Pacific teams gather for league showdown

first_imgFeleti Mateo Photo: Photosport RNZI reports Gold Coast Titans players David Mead and Nene Macdonald are included in Papua New Guinea’s squad along with Wests’ second rower Rod Griffin.Despite the loss of Semi Radradra to Australian duties, Fiji has exciting and experienced outside backs in the form of Sisa Waqa, Akuila Uate and Kevin Naiqama.Tonga welcomes the return of Manly’s Feleti Mateo but Warriors powerhouse Solomone Kata will be without centre partner Konrad Hurrell who was made unavailable by the club for disciplinary reasons as was Albert Vete.Frank Pritchard gets to play alongside his brother Kaysa who will make his debut at hooker for Samoa.The Samoans will be without Sam Lisone who is also one of a group of six suspended Warriors.Lisone played in last year’s test meeting between Samoa and Tonga.last_img read more

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In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, August 9, 2019

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannon There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsAn anthropologist tried to fight off poachers’ dogs going after chimpanzees in Uganda (The Atlantic).Agri-giant Chiquita says it will take steps to protect biodiversity (Produce News).Lawmakers in California are considering a rule that would penalize companies for not standing in the way of forest destruction (ProPublica).Forest communities and conservation efforts stand to lose if India’s Forest Rights Act isn’t passed, says wildlife biologist Ravi Chellam (The Hindu).Rainforests can only hold so much carbon dioxide, new research shows (UPI).Mozambique’s Gorongosa has African wild dogs once again (The New York Times).Other newsA water shortage is devastating herders in western India (Al Jazeera).The combination of fire and destructive elephants may not be as harmful to savanna trees as once thought, scientists have found (The Economist).Sixteen black rhinos were successfully moved to Swaziland in July from South Africa (The Maravi Post).Canada has two new ocean sanctuaries aimed at protecting sea ice and wildlife in the Arctic (Mother Nature Network).The new report from the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warns about the dangers of climate change to water and food security (The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Economist, The Atlantic, The Guardian).More young conservatives in the U.S. see climate change as a priority (The New York Times).Climate change could cause a global financial meltdown (The Atlantic).Fires in Siberia were set by illegal loggers, authorities say (The Irish Times, Reuters, The Moscow Times).Mercury concentrations in fish are rising, despite decades of emissions reductions through regulation (The Atlantic).Banner image of a chimpanzee in Uganda by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Conservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update last_img read more

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Will a massive marine protected area safeguard Cook Islands’ ocean?

first_imgIn 2017, the Cook Islands government passed the Marae Moana Act, which designated the country’s entire exclusive economic zone (EEZ) as a multiple-use marine protected area (MPA).Spanning almost 2 million square kilometers (772,000 square miles) — an area roughly the size of Mexico — the MPA is the biggest of its kind in the world.Now, as bureaucrats, NGOs and traditional leaders get to grips with implementing Marae Moana, many stakeholders are wondering what the act will mean in practice and whether it can meaningfully change the way the ocean is managed. This story is part of a series on Marae Moana, the massive, recently enacted multiple-use marine protected area covering the Cook Islands’ entire exclusive economic zone. Other stories in the series:Building the world’s biggest MPA: Q&A with Goldman winner Jacqueline EvansParadise, polluted: Cook Islands tries to clean up its tourism sectorGive it back to the gods: Reviving Māori tradition to protect marine lifeCook Islands MPA leader fired after supporting seabed mining freezeRAROTONGA, Cook Islands — At certain times of the year, Puna Rakanui’s grandfather used to travel to a favorite fishing spot and return with his canoe full of decapitated tuna. “He would tell us kids, ‘When you take fish out of the ocean, you must give something back,’” Rakanui said. “So he would chop the head off the tuna, tie a rock to it and sink it. To feed the fish. ‘That’s for tomorrow,’ he’d say.”In the decades since, that conservative attitude waned among residents of the Cook Islands, and alongside it the health and abundance of the archipelago’s marine habitats. Commercial fishing vessels exploited the deep ocean, while many of the islands’ lagoons were overfished and polluted by locals and tourists alike. Then, in 2017, something changed. The Cook Islands government passed the Marae Moana Act, which designated the country’s entire exclusive economic zone (EEZ) as a multiple-use marine protected area (MPA). Spanning almost 2 million square kilometers (772,000 square miles) — an area roughly the size of Mexico — it’s the biggest of its kind in the world. The intent was essentially to shift marine governance back into alignment with the attitude of Rakanui’s grandfather.But what does “multiple-use” actually mean? Two years on, communities still come to heads with the government over indiscriminate commercial fishing practices, and there is growing international interest in the minerals on the ocean floor. Bureaucrats, NGOs, traditional leaders and community members are currently debating a marine spatial plan to designate which activities will be allowed where within the MPA, a process they aim to complete by 2020. Now that the details are being hashed out, the questions on many stakeholders’ lips are: what will the act mean in practice? Can it actually change the way the ocean is managed, or is it simply a tourist-friendly title for business as usual?Map shows the location of the Cook Islands, with the international date line running past on a ragged course through the Pacific Ocean. Image courtesy of Google Maps.Old paradigm, new systemThe Pacific Ocean and its islands are often left off the edges of world maps, seen perhaps by cartographers as a convenient blank space through which to slice the globe and produce the flat maps we’re familiar with, with the continents in the middle. But for those born and raised in the Cook Islands, the ocean is anything but empty space.“It’s a highway, a line of communication, and a food basket for us,” said Rakanui, the spokesman for the House of Ariki, a parliamentary body of Cook Islands paramount chiefs. “And it was a place where [our ancestors] strengthened their ties with the supernatural powers … There’s nothing to hold onto out there except your canoe; and your faith in the water, taking you to where you’re supposed to be.”From the 16th century on, Europeans jumped on that highway, too: explorers, missionaries, whalers, slave traders and, eventually, colonizers. The Cook Islands became a British protectorate in 1888, and a territory of New Zealand in 1901. In 1965, the archipelago gained independence, but retained much of the colonial mindset on ownership and management of the land and sea. “When you look at our traditions … both the land and the ocean were recognized astapu [sacred],” Rakanui said. “But when we had the transition to the Western form of government, there was little focus on the ocean.“Because the land is so limited, everyone was fighting for it and setting boundaries around it,” he said. “They didn’t put any boundary on the ocean. But that’s not to say that they didn’t place any value on it.”Commercial fishing debris washed up on the shore of Rarotonga. Image by Monica Evans for Mongabay.In recent years, it’s become clear to the islanders that the ocean’s bounty is limited, too. For decades, the Cook Islands government has bolstered its economy by selling fishing licenses to foreign companies to exploit its waters. As technologies like fishfinders and sonar-emitting fish-aggregating devices (FADS) make it easier to find and attract a catch, the zone is increasingly at risk of being overfished.What’s more, abandoned nets and FADS are trapping threatened species like sea turtles, and washing up in huge volume on the Cooks’ 15 islands and atolls. Last year, members of the local environmental NGO Te Ipukarea Society (TIS) visited uninhabited Suwarrow, a coral atoll almost 1,000 kilometers (620 miles) away from the largest and most developed island of Rarotonga. They were appalled at the amount of fishing rubbish — particularly FADS — that they found there.For Polynesians, the ocean is both a god and a relative, and maintaining the mana(prestige, dignity, spiritual power) of one’s family is of overriding importance. So in 2010, when rugby league star Kevin Iro approached the House of Ariki saying he felt sorry for the ocean and asking for help to revive its mana, the chiefs came quickly on board.That was the beginning of a seven-year process of advocacy and consultation that culminated in the passing of Marae Moana, a title that means “sacred ocean” in Cook Islands Māori.Under the act, the country’s entire EEZ is marked out as a marine protected area, and the spatial plan that’s currently being developed will designate pockets for different activities such as commercial fishing or tourism. These activities must comply with Marae Moana’s overarching purpose: to protect and conserve the ecological, biodiversity, and heritage values of the Cook Islands marine environment.“We really wanted to express that out to the rest of the world, that we view the ocean not just as small bits and pieces but as a whole,” Iro said. “So rather than setting protection targets of 10 percent by 2020 or whatever, we said ‘Let’s flip that on its head and just say 100 percent is protected and work backwards from there.’”last_img read more

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Call for scientists to engage in environmental movements strikes chord

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Biodiversity, Carbon Emissions, Civil Disobedience, Climate Change, Climate Science, Conservation, Earth Science, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Protests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Scientists have a “moral duty” to partake in environmental movements such as the Extinction Rebellion and the Global Climate Strike, a pair of ecologists argues.The engagement of scientists could spark a deeper interest in — and action to address — these issues, they write.The participation of scientists will also lend credibility to the urgency of such movements, the scientists say. Cataloging the growing number of declining species or tracking the relentless rise of temperatures around the world today can make for some dark days for scientists in these areas of study — scientists like ecologist Claire Wordley.“I was feeling very despairing about the situation, particularly climate change and what we were doing to the world,” Wordley, who has studied the influence of agriculture on bats in India and worked to promote evidence-based conservation policy at the University of Cambridge in the U.K., told Mongabay.One ray of hope, which sparked her own involvement in movements such as the Extinction Rebellion and the Global Climate Strike, has been the rising tide of activism taking aim at the set of ecological crises facing the world today.“To me, seeing that people were really willing to rise up against that was very uplifting,” Wordley said.Claire Wordley at a protest on Blackfriar’s Bridge in London. Image by Jane Carpenter.In fact, she said she thinks more scientists should get involved — and not just because it will make them feel better. Wordley and fellow conservation scientist Charlie Gardner, in a commentary published Sept. 2 in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, argue that scientists have a “moral duty” to join the movements focused on environmental issues like climate change and species extinction.The collaboration began on the heels of an opinion piece that Wordley wrote for Mongabay in December 2018 encouraging environmentalists to engage in the then-nascent Extinction Rebellion. Reading it prompted Gardner to get in touch, and the two researchers began working on the current commentary to get scientists more involved.Wordley and Gardner said they found the lack of representation from the scientific community surprising.“It just struck me as both a bit odd that the people who know most about the crises we face were not getting involved,” Gardner said in an interview. “I think we have a moral responsibility, given the urgency of the situations we face, to act on our knowledge.”A pink boat, named after murdered Honduran activist Berta Cáceres, in Oxford Circus, London, April 2019. Image by Louise Gardner.Scientists might worry that participating in protests or civil disobedience could cloud their objectivity. But as Wordley points out, the science in these fields isn’t “neutral.”“If you’re working as a conservation scientist, you’re already advocating. You’re already taking a position that we should be conserving these species,” she said. “I don’t think it’s going that much further to then go and support the people who agree with the positions that you’ve drawn out from your science.”“The science has been done,” Gardner added. “Now it’s about acting on that.”Similarly, researchers might worry about the erosion of the public’s trust when they’re seen carrying banners or blocking a road as a way of drawing attention to these problems. But the pair cites a study after the 2017 March for Science in Washington, D.C., demonstrating that scientists’ participation didn’t change public perceptions of their credibility.On the contrary, Gardner said he thinks that engagement by scientists could ignite deeper interest in — and action to address — these issues.“That makes people sit up and take notice and think, ‘Wow, this must really be serious,’” he said. “As far as I’m concerned, science is one tool that we have in our toolbox for addressing the environmental crisis, and I’m prepared to use whatever tools that we have.”Claire Wordley, right, joins Extinction Rebellion protesters blocking Blackfriar’s Bridge, London. Image by Jane Carpenter.By participating, the researchers write, they can help ensure that the people involved in the movements are armed with the most accurate information. Gardner said that a group of scientists are planning to attend the next round of Extinction Rebellion protests beginning Oct. 7 in the U.K., where they’ll wear white lab coats and carry signs inviting participants to ask them questions.Wordley said she’s sympathetic to concerns about what an arrest record might mean, especially for researchers working in foreign countries who might worry about losing their visas. But they can find other ways to support the movements, she said.“We can give talks, act as media spokespeople, write or speak publicly about why we have embraced civil disobedience, or support organisational tasks,” Wordley and Gardner write.There are signs that the scientific community is taking notice. On Sept. 19, more than 200 researchers in Australia signed a letter supporting the Extinction Rebellion. And a recent study in the journal Frontiers in Communication found that these events are triggering action on the part of the public.Wordley and Gardner said they’ve received emails and tweets expressing support for the ideas they laid out in the commentary. It’s also caught the eyes of readers online: Out of more than 180,000 papers published in the past three months, the commentary ranks 31st, according to Altmetric, which tracks the online activity of scientific publications.“What that says to me is that scientists were waiting for someone to say this,” Gardner said, adding that, given the stakes, just producing the science is not enough. “All of us as individuals have a choice, and if we choose inaction, we’re choosing climate breakdown.”This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.Banner image of protesters on Blackfriar’s Bridge in London by Jane Carpenter.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonClarification: Claire Wordley’s publication written for Mongabay in December 2019 was an opinion piece. The article has been updated to reflect this fact.Citations:Gardner, C. J., & Wordley, C. F. R. (2019). Scientists must act on our own warnings to humanity. Nature Ecology & Evolution, 3(9), 1271–1272. doi:10.1038/s41559-019-0979-ySwim, J. K., Geiger, N., & Lengieza, M. L. (2019). Climate Change Marches as Motivators for Bystander Collective Action . Frontiers in Communication. doi:10.3389/fcomm.2019.00004FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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Combining negotiation, legal backing and orchids to create ecotourism reserve

first_imgArticle published by Sue Palminteri Biodiversity, Conservation, Conservation Solutions, Deforestation, Ecotourism, Forests, Private Reserves, Protected Areas, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforests, Research, Tropical Forests In Ecuador, the Ceiba Foundation for Tropical Conservation has worked with local landowners to create conservation agreements and sustainable ecotourism ventures in areas otherwise fragmented by intensive human activity.After nearly 20 years, the impacts of two small, family-based initiatives are rippling outwards into the rest of the Andean cloud forest and coastal dry forest.Negotiation, relationship-building, and transparency helped Ceiba earn the landowners’ trust and enable the success of the initiatives. On the 650-hectare (1,600-acre) El Pahuma Orchid Reserve in Andean cloud forest, you can find over 300 species of orchids, and even a handful of endangered spectacled bears. If you had visited the area, in the northwestern corner of Pichincha, Ecuador, 20 years ago, you might not have imagined that this landscape, heavily affected by logging and agriculture, would have become part of an ecological corridor. But time and negotiation have had a positive impact. El Pahuma’s owners used to make their living cutting down timber, and they now run a successful ecotourism business.Ceiba’s founders Catherine Woodward and Joe Meisal (center) with the Lima family at El Pahuma Orchid Reserve in 2000. Image by Catherine Woodward.This unlikely transition came about as the result of a chance encounter. Joe Meisal and Catherine Woodward, (the founders of Ceiba Foundation for Tropical Conservation and biology professors at the University of Wisconsin- Madison) stopped to look at a waterfall that they had spotted during a visit to Ecuador in 1997.  When they met the landowner along one of the trails, he asked, “Would you like to see my orchids?” He showed the biologists his garden, a small collection of orchids that he had collected from fallen trees, and asked them if they thought tourists would be interested in visiting the forest.Woodward and Meisal agreed to meet with the landowner, Ephraim Lima, a week later. When they arrived at the meeting, they found that four generations of the Lima family had turned out to meet with them. In the four-hour conversation that followed, Woodward and Meisal agreed to look for legal solutions to help the Lima family conserve their land.Woodward and Meisal explored the option of forming a conservation easement. This legal figure (‘servidumbre ecológica’ in Spanish) was uncharted territory in Ecuadorian law. It was the first time that a nongovernmental organization and a private landowner entered into a legally-binding conservation agreement. Woodward told Mongabay that this was both a help and a hindrance: it meant that they had to craft the legal framework from scratch, but it also gave them the flexibility to tailor the agreement specifically to the landowner’s needs.Woodward herself wrote much of the original document, with the help of an environmental lawyer. The land was carefully divided up into usage zones. While most of the land was designated as a conservation zone, another section of the land was designated for trails and tourist cabins, and a final patch of land was left to the Lima family, zoned for residential and agricultural use. Woodward said that there was a lot of dialogue back and forth about which parts of the land would be designated for what purposes. The Lima family knew the terrain well and offered suggestions as to which places would be good for trails, lookout points, and bridges.The Stanhopea napoensis orchid from Ecuador. Image by Andreas Key via Flickr. CC 2.0.They took three years to work out the final agreement, which stipulated that the Lima family was obligated to leave the conservation area untouched –no logging, no hunting –for 25 years. (While most conservation easements in the United States are negotiated for perpetuity, Woodward said that such long and definitive time frames are rare in Latin American easements, which tend to range from 25 to 99 years.) In exchange, Ceiba agreed to invest in the infrastructure needed to build an ecotourism business, which would allow the family to make a sustainable income from the land.With the guarantee of a signed easement backing their conservation goals, Ceiba was then able to approach potential donors. The San Diego Orchid Society and Fauna and Flora International funded the next phase of the project: outfitting El Pahuma as an ecotourism destination. The foundation hired a guard and a local project manager to oversee the building of trails, signs, bridges, cabins, and an interpretation center. The Lima family learned book-keeping and management and even received training on how to take care of the orchids, to keep them from flowering too often.Within five years of the initial investment, El Pahuma Orchid Reserve was up and running, and within 10 years, it had become a self-sustaining operation with thousands of visitors.With a successful business in their hands, the family was able to apply for a bank loan to build a restaurant across the highway from the reserve’s entrance. Woodward credits the visibility of the reserve for part of its success in ecotourism: El Pahuma is located less than an hour outside of Quito, along a major highway that many travelers take to the coast or to other tourist destinations like Mindo.  They now receive local tourists escaping from the capital city, foreign tourists who visit as part of a tour package, and study abroad students sent by Ceiba to learn about tropical ecology.Catherine Woodward with students at Lalo Loor reserve. Image courtesy of Ceiba Foundation for Tropical Conservation.In the case of El Pahuma, the conservation easement helped to buy time. Now, in 2019, there are other opportunities and mechanisms in place that encourage conservation. Since 2015, the Lima family has received an economic incentive from the Ecuadorian government’s Socio Bosque program, and the dozens of other reserves and ecolodges that have popped up throughout the cloud forest are evidence of the growth of the ecotourism market. But in the late 1990s, none of these options were available to rural landowners. By working with Ceiba, the Lima family was able to take the lead, becoming ambassadors for conservation in the local community.In 2018, Ceiba was also able to support the Mancomunidad del Chocó Andino (Andean Chocó Commonwealth) and the Maquipucuna Foundation in a petition to declare the Northwestern Pichincha Corridor as a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve, protecting over 280,000 hectares (690,000 acres) of cloud forest ecosystem.Expanding to other areasCeiba has more recently applied similar efforts to a family reserve in an entirely different ecosystem, the tropical dry forest in Ecuador’s coastal province of Manabí.This 200-hectare (500-acre) tract of primary forest is one of the best-preserved semi-deciduous forests in northwestern Manabí province. It’s home to several of this ecosystem’s threatened species, including the critically endangered Ecuadorian white-fronted capuchin (Cebus aequatorialis) and the grey-backed hawk (Pseudastur occidentalis).The Ecuadorian mantled howler monkey is one of the threatened species that lives in the coastal dry forest ecosystem at the Lalo Loor Reserve. Image courtesy of Ceiba Foundation for Tropical Conservation.Eduardo (nicknamed “Lalo”) Loor, a dairy farmer, inherited hundreds of hectares of land from his father. When he found that this patch of primary forest was among them, he decided to leave it as it was. “My father is a nature-lover,” Mariela Loor, the landowner’s daughter, told Mongabay.When Ceiba approached him in 2000, he welcomed their suggestion to designate the land for conservation. There was not as much urgency here as at El Pahuma. The Loor family had another livelihood and had no desire to cut down the forest. Ceiba hired a local guard and local ranch hands to work on the trails, and signed a notarized (but not legally-binding) agreement in 2004, stipulating that the Ceiba would manage the reserve and give Loor a percentage of the revenues. In 2008, Ceiba received a grant to build the visitor’s center and dormitories.The reserve now receives a variety of tourists, volunteers, interns, and students who stay anywhere from a day to a semester. This year, the reserve is transitioning to family management, with Mariela Loor taking over day-to-day operations at the reserve. In addition, this year her father will sign a 30-year conservation easement with Ceiba.The entrance to Lalo Loor reserve. Image courtesy of Ceiba Foundation for Tropical Conservation.Woodward said that on both reserves, time and relationships have been important factors. “Building a relationship of trust with the landowner is critical. You can’t just show up and ask someone to sign the rights to their land away.”Building a conservation corridorThe Lalo Loor Reserve sits at a meeting point between two major ecosystems: the Tumbesino tropical dry forest coming up from Peru and the humid Chocó forest system coming down from the Pacific Coast of Panama. The unique mix of plant and animal species native to the area have earned it a designation as a “biodiversity hotspot.” But sustaining the delicate balance of this ecosystem is an uphill battle here on the coast, where the growth of cities and monocultures have left the forest badly fragmented.Carolina Toapanta, Ceiba’s executive director, based in Manabí, is spearheading the foundation’s next conservation project, collaborating with county and provincial governments: an ecological corridor that will knit together the remaining patches of primary forest in the area. Ceiba hired a team to map out 200,000 hectares (500,000 acres) of conservation area in the counties of Pedernales, Jama, San Vicente, and Sucre. The ACUS (Área de Conservación y Uso Sostenible — Conservation and Sustainable Use Area) agreement will be enforced by local government through zoning restrictions. Toapanta is convinced that working with local people and institutions is the best way to ensure a lasting impact.The El Pahuma and Lalo Loor reserves both started out as small projects –helping a single family find a way to make conservation sustainable. But as the influence of the local families ripples outwards, an entire region begins to come together to work for solutions. Toapanta sees conservation work as a way of empowering the community by helping them think in a different way. “We’re really passionate about seeing that change take place in Manabí.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Indonesia re-exporting illegal waste to other countries, report finds

first_imgArticle published by Basten Gokkon Conservation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Policy, Plastic, Pollution, Waste A report by environmental groups says the Indonesian government is shipping containers of imported plastic waste from the U.S. to other countries instead of sending them back to the source as it claimed it would.The report said 38 containers ended up arriving in India, while the others were sent to countries including Thailand, Vietnam, Mexico, the Netherlands, and Canada.The Indonesian government has rebuffed the allegation, saying the re-export documents list the U.S. and Germany as the final destinations.The groups behind the report have called on Indonesia to work together with the source countries and to prosecute those involved in the trafficking of waste. JAKARTA — Indonesia earlier this year condemned the practice of wealthy countries sending it their waste, but is now doing the same by shipping that same waste to other countries instead of sending it back to the source, environmental groups say.Between July and August 2019, Indonesia denied entry for 58 containers exported from the U.S. because they were found to contain paper scrap mixed with other waste, such as rubber and used diapers. Indonesian authorities said they repatriated the containers full of waste to the country of origin.But only 12 of those containers eventually returned to the U.S., according to U.S.-based waste trade watchdog Basel Action Network (BAN) and Indonesian environmental group Nexus3 Foundation. The rest appeared to have been sent to India, Thailand, Vietnam, Mexico, the Netherlands, Canada and South Korea between August and October, the groups reported on Oct. 28.Using shipment tracking techniques, the group laid out in a report the exact dates and times of the respective consignments landing in those countries, including transit stops.Most of the containers of paper waste from the U.S. that were contaminated with other waste never returned to the States after Indonesia rejected them. Image courtesy of Nexus3.“Containers do not just travel around the globe by themselves. Somebody directed them,” Yuyun Ismawati, a senior adviser to Nexus3, told Mongabay in a text message.Yuyun said the final destination of each shipment was determined before it left port, unless there was a strong reason for a diversion along the trip, such as a disaster or tsunami.“If the stated target destination of a shipment and the reality are different, then this is fraud,” she said.The containers, which had been destined from the U.S. to Indonesian paper recycling mills PT Mega Surya Eratama (MSE) and PT Surabaya Mekabox (SM), left Indonesia on board vessels operated by shipping companies Cosco, Maersk, and Hyundai Merchant Marine. Thirty-eight containers shipped by Cosco and Maersk ended up in India, while the others carried by Hyundai went to the other countries.The Indonesian government has rebuffed the allegation that it passed the waste on to other countries instead of sending it back to the source countries. It says the re-export documents from PT MSE and PT SM list the U.S. and Germany, respectively, as the final destinations.“The Indonesian government has never recommended or issued an agreement for re-export of contaminated waste from the United States to other Asian countries,” Syarif Hidayat, the director of international customs at the finance ministry, said in a statement.Syarif said the government would investigate the allegations, notify the countries of origin and transit of the imported waste, and likely ban imports from the companies that had exported the waste to Indonesia in the first place.“The Indonesian government highly appreciates anyone who has provided insightful information or feedback, and will follow up on all information by coordinating with other institutions,” he added.This chart shows the flow of paper waste contaminated with plastic waste being re-exported to other countries after Indonesia rejected it. Image courtesy of Basel Action Network & Nexus3.BAN and Nexus3 have called on Indonesia to work with the source countries of the waste in any follow-up action, and to prosecute those involved in the trafficking of the waste.“Without properly involving the country of origin, or taking the steps to prosecute Basel Convention violators, the criminality will just continue, and more containers will keep coming to pollute Indonesia,” Jim Puckett, the director of BAN, said in a statement.Puckett also called out lack of enforcement by the receiving countries, particularly India, which has banned the import of plastic waste since August this year.Last month, Indonesia accused two Singaporeans of illegally importing 87 containers of plastic scrap containing hazardous items from Hong Kong, Spain, Canada, Australia and Japan between May and June this year. Illegally importing hazardous and toxic material into Indonesia is punishable with up to 15 years’ imprisonment and 15 billion rupiah ($1 million) in fines.Waste imports into Indonesia and other Southeast Asian countries surged after China enforced a ban on the import of all waste at the start of 2018. Indonesia’s imports of plastic waste more than doubled that year to 283,000 tons following the ban, according to the national statistics agency.This chart shows the flow of paper waste contaminated with plastic waste being re-exported to other countries after Indonesia rejected it. Image courtesy of Basel Action Network & Nexus3.A Greenpeace report published in April found most of Indonesia’s waste imports came from Australia, Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The surge in illegal imports has prompted the government to tighten its own rules on the issue.However, restrictions on importing plastic scrap have been resisted by some, chiefly lobby groups for the plastic recycling industry, which say that tighter inspections have impacted their business and resulting in a decrease in Indonesian exports of recycled plastic products. They also say the sorting and processing of imported waste supports thousands of jobs in the country.Indonesia already struggles to manage its own waste, which often goes into landfills or is dumped into waterways, from where it winds up in the oceans. The country is the second-biggest contributor to the plastic trash crisis in the oceans, after China, according to a 2015 study in the journal Science.“We urge President Joko Widodo to conduct a complete investigation of the waste import business, including all ministries and corporations if involved,” said Nur Hidayati, the executive director of the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi).“We are calling on the president to revoke the permits of polluters and enact a total ban on waste imports.”Indonesia has denied entry for hundreds of containers carrying paper scrap contaminated with other waste. Image by Petrus Riski/Mongabay Indonesia.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Education Ministry finally fixes leaking roof

first_imgSmith’s Memorial PrimaryFour days after Guyana Times published an article that the Smith’s Memorial Primary School’s roof was leaking, causing mass inconvenience for teachers and students there, the Education Ministry has announced that the issue has been rectified. The school is located on Hadfield Street, Georgetown.Over the course of the weekend, a visit was made to the institution where the issue was identified and the aluminium sheet roofing was replaced. The students and teachers are now situated in a more comfortable environment and it is one that is dry.In a statement to the media, the Education Ministry said, “Over the weekend, officials from the Ministry of Education Buildings Department visited the school…and rectified the problem. The leaks were identified and the old leaking zinc sheets are now replaced with new ones”.Last week, during a visit to the school, teachers had expressed worry over the leaking roof which went unnoticed for months during the dry weather. However, after the rainy season began, students and teachers were forced to move around their classrooms to avoid getting wet.In fact, the Head Teacher of the school, Lyodele Hamilton, was being interviewed in her office when she too was distracted by a leakage coming from above her.She explained that the Education Ministry was informed of the situation since last term and had promised to rectify it as soon as possible.last_img read more

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A wildfire smoke advisory remains in effect for Northeast B.C.

first_imgIf you are experiencing any of the following symptoms, you should contact your health care provider immediately: difficulty in breathing, chest pain or discomfort, and sudden onset of cough or irritation of airways. If you are experiencing symptoms, avoid strenuous outdoor activities, especially along busy traffic corridors. Exposure is particularly a concern for infants, the elderly and those who have underlying medical conditions such as diabetes, and lung or heart disease.Real-time air quality information in Fort St. John and other communities in B.C. is available at http://www.bcairquality.ca.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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Mandzukic calls time on Croatia career

first_imgThe Juventus player said that losing 4-2 to France in the World Cup final to take the runner-up spot had given him “new energy but also made this incredible decision easier”.Mandzukic scored 33 goals for Croatia in 89 games and ranked second only to the country’s Davor Suker.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Croatia’s Mario Mandzukic, pictured July 2018, says that he “gave [his] best” for Croatia and “contributed to the greatest success in Croatian football” in his retirement letter © AFP/File / Mladen ANTONOVPARIS, France, Aug 15 – Croatian World Cup hero and star striker Mario Mandzukic has announced his retirement from international football at the age of 32, the country’s national soccer federation said Tuesday.“I think the time has come for me now. I gave my best for Croatia and I have contributed to the greatest success in Croatian football,” Mandzukic said in a letter circulated by the federation.last_img read more

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Chelsea fans are optimistic again after seeing their side beat Dynamo Kiev

first_img1 Chelsea fans appear to think their team have turned a corner after their Champions League victory over Dynamo Kiev. Chelsea fans appear to think their team have turned a corner after their Champions League victory over Dynamo Kiev. After leading 1-0, the Blues conceded 13 minutes from time in the Stamford Bridge clash, and it looked as though they could have continued their poor form by conceding a second. Jose Mourinho’s side showed excellent character and resilience to grab a winner as Willian scored a stunning 25-yard free-kick. The home crowd were clear in voicing their support for the Portuguese manager and here is their reaction to the 2-1 victory. Despite a mistake from goalkeeper Asmir Begovic, fans can see an upturn in results, starting with Stoke at the weekend as they took to Twitter to state their optimism.last_img read more

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