SHSU Survives Shootout, Eliminates South Dakota

first_imgTre Honshtein provided the Bearkats a boost in the fourth, nailing both field goals he attempted including a 28-yarder that stretched the lead the lead to nine points with 11:33 remaining. The junior hit again from 40 yards with 2:53 left as the advantage reached 54-42.Sam Houston ran off 27 second-quarter points, finding paydirt on four of five drives, while marching 70-plus yards on each. Davis started and capped the scoring on the frame with a 3-yard, end-around rush and 12-yard touchdown reception, respectively.The Bearkats led 41-14 at the half, totaling 468 yards at the midway point. Davis used a 44-yard catch and run to start the scoring on Sam Houston’s first drive. After the Coyotes knotted it up, the Kats responded with a 10-play, 87-yard drive, capped by a 13-yard pass and catch to Davis for the 14-7 advantage.The third quarter was not find the Sam Houston, however, as the Kats were limited to 28 total yards on 14 plays. South Dakota scored on its first two drives of the second half, cutting its deficit to 41-28. One play into the fourth, the Coyotes capped a 49-yard drive was capped by a two-yard rush, making it 41-35. Davion Davis accounted for four touchdowns, including three through the air, as Sam Houston racked up 708 yards of total offense, the third most in program history. In the process, the wideout Davis became Sam Houston’s leader in touchdown receptions with 30. Quarterback Jeremiah Briscoe completed 28 of 43 passes for 505 yards to seven different receivers, including eight catches for 131 yards to Davis.Nathan Stewart led the Sam Houston receiving corps with 180 yards alongside one score. Meanwhile, Corey Avery totaled 16 carries for 100 yards and two scores while Remus Bulmer picked up 82 yards on 13 carries. Both averaged 6.3 per carry.South Dakota (8-5), who entered the game ranked No. 2 in total offense in the country behind SHSU, stormed back, outscoring Sam Houston 14-0 in the third quarter. Much of that came thanks to 520 yards passing from quarterback Chris Streveler who completed 33 of 54 passes alongside five scores for the night. The shootout featured a combined 55 first downs and 1,345 yards including 1,025 passing.But late in the game, when the Bearkats needed it the most, it was the defense who stepped up. Khalil Welsh provided a key interception at Sam Houston’s 17-yard line, halting a 5-play, 58-yard Coyotes’ drive with Sam holding a 51-42 lead. Sam Houston also stopped South Dakota on a pair of fourth downs in the fourth quarter.Sam Houston State’s Kahlil Welsh with the bank-shot INT!!!SHSU 51, USD 42 – 4Q?? #FCSPlayoffs on ESPN3: https://t.co/mH2cX0MU60 pic.twitter.com/zpUN6nCzSy— FCS Football (@NCAA_FCS) December 2, 2017 HUNTSVILLE, Texas — It was not easy by any stretch. In the FCS Playoffs, however, the Bearkats will take it.Sixth-seeded Sam Houston State saw its four-touchdown halftime lead trimmed to two points early in the fourth quarter before responding with a 9-play, 75-yard drive and late field goal to defeat South Dakota, 54-42 in the second round of the playoffs on Saturday at Bowers Stadium.The victory, combined with a Kennesaw State upset of Jacksonville State, means Sam Houston (11-1) will host the Owls in the quarterfinals next weekend at Bowers Stadium. The win, which matched the most points for a playoff game in program history, moved the Bearkats to 12-0 all-time at the venue in the postseason.Briscoe’s arm is on FIRE!SHSU 34, USD 14 2Q?? #FCSPlayoffs on ESPN3: https://t.co/mH2cX0MU60 pic.twitter.com/M90YtI9CVY— FCS Football (@NCAA_FCS) December 2, 2017last_img read more

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Barras beat Dutch by 5 wickets

first_imgBy: Troy TauleResuming play at 2/66, the Barras managed to chase down the target of 305 after just 76.3 overs.An unbeaten 124 from veteran all-rounder Assad Vala steered the Barras to a historic win. Vala’s knock included a massive 13 fours.Vala was assisted by another veteran in Mahuru Dai who smashed 91 runs before being dismissed.Dai’s dismissal brought to the crease captain Jack Vare who pitched in with an unbeaten 11 runs to bring home the win.last_img

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PNG Men’s Basketball League to resume Round 2 games

first_imgThe games after round 1 had been called off by officials to give team’s time out to regroup and refocus for Round 2 battles. As for the second weekend games were called off due to a player’s death.However, the games for this weekend are set as the teams prepare for their round two battles after two weekends off.Moreover, the competition will also see a game to be played on Saturday night after negotiations to host Saturday night games at the Taurama Indoor Complex. The games will kick off this Saturday with a grand final match replay between KSS Flames and the MoniPlus Tamaraws.Then on Sunday afternoon, Chariots will take on West Jokers while Superior Coffee Saints will battle with MTSL Exodus.last_img read more

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Audio: Environmental justice and urban rat infestations

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Today we speak with Dawn Biehler, an associate professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, whose research focuses on the history and public health impacts of rats and other pest species in Baltimore.The issue of urban pests like rats in Baltimore has been in the news lately due to tweets sent by US President Donald Trump about the city being “rat and rodent infested.” Trump isn’t the first American politician to use this kind of rhetoric to target communities that are predominantly made up of people of color, while ignoring the fact that policies deliberately designed to marginalize communities of color are at the root of the pest problems in many cities.Biehler, who is also the author of the 2013 book Pests in the City: Flies, Bedbugs, Cockroaches, and Rats, joins us on this episode of the Mongabay Newscast to discuss how rat infestations in cities are actually an environmental justice issue and how they can be dealt with in an environmentally sustainable manner. Today we speak with Dawn Biehler, an associate professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, whose research focuses on the history and public health impacts of rats and other pest species in Baltimore.Listen here: Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Environment, environmental justice, Interviews, Pesticides, Podcast, Rodents, Urban Planning, Urbanization The issue of urban pests like rats in Baltimore has been in the news lately due to tweets sent by US President Donald Trump about the city being “rat and rodent infested.” Trump isn’t the first American politician to use this kind of rhetoric to demean communities that are predominantly made up of people of color while ignoring the fact that policies deliberately designed to marginalize communities of color are at the root of the pest problems in many cities.Unlike Trump, Dawn Biehler actually knows what she’s talking about when it comes to the root causes of rodent infestations in cities like Baltimore. She has just penned an op-ed in the Baltimore Sun newspaper that looks at how racial segregation and inequitable funding for urban housing and infrastructure contributes to rat infestations.Biehler, who is also the author of the 2013 book Pests in the City: Flies, Bedbugs, Cockroaches, and Rats, joins us on this episode of the Mongabay Newscast to discuss how rat infestations in cities are actually an environmental justice issue and how they can be dealt with in an environmentally sustainable manner.Here’s this episode’s top news:July 2019 was the hottest month ever recorded on EarthAs Amazon deforestation in Brazil rises, Bolsonaro administration attacks the messenger (commentary)In Indonesia, a court victory for Bali’s ban on single-use plasticsWould you like to hear how Mongabay grew out of its founder’s childhood adventures in rainforests and a fascination with frogs? Or how a Mongabay editor reacted to meeting one of the world’s last Bornean rhinos? We now offer Insider Content that delivers behind-the-scenes reporting and stories like these from our team. For a small monthly donation, you’ll get exclusive access and support our work in a new way. Visit mongabay.com/insider to learn more and join the growing community of Mongabay readers on the inside track.If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.The brown rat (Rattus norvegicus), also known as the common rat, street rat, sewer rat, Hanover rat, Norway rat, Norwegian rat, Parisian rat, water rat, or wharf rat, is one of the most common rats found in urban environments. Photo by Jean-Jacques Boujot, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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The Pan Borneo Highway brings wildlife threats to nat’l park doorstep

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannon Animals, Anti-poaching, Biodiversity, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forest Fragmentation, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Fragmentation, Freshwater Ecosystems, freshwater turtles, Green, Hunting, Illegal Logging, Infrastructure, Logging, logging roads, Monkeys, National Parks, Parks, Poaching, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Roads, Saving Rainforests, Sea Turtles, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Tropical Forests, Turtles, Turtles And Tortoises, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade center_img The southern terminus of the Pan Borneo Highway in Malaysia extends to the edge of Tanjung Datu National Park in Sarawak.The highway’s proponents say the road is already bringing more tourists who are eager to see the park’s wildlife to the adjacent communities, helping to boost the local economy.But one of the world’s rarest primates, the Bornean banded langur, resides in the park, raising concerns in the conservation community that increased access could bring poachers into the park. This is the second article in our six-part series “Traveling the Pan Borneo Highway.” Read Part One.TELOK SERABANG, Malaysia — At the westernmost tip of Borneo sits a dense pocket of mountainous forest, the likes of which have grown rarer in the Malaysian state of Sarawak. Logging and oil palm interests have jigsawed the state’s once-unbroken green canopy into a patchwork of brown earth and slivers of forest clinging to survival. Yet, perhaps improbably, rich, old-growth forests survive here, and within them an explosion of wildlife on this promontory shared with neighboring Indonesia.Tiny Tanjung Datu National Park and the adjacent Semunsam Wildlife Sanctuary are home to critically endangered painted terrapins (Batagur borneoensis), green and hawksbill sea turtles, and six species of primate, including the critically endangered Bornean banded langur (Presbytis chrysomelas), found in only a few other places on the island.Female, top, and male Bornean banded langurs. Image by H. Schlegel via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain).The recent arrival of the Pan Borneo Highway in 2019 has meant seismic changes for all life in this corner of Borneo. It has brought more tourists to the area, according to my guide, Minhad Fauzan. Meanwhile, the residents of his village, Telok Serabang, and neighboring Telok Melano, where the official “Kilometer 0.00” of Sarawak’s Pan Borneo Highway sits, have capitalized. Homestays and small kedai kopi cafes offering noodles and rice along with iced coffee have popped up all around.But Minhad also worries about what the increased access to this formerly remote corner of Borneo will mean. A self-described conservationist, he and others living near the national park have repurposed their fishing boats, shuttling visitors to see nesting sea turtles on Tanjung Datu’s pristine beaches, to trek into the forests of the national park for a chance glimpse of a langur or a gibbon, and to snorkel with the swarms of “Nemos” (anemonefish) that swarm just offshore.A blue-eyed angle-headed lizard (Gonocephalus liogaster) in Sarawak’s Tanjung Datu National Park. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.The worry among conservationists is that the highway’s arrival could also mean more hunting and poaching, as many communities in the area have long relied on meat from the forest and turtle eggs for a kick of protein in their diets. Minhad, too, grew up eating turtle eggs, often adding them to his coffee in an area conspicuously devoid of milk-bearing livestock.Before the roughly 30-kilometer (19-mile) stretch of road connected Telok Melano with the workaday town of Sematan, getting to Melano or Serabang typically required an hour-long motorboat trip (or daylong paddle) through the sometimes-choppy South China Sea. The alternative was a sweltering hike through the swampy forest — by Minhad’s estimation both a deterrent and a boon for poachers. That remoteness meant that hunters and poachers going after small game like deer, monkeys and gibbons could stalk the dense forest with little worry of being discovered by rangers. Similarly, egg collectors could track the region’s turtles and terrapins unperturbed.A sign marks the southern terminus of the Pan Borneo Highway in the village of Telok Melano. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.But Minhad says he’s optimistic the road will make it easier for forestry personnel to patrol the area and look out for poachers. His views — and his diet — have changed. He now sees himself as a protector of the sea turtles and their terrapin cousins that visit the area’s beaches to lay their eggs.As a former elected headman of Serabang, Minhad is a leader in the community, and he says he’s embarked on a campaign to “win the hearts and minds of the people.” He argues that wildlife, through the tourism dollars the animals draw, is more valuable alive than dead.Convincing people is a challenge, because “these are my friends,” he says, and egg collecting is a hard habit to break. He concedes that sometimes the best he can do is convince them to take just some, rather than all, of the eggs they find.Residents of the villages near Tanjung Datu National Park have built homestays to accommodate the rising number of tourists since the road was built in early 2019. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Scientists and conservationists from outside seem mostly concerned with the future of the Bornean banded langur. Already one of the world’s rarest primates, the critically endangered monkey now occupies less than 5 percent of the boggy peatlands and lowland forests it once inhabited, according to the IUCN. Now, the highway has wedged its way into their territory, potentially separating a cadre of family groups living where the wildlife sanctuary and the national park intersect.Minhad watches for langurs on his daily training runs into the hills around Serabang, and he thinks that they can cross the new rubber plantation that’s just popped up on one of the hillsides between the park and the wildlife sanctuary. Canopy-dwelling primates in the area, like the langurs, gibbons and proboscis monkeys, haven’t yet descended from the treetops to cross the road, at least to his knowledge, but they like the young rubber shoots that sprout on the tops of growing rubber trees.Oil palm planted within the boundary of the Samunsam Wildlife Sanctuary. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Whether agriculture will stop cropping up on the approach to the national park boundary isn’t clear. A mature rubber crop might provide a surrogate home for high-climbing monkeys. But in the early stages of growth, fledgling oil palm or rubber plantations are mostly exposed earth with wispy saplings pushing up through the soil. Along the road from Sematan, there’s a sign demarcating the edge of the wildlife sanctuary, a legally protected area meant to be set aside just for wildlife.And yet the rows of oil palms that flank the road before the sign continue well beyond it — planted by “accident,” Minhad said. The scale of the plantation suggests otherwise, as the planted rows cover a significant sweep of the view to the horizon.Further along the road toward the national park, just beyond the would-be oil palm plantation, a façade of forest returns. But behind it, charred stumps and vegetation still smolder, the result of a fire probably set by hopeful hunters. Within a few days, Minhad explains, the green sprouts that burst through the soil will be irresistible for samba and mouse deer, luring them out into the open where they’re easy prey.The highway bridge over the Samunsam River. Planners agreed to extend the bridge’s length to allow the passage underneath of wildlife between the forest and the mouth of the river, which opens into the South China Sea. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.From a construction standpoint, the Ministry of Works holds this stretch of highway up as an example of the compromises that are possible. The road is only two lanes across, not four, so it follows a narrower path through the delicate mangroves. And the bridge over the Samunsam River was extended to allow for the passage of wildlife underneath. It’s a small concession that may allow animals like painted terrapins to travel from their freshwater homes to the beaches at the river’s mouth to lay their eggs, thereby linking the inland and coastal environment.In this microcosm of the impacts of a road balanced with the needs of conservation, the short-term benefits for Serabang and Melano’s residents are hard to refute: shorter travels times, better access to goods and health care, and an economic boost in the form of more visitors. But the highway has also undeniably brought with it changes to the landscape.Minhad knows that the easier access that he and his neighbors enjoy is likely to be exploited by more than just wildlife rangers. And the hunters it brings could come after more than just the relatively numerous deer. Of still greater concern are rumors that the highway, which currently dead-ends into a traffic circle near the edge of Tanjung Datu, could be extended further into the park. However, Mongabay confirmed with Malaysia’s Ministry of Works that the federal government currently has no plans to push on further.The forests of Tanjung Datu National Park viewed from the sea. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.For now, Minhad said he would continue his work protecting the animals he can and talking to the people who might threaten them. The irony that the road, meant to bring tourism, might also help eradicate its foundations isn’t lost on him.As he tells would-be hunters and poachers, “You kill this animal, we lose our product.”A map created with Datawrapper shows the approach of the Pan Borneo Highway to Tanjung Datu National Park. Image by Willie Shubert/Mongabay.Continue to Part Three.Banner image of a stretch of the Pan Borneo Highway in southern Sarawak by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonCitations:Asian Turtle Trade Working Group. (2000). Batagur borneoensis (errata version published in 2016). The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2000.RLTS.T163458A5608163.enNijman, V., Hon, J. & Richardson, M. (2008). Presbytis chrysomelas. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. doi:https://doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2008.RLTS.T39803A10268236.enFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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Beneficial and harmful fungi are at the root of forest diversity

first_imgBiodiversity, Forests, Fungi, Rainforest Biodiversity, Symbiotic Relationships, Trees, UCSC If there are many trees of a given species in a tract of forest, a new tree of that same species has a harder time thriving in the same area.This “rare-species advantage” produces diversity in forests.In a Chinese subtropical forest, researchers showed that the balance between beneficial and harmful soil fungi controls the rare-species advantage.This study provides the first look into the mechanism behind the strength of the rare-species advantage and adds to an understanding of how all forests develop. A delicate balance between beneficial and harmful soil fungi associated with tree roots guides the diverse mixture of tree species that thrive in subtropical forests, according to a new study.Scientists had previously hypothesized that forest diversity resulted from a “rare-species advantage” driven by pathogenic, or harmful, fungi. The more trees there were in an area, the more quickly such fungi would accumulate on tree roots, the common model claimed. This would create a deadlier environment for new seedlings.Now, new research suggests that beneficial fungi are closely involved as well. A Chinese-led team recently reported in Science that symbiotic fungi, which associate tightly with roots and help trees by exchanging nutrients, alter the rate that pathogenic fungi accumulate in the soil. This fungal give-and-take is critical in determining which trees grow most successfully in forest plots, the team showed.View overlooking the forest in Gutianshan National Nature Reserve. Photo courtesy of Lei Chen.“Species differ in their sensitivity to having their own kind around,” said Nathan Swenson, a forest ecologist at the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland, and a co-author of the study. “That sensitivity itself is related to the types of positive associations they have with fungi in the soil.”To unveil these partnerships, a team led by Lei Chen, a forest ecologist at the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, studied a subtropical forest plot in Gutianshan National Nature Reserve in Zhejiang Province, China. The researchers collected and analyzed soils from the roots of 322 trees, representing 34 species. They isolated DNA from the samples and used genetic sequencing to identify the species of fungi near the roots of each tree.In addition to soil collection, the researchers tracked the number and sizes of seedlings, saplings and adult trees in the plot over nearly a decade, logging more than 25,000 measurements.The subtropical plot measured 0.24 square kilometers (0.093 square miles). “This is a relatively small area that’s like half of a golf course,” said Daniel Johnson, a forest ecologist at the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, who was not part of the study. “But what they did was look at the entire community of the forest and quantified how the fungi were associating with the trees. They’ve done something on a scale that no one’s ever done before.”Researchers taking a break between experiments in Gutianshan National Nature Reserve. Photo courtesy of Lei Chen.The researchers found that larger trees had a higher concentration of pathogenic fungi than smaller trees. This finding agrees with earlier hypotheses for the rare-species advantage, which posited that older trees would create a deadlier environment for younger seedlings and saplings nearby.The amount of pathogenic fungi was lower around trees that interacted with helpful ectomycorrhizal fungi, which coat the surfaces of roots and exchange nutrients via the soil. In contrast, pathogenic fungi were more common around trees that interacted with a different type of symbiotic fungi, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, that tunnel into tree roots and exchange nutrients directly with the roots, bypassing the soil.The researchers developed mathematical models for which trees survived over a decade in their plot. Tree species with more ectomycorrhizal fungi also had higher-than-average survival rates; this corresponds with a weaker rare-species advantage. On the other hand, tree species with more arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi had lower-than-average survival rates; this corresponds with a stronger rare-species advantage.These findings support a model where symbiotic fungi regulate how pathogenic fungi build up around tree roots. The researchers hypothesize that the root-coating fungi might form a protective barrier that keeps out harmful fungal invaders. In contrast, the root-tunneling fungi create tiny entry points that pathogenic fungi can use to get in.This work extends previous studies, based on tropical forests, that only included pathogenic fungi in a mechanism for the rare-species advantage, said Chen. “There are tropical forests, subtropical forests, and temperate forests,” he said. “So actually, we ecologists want to know a general pattern that can explain all forests.”A canopy crane in the forest in Gutianshan National Nature Reserve. Photo courtesy of Lei Chen.CitationChen, L., Swenson, N.G., Ji, N., Mi, X., Ren, H., Guo, L., Ma, K. (2019) Differential soil fungus accumulation and density dependence of trees in a subtropical forest. Science 366 (6461) 124-128; DOI: 10.1126/science.aau1361Jack J. Lee (@jackjlee) is a graduate student in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Other Mongabay stories produced by UCSC students can be found at https://news.mongabay.com/list/ucsc/. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Rhett Butlerlast_img read more

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Altas’ Prince Eze officially named NCAA Season 94 MVP

first_imgPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netThe jeers rained down on Prince Eze as he collected the MVP award on Monday before Game 2 of the NCAA Season 94 men’s basketball Finals at Mall of Asia Arena.The boos from the Lyceum gallery, however, won’t deter the fact that Eze deserved the plum after leading University of Perpetual Help back to the Final Four.ADVERTISEMENT Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew MOST READ Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title LATEST STORIES The 6-foot-10 Nigerian also bagged the Defensive Player of the Year award.Meanwhile, Letran’s Larry Muyang was named Rookie of the Year while Arellano University’s Archie Concepcion won Most Improved Player. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plumcenter_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View comments The Nigerian big man had a dominating season where he averaged 17.9 points, 16.3 rebounds and 3.3 blocks to garner 61.39 Player All-Around Value (PAV) Points.Letran’s Bong Quinto was a distant second with a total of 48.83 PAV, San Beda’s Robert Bolick came in third with 48.39 while teammates Javee Mocon (47.89) and Donald Tankoua (46.56) finished fourth and fifth, respectively.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissLyceum’s CJ Perez was ineligible to win any individual award after getting suspended due to his failure to notify the league that he had entered the PBA Draft. Perez, who won the MVP last season, served his suspension last Tuesday in Game 1 of the finals.Eze would’ve still won the MVP had Perez was eligible. Japanese runner finishes race by crawling with broken leg Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity.last_img read more

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Child Labor on the Rise

first_imgThe Coordinator of the Division of Child Labor at the Ministry of Labor, Patience S. Heah, has said the unavailability of budgetary allocation to implement programs to tackle child labor, is a major contributor to increased child Labor in Liberia.Madam Heah named the low capacity of social partners due to a lack of technical support and logistic, limited commitment of stakeholders and the lack of coordination among them as some of the other factors.She defined child labor as “work undertaken by children under the minimum working age as stipulated in national legislation in accordance with the ILO Convention 138 .”She made the statement Thursday, February 27, at the opening of a two-day interactive workshop for media professionals.The workshop, under the theme: “Reporting Children’s issue and Consequences of Child Labor and Abuse,” was held at the Monrovia Christian Fellowship Hall in Monrovia.Madam Heah stated that child labor instances are rampant across the country and that they primarily exist in the mining, agricultural, and informal sectors.  She said that children are also used for illicit activities such as promotion of criminal activities and smuggling of narcotic substances.Discussing how the ministry would enforce the fight against child labor, Ms. Heah explained that the Labor Ministry is prepared to fight against child labor in the country:  “We are going to work hard in fighting against child labor and make sure the children are taken off the streets. This task is difficult because there would be no proper care given to these children due to insufficient support from parents and guardians. In spite of this, we will continue to work towards solving the problem.”She defined a child as any person below the age of 18 years in accordance with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the child (UNCRC) and the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of a child. It is also in line with ECOWAS child policy.Making reference to the ILO convention 182 she said, “Liberia ratified the ILO Convention 182 in June 2003, but is yet to ratify Convention 138. The knowledge base on child labor in Liberia is relatively weak and grass roots commitment to reduce child labor is poor.”Child Labor is viewed by many as something only taking place outside a child’s home, while the description and analysis of the incidence and nature of child labor in Liberia draws on data collected under the 2010 Labor Force Survey (LFS) as its main source.“The absence of a general prohibition of work is likely to harm the health, safety, and morals of children less than 18 years, as is the absence of a clear enforceable list which defines these types of work,” Ms. Heah concluded.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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50,000 jobs are justifiable, Irfaan is standing on solid ground

first_imgDear Editor,Please permit me to respond to an article entitled “Irfaan Ali has selected two of the worst planks on which to walk”, which was published in a section of the media on April 8, 2019. In the letter, the writer raised a valid point on the possibility of the creation of 50,000 new jobs. However, I beg to differ that such a figure is no nowhere close to an exaggeration. First, I would like to remind the writer that it is of public knowledge that the APNU/AFC Government, since taking office, is responsible for the extirpation of over 30,000 jobs. And in the interest of refreshing the minds of our readers, the composition of such a figure includes the direct dismissal of over 7000 sugar workers, 1974 Amerindian CSOs, hundreds of miners and loggers, and even some of our public servants. Indirectly, when accounted for the spinoff effect, the total number of jobs lost easily exceeds the 30,000 estimates. And note also, this figure was also cited in the 2014-17 Global Human Capital Index Report on Guyana.Reinstating 30,000 JobsHence, these jobs could be easily reinstated with a few policy adjustments such as repeal all 200 tax measures, re-opening of the sugar industries, tax optimisation, expansion of the housing drive, FD special incentives, and other forms of quantitative easing such as increased liquidation of our commercial banks. Essentially, the 30,000 job losses could be reinstated by simply remedying all incoherent policies implemented by the APNU/AFC Government. In the interest of space, I will not dwell on the corollaries of such policies and since it is also well articulated in the media. Now, before I examine the origin of the remaining 20,000 jobs, I would first like to shed some light on our economy.Job losses and deteriorating economyOverall, the impact of the 30,000 job losses is evident in the deterioration of our economic structure. Starting with the manufacturing sector, in the 2018 mid-year report, it has been reported that our manufacturing sector contracted by over 3.7 per cent or $23.6 billion. What this tells us is that our value-added production is on the decline. And given the composition of our manufacturing sector, we are essentially referring here to the rice millers, sugar estates, lumber yards etc, industries that are directly engaged in the production of value-added. Hence, it now becomes clear that since the output level of the manufacturing sector is on the decline in tandem with its share of total employment, then inevitably, our economy is actually deindustrialising, an outcome that would see Guyana losing out on the opportunity of using manufacturing as an “engine of growth”. Now, given our soon to be oil-driven economy, such predisposition could become one of our greatest impediments towards a mature and successful service-driven economy. In the long run, our economic structure could further deteriorate since a relatively small and weak manufacturing sector will become prone to crowding out. The theory in short and is as follows: increased spending in the non-tradable sector (service) would lead to an appreciation of value relative to the tradable sector (manufacturing). As prices increase, such as wages, under the assumption that the elasticity of labour substitution is less than unity, workers would move to the non-tradable sector. In layman terms, we could see, for eg, a labour choosing to drive taxi over cultivating rice. In the long run, our over-reliance will increase on oil in tandem with the import of foodstuff.Apropos to our balance of payment at the end of 2018, a deficit in excess of US$189 million or 239 per cent has been recorded when compared to 2017, in tandem with US$463 million or 97 per cent more when compared to 2017. Such an outcome has been furthered exacerbated by the mere fact that in excess of US$104 million was utilised from our Net Foreign Reserve in 2018 to service our debts, taking the revised balance to a mere US$240 million or 40 per cent less when compared to 2014. Other noticeable declines, when compared to 2017, include that of export by more than US$48 million and public enterprises and Bank of Guyana revenue by more than $3.3 billion and $1.8 billion respectively. There is a slew of other indicators that could be provided but in the interest of space, I will also stick to the aforementioned. Hence, essentially what is being conveyed is that there is ample evidence of gross underperformance of our economy. And given our existing economic trajectory, our oil windfall might be more of a curse than a blessing. In order to mitigate such, urgent steps must be taken in order to remedy our existing economic framework. An outcome that is not impossible, but requires fiscal discipline, which unfortunately this Administration doesn’t seem to possess.Getting to 50,000 jobsThe other part that I would like to quickly touch on, is how the remaining 20,000 jobs will be created. To understand how such a plan would unfold, I would like to bring to your attention a few areas of wasteful spending. First, the combined increase of the 2019 recurrent expenditure is more than $19 billion. In other words, expenditure on drugs, rental of buildings, security, celebration etc in 2019 is expected to increase by $19 billion. Moreover, our traditional sectors such as rice, sugar, bauxite, gold and forestry, since 2014 we have lost in excess of $58 billion or 13 per cent of our 2019 GDP when adjusted for inflation. What this means is that in addition to gross underperformance, there is a lot of economic slack within our economy. Essentially, a large share of our resources, both human and capital, lay idle. Now, if you look at the amount of revenue we have lost, and note, I have conveniently omitted to account for the increase in taxation, the figure easily surpasses $78 billion. That is additional funds we could easily amass by simply pursuing the coherent policies. And note, our economy could accommodate a massive increase in expenditure without fear of overheating because of the existing economic slack. Macroeconomic prudential coupled with strategic investments and policies geared at enticing private investment and consumption are more than capable of delivering in excess of 20,000 jobs. The housing drive alone, which is one of Irfaan’s specialties, will deliver a sizable amount of jobs. This has been done and is well within the grasp of re-executing. In relation to foreign direct investment, it is public knowledge that the PPP had plans, as enshrined in their 2015 manifesto, to set up a free-trade zone, and undertake massive infrastructural and transformational projects such as the Linden/Lethem road and the speciality hospital project. In the business sector cheap credit, which again could be easily attained by simply increasing GoG deposits in our commercial banks, investment and expansion could further be spurred. Such an outcome would favour our business sector, and business once again would flourish in tandem with disposable income from the creation of the new jobs. Hence, given the massive level of underemployment and idle capital, which is an indisputable claim, Guyana is capable to absorb a huge increase in investment. And note, we are yet to account for the oil windfall and astute local content policy that would ensure our nation fully benefits from its oil endowment. Thus, the forward and backward linkages that would ensue, including the spillover effect to other industries and sectors, will push the number of jobs well above 50,000! It is a pity that a majority of us are still oblivious, I would like to assume, of this vision.Sincerely,Timothy Issacslast_img read more

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The Ministry of Citizenship needs guidance

first_imgDear Editor,The recent actions of the Ministry of Citizenship are appalling at best. The Ministry has already created a homestead, which they should not have done in the first place, for a group of Venezuelans in Essequibo.Thus, strengthening their claim on Essequibo while we are in the middle of a dispute in the world court. What’s next? Will this Ministry also issue the Venezuelan ID cards on behalf of the Maduro Government? In our recent history, Maduro was attempting to issue over 200,000 ID cards in Essequibo.This poorly directed Ministry is now in the process of relocating Venezuelan migrants who have been squatting on the riverbank to a “permanent” location on an old military training base. Not the same “homestead” location, but yet another location where they can stake another claim on our territory.The action of this Ministry speaks to the level of short-sightedness and lack of consideration for the gravity of our nation’s current border controversy. It is hard to believe that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs is aligned with the current actions being undertaken by the Ministry of Citizenship.If some of these Venezuelan migrants turn out to be military operatives from Venezuela who are posing to be destitute, our Ministry of Citizenship would have single-handedly enabled the Venezuelan military in infiltrating our nation’s defence system while giving our declared enemy more than one foothold in the event of a war.Yes, I said War! This was a very present reality for those of us who grew up in the 1980s. Some of our citizens can remember when our country lost half of Ankoko Island in the 1960s via occupation as it is occurring today. This was followed by military action and to date, Guyana has been unsuccessful in recovering this lost territory.I remember to this day having a long discussion with a military officer who participated in the Ankoko military engagement under President Burnham. He simply said that they were outgunned. As a nation, we should also remember how the Venezuelan Government had supported a plan for secession in the Rupununi around the same time. The GDF had to be called in and eventually were successful in regaining control.The current situation of our dispute and the independent-mindedness of Maduro should not be taken lightly. The cry of the 1980s “not a blade of grass” has now turned into anything you want you can get. Our nation’s military needs to take charge of this situation and round up all Venezuelan migrants. Transport them to Ankoko Island and release them to the half of the island that was stolen by the Venezuelan military and their Venezuelan citizens.Stop allowing them to scout our land for potential invasion, do not allow them to assess our military training methods and do not let them forage on our resources. We have many mouths to feed including the unemployed sugar workers and our efforts are best served in strengthening our own citizens. Do not willingly deplete our resources to strengthen our declared enemy.Otherwise, how are we Guyanese to continue to trust our current leadership with our nation’s independence when such shortsighted actions are being taken. Not only has this Ministry’s actions undermined our nation’s efforts to secure our territory, but they have also gone a step further and offered them an old military installation which can be converted into a paramilitary base for the Venezuelans during a war. Where are the military strategists in the GDF? This nonsense has to be reeled in and done so quickly before it gets further out of control. Maduro has shown his resistance to the USA and his Russian allies have also shown their willingness to support his Administration. If we continue down this current path, we may either be the spark that causes a war in the event of a favourable court ruling, or we may be collateral damage in the event the USA moves from economic embargoes to military action.Our Government is currently having trouble stopping accidents on the road and has struggled to reel in the criminal activity of those on bicycles. We should not take the Venezuelan criminal organisation of the syndicato and Venezuelan military operatives lightly.Those two organisations may be one and the same or at least with significant overlap as seen in other parts of the world. The Ministry of Citizenship needs to wake up from its utopian dream and get back to the reality of our nation’s territorial dispute. The President can no longer afford to delegate this important issue and a coordinated effort has to taken to prevent further infiltration while correcting the current situation.Best regards,Jamil Changleelast_img read more

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