Demand for charcoal threatens the forest of Madagascar’s last hunter-gatherers

first_imgThe Mikea, who number around 1,000 people, are facing what many of them say is an existential environmental problem.Their ancestral forest in southwestern Madagascar is partly protected inside a national park.However, it is rapidly being chopped down to supply a growing demand for charcoal, the country’s primary source of cooking fuel.Some Mikea, having lived their entire lives hunting and gathering, are facing a shortage of game and other food and are now considering whether they must abandon the forest, and their way of life, for good. MIKEA FOREST, Madagascar — A spear, an ax, a fire starter crafted from cow horn, a hand-carved pipe, and tobacco: these are all of Bezery’s material possessions, and he carries them at all times. A member of the Mikea tribe, the last group of hunter-gatherers in Madagascar, Bezery has lived off food he gathers from the forest for his entire life — 60 years, perhaps, although he said he doesn’t know his age. He’s gone years without drinking anything, relying instead on a water-rich yam called balo.Having grown up, married and raised his children in the forest, he knows no other way of life. Now, however, he’s facing a crushing predicament. He says he must leave the forest to find work. “The forest is all I know, I don’t want to leave,” he told Mongabay while sitting by a campfire, smoking his pipe. “If there’s enough food I want to stay, but there is just not enough food in the forest anymore.”The Mikea, which unofficial sources often put at 1,000 to 2,000 people in the apparent absence of a rigorous population estimate, are facing what many of them say is an existential environmental problem. The tribe lives in a roughly 370,000 hectare (914,000 acre) swath of dry and spiny forest in southwestern Madagascar’s Atsimo-Andrefana region that bears their name, Mikea Forest. About half the forest, which is home to numerous unique and endangered animals, including several species of lemur, has been protected since 2011 as Mikea National Park.Like many of Madagascar’s forests, Mikea Forest is rapidly being chopped down to supply a growing demand for charcoal, the country’s primary source of cooking fuel.last_img read more

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Seven elephants found dead as Sri Lanka’s human-wildlife conflict escalates

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Authorities have launched an investigation into the suspected poisoning deaths of seven elephants last month in Sri Lanka.Human-elephant conflict caused by habitat loss has long been a problem on the country, with both the elephant and human death tolls climbing in recent years.Investigations into previous elephant deaths have failed to hold anyone liable, and conservationists say they fear the recent spate of deaths will also go unpunished.Conservationists say the root causes for human-elephant conflict need to be removed or mitigated, including through community-based electric fencing, increased manpower for the wildlife department, and conservation of elephant habitat. ANURADHAPURA/COLOMBO — Wildlife authorities in Sri Lanka have launched an investigation after seven elephants were found dead late last month in the north-central district of Anuradhapura.Four of the elephants were found dead near the city of Habarana on Sept. 27, and three more on the following day. All except one were female, and all are believed to have been poisoned.“There is a chemical poisoning, but we do not know if it was a deliberate attempt. We are still trying to verify this,” said M.G.C. Sooriyabandara, the director-general of Sri Lanka’s Department of Wildlife Conservation (DWC).The minister of wildlife and tourism, John Amaratunga, has appointed a special committee to investigate the matter, but it has yet to release its findings.While the exact cause of death has yet to be confirmed, it’s strongly believed that the elephants were poisoned by farmers, likely in retaliation for raiding their crops. If confirmed, the recent discoveries would bring to 10 the toll of elephants killed by poisoning in Sri Lanka.Although the island is home to fewer than 6,000 Sri Lankan elephants (Elephas maximus maximus), a subspecies of the Asian elephant, the loss of their habitats and the expansion of human settlements have intensified the frequency of human-elephant conflicts.In 2018 alone, 319 elephants and almost 100 people were killed in such encounters. Sixty-four of those deaths were caused by explosive devices hidden in fodder bait, known as hakka patas. Fifty-three elephants died of gunshot injuries. The last four years have seen at least 21 cases of elephant poisoning deaths, according to Sooriyabandara, for which no perpetrators have been identified.Elephants roam into villages and fields, causing significantdestruction and even human deaths. Image courtesy of the Centre for Conservation & Research“There have been many cases of suspected poisoning, but it is almost never proven,” said Prithiviraj Fernando, head of the Sri Lankan Centre for Conservation and Research. “Elephant deaths are continuously going up. In the past year, they exceeded 300 for the first time, and we are on track to exceed 300 again this year,” he told Mongabay.Shrinking habitatsElephants are Sri Lanka’s most iconic animal and occupy an important place in the local culture. But there is only so much space on the island: Forests are being cleared, trees cut down, rivers rerouted to fill village tanks for agriculture. Elephant habitats are shrinking, and managing elephant-human co-existence has become the core issue.The government has tried to restrict elephants to protected areas under the Department of Wildlife Conservation, but Fernando maintains this approach has failed. Translocated elephants rarely stay in place, he notes, and the drives to round them up for relocation makes the animals more aggressive, increasing the likelihood of conflict.“More than 70 percent of elephants are outside of protected areas,” Fernando said. “People and elephants live in the same landscape, and this is where the conflict occurs. People feel like they have to take matters into their own hands and do something about it.”With people and elephants sharing space across roughly 44 percent of Sri Lanka, a sustainable solution has to be found to stop suffering on both sides, conservationists say. From bio-fences to thorny crops and from nature reserves to elephant thunders, many approaches have been tried. Fernando has found one to be workable: “Putting up fences around human settlements and cultivated areas has proven to be effective. Basically, the only way currently to manage the conflict is community-based electric fencing.”Even if this solution is scaled up, clashes between elephants and rural communities are still likely to continue as long as human settlements and farms encroach deeper into elephant territory. This will leave the animals little choice but to plunder villages and fields in search of food and water, and villagers to see no other option than to retaliate.In places like this rural road near Tangalle in the south ofSri Lanka, elephants share space with humans. Image by Sofia C.C. Valladares via Pixabay.As the mounting death toll indicates, the authorities lack sufficient resources to protect the elephants against such attacks. “The wildlife department has less than a thousand people in the field,” said Jagath Gunawardena, an expert on environmental law. “They are stretched thin in so many different sections that they cannot work effectively.”Gunawardena said it was this lack of enforcement, rather than a lack of legal deterrent, that was the issue. He noted that Sri Lanka’s Fauna and Flora Protection Ordinance has several provisions dealing exclusively with elephants and affords them the highest degree of protection.“Anyone who harms, kills or injures an elephant is liable for imprisonment or a fine of up to several hundred thousand rupees,” he said. “I do not think it is necessary to afford elephants additional legal protection. The existing provisions are more than enough.”In any case, he said, demanding stricter laws might miss the point: Fines or jail terms are of little consequence if no one is convicted.“All these offenses are criminal offenses and need to be proven beyond a reasonable doubt,” Gunawardena said. “When there is poisoning or a hakka patas, there is no way of tracing it to the person who is responsible, unless we have some very good circumstantial evidence.”In many places, elephants can no longer retreat into theforests and are forced to co-exist in a human-dominated landscape. Image by Celles via Pixabay.The case of the seven Habarana elephants illustrates the difficulties in investigating this kind of crime, said Ravi Perera, chief operating officer of the Serendipity Wildlife Foundation and a veteran wildlife crime scene investigator.“If the elephants were indeed poisoned, toxicology results should show what type of substance was found,” he said. “Unfortunately, there is no way of tracing it back to the responsible party. Once the substance is identified, we would rely on intelligence gathering to pinpoint certain areas.”Perera has investigated poisonings before: “In Kenya, where our foundation operates, there have been several known cases, the majority of them due to human-animal conflict. Easily available insecticides are hidden in animal carcasses or fruit. Poisoning is silent and cheap, and very often a suspect cannot be found. If we are lucky, a whistle-blower or someone known to the suspect would divulge valuable information.”No one may ever be held liable for the deaths of the seven elephants in Habarana. For the moment, even the cause of their death is speculation, even as experts indicate it’s more than just an ordinary case of poisoning.Fernando said he was puzzled that the perpetrator would target female elephants, as it is mostly adult males that are known to raid farms. “Even if they wanted to target females, female elephants are always with their young ones. It is a great mystery how only the adults can be poisoned without poisoning the young ones as well.”Perera raised the same point: “If these deaths were due to poisoning, it is baffling why the mother died while the baby survived.”With the latest deaths adding to the toll in the escalating human-elephant conflict, conservationists and policymakers continue to work with various solutions to the problem. For now, that means that community-based electric fencing, increased manpower for the wildlife department, and the conservation of existing elephant habitat are the steps seen as best protecting Sri Lanka’s elephants and allowing for a peaceful co-existence with humans. Banner image of an electrocuted elephant in southern Sri Lanka, courtesy of the Centre for Conservation & Research. Article published by dilrukshi Elephants, Environment, human-elephant conflict, Wildlife Conservation last_img read more

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Bringing back extinct plants to life: Q&A with ‘plant messiah’ Carlos Magdalena

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta Carlos Magdalena, a botanical horticulturalist at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, U.K., who’s been labeled the “plant messiah” by the media, has figured out how to get some of the world’s rarest plant species to grow.Magdalena travels around the world collecting seeds and cuttings of extremely rare plant species, then brings them back to the Royal Botanic Gardens, where, together with his colleagues, he sets about trying to propagate them.But the clock is ticking, he tells Mongabay. Tropical forests with high biodiversity are being razed around the world and plants are going extinct by the hour.Mongabay chatted with Magdalena over the phone about what it takes to save rare plants and what drives him. Carlos Magdalena lives and breathes plants. He’s obsessed with them. But he also understands why many people aren’t.“Plants are not as obvious as animals,” he tells Mongabay. “You see an animal and it’s very easy for you to feel empathy for the animal because you’re an animal too. But you cannot see a plant truly until you know it well, until you know the facts surrounding it, what pollinates it, what magic tricks it can do.”Magdalena, a botanical horticulturalist at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, U.K., has figured out many of these tricks. He’s especially drawn to plants that are extremely endangered and down to their last or just a handful of individuals in the wild. He travels around the world collecting seeds and cuttings of such extremely rare plant species, then brings them back to the Royal Botanic Gardens, where, together with his colleagues, he sets about trying to unravel the plants’ mysteries. Take Nymphaea thermarum, the world’s smallest known water lily, for example. After the species went extinct in its only habitat in Rwanda in 2008, Magdalena managed to crack the code and germinate the plant’s seeds at Kew after several failed attempts.As in the case of the lily, sometimes making a rare species grow is a struggle that can span decades. Other times it’s surprisingly easy. So there’s hope, Magdalena says, that some of the plants that we are losing could be very easily propagated and saved.For his efforts to give life to near-extinct and extinct plant species, Magdalena, born in Gijón, Asturias, in northern Spain, was labeled “El Mesias de las Plantas” (The Messiah of Plants) in a Spanish newspaper in 2010. That label has stuck.“I suspect the name was partly inspired by my post-biblical (though pre-hipster) beard and long hair, and also because I was spending a lot of my time trying to save plants on the brink of extinction,” he writes in his book, The Plant Messiah: Adventures in Search of the World’s Rarest Species.He doesn’t have a messiah complex, he quickly adds in the book. What he does want to be, though, is a messenger who makes people aware of how important plants are, and how critical they are for our survival.But the clock is ticking, he tells Mongabay. Tropical forests with high biodiversity are being razed around the world and plants are going extinct every hour. In fact, one in five plant species in the world is estimated to be threatened with extinction.“None of us has the authority or the right to destroy the forests at this scale,” he says. “Who owns the oxygen we breathe? Nobody does, and it is only produced in a few places like the oceans and rainforests of our precious planet.”Mongabay chatted with Magdalena over the phone about what it takes to save rare plants and what drives him.Carlos Magdalena. Image courtesy of Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.Mongabay: How did you get interested in plants and what excites you about them the most?Carlos Magdalena: I was always interested in wildlife and nature. From a very early age I was helping my mother who had some flower shops and liked to grow lots of different things — some because they were beautiful, others because they were strange. But as I got older, I started liking plants more and more because I think plants are not as obvious as animals. You see an animal and it’s very easy for you to feel empathy for the animal because you’re an animal too. But you need to know plants. You cannot see a plant truly until you know it well, until you know the facts surrounding it, what pollinates it, what magic tricks it can do.Plants do things on a different scale of time. Even if you see a plant doing nothing, it is doing something very deep and at many levels: at the soil level, at the root level, at the stem level, at the flower level. I will say that many of us don’t love plants because we don’t know them.What kind of work do you do at Kew?I work with Kew’s living collections of plants, more precisely in the glasshouse department where we cultivate tropical plants like tropical trees, shrubs, climbers and aquatics like water lilies. We also work with a huge variety of species from tropical crops to plants that have interesting biology or an economic value, plants that are simply beautiful and fascinating. We work with many different countries. We have many examples of flora from islands because islands are fragile ecosystems and they have their own sets of plants that are very unique. For example, I work with lots of species from the Mascarene archipelago in the Indian Ocean. We also have plants from other islands such as Hawaii and the Canary Islands.The work sits on different levels, both saving individual species but also understanding the genes of different species because taxonomy is key to protect species. You can only protect what you know exists. If you don’t understand that, you don’t know whether it’s endangered or not.At Kew there are more than 27,000 plant species, and more than 68,000 accessions [different plant materials collected from the same species, or the same species collected from different places] and the nursery where I work has 8,000 to 9,000 species. It’s currently estimated that there are about 400,000 plant species in the world, and one in five species is threatened with extinction. That means that over 70,000 species are threatened with extinction. There are more plant species threatened with extinction than all threatened bird and mammal species put together. It’s a huge problem.Could you give an example of a rare plant species that you’re working on now?We are trying to work with a plant in the family Podostemaceae, which is a group of plants that grows in fast-moving rivers. Trying to figure out the conditions in which it grows has been very difficult.How do you decide which plant species is worth saving, since there are so many of them?I try to work with whatever I can. A plant species may be endangered but if you don’t have any links with the country where it grows, and you don’t have any funding, then it’s difficult to work on that species. Sometimes I try to chase planet alignment, where I know that there is a case, and I know that somebody is willing to help and where I can justify the use of resources for them. Of course the more endangered a plant is, the more desperate the situation is and the more interested I become. For example, for animals, if I tell you that there are 300 specimens left, people will be like “Oh my god, this is terrible.” In Mauritius, plants species that have 300 specimens will be considered of least concern.There are 70 species of plants that we know of that have less than 10 individuals left. In some cases, there is just the last individual plant left, or there are the last three individuals left, those will probably be more of a priority because the clock is ticking, and these specimens might have only few minutes left. These last individuals could disappear by the end of this week. Maybe the individuals could disappear with the next cyclone, or when the next pest gets introduced.Nymphaea thermarum, the world’s smallest known water lily, went extinct in the wild in 2008. Image courtesy of Carlos Magdalena/Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.Once you zero in on a species, how do you go about looking for them in the wild?It’s important to have someone help you at the other end. If I go to Mauritius by myself, it will take me forever to find the plant I want. But if you work with people who are on the island and know where the plants are, in one day I can take cuttings from maybe 30 to 40 species. Rather than reinvent the wheel you need to work with whatever help you can get. Local knowledge is key.Also, we all have specialties and I step in only when people are having difficulty. For example, if there is a plant species that’s threatened and if people within the country are already growing it from seeds, it’s not relevant for me to help. But if they have tried to grow it and don’t know what to do next, that is when I usually try to step in, when there’s some kind of difficulty.How hard is it to navigate permits and bureaucracy in order to take seeds or cuttings back to Kew?It depends. Kew works in partnerships in over 100 countries worldwide. Seeds, for example, can be relatively easy to bring in provided we comply with global conventions and protocols. We seek approvals from the countries of origin, and a copy of all seeds we collect for the Millennium Seed Bank are stored in their country of origin too so we don’t do anything against the will of any government and always make sure everyone is benefiting equally.When you bring materials like cuttings, or living plants, then you need more permits and documentation as well as a period of quarantine. Even at Kew, to save our collection, anything we bring from abroad, we put in quarantine.Once you’ve brought the seeds or cuttings, what’s your process in trying to figure out how to grow them?Sometimes it can be very tricky to grow these rare plants. But amazingly, sometimes it can be very easy too. So there is hope.Sometimes there is a single tree in the world, and maybe it’s not growing in the country, and I bring a cutting, and then it roots using normal techniques that you use for any plant without much drama. So in a way, some of the plants that we are losing could be very easily propagated and saved.Sometimes, though, it gets more complicated. The more endangered a plant is the more specialized it is. When they are very specialized to a particular type of soil, particular type of climate, that is when there is a challenge. Then you spend a lot of time thinking about what you could do.It’s like working in a hospital. A patient might come in, but you don’t know what happened to that person, you don’t know much about the history of that person. All you know is that he is sick, and he can’t speak to you. How do you go about it? You try to react to what you’re seeing. For example, if the person has low blood pressure, then you try to raise the pressure. If he has signs of infection, you may try some general antibiotics. If that doesn’t work, you think about what you can do next. With plants, you need to think similarly, often think out of the box, and use your sixth sense, if you like.  It can become very personalized for every plant.If your memory is good, you can look at a plant and realize that yesterday the plant was a little greener or was facing up. And that enables you to react quicker than if you don’t notice anything.Sometimes things can also work differently in cultivation. You could try to replicate the conditions in which a plant species grows in the wild, and sometimes that doesn’t work. That’s because in cultivation they may like something different. For example, a plant that lives in running water, you may think it would like to sit in water. But actually, it’s different. In the wild, the water is flowing, the water has higher oxygen. In cultivation, it may do better out of the water. Then sometimes you think that because you collected your specimen from a place that was very, very hot, that’s what your plant likes. But maybe it was hot at midday and at night the temperature drops, so in cultivation it grows in a cooler temperature than you think it’s going to be.Hyophorbe amaricaulis is only known from a single, so far impossible to reproduce specimen, in Curepipe, Mauritius. Image courtesy of Carlos Magdalena/Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.You mentioned that some species are surprisingly easy to grow. Could you give an example?There is a plant in Mauritius called Elaeocarpus bojeri. There were only two trees left, and they told me that they tried to propagate it but it didn’t grow. I took some cuttings and seeds. The seeds didn’t germinate straight away, but I did something called nicking, which is cutting a bit of the outer hard shell of the seed, which it allows some water to go in, and all the seeds germinated.In 2014, a rare water lily was stolen from Kew. You have so many rare species there. Is theft a big concern?It depends on how you look at it. While it happens and while we take it seriously, it doesn’t happen that often. We all try to balance the line between protecting our collections and also allowing people to see plants up close. We don’t want to keep the plants out of public eye all the time or put them in glass boxes or put CCTV cameras in every single corner. So it is a concern, but 99 percent of the people are really well behaved.What do you think of the current rate of forest loss across the tropics and the rate at which plants are going extinct?Plants are going extinct every single day, probably every single hour. It’s like killing all your golden-egg hens systematically. It is so nonsensical. We really need to realize that protecting the forests is not optional. This is not something that’s just idealistic. This is at the very core of our survival.We cannot stabilize the planet’s climate if there is no tropical forest. We cannot ensure that we will have resources to support humankind in terms of medicines, food, water and more without protecting these forests. Sometimes we destroy tropical forests for unnecessary reasons like palm oil production in parts of tropical Asia, for example.Being Spanish, I cannot think of any single traditional food recipe that has been used for last maybe 30 years that has used palm oil as an ingredient. Then why do we have palm oil in nearly every single piece of food we eat now? Many farmers rely on this production for their livelihoods and at the end of the day people need feeding too, so it’s important to find more sustainable uses for the land that still support local communities.We’re also destroying tropical forests of very high diversity to produce very low quality meat. You need to think on a deeper timescale. What annoys me the most about tropical forest destruction is how unnecessary much of it has been. We also need to learn from the mistakes of past generations so that we don’t replicate those mistakes.None of us has the authority or the right to destroy the forests at this scale. Who owns the oxygen we breathe? Nobody does, and it is only produced in a few places like the oceans and rainforests of our precious planet.Is there anything else that you would like to add?I want to finally repeat that many of us don’t like plants only because we don’t know them well. One of the things I find most fascinating about plants is that the more I know about them, the less I know about them. I never get bored observing a plant. Everyday there’s something new that I learn. And every day I find yet another plant that’s even more interesting than the previous one.All you have to do is just keep watching them, understand them. That’s a very healthy thing to do.Banner image of Carlos Magdalena courtesy of Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Biodiversity, Climate Change, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Green, Plants, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Research, Threats To Rainforests, Trees, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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$10M in prize money for mapping rainforest biodiversity

first_imgAmazon Biodiversity, Biodiversity, Conservation Technology, Rainforest Biodiversity, Remote Sensing, Technology, Technology And Conservation, Wildtech XPRIZE has established a $10 million prize to support the development of technology that enables rapid assessment of rainforest biodiversity.XPRIZE hopes the initiative will help address the perceived value gap between living and felled rainforest.Current efforts to survey rainforest biodiversity often employ a combination of technology — like camera traps, audio sensors, and remote sensing from drones to airplanes to satellites — and old-fashioned boots-on-the-ground surveys.But approaches have been limited by the challenge of hot and humid conditions, dense canopy cover, remoteness, and the sheer diversity of species of tropical rainforests. Efforts to catalog the fast-declining biodiversity of tropical rainforests just got a $10 million boost via a new competition from XPRIZE, an organization that has more than a dozen competitions on topics ranging from spaceflight to oil cleanup over the past 25 years. Last week, XPRIZE formally unveiled the $10 million Rainforest XPRIZE to catalyze development of “technology capable of identifying and cataloging rainforest biodiversity” that can underpin the emergence of new bioeconomy based on the value of standing forests as heathy and productive ecosystems. Lowland rainforest in Indonesian Borneo as seen by drone. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.XPRIZE hopes the initiative will help address the perceived value gap between living and felled rainforest. At present, standing rainforest is generally viewed as less economically valuable than clearing the land for agriculture, timber, or plantations, but many of the services afforded by healthy forests — from carbon sequestration to water provision to biodiversity — are unaccounted for.“Despite their importance in supporting life on Earth, rainforests are undervalued because we simply do not yet know everything that exists in this ancient ecosystem,” said Executive Director of the Rainforest XPRIZE Jyotika Virmani, in a statement. “I’m excited to see the innovative technologies that will emerge from this competition and give us a better assessment of the incredible biodiversity. Our goal is for the Rainforest XPRIZE to provide new understanding and reveal the true potential of the standing forest, allowing local communities to lead the way for all of us to live in harmony with these magnificent rainforests.”The winner will be selected based on a challenge:The winning team will survey biodiversity in at least three stories of a rainforest (emergent, canopy, understory, and forest floor) in eight hours to produce the most comprehensive biodiversity assessment and utilize this and other data to produce the greatest number of insights in 48 hours. Insights may include, but are not limited to, new ecological dependencies, biodiversity and climate connectivity, anthropological findings, or even sustainable societal interactions with the forest.The competition offers a grand prize of $5 million, $2 million for second place, and $1.25 million for two runners-up. There is a $500,000 bonus prize for technology that can rapidly identify previously undocumented species.Topher White of Rainforest Connection installing a bioacoustic device in the forest canopy. Image by Ben Von Wong.Current efforts to survey rainforest biodiversity often employ a combination of technology — like camera traps, audio sensors, and remote sensing from drones to airplanes to satellites — and old-fashioned boots-on-the-ground surveys. But these have been limited by the challenge of hot and humid conditions, dense canopy cover, remoteness, and the sheer diversity of species of tropical rainforests, which may have upward of 400 types of trees per hectare. As such, XPRIZE expects the winning team in involve multiple technologies.“The current methods used to identify and catalogue biodiversity, including in situ human-led studies, remote sensing by satellites or radar, or sophisticated spectroscopy, cannot operate to scale and gather the data necessary to understand the full ecosystem wealth of rainforests in sustainable ways. The competition accelerates a new bioeconomy, while also engaging indigenous and local communities, as well as local academic institutions in developing the solution. The Rainforest XPRIZE is a call-to-action to help save rainforests through the development and implementation of transformative, scalable, and affordable technology,” said XPRIZE in a press release.A team led by Greg Asner the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (now at the Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science) developed a system for mapping tropical forests using a multispectral approach. The resulting laser-guided imaging spectrometer data are fully three-dimensional, providing the structure and architecture of the forest, while simultaneously capturing up to 23 chemical properties of the canopy foliage. These colors indicate the diversity of canopy traits among co- existing tree species in the same hectare. Image courtesy of Greg Asner, Carnegie Institution for Science“The teams of the Rainforest XPRIZE will develop sophisticated technologies to inventory rainforest biodiversity faster, affordably, and in unprecedented detail in challenging harsh environments, delivering insights to support the sustainable use and well-being of the standing forest. Interdisciplinary teams can use emerging technologies such as robotics, remote sensing, data analysis, artificial intelligence, and machine learning to survey biodiversity, deal with the challenges of a harsh environment, and demonstrate that these ecosystems are worth preserving.”The deadline for registration is June 30, 2020.Diagram showing the timeline for the Rainforest XPRIZE.XPRIZE’s approach is based on the premise that prizes generate investment in an objective that far exceeds the value of the prize itself. One of the most prominent examples of the idea is the Orteig Prize, which put up a $25,000 prize in 1919 for the first nonstop flight between New York City and Paris. Ultimately nine teams invested $400,000 in pursuit of the prize, which was captured in 1927 by Charles Lindbergh. Article published by Rhett Butlercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Whitetip sharks declared critically endangered, but gain no protections in Pacific

first_imgThis week, the International Union for Conservation of Nature classified oceanic whitetip sharks (Carcharhinus longimanus) as “critically endangered,” citing “steep population declines” in all oceans.The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission, a multilateral body, manages fisheries in a vast swath of the Pacific Ocean, including the large and lucrative tuna fishery that accidentally kills tens of thousands of whitetips each year.Whitetip sharks are predicted to become extinct in the western and central Pacific under current management practices, their numbers having declined there by around 95% since 1995.The commission met this month in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. It adopted several conservation measures, but took no new steps to protect whitetip sharks, as many scientists and conservationists had hoped. This week, the oceanic whitetip shark was reclassified as “critically endangered” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), citing “steep population declines” in all oceans. That represents two big steps toward extinction from the shark’s previous classification as “vulnerable,” which it had held since 2006.However, that wasn’t enough to convince countries that fish for tuna in the western and central Pacific Ocean to step up protections for the species in that region, where scientists predict the sharks will disappear if current management practices don’t change.Many scientists and conservation advocates were hopeful that the 16th meeting of the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC), held from December 5 to 11 in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, would commit to new steps to boost the region’s population of whitetips (Carcharhinus longimanus). The multilateral body manages fisheries in the vast region, including the large and lucrative tuna fishery that accidentally kills tens of thousands of whitetips each year.At the meeting, delegates finalized and adopted a new conservation and management measure for sharks, which may help other species. But the measure doesn’t offer any new protections for whitetips, and their particular plight in the region didn’t make it onto the agenda.“The Commission’s annual meeting was the first real opportunity for the member states to act on these alarming findings,” said a statement issued by the NGO WWF after the meeting. “Unfortunately, they did not rise up to the challenge. The tragic situation of the oceanic whitetip shark was not substantially addressed during the meeting, with no opportunity to even consider a much-needed recovery plan as a solution.”Oceanic whitetip shark (Carcharhinus longimanus). Image by Andy Mann.Dramatic declineOceanic whitetips were once among the most common pelagic shark species in the tropics. As apex predators, they play a crucial regulatory role in marine ecosystems, maintaining balance and diversity in the species below them in the food web. Sharks are also culturally important for many Pacific peoples, often seen as manifestations of ancestors, deities or guides for ocean-goers.But a recent stock assessment commissioned by the WCPFC revealed that the oceanic whitetip population in the western and central Pacific Ocean has declined by about 95%. The assessment concluded that if new measures aren’t taken to protect the sharks, the population will become regionally extinct.Why? The region’s oceanic whitetips are “overfished and undergoing overfishing,” according to the assessment. And it’s mostly by accident.Whitetips are often caught by longliner boats fishing for tuna, because they swim close to the surface and are attracted to the longliners’ lures. Less commonly, they’re caught by purse seiners, which enclose all the fish in an area in a large net that’s drawn tight at the top and bottom. Whitetips are considered bycatch, a term for species that are caught accidentally, and to date there are no catch limits in place for them.Like most sharks, whitetips take a long time to reach sexual maturity and have small litters of pups every year or two, so they are vulnerable to overfishing. “It’s very, very simple, we’re taking them out faster than they can replenish themselves,” Demian Chapman, a shark conservation expert at Florida International University, told Mongabay.Demand for whitetips’ large fins, which fetch high prices as an ingredient in shark-fin soup, a prized dish in many East Asian countries, has also contributed to whitetips’ decline. To mitigate this, in 2011 the WCPFC enacted a “catch and retention” ban, making it illegal for fishers to intentionally catch whitetips and requiring them to immediately release any they catch accidentally — with their fins still attached. Then, in 2013, parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) passed restrictions that severely limited the legal trade of whitetip fins.The stock assessment found no evidence that fisheries are currently targeting whitetips in the region. “But we know that there is still a fin trade of this species, for sure,” said Chapman, who has researched the trade in Hong Kong and China, “and probably a good amount of it is illegal.” This suggests that some fishers are still opportunistically selling the fins of the sharks they catch.Keeping whitetips off the lines According to the assessment’s authors, the WCPFC’s existing measures “may have had a positive impact on stock status by decreasing fishing mortality.” But they also acknowledged that some fishers and observers had not updated their identification, recording, and surveillance practices since the 2011 catch and retention ban took effect, so some whitetip catches may have gone unrecorded or been incorrectly identified, compromising the data used in the assessment.Keeping more whitetips alive remains a “pretty major conundrum,” said Chapman, even for researchers at the forefront of the issue. “The problem is that a decent proportion of the whitetips still die when they’re caught,” he said.He identified three ways to boost the survival rate of the species. The first is keeping sharks from getting stuck on longlines. Discouraging them from taking the bait, for example by attaching magnets to the hooks, which sharks find irritating, is one option. Ensuring that lines are made from material that sharks can bite through to free themselves, such as nylon rather than wire, is another.The second is to maximize the survival of whitetips that do get hooked by training fishers to free them safely. Chapman said that steps such as keeping sharks in the water while they’re being released and cutting the line right at the hook so they don’t swim off trailing gear have made a big difference for whitetips in Atlantic tuna fisheries. Leaving longlines in the water for shorter time periods is also effective, he said.“Whitetips are quite tough,” said Chapman, “so when they get hooked, they can handle struggling on the line for a while. There’s definitely a relationship between how long the longline was soaked and how many whitetips come up dead or in very poor condition.” The downside is that shorter soak times entail more work for fishers and may also reduce tuna catches.The third and most radical method Chapman identified is to simply avoid setting longlines in places where whitetips are relatively common. That’s also a challenging prospect for tuna-fishing nations, he said, “because the whitetips are pretty closely correlated with the oceanographic features that would also attract tuna.”But economic impacts like these are no reason not to act, said Chapman.“We’ve left it so long with these species that now it’s pretty drastic. This is the problem: we tend not to act until the grim reaper is on the doorstep, and that’s where we find ourselves with the whitetip in this region,” he said. “These measures are going to hurt, probably, but this is because we kicked the can too far and let them drop and drop and drop, and now it’s critical.”Andy Cornish, who leads WWF’s global shark and ray conservation program, also emphasized the urgency of the situation. “With the population pushed to the brink of extinction, there is no time to waste,” he said in the organization’s closing statement. “WCPFC nations will not have another chance to introduce new measures to start recovering the population until the next Commission meeting in a year’s time.”At the meeting, WCPFC took a number of new measures to better manage fisheries in the region, such as adopting voluntary guidelines for how fishers should safely free seabirds caught on longline hooks; adopting a work plan to boost albacore stocks; banning the catch and retention of manta and other mobula rays; and adopting a resolution to consider the impact of climate change on its work.Oceanic whitetip shark (Carcharhinus longimanus). Image by Alexander Vasenin via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0).Banner image: Oceanic whitetip shark (Carcharhinus longimanus). Image by Cvf-ps via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 1.0).Monica Evans is a freelance writer based in Aotearoa, New Zealand, who specializes in environmental and community development issues. She has a master’s degree in development studies from Victoria University of Wellington. Find her at monicaevans.org. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Rebecca Kessler Animals, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Governance, Illegal Fishing, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Overfishing, Sharks, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Misbah to quit Test cricket?

first_imgISLAMABAD (AP):Ageing Pakistan captain Misbah-ul-Haq is thinking about quitting Test cricket, and this month’s three-match series against England could be his last in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).”I have not yet taken the final decision about it (retiring), but I am thinking about it,” the 41-year-old Misbah told reporters yesterday.Misbah has already retired from Twenty20 and also stepped down from ODIs after Pakistan couldn’t progress beyond the quarter-finals at the World Cup this year.The delay in India’s confirmation for its scheduled series against Pakistan in December – also in the UAE – is one of the reasons Misbah is contemplating retiring from Test cricket.If the India-Pakistan series doesn’t go ahead, Pakistan’s next Test assignment is against England in July next year.”This is the point on which I am thinking, too. I have to see how I will keep myself ready for the next series because there’s not much domestic cricket during this period,” Misbah said.Pakistan defeated England 3-0 in their last Test series in the UAE in 2012, but Alistair Cook’s team will be confident after defeating Australia in the Ashes series at home.”It’s not correct to create a perception about our past victory against them,” Misbah said. “England is coming on the back of some very good recent performances at home against Australia and they will not be an easy opponent.”Misbah, who scored Test cricket’s fastest century against Australia last year in the UAE, will be forming a batting nucleus along with Azhar Ali, Younis Khan and Asad Shafiq, who all played in the 2012 series against England.Graeme Swann and Monty Panesar were among England’s spin ranks in the last series, but now England will be relying heavily on Moin Ali’s off-spin to trouble Pakistan’s strong middle order on the slow wickets in the UAE.”Last time their spin bowling was quite experienced and Swann was world’s No. 1 bowler in Test cricket, but now they have Moin Ali,” Misbah said.In the absence of Saeed Ajmal, Misbah hoped Yasir Shah, who played a key role in tormenting Australia last year, and left-arm spinner Zulfiqar Babar would step up again to offset England’s batting line-up.”Yasir and Zulfiqar have given good performances and they did well against Sri Lanka,” Misbah said. “I hope that they won’t let us down in the absence of Saeed Ajmal and will do well.”last_img read more

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Warriors’ Klay Thompson ‘aspires’ to create dynasty like Michael Jordan’s Bulls

first_imgSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set MOST READ “It was cool a couple years ago when we were chasing that 73-win season,” Thompson recalled. “Just being compared to that team is an honor. There’s definitely motivation. I would love to match up, play against Michael Jordan. That would be a dream. Obviously we don’t have a time machine, but that would be pretty special to see that. There’s definitely motivation to leave that type of legacy.”But despite their historic regular season run that year, the team failed to capture the Larry O’ Brien trophy after squandering a 3-1 series lead  against the Cleveland Cavaliers.Still, the 27-year-old dead shot believes his current team is still the closest comparison to Jordan’s Bulls team.“Every time the Bulls came to town that was the ticket of the year. Now it’s when the Warriors come to town, that’s the must-see game,” he explained. “And we don’t take that for granted; that’s such a cool position to be in. We rarely play in front of a crowd that’s not sold out. That’s so special. It’s hard to really grasp that as a player. So I think it’s close, I still think we’re not on their level yet, but that’s what we aspire to be of the 2000s. We aspire to be that dynasty that will be in the minds of NBA fans forever.”  Khristian Ibarrola /raADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Golden State Warriors’ Klay Thompson dribbles during an NBA basketball practice, Wednesday, May 31, 2017, in Oakland, California.  AP PHOTO/Marcio Jose SanchezThe seemingly overpowered roster of the Golden State Warriors is once again primed to repeat as champion in the upcoming NBA season and could very well be on its way to establishing a dynasty.READ: NBA: Warriors to repeat as champs, LeBron to win MVP, GM survey saysADVERTISEMENT Rest: Frowned upon when NBA games count, not in preseason Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny With the likes of superstars Steph Curry, Kevin Durant, Draymond Green and Klay Thompson all in one team, it’s not hard to envision the Bay Area franchise to win its third championship in four years.In a recent interview with ESPN’s Nick Friedell, the Dubs’ sweet-stroking shooting guard Thompson couldn’t help but compare his squad to perhaps the greatest dynasty the league has ever seen, the Michael Jordan-led Chicago Bulls of the ’90s.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smog“What’s that, six championships in eight years?” he said. “So we’re, what, like only a third of the way there? I think it’s close. We still have a long way to go, but I do see the fandom, the fanfare like the Bulls had in the ’90s.The Warriors, of course, are no strangers to eclipsing the Bulls’ historic records, having topped the team’s 72-win regular season in 2016. View commentslast_img read more

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Where President Edwin J. Barclay Died and Was Buried

first_imgDear Mr. Editor:I have read an article in Front Page Africa on Edwin James Barclay (1882-1955), Eighteenth President of Liberia (1930-1944), in which the so-called “expert” historian, Rev. Emmanuel Bowier, writes that “former President Barclay and former President William V.S. Tubman had a feud where Barclay was accused by the Tubman Government [of] plotting against the state. As a result, Barclay was arrested and sent to prison where he remained and fell ill and died.”  (This quotation is taken from Barclay Redux…Front Page Africa April 30, 2014.I observe that in the same article for May 1, 2014 the section on Barclay’s alleged arrest, imprisonment, illness and death in prison have been taken out).  I have also heard   your ”EXPERT” Historian, Rev. Emmanuel Bowier, former Minister of Information, (on Charles Snetter’s radio station) telling  Front Page Africa that in 1955 “former President Edwin Barclay refused the  involvement of the government in his funeral rites and was buried in a quiet ceremony on his farm after his death in the U.S.  This was a result of a bitter feud between Barclay and the W.V.S.  Tubman era.”  Why would Emmanuel Bowier give such false information to Liberians and the world?EDWIN JAMES BARCLAY WAS NEVER SENT TO PRISON.  HE DID NOT DIE IN PRISON AND HE DID NOT DIE IN THE USA.  HE DIED IN A BED AT THE DU SIDE MEDICAL CENTER near Harbel, on the Firestone Plantation.Edwin Barclay and his doctor travelled in a small plane from  the James Spriggs Payne Airfield to the Du Side Medical Center for medical treatment and that is where he left us for a much better place on November 6, 1955. My husband and I with many others were at the airfield to see him off. When the little plane taxied near where we were standing, he was looking straight ahead and I wanted him to see that I was there.  I had several names for him but he enjoyed the story about Chesterfield and snakes. I yelled, “CHESTERFIELD!”  He started to look around.  My husband said, “He is looking for you.”When he saw where I was he gave me a big smile and wave, which I returned. I have never forgotten that smile and the wave.  I admired the man and listened to his stories and as he did not have many visitors,  he did have someone to listen to his stories. At this time I was living three doors from his house and could drop by anytime.Another name I sometimes called him was “Lone Star” and when I talked about how he wrote that brilliant song, he would tell about the inspiration for other things he had written.His body was driven by road to his farm and I was one of those assigned to be there to receive the body and make preparations for the burial. It was a beautiful ceremony with his family, friends and neighbors.  Everybody at that funeral wanted to be there. Neighbors brought chairs, etc. Among the relatives working with us was his first cousin’s daughter whom he educated in France, Mrs. Antoinette Louise Padmore Tubman, wife of President William V.S. Tubman.Sometimes I wonder whether EDWIN James Barclay was not a genius. To have written The  Lone Star Forever at nineteen years old was quite a feat.To have a local politician refer to him as “a jill cup thinker” is sycophancy at its highest level—sycophancy seems to be a Liberian thing.Continue to rest in perfect peace, “Chesterfield,” “Lone Star,” “Cousin Eddie.”  You did not treat with them—you ignored all of them. You did your best for Liberia.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Cop can be punished for sharing video on Facebook

first_imgLawyer’s ‘cuss out’ saga The traffic rank who posted on Facebook a video of Attorney-at-law Ryan Crawford “cussing” him out after being stopped could face disciplinary charges for acting in what has been described as an unprofessional manner by ‘C’ Division Commander Calvin Brutus.Commander Brutus told this publication on Saturday that even though the video could be used as evidence in court, the rank would be subjected to departmental charges for posting the video on social media.“There is a process to deal with that image that was recorded. Because it becomes evidence in a case like that, releasing it without permission or without the matter being properly investigated is not appropriate, and it falls under our disciplinary code,” he told this publication.Nevertheless, Commander Brutus stressed that there is no regulation prohibiting anybody from videoing anything. Road users can also video Police officers while they are preforming their duties, or if they feel subjected to mistreatment.Further, departmental charges mean that the traffic rank could be subjected to suspension, or to not being considered for promotion over the next two years.The commander disclosed that a file has been submitted to the Legal Practitioner’s Association in order to facilitate that body taking legal action against Attorney Crawford.Accompanied by a battery of lawyers, Attorney Ryan Crawford appeared on Friday before Vigilance Magistrate Peter Hugh and denied five charges with which he was slapped for reportedly verbally abusing the policeman. The charges stated as follows: that on September 13, at the Yorkshire Public Road in Mahaicony, East Coast Demerara, he 1: failed to produce his driver’s licence when asked to do so; 2: drove an unfit motor vehicle; 3: used obscene language; 4: behaved in a riotous manner. A charge of prohibition of tinted glass was also slapped on him.Presiding Magistrate Peter Hugh subsequently released the lawyer on his own recognisance. The case will continue on October 10.last_img read more

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Tracker Flyers lose in Dawson Creek

first_imgThe Northeast BC & Yukon Midget Flyers faced a tough opponent this weekend, in the twice defending RAMHL league champion Camrose Kodiaks. The Tracker Flyers were hosts for the weekend, with the first game going on Saturday night in Dawson Creek.The Kodiaks took an early lead, and never looked back, eventually winning the game 5-2.Tracker -Flyer goals were scored by Jordie Cool, and Robbie Sidhu.- Advertisement -Sunday’s game goes in Taylor at 11:30am.For more on the team visit www.nebcflyers.comlast_img read more

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