Virat Kohli opens up on absence from Asia Cup 2018: Definitely needed the break

first_imgVirat Kohli’s absence from the Asia Cup 2018 was met with mixed opinions from cricket pundits and fans but on Wednesday, the Indian captain himself cleared the air on the issue saying that he “definitely needed the break”.Kohli was rested for the Asia Cup which India won for the seventh time under Rohit Sharma’s captaincy after going unbeaten in the tournament.Kohli joined the team ahead of the two-match Test series against the West Indies which starts from Thursday in Rajkot. On the eve of the first game, the 29-year-old spoke at length about his absence and actually prompted him to take this short break.Virat Kohli looks at the future as India gear up for West Indies”I feel rejuvenated. It was both mental and physical because of the intensity at which the two tours in South Africa and England went,” the world’s top-ranked Test batsman said.”People usually talk about workloads but they don’t usually understand the concept. They refer to workload as number of games played. There is no workload if you make zero in every game. If I bat for six hours that is workload.India vs West Indies: Prithvi Shaw to debut in 1st Test as India announce 12-man team”I definitely needed the break as my back went once in South Africa and again in England. These things are very important to consider… to give players ample rest and opportunity to train well and come back stronger. You don’t want guys breaking down in very important series,” Kohli added.advertisementCaptain @imVkohli looking on point on the eve of the 1st Test against West Indies #TeamIndia #INDvWI pic.twitter.com/JR65lonaacBCCI (@BCCI) October 3, 2018Virat Kohli, Prithvi Shaw share a light moment as India get down to practice in RajkotIndia on Wednesday also announced a 12-man squad for the first Test against the Caribbean side with Prithvi Shaw’s name being the new addition.Selection is not my job: Virat Kohli on Karun Nair omissionShaw will make his Test debut at Rajkot as India’s 293rd Test cricketer. Shaw has played only 14 first-class games, scoring 1,418 runs at an average of 56.71, and will open alongside Lokesh Rahul, who was the third opener in England and survived the axe after posting a breezy 149 in the final test at the Oval.Also read – Virat Kohli tells Prithvi Shaw the secret behind his success in EnglandAll set! #TeamIndia gear up for their practice session on the eve of the 1st Test against West Indies #INDvWI pic.twitter.com/penzpeSDHdBCCI (@BCCI) October 3, 2018″We have a change at the top of the order and we will give these guys enough space and enough chances to feel comfortable at that position,” Kohli told reporters. “We want them to be confident about what they are doing.”Apart from the top of the order getting cemented, I don’t think that with these two test matches there’s a lot that we are looking at. The rest of the things feel quite settled.”At the top of the order these guys are new, so they will take a bit of time to get into it. They definitely have the skill-set, they are supremely talented and what we have seen of them is very, very exciting,” Kohli said on Shaw’s inclusion.last_img read more

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Video: Ohio State Linebackers Joe Burger And Craig Fada Show Off Their Apartment On “OSU Cribs”

first_imgA closeup of an Ohio State football helmet on the field.NEW ORLEANS, LA – JANUARY 01: An Ohio State Buckeye helmet is seen on the sidelines prior to the start of the game during the All State Sugar Bowl at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome on January 1, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)When it comes to college housing, Ohio State football players have it pretty good. Buckeye linebackers Joe Burger and Craig Fada showed off their apartment on the first episode of “OSU Cribs,” and we must say, they have a pretty nice pad. There is plenty of Ohio State-themed memorabilia around, as you’d expect, but they also show off the strobe light and fog machine set up. And of course, like any good episode of Cribs, we get a look at the players’ cars.Playing football at Ohio State looks like a decent time. Not that we didn’t already know it.last_img read more

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Roots shares plunge in trading debut on TSX amid challenging retail environment

first_imgTORONTO – Shares of retailer Roots Corp. had a less-than-stellar initial public offering, plummeting more than 16 per cent on the stock’s first day of trading.The stock (TSX:ROOT) was priced at $12 per share at market open, but quickly fell to a low of $9.48 by early afternoon.The shares were down 16.67 per cent, at $10.00 on the Toronto Stock Exchange at the close of markets Wednesday.For the heritage-fashion retailer, the switch from being a private company for more than four decades comes against a challenging retail environment that’s seen numerous bankruptcies, mass store closures and layoffs in recent years.“We are in the early stages of leveraging our strategic operational investments to support our continued growth in Canada, the United States and internationally,” said Roots CEO Jim Gabel in a released statement.“Our TSX listing provides an additional platform to help us unlock the potential of the Roots brand.”The debut of Roots as a publicly-traded company follows recent initial public offerings by other Canadian fashion companies, including Aritzia Inc. (TSX:ATZ) and Canada Goose Holdings Inc. (TSX:GOOS).Shares in Canada Goose have soared since they began trading earlier this year, however Aritzia shares have struggled and fallen well below their IPO price.Roots is in the midst of planning a massive North American and international expansion over the next several years.The company, known for its poor-boy style hats and woolly winter mitts that have adorned both Canada’s Olympic athletes and consumers, currently operates 120 stores in North America and has a partner running another 136 between Taiwan and China.Roots is looking to open dozens of new locations. That includes up to 10 in Canada and up to 14 in the U.S. by the end of its 2019 financial year.It’s also eyeing international markets, hoping to add up to 25 new locations in Taiwan and China, and build a presence in Singapore and Malaysia in the same time frame.Beyond that, the company is evaluating partnerships in a dozen new markets abroad.Follow @DaveHTO on Twitter.last_img read more

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Apple sees further weakness in iPhone sales

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO — Apple warns that disappointing iPhone sales will cause a significant drop in its revenue over the crucial holiday season compared to earlier projections.CEO Tim Cook made the announcement after the market closed Wednesday. It embodies some of the worst fears of investors, who have been dumping Apple shares amid signs that the latest iPhone models weren’t living up to expectations.Cook cited China as Apple’s biggest weak spot, but also said that consumers weren’t upgrading to the latest iPhones models as eagerly as anticipated.As a result, Apple now expects revenue of $84 billion for the fiscal quarter running from October through December. Management had previously predicted revenue ranging from $89 billion to $93 billion.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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SpaceX to build Mars spaceship in Texas not Los Angeles

first_imgHAWTHORNE, Calif. — SpaceX says it will build its Mars spaceship in south Texas instead of the Port of Los Angeles, dealing another blow to the local economy only days after the company announced massive layoffs.The Southern California-based company announced Wednesday that test versions of its Starship and Super Heavy rocket will be assembled at its Texas launch facility in a move to streamline operations.Development of the spaceship will continue at the SpaceX headquarters in Hawthorne.SpaceX won permission last year to build a giant new facility on leased land at the port, which could potentially have added hundreds of jobs to the region.Last week, SpaceX announced that it will lay off about 10 per cent of its roughly 6,000 workers, mostly from its Hawthorne headquarters.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Notley says Trudeau promised new timeline on Trans Mountain pipeline in weeks

first_imgCALGARY, A.B. – Alberta Premier Rachel Notley says the federal government has promised a revised timeline within weeks to resume construction on the stalled Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project.Notley says she is satisfied Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is committed to getting the project back online in good time, and her government is willing to work with him to make it happen.But she says she expects Ottawa to move quickly given the investor uncertainty that has rippled out in all directions from last week’s Federal Court of Appeal decision on the project. The Appeal Court quashed the expansion on the grounds that the federal government failed to properly consult Indigenous groups and the National Energy Board did not take into account the impact of increased tanker traffic on marine life, particularly endangered whales.Notley says full consultation with Indigenous groups must be carried out but says it’s critical to the construction timeline that the government fix the marine impact assessment without restarting a lengthy hearing process.The Trans Mountain expansion project would triple the capacity of the existing line, which takes oil products from Edmonton to Burnaby, B.C.Alberta says the project is critical and it is losing billions of dollars a year because the oil currently shipped to B.C. is sold at a discount to a captive market in the United States.Notley and Trudeau met Wednesday in Edmonton to discuss the expansion project.Ottawa has already done a lot of work beefing up marine safety on the B.C. coast and it’s Alberta’s hope that this work can be included in the missing impact assessment, Notley said Thursday. In the meantime, Notley has pulled her government out of the federal climate plan, which includes a price on carbon, saying Alberta will return when it is satisfied the Trans Mountain project is back on track.last_img read more

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Highway 29 closed between Chetwynd and Moberly Lake Road

first_imgUPDATE – The highway is now open in both directions.CHETWYND, B.C. – Highway 29 is closed from Chetwynd and the Moberly Lake Road.A collision has caused the closure and an estimated time of opening is not available as of 10:20 p.m. Friday. The only detour is through Dawson Creek and Fort St. John.Drivebc.ca says the next update on the collision will be released at 12 p.m. on Saturday, December 1.If you’re in the area, let us know what you see, email news@moosefm.calast_img

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A class apart

first_imgIndian billionaires are far outpacing the country’s industrial and economic growth numbers. Notably, the number of individuals in the Barclays Hurun India Rich List, 2018, having a minimum wealth of Rs 1,000 crore, grew by 100 per cent since 2016 to a record level of 831. India’s private wealth creation rate is, ironically, now all-time high despite rupee depreciation, rising crude oil prices and fall in industrial investment. The number of unicorns — any tech startup company that reaches a $1-billion dollar market value as determined by private or public investment — have crossed 20 for the first time. Interestingly, the pharmaceutical sector accounted for most of the wealthy entrepreneurs in the country’s fast-growing list of rich individuals, followed by the software and services sectors. The average wealth of these super-rich Indians in the Barclays list is around Rs 5,900 crore. Also Read – A special kind of bondAmong the Indian states, Gujarat has set the most impressive trend of generating wealthy entrepreneurs. Traditionally, Maharashtra tops the list, headed by Mumbai-based Mukesh Ambani. But, now Gujarat is fast catching up. As of last year, there were 58 billionaires In Gujarat. Gautam Adani tops the Gujarat billionaires’ list, followed by Cadila Healthcare’s Pankaj Patel. While Adani’s wealth is estimated at Rs 71,200 crore, Pankaj Patel has Rs 32,100 crore. IIT-Kanpur graduate Bhadresh Shah’ s wealth is over Rs 9,700 crore. With a capital of only Rs 100,000, the metallurgical engineer set up a small foundry that made pressure dye castings and succeeded in losing all his money in the first year. Bhadresh Shah of AIA Engineering is now one of the country’s richest entrepreneurs. Ahmedabad is home to 84 per cent of Gujarat’s 58 billionaires. Karsanbhai Patel is the fourth richest in the state with a wealth of Rs 9,600 crore. Two brothers of Torrent Pharmaceuticals — Samir and Sudhir Mehta — are next, each having Rs 8,300 crore. Of the total Gujarat billionaires, 49 are based in Ahmedabad, five in Rajkot, three in Surat and one in Vadodara. Also Read – Insider threat managementUnfortunately, the massive expansion of Indian billionaires in the last four or five years has not added much to the country’s overall wealth and employment. While the GDP, aided largely by imports, has grown by an average of only around 6.8 per cent, the industrial growth hovered around four per cent. India’s Industrial production rose only 0.1 per cent on a year-on-year basis in February 2019, following an increase of 1.4 per cent YoY in the previous month. India’s Industrial production index growth data reached an all-time high of 20.0 per cent in Nov 2006 and a record low of -7.2 per cent in Feb 2009. The Index covers mining, manufacturing and electricity sectors. The 150 per cent plus billionaires’ growth in the last four years had a little positive impact on India’s key economic indicators. It did not lead to noticeable fresh industrial investments, higher production, profitability, larger employment, better banking performance and lower international trade gap. Sadly, the country’s economic and industrial growth in the last five years has almost been jobless. The unemployment rate is rising in stark contrast to the growth of India’s wealthiest. According to data compiled by the Centre for Monitoring Indian Economy, the unemployment rate rose to 7.2 per cent in February 2019, the worst in 28 months. The labour force is down 25.7 million since September 2016 and the number of employed persons has declined by 18.3 million in the same period. While the unemployment rate has shot up from 5.9 per cent in February 2018 to 7.1 per cent in January 2019, the labour participation rate — the proportion of the working age population, comprising those over 15 years of age, that is either employed or unemployed but actively looking for a job — has been ironically falling. Also, in contrast, bankruptcies are growing. And, so are the non-performing assets of India’s public sector-led banking system. The likes of individually rich Nirav Modi, Mehul Choksi, Vijay Mallya, Anil Ambani and, now, Naresh Goyal have been contributing to the bank NPAs. As of March 31, 2018, provisional estimates suggest that the total volume of gross NPAs in the economy was Rs 10.35 lakh crore. About 85 per cent of these NPAs is from public sector banks. For instance, NPAs in the State Bank of India alone are worth Rs 2.23 lakh crore. In the last few years, gross NPAs of banks (as a percentage of total loans) has increased from 2.3 per cent of total loans in 2008 to 9.3 per cent in 2017. This indicates that an increasing proportion of a bank’s assets have ceased to generate income for the bank, lowering the bank’s profitability and its ability to grant further credit. Escalating NPAs require a bank to make higher provisions for losses in their books. The country would have strongly stood by its fast-growing billionaires’ brigade and rejoiced their achievement if their ever-growing private wealth also helped the creation of national wealth, bolstered the banking sector and created large employment and income. Indian billionaires would have probably felt more ‘at home’ in their home country than spending a fortune to ‘buy’ residential status in other countries such as the UAE, the USA, the UK, Cyprus, Thailand, Malaysia and Australia. The quantum of money sent through the liberalised remittance scheme alone to buy property abroad increased 59 times from $1.9 million in 2005-06 to $111.9 million in 2016-17. Many of them have become rich NRIs, living mostly on large business income from India, and receive red carpet welcome in the country on the NRI Day, observed once in two years on January 9 to mark their contribution to India’s development. Ironically, the day is marked in the memory of Mahatma Gandhi, once an NRI in South Africa, who returned to India on January 9, 1915, to lead the country’s freedom movement and never to return. (The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

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Industrial production dips 0.1% in March… lowest in 21 months

first_imgNew Delhi: India’s industrial production contracted by 0.1 per cent in March this year, the lowest in 21 months, mainly due to manufacturing sector slow down, official data showed Friday. Factory output, as measured in terms of the Index of Industrial Production (IIP), had grown by 5.3 per cent in March 2018, according to data released by the Central Statistics Office (CSO). IIP’s previous low was recorded in June 2017, when output shrank by 0.3 per cent. Also Read – Commercial vehicle sales to remain subdued in current fiscal: IcraOn annual basis, IIP growth slowed to three-year low of 3.6 per cent in the 2018-19 fiscal as against 4.4 per cent in the previous fiscal. Industrial production growth was 4.6 per cent and 3.3 per cent in 2016-17 and 2015-16, respectively. Meanwhile, Index of Industrial Production growth for February 2019 has been revised downwards to 0.07 per cent from 0.1 per cent earlier. The manufacturing sector, which constitutes 77.63 per cent of the IIP, contracted by 0.4 per cent in March as compared to 5.7 per cent expansion in the year-ago month. Also Read – Ashok Leyland stock tanks over 5 pc as co plans to suspend production for up to 15 daysCapital goods output declined by 8.7 per cent in the month under review as against 3.1 per cent contraction in March 2018. Power sector growth slowed to 2.2 per cent in March as compared to 5.9 per cent a year ago. Mining sector growth also dropped to 0.8 per cent in March compared to 3.1 per cent expansion a year ago. As per use-based classification, growth rates in March 2019 are 2.5 per cent in primary goods, (-) 2.5 per cent in intermediate goods and 6.4 per cent in infrastructure/ construction goods. Similarly, consumer durables and consumer non-durables have recorded growth of (-) 5.1 per cent and 0.3 per cent, respectively. In terms of industries, 12 out of 23 industry groups in the manufacturing sector have shown negative growth during March 2019 as compared to same month a year ago.last_img read more

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Frontcourt provides relief in Ohio State womens basketballs 9770 win

OSU forward Alexa Hart (22) looks for space around defending Virginia Cavaliers forward Sydney Umeri (44) on Dec. 21 at the Schottenstein Center. Photo Credit: Greg Bartram | USA TODAY SportsThe Ohio State women’s basketball team has relied heavily on the explosiveness of the nation’s top-scoring duo during the 2015-16 season.That wasn’t the case Thursday evening at the Schottenstein Center against the Indiana Hoosiers.Top Buckeye guards, sophomore Kelsey Mitchell and senior Ameryst Alston, were held in check early on in Columbus, prompting the OSU frontcourt to come alive. The extra effort was definitely needed for the No. 5 Buckeyes (11-3, 3-0) to fend off Indiana (9-6, 1-2) at home, 97-70.“They came out ready to play right off the jump,” OSU junior forward Shayla Cooper said. “We had to match their intensity, and once we matched it we actually took it to another level after that.”The Buckeyes have struggled immensely with their perimeter defense this season, ranking dead last amongst Big Ten teams in 3-point defense. A lack of outside pressure has allowed teams to attack OSU with an onslaught of long-range jumpers from the tip.Matters were no better on Wednesday when Indiana opened up the first quarter of play shooting 4-of-6 from beyond the arc.“I think putting more pressure on the ball, not letting them see the open man,” Cooper said of the team’s solution to Indiana’s hot start.Multiple missed layup opportunities also stymied OSU from overcoming Indiana. However, OSU sophomore Alexa Hart and Cooper continued to work the interior, sparking a 10-3 run that knotted the contest at 18 after one quarter of play. Hart registered a double-double on the night, scoring 18 points and collecting 13 rebounds.Despite breaking out of an early shooting slump, the Buckeyes still could not entirely pull away from the Hoosiers. That’s because OSU’s elite scorers Mitchell and Alston continued to be held in check by Indiana, combining to shoot 4-of-18 from the field in the first half.“The way (Indiana) came out, the way they shot the ball, I think that prevented us from doing things that we usually do,” Mitchell said.Nevertheless, OSU’s presence in the post continued to eat away at Indiana. Cooper provided a 14-point first-half spark off the bench, leading a Buckeye frontcourt that outscored the Hoosiers 32-18 in the paint over the first 20 minutes. Cooper finished the night shooting 10-of-16 from the field, tallying 23 points and eight rebounds.“I like the energy and it gives us a different look when she comes in,” OSU coach Kevin McGuff said of moving Cooper to the bench.The Scarlet and Gray brought a 40-35 advantage into halftime and built some early momentum after the break. OSU’s first 3-point conversion two minutes into the second half from Mitchell brought the Buckeyes’ lead to seven and led to an Indiana timeout.Mitchell, who finished with 23 points on the night, led the team with 15 points in the third quarter on a perfect 5-of-5 shooting from the field, opening up a 12-point lead heading into the final quarter.“Sometimes when you’re not sure about yourself and you have a slow start it can wear on you,” McGuff said. “But I do think we have a lot of confidence about how we’re playing.”OSU continued to pull away via not letting up on the Hoosiers, sustaining an aggressive and pesky press on defense. That tenacity brought the team’s turnover margin to a plus-10 mark by the game’s end, and helped the Buckeyes finish with 16 points off of turnovers and 23 offensive rebounds.The Buckeyes will continue their Big Ten schedule with a matchup against Rutgers (10-4) on Sunday. Tipoff is set for 2 p.m. at the Schottenstein Center. read more

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UNC head football coach Everett Withers joins Ohio State football staff

Everett Withers, the current interim head coach of the University of North Carolina football team, was hired Wednesday to join new Ohio State football coach Urban Meyer’s staff. Withers will be the assistant head coach, as well as co-defensive coordinator under Meyer, according to a press release. Withers will split defensive coordinator duties with current OSU head coach Luke Fickell. However, Meyer previously said Fickell will call plays for the unit. In his fourth season at UNC and his first as its head coach, Withers led the team to a 7-5 overall record and an appearance in the Dec. 26 Independence Bowl against Missouri. Withers will stay with the Tar Heels to coach its bowl game. A UNC football team spokesman declined to comment to The Lantern regarding Withers’ departure from the university. OSU did not immediately make Withers’ contract details available. Withers is currently in his 24th season as football coach of both NFL and college teams. Withers began his coaching career as defensive coordinator at Austin Peay in 1988 and would eventually hold other collegiate coaching position at Tulane (1991), Southern Mississippi (1992-93), Louisville (1995-97), Texas (1998-2000) and Minnesota (2007) before becoming UNC’s defensive coordinator and secondary coach in 2008. Withers has also served as defensive backs coach for the NFL’s Tennesee Titans from 2001-2006 and oversaw defensive quality control for the New Orleans Saints in 1994. The Independence Bowl Dec. 26 is scheduled for 5:00 p.m. kickoff while Fickell will coach OSU in Jacksonville, Fla., Jan. 2 when the Buckeyes play Florida in the Gator Bowl. read more

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NCAA approves tougher violations rules Gene Smith sees improvement in flawed system

The NCAA Board of Directors released a new, more stringent set of rules Tuesday for enforcing athletic programs’ adherence to codes of conduct. The new rules try to simplify and accelerate what has traditionally been a long and complicated rule-enforcing process. The rules also aim to increase the severity of the sanctions and make punishments more uniform instead of treating things on a case-by-case basis, according to the announcement posted on ncaa.org.  Among the most notable changes involve holding head coaches more accountable for the actions of their staff. Now, violations by any member of the staff will reflect on the head coach, unless he or she can prove their personal effort for an “atmosphere of strict compliance.” There was also a change in tiers of violations. Rather than categorizing a violation as “major” or “secondary,” there will now be four levels, with a level one violation being the most “severe breach of conduct.” The NCAA could potentially disqualify a team for multiple years of postseason play and fine the program millions of dollars for a level one violation. Other consequences for various levels of infractions include harsher scholarship reductions, recruiting limits and head coach suspensions. Suspensions for coaches as well as programs can range from 10 percent of the season to a full season. The NCAA Division I Committee on Infractions will expand from 10 members to 24, speeding up the infractions process and handing out violations in a more timely manner. In Ohio State football’s case, this could have meant serving out OSU’s bowl ineligibility during the 2011 season rather than the current season. The last of the most significant changes in the new set of rules includes a more consistent penalty system. Sanctions will no longer be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, and the new standards will ensure equal treatment – and punishment – across the NCAA. NCAA President Mark Emmert said the rules aim to eliminate the temptation for teams to do whatever it takes to win. “We have sought all along to remove the `risk-reward’ analysis that has tempted people — often because of the financial pressures to win at all costs — to break the rules in the hopes that either they won’t be caught or that the consequences won’t be very harsh if they do get caught,” Emmert said. “The new system the board adopted today is the result of a lot of hard work and membership input devoted to protecting the collegiate model.” OSU athletic director Gene Smith said he agrees with the new rules and says they help to solve a “flawed” system. “I am supportive of the new legislation,” Smith said. “It provides clarity and transparency to a system of enforcement and infraction management that was flawed. It also will improve the ability for cases to be handled more expeditiously.” Emmert began the process of establishing a new set of rules in August 2011. The new enforcement structure will take effect on August 1, 2013. Dan Hope contributed to this article
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We must defeat ruling evil force to restore peoples rights

first_imgMirza Fakhrul Islam AlamgirThe Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) on Tuesday alleged that the government deliberately denied the party permission for visiting its founder Ziaur Rahman’s grave on the occasion of ‘National Revolution and Solidarity Day’ on the pretext of the ongoing CPA conference, reports UNB.”We think the government did it deliberately on the pretext of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association (CPA) conference. They could have kept that place (Zia’s grave) out of purview of the restriction,” said BNP secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir.Speaking at a press conference at BNP’s Naya Paltan central office, he also said their party leaders and activists, led by its chairperson Khaleda Zia, paid homage to Zia every year on 7 November in the past.”But, we’ve been deprived of it this time. Imposing section 144 in the name of the CPA conference, the government deprived us of going there to pay tribute to him [Ziaur Rahman].”The BNP leader said the government did it as it does not want political parties to exercise their democratic rights.BNP is observing what it says the National Revolution and Solidarity Day on Tuesday, marking the ‘civil-military uprising’ in 1975 with various programmes.BNP chairperson Khaleda Zia together with party leaders and activists was scheduled to place wreaths at Zia’s grave in parliament area at 10:00am today, Tuesday, marking the day.But, the government slapped ban on any sort gathering in the areas as per Section 144 of the Code of Criminal Procedure and it will remain in force until 11:00pm on Wednesday due to the CPA conference.Fakhrul said they have appraised the parliamentary teams of different countries joined the CPA conference of the state of Bangladesh’s democracy.”We’ve already informed them through various ways about the circumstances of our country and democracy. A Canadian parliamentary team also met our leader Khaleda Zia. A Malaysian team will meet her tomorrow [Wednesday]. So, unofficially we’ve informed the Commonwealth and its members about it,” he said.Fakhrul said the current government has obliterated democracy, the freedom expression and the rule of law, and snatched people’s all rights.”We must defeat the current ruling evil force to restore people’s rights and install a pro-people government.”last_img read more

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Full Show Where To Rebuild After Harvey And A Hidden Message In

first_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: X 00:00 /50:35 On Tuesday’s edition of Houston Matters: How, and where should Houstonians rebuild differently after Harvey? Our panel of experts share their ideas as we invite you to join in on  the conversation.Also this hour: We hear how Houston’s technology community pulled together to help during and after the storm. And we learn about a hidden message discovered in a Houston home damaged by Harvey.We offer a free daily, downloadable podcast here, on iTunes, Stitcher and various other podcasting apps. Listen Sharelast_img read more

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WATCH 42 States Havent Upgraded Their Election Equipment In Over A Decade

first_imgSen. James Lankford, R-Okla., and Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., join Judy Woodruff to discuss their bipartisan effort to protect future elections, as well as President Trump’s call for Republicans to take over the Russia probe and the immigration negotiations. Sharelast_img

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Scientists resurrect 700yearold viruses

first_img Upon the discovery of a viral DNA and RNA in ancient caribou feces, researchers reconstituted the viral DNA genome to test whether it might infect plants. Nicotiana benthamiana plants inoculated with the ancient viral DNA displayed evidence of infection including replication of viral DNA in inoculated leaves (orange arrow) and newly emerging leaves (white arrow). Credit: Li-Fang Chen (Phys.org) —Eric Delwart of the Blood Systems Research Institute in San Francisco and colleagues have found two 700-year-old viral sequences in frozen caribou dung in an arctic ice patch. The researchers isolated part of a viral RNA genome and the complete genome of a DNA virus. They infected living plants with the DNA virus. The study appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. © 2014 Phys.org Explore further Scientists don’t know much about how viruses evolve. Understanding the structure of ancient viruses would increase knowledge of virus evolution. However, scientists have sequenced only a small number of ancient viruses. Reconstructing ancient viruses is difficult because they change very rapidly, making it hard to see how new sequences are related to one another. In addition, the nucleic acid content of ancient viruses can degrade quickly.In a quest to find well preserved ancient viruses, Delwart and his team analyzed layers of caribou feces in a 4,000-year-old ice patch in Canada’s Selwyn Mountains. When examining nucleic acids in frozen fecal pellets extracted from a 700-year-old ice layer, they identified two sets of well preserved viral sequences.One of these was part of the genome of an RNA virus, which the researchers identified as belonging to the insect-infecting genus Cripavirus. They think caribou may have ingested insects infected with the virus. Insects attracted to the caribou or the feces may also have deposited the virus on the feces and the surrounding snow.Delwart’s team was able to reconstruct the entire genome of a DNA virus from the other viral sequence. This virus did not closely resemble any modern sequenced virus. However, the team discovered distant relationships with a group of plant-infecting viruses called geminiviruses and with gemycircularviruses, found in dragonflies, fungi and animal feces. An ice core containing ancient caribou feces. For thousands of years, caribou gathered on ice patches to escape summer heat and insects. The caribou feces, which contain caribou DNA, digested plants, and viruses, were frozen within layers of ice, enabling researchers to detect the genomes of ancient viruses. Credit: Brian Moorman Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Plants can ‘switch off’ virus DNA Subarctic ice patch in the Selwyn Mountains in the Northwest Territories of Canada. Alpine ice patches are unique repositories of archaeological artifacts and biological specimens that accumulate in ice layers deposited over thousands of years. Credit: Thomas D. Andrews More information: Preservation of viral genomes in 700-y-old caribou feces from a subarctic ice patch, PNAS, Terry Fei Fan Ng, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1410429111AbstractViruses preserved in ancient materials provide snapshots of past viral diversity and a means to trace viral evolution through time. Here, we use a metagenomics approach to identify filterable and nuclease-resistant nucleic acids preserved in 700-y-old caribou feces frozen in a permanent ice patch. We were able to recover and characterize two viruses in replicated experiments performed in two different laboratories: a small circular DNA viral genome (ancient caribou feces associated virus, or aCFV) and a partial RNA viral genome (Ancient Northwest Territories cripavirus, or aNCV). Phylogenetic analysis identifies aCFV as distantly related to the plant-infecting geminiviruses and the fungi-infecting Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hypovirulence-associated DNA virus 1 and aNCV as within the insect-infecting Cripavirus genus. We hypothesize that these viruses originate from plant material ingested by caribou or from flying insects and that their preservation can be attributed to protection within viral capsids maintained at cold temperatures. To investigate the tropism of aCFV, we used the geminiviral reverse genetic system and introduced a multimeric clone into the laboratory model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. Evidence for infectivity came from the detection of viral DNA in newly emerged leaves and the precise excision of the viral genome from the multimeric clones in inoculated leaves. Our findings indicate that viral genomes may in some circumstances be protected from degradation for centuries. Citation: Scientists resurrect 700-year-old viruses (2014, October 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-10-scientists-resurrect-year-old-viruses.html To learn more about the DNA virus, the researchers introduced it to the plant Nicotiana benthamiana, which scientists often use as a model when studying the infectivity of cloned geminiviruses. The virus replicated itself in inoculated as well as newly emerging leaves, evidence of infection. However, the infected plants did not develop any disease symptoms. The researchers suggest this could be because Nicotiana benthamiana is not the ideal host for this virus. Delwart’s team believes that caribou ingested the DNA virus when eating plants. Earlier studies have shown that viruses can remain infectious after passing through the digestive tracts of animals that have eaten virus-infected plants, insects or animals.The researchers believe that as climate change speeds up the melting of arctic ice, more viral particles, which might remain infectious, could escape into the environment.last_img read more

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Addressing growing burden of heart diseases

first_imgThe Society for Heart Failure and Transplantation (SfHFT) hosted the midterm meeting to focus on experiencing an unparalleled fest of knowledge and skill enhancement. The theme of the meeting was Primary Graft Dysfunction after Heart Transplantation. The event witnessed an exhilarating scientific program to provide the most imperative information and was customised especially through didactic lectures by the most renowned cardiothoracic surgeons, cardiologists and cardiac anesthesiologists from all over the country. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfStar highlight of the program was the cases discussed by most experienced faculty in the management of primary graft dysfunction (PGD). Dr Yugal K Mishra, Head – Cardiac Sciences and Chief of Cardiovascular Surgery, Manipal Hospital, Dwarka, New Delhi, addressed the audience. The event was also marked by the presence of the eminent Nobel Laureate Dr Kailash Satyarthiji, Indian children’s rights activist and Founder – Bachpan Bachao Andolan and the Guest of Honour gracing the occasion was Dr Vasanti Ramesh, Director, National Organ and Tissue Transplant Organisation (NOTTO). Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveCreating increasing awareness of the growing national burden of heart diseases and the urgent requirement of heart transplants in these patients, the Key Opinion Leaders drew attention on the demand of the current patients registered and the supply of the organ. The speakers also addressed the urgent need for donors and endeavored to bust a few myths, create more awareness on why donors should step forward, think beyond religion, customs, and social bindings to contribute and be a part of this noble cause which can help save innumerable lives. The event witnessed discussions on the entire spectrum of Primary Graft Dysfunction from Epidemiology of PGD, Risk factors, BioMarkers of PGD, clinical findings of PGD to Novel techniques of Graft preservation, Role of donor management after the heart transplant. The cases represented the highlights of the conference and doctors demonstrated several factors that cause PGD and the management of the outcome. Dr Yugal K Mishra, Head – Cardiac Sciences and Chief of Cardiovascular Surgery, Manipal Hospital said, “This is a devastating complication that occurs in the immediate postoperative period following heart transplantation. It manifests as severe ventricular dysfunction of the donor graft and carries significant mortality and morbidity. Over the past decade or so, developments and upgrades in pharmacological treatment and mechanical circulatory support that are devices that support the heart when not working at its best, have improved the outcomes for patients undergoing heart transplants and develop this complication.” Research, however, reveals that PGD still remains a challenge as it is still a leading cause of death in the post-operative stages of a month or so. Eminent Noble Laureate, Kailash Satyarthi said, “Medical Professionals represent hope and therefore, humanity, divinity for the patient. 2, 50, 000 children in India are born with heart diseases and a mere 5% are able to afford treatment for their condition. I request and urge the doctors, cardiologists, and surgeons to see solutions of giving these poor children a reason to live.”last_img read more

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