In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, August 30, 2019

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Conservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsCôte d’Ivoire is trying to increase its vegetation cover by planting trees (Ecofin).Indonesia plans to move its capital to Borneo, which could damage rainforests (Fast Company).The Amazon is reaching a tipping point for its weather system (The New York Times).Other newsResearchers are working to protect a species of bat that lives in a single cave in Cuba (BBC News).U.S. President Trump is trying to allow further logging of the country’s largest temperate forest (The Washington Post).Young climate activist Greta Thunberg has reached New York for the U.N. climate summit after sailing across the Atlantic (The Washington Post).Sea otters in California are dying after contracting parasites from cats (The New York Times).Companies in the United States won’t have to check pipelines for methane leaks if a proposal to relax methane regulations is accepted by the Environmental Protection Agency (The New York Times, The Washington Post).Kenya is cracking down on illegal fishing in its waters (Hakai Magazine).The Atlantic Ocean may soon have the world’s largest marine protected area (National Geographic).The food giant Nestlé wants to take 1.1 million gallons of water from a river in Florida, but environmentalists say that will damage the river’s ecosystem (The Guardian).Climate change, overfishing and land clearing are damaging the Great Barrier Reef, an Australian agency says (Reuters).Banner image of a sea otter by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by John Cannonlast_img read more

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Climate justice advocates at UN: ‘Come with plans not speeches’

first_imgActivism, Climate Activism, Climate Change, Corporate Responsibility, Human Rights, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Rights Article published by Genevieve Belmaker As the Peoples’ Summit on Climate, Rights and Human Survival convened in New York last weekend, leaders had a call to action for attendees: bring solutions.The climate justice movement meeting brought human rights and climate leaders together for one of the most prominent such gathering to date.The meetings came amid debates over aggressively gutted environmental safeguards by the US, including its withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. The UN special envoy for this year’s climate summit, Ambassador Luis Alfonso de Alba, opened the September 19-20 Peoples’ Summit on Climate, Rights and Human Survival with an admonition for nations the coming week: “This will not be a traditional summit.” The time for addressing linkages between climate and human rights has passed, de Alba said and concentration should shift to individual and collective action.The meeting integrating human rights and climate leaders was the most prominent and clearest representation of the climate justice movement to date. According to Amnesty International, one of the event’s organizers, the meeting aimed to galvanize the human rights community to urgently scale-up its efforts on climate justice, creating the most diverse movement ever assembled to tackle the climate crisis.The gathering preceded this week’s Climate Action Summit at UN headquarters in New York City, where leaders from approximately 60 nations are gathered to form a plan of action to address the climate emergency.The UN secretary general wants ambitious new commitments at the pace and scale required to significantly reduce emissions. The climate justice group made clear that generalized rhetoric is no longer welcome.“There needs to be a multi-front response to the emergency of climate change,” said Craig Mokhiber, director of the New York Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights. “[That] includes legal strategies that the various communities can bring, social and political strategies that includes looking at aspects of economic decisions that have led us to where we are now, and the full spectrum of tactics that goes from action in court to action to civil disobedience in the streets, because that’s where we are in terms of crisis.”The earth’s rapid warming as a result of humankind’s activities has created what panelist and UN special rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, Philip Alston, described as a “climate apartheid,” where the disproportionate effects of the climate crisis are borne by colored populations.“When you tell people there’s a leak in the boat, they’ll believe you when they’re up to their knees in water,” said Mokhiber on the importance of bringing together the voices of those who have already been dramatically affected and those who will be without meaningful immediate action. “That’s where we are now.”Much of what has been done to address the climate crisis thus far has been described as “rearranging the deck chairs of the Titanic.” As world leaders gathered in New York this month, he puts special blame on the US. “Worse than that,” Mokhiber said, “the US is buttressing the iceberg.”President Donald Trump, who made a surprise 14-minute appearance on the opening day of the climate summit before departing for a meeting on religious freedom, has aggressively gutted environmental safeguards since taking office and is leading the US withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. According to human rights leaders, such negligence might constitute a human rights violation.Jennifer Morgan is the executive director of Greenpeace International. “While we all recognize [climate and human rights] linkages, and they are more and more prevalent every single day, I don’t believe that corporations and states have truly understood that their lack of action on climate change is a violation of their human rights obligations.”Kumi Naidoo is the current Secretary-General of Amnesty International. “I just have one message to the leadership of the fossil fuel companies of the world,” Naidoo said. “They need to understand that we are now going to be using the full weight of human rights law. They need to understand that any decision they make now to invest one cent more in new fossil fuel projects is an investment in the death of our children and their children.”A number of countries have not been selected to speak at the climate summit, including coal-supporting nations like Japan and South Africa. According to Financial Times, also excluded will be the US, as well as Brazil and Saudi Arabia.The energy in New York was undeniably positive as the imperative for action seems to be gaining traction, if just in the public’s consciousness.Ellen Dorsey is the executive director of the Wallace Global Fund, a private foundation focused on progressive social change in the fields of environment, democracy, human rights and corporate accountability. “The real measure of success of this summit is that it unleashes the process where we have built such power and collaborative action so strong and so clear that the fossil fuel companies will tender plans consistent with a 1.5-degree world,” Dorsey said.What does that mean for corporations and governments?“That means they must wind down or fundamentally transform themselves and they must stop their capital expenditures now – no new fossil fuels,” said Dorsey, whose organization seeks to put the rights of people at the center of climate solutions. “We will ensure that as we move into the new energy economy that it is a rights-respecting economy and the solutions out people not profit at the center and that the renewable energy companies themselves are held accountable to human rights as well as environmental standards. That power is building and it is time that we show that power in very clear ways.”At the end of the first day of the Climate Action Summit, Nemonte Nenquimo, of the Waorani Nation in Ecuador and one of the founding members of the indigenous organization Ceibo Alliance, delivered a rousing speech at an indigenous community event hosted by the Ford Foundation. “We must respect the right to live well, to conserve air, water, and land,” she said. “This is my fight. Not just for my country, for the indigenous, this work is for the world. This is a fight for all.”Lavetanalagi Seru is a co-founder of the Alliance for Future Generations, a youth-led voluntary organization working for education and climate justice, who traveled from Fiji. “There is very little time left now for systems change,” Seru urged in his closing remarks to last week’s indigenous peoples’ summit.“Let us use our moral voice to call on our governments to take ambitious climate action, demanding corporate accountability and also by playing our part in the current unsustainable consumption, production and distribution patterns. Let us rise to the challenge this planet seeks of us––or we shall all be judged for our inaction by a jury that is yet to be born.”This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Amazon trees may absorb far less carbon than previously thought: study

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer The capacity of the Amazon rainforest to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere is predicted to increase with climate change, but now computer modelling suggests that these increases may be far smaller than expected.So far, global photosynthesis rates have risen in line with increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, but whether this pattern will hold true for the Amazon, one of the oldest ecosystems on Earth, is still unclear.Depending on how key nutrient cycles are represented, researchers found that models predict the Amazon carbon sink could be 46 to 52 percent smaller than predicted based on current trends, a finding that has serious implications for carbon sequestration forecasts and future climate change.The researchers plan to test the model predictions against the results from proposed field experiments that will artificially elevate CO2 levels in real sections of the Amazon forest — a study for which the team is currently raising funds. The Amazon’s 30-million-year-old soils were never subjected to ice age glaciers, making most highly weathered and low in nutrients like phosphorus. Photo credit: CIFOR on Visual Hunt / CC BY-NC-NDThe capacity of the Amazon rainforest to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere is predicted to increase with climate change, but a computer modelling study published in Nature Geoscience suggests that these increases may be far more modest than expected.Depending on how key nutrient cycles are represented in climate models, the Amazon carbon sink may be half the size predicted based on current trends, the study reports — a finding that has serious implications for the escalating climate crisis.One of the few apparent silver-linings of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels has been a predicted simultaneous boost to plant growth — carbon dioxide is one of the key ingredients that fuels photosynthesis, so adding more if it to the air allows plants to photosynthesize more, and produce increased energy for growth — a process known as “CO2 fertilization.”Higher atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are also forecasted to help plants use water more efficiently by allowing them to keep the pores in their leaves, known as stomata, closed for longer — a potential help against climate change intensified drought.These effects have caused some scientists to anticipate dramatic increases in crop yield, as well as an expansion in the capacity of trees to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and to mitigate human emissions. But these predictions rely on the assumption that forest growth rates, while enhanced by increased carbon, are not limited by other factors, for example, lack of soil nutrient availability.The phosphorus limitIn fact, scientists have discovered a battle going on in Amazon soils. Phosphorus — an essential plant nutrient leached from rock — is in short supply there. But at the same time, this element is in high demand from plants and microbes, while soil minerals naturally bind with it and lock it away.Amazon soils are rich in clays, which contain iron and aluminium oxides that chemically bind and store phosphorus in the soil , putting it out of reach of living organisms that desperately need the element.“While higher CO2 stimulates forest growth by making it easier for [trees] to take in CO2 … that growth will be constrained, over both short and long time periods, by the availability of the nutrients needed for tree growth, mainly nitrogen and phosphorus,” explained Christopher Neill, an ecosystem ecologist at Woods Hole Research Center in Massachusetts, USA. This phosphorus-imposed growth constraint could have serious repercussions for current estimates of Amazon forest carbon sequestration.A Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment in Wisconsin performed by the US Department of Agriculture, which has demonstrated that elevated carbon dioxide levels increase plant growth in a temperate aspen forest. However, scientists question whether a similar growth enhancement would occur in the tropics where soil nutrients are more limited. Image by Bruce Kimball / USDA.Field testing Amazon forest carbon storage modelsThe United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates that natural processes, such as photosynthesis, currently absorb just under a third of all human GHG emissions. The Amazon rainforest is a major contributor to this ecosystem service and — although there have been hints that its capacity for absorbing carbon has been reduced by climate change and deforestation — a growing Amazon carbon sink is still a key component of models used to forecast warming and evaluate mitigation strategies.To date, global photosynthesis rates have risen in line with increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations — meaning more growth and more carbon storage — but whether this global pattern will continue to hold true for the tropics and particularly the Amazon, one of the oldest ecosystems on Earth, is unclear.“A lot of our climate and ecosystem models that are applied to [predict] what [will be] happening in the future have these assumptions built into them … but since [these carbon storage expectations have] never been tested, it’s really urgent that we have a large-scale experiment in the tropics and the Amazon” to ground truth our sequestration hypotheses, said Katrin Fleischer a post-doctoral researcher at the Technical University of Munich in Germany, who led the current modelling study.Fleischer is part of an international research team preparing to do this field work. They’re setting up a large-scale experiment to measure the actual response of Amazon forest patches to elevated atmospheric CO2 levels. The so-called AmazonFACE project will use free-air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) to artificially increase CO2 levels around groups of Amazon trees over a period of 15 years, and monitor above- and below-ground processes to get a full picture of how individual trees and whole ecological communities might respond to rising carbon dioxide levels.Prior to starting the experiment, the researchers collected baseline data on tree growth, plant nutrition, leaf development and root growth, as well as soil nutrient cycling of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus at the AmazonFACE site near Manaus, in the Brazilian Amazon. They plugged this data into 14 different climate models that included different elements involved in the soil nutrient cycle, including nitrogen and phosphorus, and looked for varying levels of adaptability in plant responses to increased carbon dioxide for photosynthesis.All the models supported the hypothesis that atmospheric concentration increases of up to 200 parts per million above current levels would have a positive effect on plant growth, however the increases were, on average, smallest in the six models that took account of phosphorus limitations in the calculations. These models predicted that the Amazon would absorb between 46 and 52 percent less carbon compared to models that did not consider phosphorus limitation.“The [computer] study is slightly unusual [and innovative] in that it involved running a range of different ecosystem models in advance of a [field] experiment, to better inform which processes will be most important to measure [during] the [15-year AmazonFACE] experiment,” explained Lucas Cernusak, a plant physiologist at Australia’s James Cook University, who wasn’t part of the modeling study.Researchers measure forest canopy processes from a measurement tower at the AmazonFACE site near Manaus in the Brazilian Amazon. Researchers can collect data on tree growth, leaf development and root growth, as well as soil nutrient cycling of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus. Image by Joao M. Rosa, AmazonFACE.The nutrient-limited AmazonThe Amazon rainforest is more than 30 million years old and was never subjected to ice age glaciers, so most of its soils are deep and highly weathered. As a result, phosphorus is severely depleted in most areas. However, phosphorus is required by plants for protein synthesis, cell division, and energy metabolism, making it essential for growth. In addition, many plants produce phosphorus-rich seeds, fruit or pollen, making reproduction another phosphorus-demanding activity.Even though Amazon soils are known to be nutrient poor, you wouldn’t know it to look at the thriving forest. That’s because plants there have evolved myriad compensatory strategies to win the phosphorus battle: growing larger more extensive root networks, releasing sugars that alter soil pH and free phosphorus from grasping clay, and producing enzymes that activate nutrient-cycling microbes or liberate the nutrient directly from the soil or leaf litter.“It’s a very productive forest, but it’s been adapted to really [efficiently] recycle those few nutrients that it has,” said Fleischer.However, these survival strategies have a cost: “Carbon is the currency that plants can use,” to succeed in multiple ways, Fleischer explains. In the Amazon’s case, plants must invest carbon to get sufficient phosphorus in return, but this trade off means that the plants “have less carbon to invest in [producing] wood,” she said.So, higher levels of atmospheric CO2 — a product of human-induced climate change — should theoretically offer plants sufficient carbon to extract phosphorus from the soil while also investing in more woody plant matter. But that’s only assuming there is enough phosphorus available in the soil to extract.In the computer study, models that allowed some flexibility in how plants balance this trade-off, demonstrated a moderate boost to plant growth under elevated atmospheric CO2 levels: The models generated a range of predictions for how much extra carbon would be stored in plant material under high-CO2 conditions, from an increase of just 5 grams per square meter per year all the way up to 140 grams.However, when compared to field records from the 2000s at the Manaus field site, the authors found that plant carbon sequestration increased by just 23 grams per square meter per year, suggesting that the more conservative models may be closest to the truth — at least for this particular patch of forest.Climbing carbon, fixed phosphorus: into the unknown“The key insight from this paper stems from the fact that the model results vary very widely,” said Neill, because each [computer] model approximates the cycling of phosphorous in different ways. This generates hypotheses that can be tested [on the ground] by the AmazonFACE experiment. “It’s a great use of models… to guide [field] experiments that lead to new insights.”“The crucial next step will be to conduct the FACE experiment, which will be the first stand level CO2 manipulation experiment in a hyper-diverse tropical forest, to see if the models are actually on track with reality,” agrees Cernusak. However, FACE experiments are expensive to set up, and AmazonFACE is currently seeking the remaining funding needed to begin the work.“We know so little about this place, how it works, how it evolved over millions of years, which species are where… how do they [interact] as a community? It’s so complex,” said Fleischer. Meanwhile, the historic Amazon forest is being rapidly altered by escalating climate change, along with other human disturbances. “We’re losing it in front of us without really having understood it,” she concluded.Citation:Fleischer, K., Rammig, A., De Kauwe, M. G., Walker, A. P., Domingues, T. F., Fuchslueger, L., … & Haverd, V. (2019). Amazon forest response to CO2 fertilization dependent on plant phosphorus acquisition. Nature Geoscience, 12(9), 736-741.Banner image caption: Scientists don’t know whether growth enhancements seen in temperate climates will also occur in the Amazon rainforest, where plant growth may be severely limited by low phosphorus availability in soils. Image by Ben Sutherland found on Flickr CC by 2.0d.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Amazon Conservation, Conservation, Controversial, Environment, Forests, Green, Rainforests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Antonio Donato Nobre: “The forest is sick and losing its carbon-sequestration capacity”

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon Mining, Amazon People, Amazon Soy, Cattle, Cattle Ranching, Conservation, Controversial, Corruption, Dams, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Featured, Flooding, Forests, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Mining, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation Article published by Xavier Bartaburucenter_img A researcher at the INPE Center of Land System Science, Antonio Donato Nobre, describes the state of degradation threatening the future of the Amazon rainforest in an exclusive interview with Mongabay.Nobre fears the forest is nearing what he describes as a “tipping point,” after which it will no longer be able to regenerate on its own, thus embarking on the path to desertification. “This is not about protecting the forest simply to please environmentalists. The living forest is essential for the survival of human civilization,” he says.In order to reverse the current state of destruction, Nobre proposes the development of a forest economy – capable, in his opinion, of generating nearly 20 times as much revenue as extensive cattle ranching. As an example, he cites the project Amazônia 4.0, which defends the use of technology for the sustainable exploration of biodiversity. “We are almost losing the inhabitability of the planet,” states Antonio Donato Nobre, who recently traveled to Altamira, in the state of Pará, to participate in the Amazon Center of the World conference. In November, at the so-called Terra do Meio, situated between the Xingu and Iriri Rivers, scientists and environmentalists met with indigenous and riverine peoples to create an alliance for the Amazon and, together, find a way out for the most important organ in the planet’s climatic metabolism.Nobre knows the Amazon well. The agronomist who holds a master’s degree in biology and a PhD in earth science lived in Manaus for 14 years and worked as a full researcher at the National Research Institute of the Amazon (INPA) for 33. In 2014, he published the report “The Future Climate of Amazonia,” which details the mechanisms by which the forest helps to regulate the atmosphere and proposes actions to avoid a climatic collapse.Five years after the publication of the report, this future appears particularly somber. According to Nobre, changes in the global climate and the Brazilian government’s hostility toward the Amazon could be driving the forest to the “tipping point” toward an irreversible path to desertification.Currently a researcher at the National Institute of Space Research (INPE), Nobre has also become an activist: soon after participating in the Amazon Center of the World conference, he went to Norway to talk with the Minister of the Climate and Environment about the Amazon Fund and evaluate the possibilities for their cooperation with Brazil.In this exclusive interview with Mongabay, he shares the news he took away from Altamira and Oslo and comments on the current scenario of environmental degradation that threatens the future of the Amazon Rainforest.Mongabay: Please tell us about your recent trip to Altamira for the Amazon Center of the World conference.Antonio Donato Nobre: It was very instructive, especially getting to know how the peoples of the forest protect the Amazon efficiently and lucratively. The Amazon is indeed the center of the world. It’s the most important organ in the climate’s system of metabolism, guaranteeing the stability and environmental comfort. In the Terra do Meio, a large part of the forest is in ruins. What remains is within the conservation areas, indigenous lands and the so-called Resex, which are reserves of sustainable extractivism, where the forest is in recuperation. But in that eastern portion of the Amazon, due to the deforestation and the degradation, the remaining forest may already be passing the tipping point.Are there visible signs of the tipping point?The native forests have a certain resilience to climatic adversities. But they do not have any capacity to resist chainsaws, tractors with chains or fires set on a large scale. These malicious inventions and their barbarous attacks create a real climate of definitive destruction. [In addition,] the air, previously always humid, has gotten progressively drier, making the forest flammable. The rains are arriving later and later each year and the carbon sequestration, previously accomplished by the forest, has diminished at the same time the mortality of large trees has increased. The people there in the region are fighting against climate change. The Brazil nut trees have a cycle: they produce more nuts one year, then produce less the next. But for a number of years now, production has plummeted due to the droughts. These losses have a connection with the change in the climate and testify to the degradation of the forest. Scientific studies published in recent years leave no doubt about the climatic change associated with the forest’s destruction.Preliminary numbers, recently announced about deforestation in the Amazon, referring to the period of August, 2018 to July, 2019, show an increase of 29.5% in relation to the previous year. The government is defending itself, but the deforestation rate in August 2019 grew 222% in relation to the same period in 2018. How do you see this situation?It’s a catastrophic situation! A large front of destruction was opened up this year, exacerbated by the actions of the federal government, whose rhetoric recruits  mainly land grabbers on the front lines of deforestation. These thieves invade public lands and conservation areas, they occupy, and later sell the land to cattle breeders. The cattlemen expand the deforestation and sell the areas to soybean farmers, who consolidate the devastation. It came to the point that the loggers planned the “Day of Fire” as a way of expressing their glowing thanks, visible from space, for the new policy for the Amazon.Since the beginning of the year there’s been a very clear manifestation of hostility from the authorities regarding the issue of the environment. The first sign that the new administration was going to stimulate deforestation came right at the beginning with the announcement: “we’re going to get rid of the fining industry.” But there was no such thing as the [environmental] fining industry, there was a serious work of control that resulted in a reduction of deforestation in past years, like from 2005 to 2012. This is not a mere interpretation: the official rhetoric, admitted by the man in charge as his new policy for the Amazon, has intensified the deforestation.Surprisingly, this rhetoric resembles a statement Lula made in 2003, early on in his first administration, when he said that the forest wasn’t a sanctuary and that his government was going to develop it. 2004 was one of the worst years for deforestation in history. Signs suggest that deforestation could be even higher in 2020. So, the ideology that comes out of the mouth of those in office directly influences what goes on in the forest.Illegal logging operation in the Amazon. The Pirititi Indigenous Territory in Roraima, May of 2018. Photo: Felipe Werneck/IbamaWhat’s the difference between that period and the present moment?Despite Lula’s ‘developmentalist’ rhetoric, his Minister of the Environment, Marina Silva managed to do extraordinary work with the PPCDAM [Plan of Action for the Prevention and Control of Deforestation in the Legal Amazon], which resulted in an acclaimed control of deforestation. Compare the respected minister with the current one. All the former ministers of the Environment have denounced the current minister as an enemy of the environment. In less than 12 months he accomplished the feat of undoing decades of hard work done by the respected Brazilian environmental protection system. As a consequence, the ongoing environmental destruction is unprecedented and threatens the climatic system with desertification.What is this desertification?In 2003 and 2004 the forest was already quite altered, but it still wasn’t near the point of no return. Recent studies show that the air over the eastern portion of the forest is drier. This means increased vulnerability to fire and higher tree mortality, and therefore a lower capacity for producing environmental services for the climate and lower resistance to climate change. The forest is sick and losing its carbon-sequestration capacity. Every year, the dry season is getting longer: in the past, the rain would start at the end of September. Now, in the middle of November, the rain still hasn’t started in much of the Amazon.In 2002, Carlos Nobre and Marcos Oyama conducted computational simulations of equilibrium between climate and vegetation and they discovered that, once it arrives at a certain limit, the remaining forest cannot resist the change in the climate, becoming more susceptible to fire. When the fire enters, the forest loses its humidity and it shifts more toward savannah conditions. Recent data shows that this process is already underway. If the process of ‘savannization’ comes to pass and the biotic pump (a theory that explains the forest as a potency that propels the canalized winds through aerial rivers, functioning like a heart of the biological cycle) stops functioning, the winds could change direction and, instead of blowing from the sea inland, start blowing from land out to sea. This is when desertification takes place. Regions like the Arabian Peninsula were once forest and now are deserts. This aridity is being produced now, with the artificial destruction of the forest.The above image translates 10 years of data on the photosynthesis of plants on all continents. Each pulsation represents a year of observation conducted by satellite. The chart reveals the vital importance of the forests in the equatorial region to the global climate’s functioning. Africa and Southeast Asia do merit attention, but the Amazon represents most of the carbon metabolism. Source: Professor Yadvinder Mahli’s laboratory at Oxford University in EnglandYou recently arrived from Norway. Is there any possibility of them resuming their commitment to the Amazon Fund?I talked with the Norwegian Minister of the Climate and Environment and they are concerned about the posture of the Brazilian government. Norway had put $US 1 billion into the Amazon Fund. Along with Germany, they were attending a solicitation that the Brazilian government itself made. This money was producing some very beneficial results, not only for the protection of the forest, but for the development of the local economy. The contract with these donating countries was based on efforts made by the Brazilian government to reduce deforestation. Deforestation is once again rising sharply and this violates the terms of the contract. So, coherently, they are holding onto the designated resources in order to send them to Brazil as soon as deforestation once again trends toward reduction.The report “The Future Climate of Amazonia,” which you published in 2014, described large belts producing grains and other agricultural commodities receiving rain-forming vapors from the Amazon rainforest, the so-called “aerial rivers.” What is the position of agribusiness in terms of the forest’s state of degradation? Some leaders have reacted. Senator Kátia Abreu, who was president of the National Confederation of Agriculture, led a strong opposition to scientists in 2010 and 2011 on the occasion of the change in the Forest Code. But she recently changed her position, and declared as much. Blairo Maggi, ex-governor of Mato Grosso, over 10 years ago he was given the Gold Chainsaw Award (by Greenpeace) for his actions encouraging deforestation. But this year even he came out against the new scorched-Earth policy for the Amazon.Several other voices from the agribusiness sector, which produces grains and meat, are quite alarmed. Many are concerned with losing markets because the world will inevitably complain about the loss of the Amazon. If we lose the Amazon, the Paris Accord will be irreparably compromised. We will no longer be able to afford to reach the goals because of the huge carbon emission and mainly because of the loss of services to the climate.We are not just making room for another farm. We are crippling the functioning of the planet’s body with major consequences for everyone, not just the Brazilian people. So, this is a very serious issue. What has most disturbed me throughout my nearly 40-year career in the Amazon was seeing the immense wealth of life and the opportunities for tracing respectful, intelligent paths get thrown into the trash. This is not about protecting the forest simply to please environmentalists. The living forest is essential for the survival of human civilization.Antonio Nobre in Norway in 2015, during the event promoted by the Minister of the Climate and the Environment (Reproduction/Personal Archive)What is this wealth we’re talking about?Recently, the work of some of my colleagues from the Federal University of Minas Gerais, led by Raoni Rajão and Britaldo Soares, showed that a hectare of preserved forest, considering assets and basic services alone, generates over US$ 700 per hectare (US$ 280 per acre) per year. The average production of extensive cattle ranching in the Amazon generates something like US$ 40 per hectare (US$ 16 per acre) per year. If we consider a longer list of assets and services provided by the forest, as Bob Constanza – one of the founders of the Ecological Economy area – did, this value exceeds US$ 5,000 per hectare (US$ 2,000) per year.Take the rain, for instance. Without rain, you have to irrigate. How much will it cost to set up irrigation? And if there were no water, the water from the sea has to be desalinated, as is done in arid countries. And what are we doing? By cutting everything down, setting it on fire and replacing it with an industry that produces US$ 40 per hectare (US$ 16 per acre) per year, which is the lean cattle industry to produce red meat, something the World Health Organization has categorized as carcinogenic.We continue on destroying the heart of the world, which produces all the services for the climate, and that includes services for agriculture. Once the Amazonian system starts to falter, and this is already starting to happen, the initial impact will fall precisely upon agribusiness, because there’s no such thing as agricultural production without rain, and only a preserved forest can bring rain.And what kind of opportunities does the preserved forest offer?The program Amazônia 4.0 (proposed by his brother Carlos Nobre) shows the potential of bringing technology into the forest, generating development and wealth for the peoples of the forest and making virtually miraculous products available to humanity.The açaí industry in the Amazon, for example, already moves US$ 1 billion per year. Soon enough it will surpass the meat industry. At Inpa (the National Institute of Amazon Studies), in the area of fruit trees, decades before açaí became so successful, the researcher Charles Clement cataloged the fruits of the Amazon that had commercial potential and were unknown outside the region. The total was a sum of 89 fruits. So, with açaí being just one single fruit and giving way to a billion-dollar industry, with another 89 fruits we have US$ 90 billion and we maintain the forest.Not to mention biomimetics, a revolution in technology that consists in looking at how nature solves problems. You take the wax that covers the leaf of a plant in the Amazon and which has properties similar to that of teflon. Nothing sticks to it. The paint industry is copying this wax. You paint a car or a house and they won’t ever get dirty. The dirt doesn’t stick. Let alone the medicine and all the cosmetics. The value of these technologies in nature is incalculable. It’s a universe of solutions, wealth and wonders.This story was first reported by Mongabay’s Brazil team and published here on our Brazil site on Dec. 13, 2019.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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Liberian Takes Charge of AFL’s 23rd Brigade HQ

first_imgThe Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL) last week moved closer to operational independence when a Liberian Lieutenant Colonel (Lt. Col.), Daniel Ziankahn assumed command of the 23rd Brigade situated at Edward Biyan Kessely Barracks, near Camp Schefflin, Margibi County.The Liberian took over command from a Nigerian Army officer, Colonel S.K. Adorkor, in a change-of-command ceremondy Monday.According to the a statement from the US Embassy in Monrovia, this change of command in the restructured AFL marks the first time that a Liberian officer has commanded the unit in four years.The change of command ceremony, the statement said, featured a passing of the colors, an official transfer of authority, and a display of the lineages of previous commanders. The assumption of brigade command by Lt Col. Ziankahn, who is described as one of the AFL’s best leaders, is a seminal event in Liberia’s progression toward fully commanding its own military.The United States and ECOWAS military mentors have conducted sustained military-to-military training engagements with the AFL to help them build a more professional and capable military force –one that will effectively contribute to the overall security environment and that is a “force for good” within Liberia. The restructuring of the AFL became necessary following the adaptation of the Comprehensive Accra Peace Accord in 2003 that finally put an end to 14-long years of civil strife. Since that time, the strength of the new AFL has been between 1,000 to 2,000; with some being placed on perpetual absence without official leave (AWOL), while some have also been dropped from the official list for various reasons ranging from “indiscipline to disorderly conduct” among others.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Health Crisis Forces Senatorial Election Postponement

first_imgThe health crisis in the country, caused by the Ebola virus disease, has forced the National Elections Commission (NEC) to recommend the postponement of the ensuing Special Senatorial Election.NEC is due to hold elections to replace or reelect 15 Senators that are within the first category of senators during the 2011 elections.Constitutionally, the electoral body is to conduct polling on the second Tuesday of October of this year, but the fear of the “deadly Ebola virus” constrains the Commission to consider requesting a deferment.In a meeting with aspirants Wednesday, NEC Chairman Jerome G. Korkoya said “The health emergency in Liberia may affect the conduct of free, fair, transparent and credible election on October 14, 2014.Chairman Korkoya said the Commission’s recommendation is also based on the fact that the Ebola outbreak would hinder the smooth conduct of campaign activities by candidates who are desirous of contesting the October 14, 2014 Special Senatorial Election.According to the chairman, the campaign period for the up-coming election is scheduled to commence on August 12; but the NEC is considering a call-off due to the national health crisis.“We want to make this clear that with the current health crisis in the country, NEC will not conduct a free, fair and creditable election for the people, so, we are contemplating on conducting the election by December,” Mr. Kokoya said.NEC does not have the power to suspend a constitutional process, Cllr. Korkoya said, “but the Commission would face problems in the process if continue, including training of over 25,000 polling staff to assist the conduct of election.”Taking the views of the aspirants, including current senators of the 53rd Legislature, many of them agreed with the idea of NEC but called on the NEC to use the Supreme Court of Liberia and advice from the health authority before any decision.According to Bong County’s Senator, Jewel Howard Taylor, it is important for the country to focus on combating the deadly Ebola virus and not campaigning amongst people who are dying from the epidemic.She further disclosed that the idea by NEC to suspend the October election was in right direction, as the election is not an event but a process especially the issue of training people to control election materials. “I don’t want to become a senator when my people are dying from a deadly disease,    were we continue to have new cases from other counties on a daily basis,” the senator asserted.One of the newly contestant of Montserrado County, Miatta Fahnbulleh, said, “We all want to be senators but not a dead one.  Our people are dying from the deadly Ebola virus. How are we going to the electorate with our promises if they are dying?” According to her, the international community,  including other partners, will not take Liberians seriously if Liberians will go to election with the national health crisis in the country.Maryland County’s senator  Bhofal Chamber said based on the situation in the country, it is reasonable to have this change carried out.“Who do we have election for if our people are dying from the virus; we want to ask for humanitarian assistance to be extended to other counties.”The lawmaker said  Government needed to have a decent burial for those who are dying from the virus, rather than have them cremated. “I cannot imagine, that, because it is against our culture.   Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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35th Meeting of the Board of Directors of CARICAD set for Wednesday

first_imgThe 35th Meeting of the Board of Directors of the Caribbean Centre for Development Administration (CARICAD) will be held at the Courtleigh Hotel in Kingston, Jamaica on Wednesday, June 27, 2018.CARICAD Executive Director Devon RoweUnder the theme “Re-shaping the Public Service in the Caribbean for the Future — The Role of CARICAD”, the board meeting will be preceded by a Board of Directors’ Forum on Tuesday, June 26.Topics which will be addressed at the forum include “Economic Performance in the Caribbean and the Challenge for Public Administration”, “Resilient Caribbean Development – The Role of the Public Sector”, and “Future of Caribbean Public Services: CARICAD and Member States Working Together for Success”.The board meeting the following day will consider the report from this forum as well as the report of CARICAD’s Executive Director, Devon Rowe. The current Chairperson of CARICAD’s Board of Directors is Mr. Alyson Forte, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of the Public Service in Barbados.Based in Bridgetown, CARICAD was established by a decision of the CARICOM Heads of Government, and is an institution of CARICOM under the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas. The organisation became fully operational in 1980.CARICAD is the region’s focal point for transforming and modernising public sectors of member states, to better formulate and implement public policy towards the achievement of sound governance. Its focus has been on shaping and enhancing the development and sustainability of strong governance and leadership structures.CARICAD’s work programme is financed by annual contributions from member governments and project funding from development partners. The organisation also receives policy direction through meetings of Ministers of the Public Service. Its Board of Directors comprises senior officials of the Ministries of the Public Service in member states.The institution is managed by Executive Director Devon Rowe, who is supported by a small team of technical experts and administrative personnel. Other specialist services are outsourced from time to time.Membership of CARICAD is open to CARICOM states and overseas territories within the Caribbean. Currently, there are 17 members of CARICAD. These are – Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, The British Virgin Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago and the Turks & Caicos Islands.last_img read more

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Sanchez will respect my decision, says Wenger

first_img“It is as simple as that.”Sanchez, 28, has been linked with a move away from Arsenal during the close season, with Manchester City and Paris Saint-Germain reported to be among his suitors.He was given an extended break after playing for Chile at the Confederations Cup in Russia and his return was delayed last weekend due to illness.Having eventually returned on Tuesday, he took part in an open training session at the Emirates Stadium on Thursday ahead of Sunday’s Community Shield showdown with Chelsea at Wembley.With Sanchez’s Arsenal contract set to expire next year, the speculation about his future will not go away, but Wenger refused to divulge information about the contract talks.“Every negotiation has to be a little bit secret,” Wenger said during a press conference.“The transparency of society is very pushy, but we have to resist a little bit, as much as we can.“We know as well we have a duty to inform people, but to talk about some things is not information any more — it is suicide.“I think he will be here this season and if we can do it for more seasons, we will do it as well.”Wenger said there was “nothing to announce” regarding the futures of Mesut Ozil, Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain, Jack Wilshere and Kieran Gibbs, who are also out of contract next year.But he did say that he expects Spanish striker Lucas Perez to leave after a frustrating debut season.Perez joined Arsenal from Deportivo La Coruna a year ago, but barely featured last season and now faces extra competition from star signing Alexandre Lacazette.Asked if Perez’s future lay elsewhere, Wenger replied: “Yes, because we have a congestion of strikers.“I don’t like to lose him because, for me, he’s a top-quality striker, but we have many strikers. At some stage, too much competition is not competition any more.“You cannot give the chance to everybody, so if he finds a satisfying solution at least for a short time, he will do it.”Sanchez, Wilshere and Shkodran Mustafi are all short of fitness, having only just returned to training.Francis Coquelin will definitely miss out against Chelsea after hurting his ankle in Arsenal’s friendly against Benfica, while Gabriel and Santi Cazorla are long-term absentees.But Lacazette and fellow new signing Sead Kolasinac are both expected to feature against the Premier League champions.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Alexis Sanchez has been linked with a move away from Arsenal during the close season © AFP/File / Adrian DENNISLONDON, United Kingdom, Aug 3 – Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger expects Alexis Sanchez to “respect” his decision not to allow the Chilean forward to leave the club, he said on Thursday.“I will not give anything away on (Sanchez), but the only thing I can tell you is that he is focused and my decision is clear: he will stay and he will respect that,” Wenger told reporters.last_img read more

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92,000 troops in next rotation to Iraq

first_img The troop rotation announcement identified only six combat brigades, including one from the National Guard, that will deploy over a two-year period beginning in mid-2006. Currently there are about 17 brigades in Iraq. Monday’s announcement did not include any Marine Corps units, although they apparently will be added later. The forces “as presently envisioned” number 92,000 soldiers, the Pentagon said. Rumsfeld, appearing before reporters with British Defense Minister John Reid prior to announcing the troop rotation details, stressed that conditions on the ground in the months ahead will determine any changes in U.S. force levels. “We’re aware of the interest in the press in the mid-to-longer-term levels of U.S. forces and coalition forces in Iraq, but I would caution that it would be a mistake to draw conclusions about such matters when reviewing the force rotation announcements that will be made later today,” Rumsfeld said. “We continue to transition and transfer additional responsibilities to the Iraqi security forces, and the people of Iraq continue to meet the political milestones that they have established,” he added. “As these and other conditions are met, Gen. (George) Casey will continue to assess the capabilities that he believes he will need and make recommendations as to the levels he believes will be needed in the period over the coming months.” The Pentagon said the following major units will deploy as part of the 2006-2008 rotation: 1st Brigade, 34th Infantry Division, Minnesota Army National Guard. 2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, Schweinfert, Germany. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, Fort Lewis, Wash. 3rd Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, N.C. 3rd Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. 2nd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Drum, N.Y. 13th Corps Support Command, Fort Hood, Texas. Division headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. The announcement said, without elaboration, that Rumsfeld’s decisions “may result in changes to this rotation and may affect units now being identified and advised to prepare to deploy.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WASHINGTON – The Pentagon announced that more than 92,000 troops will be in the next rotation of U.S. forces in Iraq, and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld said its exact size will not be decided until after the Dec. 15 election of a new Iraqi government. The Pentagon said it has identified some of the major combat units that will deploy, starting in mid-2006 as part of a rotation that will run through mid-2008, including a National Guard brigade from Minnesota. It said the identified units will total about 92,000 troops, but Rumsfeld said that should not be taken as the final figure. The usual troop level this year has been about 138,000, although that has been strengthened to about 160,000 this fall out of concern for extra violence during voting in October and December. The number deployed in future rotations will depend on conditions, including the severity of the insurgency and the strength of Iraqi security forces, as well as the recommendations of U.S. commanders, Rumsfeld said. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week “We know we’re going to bulk up for the elections, and we know we’re going to go back down to some level after the elections,” Rumsfeld said in a telephone call to The Associated Press. During the call, Rumsfeld complained that an AP report gave the mistaken impression that the Pentagon has already decided to reduce troop levels below 138,000 next year. Separately, a senior Army general said there is a growing momentum in the training of Iraqi security forces, which now total about 100,000 army soldiers and about 111,000 police forces. In a detailed briefing before a group organized by the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a think tank, Lt. Gen. David Petraeus said the goal is to have a combined total of 230,000 army and police by the December election. Petraeus left Iraq last summer after a year in command of training programs for the Iraqi security forces. His briefing charts said training and equipping of the Iraqi army should be done by January 2007, and by March 2007 for the Iraqi police services. The total number of forces is to reach 325,000 by July 2007. The Pentagon hopes to be able to reduce U.S. troop levels as Iraqi security forces become more capable of defending their own country, but it is unclear when that point will be reached. Officials also disclosed that U.S. commanders in Iraq decided they would not need one brigade – normally numbering about 3,500 soldiers, until early next year. It had been scheduled to deploy to Iraq before the Dec. 15 election. That unit, the 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, based at Fort Riley, Kan., will deploy after the election instead. last_img read more

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Daniel O’Donnell ‘superfan’ is jailed for her part in cocaine factory

first_imgA YOUNG woman who became an Internet sensation as Daniel O’Donnell’s No 1 ‘superfan’ was jailed for seven years for her role in high-tech cocaine extraction factory.Molly Sloyan (25) appeared before Cork Circuit Criminal Court on charges arising from a Garda raid on a cocaine extraction factory outside Bantry in west Cork last year. Judge Sean O’Donnabhain heard from Det Sgt Joanne O’Brien that cocaine was chemically implanted in clothing and fabric in South America.It was then shipped from Brazil to Ireland where, at a rented house in west Cork, special chemicals were used to wash the cocaine out of the fabric and thereby recover it.When Gardaí raided the Bantry property, which had been rented by Ms Sloyan, they found drug paraphernalia including masks and gloves as well as cocaine.Independent.ie reports that the cocaine was found to have a street value of more than €51,000.Ms Sloyan’s boyfriend, Sean McManus (37), was jailed for 12 years.Ms Sloyan is originally from Abbey Court, Kinsale, Cork but also has an address at Benidorm , Alicante, Spain where she moved from Ireland in 2015.Only Mr McManus had a relevant prior drugs conviction.All four had pleaded guilty to possession of drugs for sale or supply at Drumleigh, Bantry, Co Cork on November 26.The court was told that Ms Sloyan was like “a sixteen year old” and “infatuated with her new boyfriend (Mr McManus)” whom she had met at a promotional event in Spain.She was working at an Irish cafe in Benidorm at the time.However, Judge O’Donnabhain warned that the entire operation could not have taken place without Ms Sloyan’s involvement.“This is a most significant case. I have never come across anything like this ever before,” he said.The judge said the level of planning, sophistication and technical know-how involved in the specific drug enterprise was very significant.The court heard that the defendants had even a special WhatsApp video whereby instructions were offered on how to use the solvent to wash the cocaine out of the clothing and fabrics.“He (McManus), as far as I can see, had significant help in this operation from Ms Sloyan.”“She was fully involved in a material and significant level. She fully knew what was going on.”Ms Sloyan and Mr McManus briefly held hands as the sentencing was imposed.The young woman, who appeared in court wearing navy slacks, a navy jacket and light blue top, remained emotionless as she was jailed for seven years, briefly holding her hand to her face.Ms Sloyan was charged with the cocaine offence one year after a video of her in the audience of RTE’s The Late Late Show for a St Valentine’s Day special went viral.Viewers were captivated by her reaction to the fact the show featured a Daniel O’Donnell impersonation by comedian Mario Rosenstock rather than a song by the Donegal star himself.Video clips of the young woman’s expression in the audience switching from delight to horror when she realised that it wasn’t the real Daniel who would be performing went viral on the Internet.The Donegal singer eventually became aware of the Internet sensation and issued his own special video invitation to meet up with the young woman at one of his concerts.Mr O’Donnell eventually met up with Ms Sloyan in Kerry and she attended his sold-out show in the Killarney INEC in August 2016.The court was told that Ms Sloyan had “vulnerabilities” which were identified by a Limerick Prison psychologist.Judge O’Donnabhain said it was important she received a structured sentence and the support of the Probation and Welfare Service (PWS) on her release.All the sentences were backdated to November 26 last.Daniel O’Donnell ‘superfan’ is jailed for her part in cocaine factory was last modified: May 10th, 2018 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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