Ohio State Insider Comments On Urban Meyer’s Future

first_imgA closeup of Urban Meyer during an Ohio State football game.NEW ORLEANS, LA – JANUARY 01: Head coach Urban Meyer of the Ohio State Buckeyes looks on prior to the All State Sugar Bowl against the Alabama Crimson Tide at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome on January 1, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)Over the past few weeks, Urban Meyer has fielded questions about his health and potential future as the head coach of the Ohio State Buckeyes. Following his health scare against Indiana earlier this season, Meyer revealed he’s dealing with a cyst that leads to severe headaches.When asked if he plans to continue on as the head coach of the Buckeyes, Meyer has remained adamant that he wants to coach. However, one Ohio State insider is questioning that desire.Earlier this week, 247Sports editor Dave Biddle asked Meyer about his future with the program and came away with more questions than answers.Here’s what Biddle had to say about the situation.“When I asked him earlier this week if he wants to respond to all of the rumors out there that he’s going to retire after this year, he said simply, ‘I plan on coaching.’ I was almost shocked that he didn’t have a more forceful denial. Then I asked him to follow up. Can you say definitively that you’ll be coaching at Ohio State? He said yes. You might take him at his word.Just the way he answered that question gives me some doubts. If you’re a Buckeye fan out there and you’re curious, I think there’s now at least a chance that Urban Meyer is strongly considering walking away after this season. If I had to guess right now, I do think he’ll be back in 2019, but the way he answered the questions earlier this week really gave me pause.”Ohio State came in as the nation’s No. 10 team in the first College Football Playoff rankings released on Tuesday night. The Buckeyes will have a chance to fight their way back into the College Football Playoff race if the team can take care of business in the Big Ten.A huge matchup with Michigan looms at the end of the regular season. This weekend Ohio State hosts Nebraska.As for Meyer’s future beyond this season, the questions will continue.[247Sports]last_img read more

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European satellite to crash to earth this weekend

first_imgFRAGMENTS FROM A science satellite are likely to crash to Earth late Sunday or early Monday after the one-tonne probe breaks up at the end of its mission, the European Space Agency (ESA) said on Friday.In a statement, the agency said when and where the pieces would land was still unclear.Experts have previously said the statistical risk to humans is remote.Several dozen fragments totalling around 200 kilos, or about the weight of car engine, will survive contact with the atmosphere, according to computer models.MissionThe Gravity Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite was placed in orbit in 2009 on a mission to monitor variations in gravity and sea levels.The sleek, finned craft ran out of fuel on October 21, leaving it without power to maintain its altitude in low orbit, where there are still lingering molecules of air.“Reentry of GOCE into Earth’s atmosphere is predicted to occur during the night between Sunday and Monday,” ESA said on Friday.“Break-up of the spacecraft will occur at an altitude of approximately 80 km. At the moment, the exact time and location of where the fragments will land cannot be foreseen.”GOCE was launched in March 2009 at an altitude of 260 kilometres – later lowered to 224 km – the lowest ever for a research satellite.The €350 million mission has lasted twice as long as its initially-scheduled 20 months.Chances of a human being hitAccording to ESA spacecraft operations manager Christoph Steiger, most of the 5.3-metre-long  spacecraft will burn up.The chances of a human being hit were about 65,000 times lower than getting struck by lightning, he said in October.In more than half a century of spaceflight, there have been no casualties from man-made space debris, despite about 20-40 tonnes impacting somewhere on Earth each year, Steiger said.GOCE was designed and built before 2008, when international recommendations were adopted that a scientific satellite must be able to execute a controlled reentry, or burn up completely after its mission.- © AFP 2013.Read: Asteroid to pass Earth at ‘remarkably close distance’>Read: Dublin start-up wins at European Space Agency technology awards>last_img read more

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