helping the Indiana Pacers escape with a 123-119 overtime victory over the Brooklyn Nets on Saturday (Sunday Manila time).ADVERTISEMENT “For whatever reason, it was tough for us in the first half,” Oladipo said. “In the second half, things started going our way. We picked it up and played at a high level on both ends.”Myles Turner had 23 points and nine rebounds and tied his career high with six blocks, and Bojan Bogdanovic finished with 17 points and six rebounds for the Pacers (19-14), who came back from down 19 to take an 85-84 lead on Lance Stephenson’s free throw with 8:29 remaining in regulation.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSpencer Dinwiddle led the Nets (12-20) and tied his career high with 26 points. He made three free throws with 19 seconds left in the fourth quarter to tie the game at 111 and force overtime.DeMarre Carroll finished with 20 points and 13 rebounds and made a 3-pointer to tie it at 119 with 45 seconds left in overtime. Oladipo made four free throws in two trips to the line in the final 29 seconds to seal the win. Redemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie Thompson Scottie Thompson also worthy of Finals MVP, thinks Cone The Pacers are having little trouble with Brooklyn, though. Indiana has won six straight against the Nets, including three this season. The two teams meet for the final game of the four-game regular-season series on Feb. 14 in Brooklyn.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina Hornets storm back from 18 down, trounce Buckslast_img read more

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