10 months agoNewcastle boss Rafa Benitez hopes for busy transfer market

first_imgNewcastle boss Rafa Benitez hopes for busy transfer marketby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveNewcastle United boss Rafa Benitez hopes to be busy during the January market.But he doesn’t expect a bumper transfer budget from owner Mike Ashley.”I am used to wheeling and dealing all my life,” he said. “I don’t think I was breaking the record in transfer windows, never, ever, with any of my teams. “We had to sell players to buy players. I don’t have any problem with that if you do things in time and find the right players. The main thing is to find the right players.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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18 days agoBrighton goalscorer Neal Maupay says Tottenham heads quickly dropped

first_imgBrighton goalscorer Neal Maupay says Tottenham heads quickly droppedby Paul Vegas18 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveBrighton striker Neal Maupay says Tottenham heads quickly dropped during Saturday’s 3-0 thrashing.Maupay scored Albion’s quickest ever Premier League goal after 150 seconds when the disorientated Hugo Lloris inexplicably dropped the ball before suffering a dislocated elbow when he fell.“We sensed their heads went down after the first goal – that’s why we kept pushing and ­putting pressure on them,” said Maupay. “Losing Lloris and the goal so early was hard for them and they looked worried. We knew they were having a tough time so we wanted to keep going at them. And it worked because they dropped a bit and we got the second goal.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Video: Ohio State Linebackers Joe Burger And Craig Fada Show Off Their Apartment On “OSU Cribs”

first_imgA closeup of an Ohio State football helmet on the field.NEW ORLEANS, LA – JANUARY 01: An Ohio State Buckeye helmet is seen on the sidelines prior to the start of the game during the All State Sugar Bowl at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome on January 1, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)When it comes to college housing, Ohio State football players have it pretty good. Buckeye linebackers Joe Burger and Craig Fada showed off their apartment on the first episode of “OSU Cribs,” and we must say, they have a pretty nice pad. There is plenty of Ohio State-themed memorabilia around, as you’d expect, but they also show off the strobe light and fog machine set up. And of course, like any good episode of Cribs, we get a look at the players’ cars.Playing football at Ohio State looks like a decent time. Not that we didn’t already know it.last_img read more

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Anderson Cooper To Return As Host Of Elton Johns Enduring Vision

first_imgOn Tuesday, October 28, 2014, the Elton John AIDS Foundation (EJAF) will present its 13th annual An Enduring Vision benefit at Cipriani Wall Street in New York City.The Foundation welcomes back award-winning CNN anchor Anderson Cooper, who will host the event for a seventh year.Founder Sir Elton John and Chairman David Furnish will present EJAF’s Enduring Vision Awards to Governor Andrew Cuomo, Charlie Hendon, Jay Jopling, and Nathalie and Pablo Salame. The Foundation honors Governor Cuomo for all of his extraordinary contributions to the fight against AIDS, especially his plan to end AIDS in New York State by 2020, and for his tremendous leadership in bringing marriage equality to New York. Atlanta real estate developer Charlie Hendon has been a devoted friend and generous supporter of EJAF’s work for many years. Jay Jopling, proprietor of the prominent gallery White Cube and a loyal EJAF supporter and advocate, has assisted the Foundation on numerous occasions by securing significant pieces of art for live auctions and art projects, helping to raise millions of dollars over the years for EJAF’s urgent mission. In addition to their extraordinary philanthropic support for the Foundation, Nathalie and Pablo Salame are also vocal champions of both EJAF’s work and LGBT rights issues.Sir Elton John and David Furnish serve as the honorary chairs for An Enduring Vision, joined by their Co-Chairs Philip E. Aarons and Shelley Fox Aarons, Alec and Hilaria Baldwin, Johnny and Edwina Barbis, Jennifer Bayer Michaels, Ken Bernstein, Scott Bessent and John Freeman, Joseph W. Blount, Jess Cagle, John Demsey, James Dolan, Isabelle Ealet and John Corbani, Tim Hanlon and Anthony Klatt, Tony Ingrao and Randy Kemper, Hugh Jackman and Deborra-Lee Furness, Donna Karan, Nikolaos D. Koklonis, Robert K. Kraft, Leonard A. Lauder, Matt Lauer, Sandra Lee, Jenna Lyons and Courtney Crangi, Joe McMillan, Leslie Moonves, Thomas E. Moore III and Mark Reynolds, James L. Nederlander, Adam Norbury and R. Martin Chavez, Ronald O. Perelman, Michael Rapino, Lily Safra, Brooke Shields, Ingrid Sischy and Sandra Brant, Jerry Speyer and Katherine Farley, and Ashok and Maggie Varadhan.Presenting Sponsors for the event are American Airlines, Goldman Sachs Gives, Robert K. Kraft, Wells Fargo, and Airfasttickets.Co-Sponsors are Joseph W. Blount, The John R. Eckel Jr. Foundation, Leonard A. Lauder, and MacAndrews & Forbes Holdings, Inc.Gold Sponsors are Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation, Gilead Sciences, M•A•C Viva Glam, The Maurice Marciano Family Foundation, and Jerry Speyer and Katherine Farley.Silver Sponsors are Acadia Realty Trust, BVGALRI, Don Capoccia and Tom Pegues, James L. Nederlander, and Adam Norbury and R. Martin Chavez.Special thanks to Cîroc Ultra Premium Vodka, Pepper Hamilton LLP, Veuve Clicquot, and Weinberg Glass.For ticket information, please contact Andreas Schwarz at the Elton John AIDS Foundation, 212.219.0670 or andreas.schwarz@ejaf.org.Source:PR Newswirelast_img read more

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Study 90 of teens killed by an intimate partner are girls

first_img Source:https://www.uwmedicine.org/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 15 2019Intimate partner homicide among teens does occur and 90 percent of the victims are girls, according to a new study in JAMA Pediatrics.”This is a public health issue that should be taken seriously,” said lead author Avanti Adhia, a senior fellow at the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center at the University of Washington School of Medicine.The study looked at data from the National Violent Death Reporting System from 2003-2016, which included 2,188 homicides of young people 11-18 years where the relationship between the victim and perpetrator was known.Related StoriesIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyPersonalizing Nutritional Medicine With the Power of NMRAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyOf these homicides, 150 (6.9 percent) were classified as intimate partner homicide.”While not a common occurrence, it does occur more often than people realize,” said Adhia.Adhia said 90 percent of the perpetrators are male, and guns are the most common weapon used.”The majority of the homicides occur in older adolescence between the ages of 16-18,” she said. “A common circumstance is when a victim ends a relationship with the perpetrator or there is jealousy over the victim dating someone new. “Adhia said another common scenario is an acute altercation or argument that ends in death by firearm or stabbing.The data comes from 32 states and each state contributed data for a different number of years, so no trend analysis was available. But the dataset has been expanded to 50 states and more cases will be available in the future.”Partly why I was interested in this topic is the perception that teen dating violence is less serious than intimate partner violence among adults,” said Adhia. “But it’s important to understand that things can escalate among teens as well.”She said evidence-based interventions should be implemented in school and community settings around awareness, communication skills in relationships and bystander intervention.last_img read more

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Social robots can lead to more positive emotions in sick children study

first_imgJoining Breazeal and Logan on the paper are: Sooyeon Jeong, a PhD student in the Personal Robots group; Brianna O’Connell, Duncan Smith-Freedman, and Peter Weinstock, all of Boston Children’s Hospital; and Matthew Goodwin and James Heathers, both of Northeastern University.Boosting moodFirst prototyped in 2006, Huggable is a plush teddy bear with a screen depicting animated eyes. While the eventual goal is to make the robot fully autonomous, it is currently operated remotely by a specialist in the hall outside a child’s room. Through custom software, a specialist can control the robot’s facial expressions and body actions, and direct its gaze. The specialists could also talk through a speaker — with their voice automatically shifted to a higher pitch to sound more childlike — and monitor the participants via camera feed. The tablet-based avatar of the bear had identical gestures and was also remotely operated.Related StoriesPuzzling paralysis affecting healthy children warns CDCWhy Mattresses Could be a Health Threat to Sleeping ChildrenRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaDuring the interventions involving Huggable — involving kids ages 3 to 10 years — a specialist would sing nursery rhymes to younger children through robot and move the arms during the song. Older kids would play the I Spy game, where they have to guess an object in the room described by the specialist through Huggable.Through self-reports and questionnaires, the researchers recorded how much the patients and families liked interacting with Huggable. Additional questionnaires assessed patient’s positive moods, as well as anxiety and perceived pain levels. The researchers also used cameras mounted in the child’s room to capture and analyze speech patterns, characterizing them as joyful or sad, using software.A greater percentage of children and their parents reported that the children enjoyed playing with Huggable more than with the avatar or traditional teddy bear. Speech analysis backed up that result, detecting significantly more joyful expressions among the children during robotic interventions. Additionally, parents noted lower levels of perceived pain among their children.The researchers noted that 93 percent of patients completed the Huggable-based interventions, and found few barriers to practical implementation, as determined by comments from the specialists.A previous paper based on the same study found that the robot also seemed to facilitate greater family involvement in the interventions, compared to the other two methods, which improved the intervention overall. “Those are findings we didn’t necessarily expect in the beginning,” says Jeong, also a co-author on the previous paper. “We didn’t tell family to join any of the play sessions — it just happened naturally. When the robot came in, the child and robot and parents all interacted more, playing games or in introducing the robot.”An automated, take-home botThe study also generated valuable insights for developing a fully autonomous Huggable robot, which is the researchers’ ultimate goal. They were able to determine which physical gestures are used most and least often, and which features specialists may want for future iterations. Huggable, for instance, could introduce doctors before they enter a child’s room or learn a child’s interests and share that information with specialists. The researchers may also equip the robot with computer vision, so it can detect certain objects in a room to talk about those with children.”In these early studies, we capture data … to wrap our heads around an authentic use-case scenario where, if the bear was automated, what does it need to do to provide high-quality standard of care,” Breazeal says.In the future, that automated robot could be used to improve continuity of care. A child would take home a robot after a hospital visit to further support engagement, adherence to care regimens, and monitoring well-being.”We want to continue thinking about how robots can become part of the whole clinical team and help everyone,” Jeong says. “When the robot goes home, we want to see the robot monitor a child’s progress. … If there’s something clinicians need to know earlier, the robot can let the clinicians know, so [they’re not] surprised at the next appointment that the child hasn’t been doing well.”Next, the researchers are hoping to zero in on which specific patient populations may benefit the most from the Huggable interventions. “We want to find the sweet spot for the children who need this type of extra support,” Logan says. Source:Massachusetts Institute of Technology Child life staff provide a lot of human interaction to help normalize the hospital experience, but they can’t be with every kid, all the time. Social robots create a more consistent presence throughout the day. There may also be kids who don’t always want to talk to people, and respond better to having a robotic stuffed animal with them. It’s exciting knowing what types of support we can provide kids who may feel isolated or scared about what they’re going through.”First author Deirdre Logan, a pediatric psychologist at Boston Children’s Hospital Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 26 2019A new study demonstrates, for the first time, that “social robots” used in support sessions held in pediatric units at hospitals can lead to more positive emotions in sick children.Many hospitals host interventions in pediatric units, where child life specialists will provide clinical interventions to hospitalized children for developmental and coping support. This involves play, preparation, education, and behavioral distraction for both routine medical care, as well as before, during, and after difficult procedures. Traditional interventions include therapeutic medical play and normalizing the environment through activities such as arts and crafts, games, and celebrations.For the study, published in the journal Pediatrics, researchers from the MIT Media Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital, and Northeastern University deployed a robotic teddy bear, “Huggable,” across several pediatric units at Boston Children’s Hospital. More than 50 hospitalized children were randomly split into three groups of interventions that involved Huggable, a tablet-based virtual Huggable, or a traditional plush teddy bear. In general, Huggable improved various patient outcomes over those other two options.The study primarily demonstrated the feasibility of integrating Huggable into the interventions. But results also indicated that children playing with Huggable experienced more positive emotions overall. They also got out of bed and moved around more, and emotionally connected with the robot, asking it personal questions and inviting it to come back later to meet their families. “Such improved emotional, physical, and verbal outcomes are all positive factors that could contribute to better and faster recovery in hospitalized children,” the researchers write in their study.Although it is a small study, it is the first to explore social robotics in a real-world inpatient pediatric setting with ill children, the researchers say. Other studies have been conducted in labs, have studied very few children, or were conducted in public settings without any patient identification.But Huggable is designed only to assist health care specialists — not replace them, the researchers stress. “It’s a companion,” says co-author Cynthia Breazeal, an associate professor of media arts and sciences and founding director of the Personal Robots group. “Our group designs technologies with the mindset that they’re teammates. We don’t just look at the child-robot interaction. It’s about [helping] specialists and parents, because we want technology to support everyone who’s invested in the quality care of a child.”last_img read more

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Dutch firm ASML perfecting microchip shrink for tech giants

The light has to be focused in a vacuum to stop it being absorbed by air—a difficult technological feat—and the parameters are so small that the machine is working “to within the size of an atom”.The tiniest speck of dust infiltrating the machine could ruin the design, leaving blank spaces on the chips.ASML now employs about 20,000 people, mostly engineers and most in Veldhoven, but it also has sites in Asia and the United States.And as it grows it is hiring. Some 3,000 new posts were added last year, with a similar number of new jobs expected this year. A former vice-president at French rail giant Alstom, he joined ASML in 2010 and has become increasingly passionate about its innovative technology.Accurate ‘to within an atom’The EUV system works by projecting the light through a blueprint, ASML explains. Using a series of complex optics, made by German company Zeiss, “the pattern is reduced and focused onto a thin slice of silicon coated with a light-sensitive chemical”.”The light interacts with the chemical effectively printing the pattern onto the silicon or wafer. When the unwanted silicon is etched away a three-dimensional structure is created.” This is repeated dozens of times, layer upon layer, leaving a grid of hundreds of chips on one silicon wafer. Citation: Dutch firm ASML perfecting ‘microchip shrink’ for tech giants (2018, May 13) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-dutch-firm-asml-microchip-tech.html ‘Phones are not for calling’Last year after two decades of research and development and billions of euros, ASML shipped its first 12 EUV machines to clients. Each costs about 120 million euros ($145 million). This year it has projected sales of 20 machines—by 2020, it hopes to be selling 35 to 40 a year.It is ironic that these machines, which produce chips of infinitesimally small dimensions, are the size of a bus. Three Boeing 747 aircraft are needed to transport one machine to a client.Long seen as a bellwether of the tech industry, the company is listed on both the Amsterdam bourse, the AEX, and the Nasdaq in New York. And pushing the boundaries of this technology is Dutch company ASML, which since its foundation in 1984 has quietly become a world leader in the semiconductor business.”There is more power in your smartphone today than was used to put man on the moon,” says ASML’s chief operating officer Frederic Schneider-Maunoury, animatedly waving his mobile phone in the air.When you open an app on your phone, the chain allowing you to book a flight, message a friend or check out who’s hot in your neighbourhood arcs all the way back most likely to ASML.Headquartered in Veldhoven, near the Belgian border, it builds sophisticated lithography machines to enable the world’s top chip makers—Intel, Samsung and Apple supplier Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing (TSMC)—to produce the smallest, most powerful, most cost-effective microprocessors on the planet.Its newest machines use highly-focused extreme ultra-violet (EUV) light to imprint designs on the chips, and are at the cutting-edge of what is scientifically and technologically possible in the art of miniaturisation. Dust is the enemy. A speck of dust inside the manufacturing equipment can ruin chips Last year ASML announced profits had almost doubled to 2.12 billion euros Dutch hi-tech group ASML notches up ‘fantastic year’ Last year it announced profits had almost doubled to 2.12 billion euros on record sales of 9.05 billion euros.Only two other companies in the world—the Japanese giants Nikon and Canon—make lithography machines and neither has yet developed EUV technology. They call it “the shrink”—it’s the challenge of how to pack more circuits onto the microchips which power everything from our phones to our computers, even our coffee machines. A lens used in the manufacturing of semiconductors at Dutch company ASML, whose latest systems project blueprints of circuitry onto silicon wafers ASML employs about 20,000 people, mostly engineers © 2018 AFP Explore further “Our problem is not just to find the technologies, we than have to put it into the products in an economical way,” Schneider-Maunoury told AFP, in his office overlooking ASML’s sprawling site.”Why buy a new phone? It’s not to make calls on. I buy a new phone precisely because it allows me to do things that the previous phone didn’t,” he said.But this is a competitive market, and if the new phone “is going to cost me 10 times more, than I’m not going to buy it”. ASML’s chief operating officer Frederic Schneider-Maunoury has become increasingly passionate about the firm’s cutting-edge technology This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

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UPS launches package delivery by drone

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2019 AFP Hospital using drones to fly blood samples between buildings The company said the shipment of medical samples at the WakeMed hospital campus in Raleigh, North Carolina was the first of “numerous planned daily revenue flights.”UPS has teamed up with Matternet, which makes autonomous drones and already has operations in Switzerland, for the same-day delivery service, the company said in a statement.The company called the inaugural flight “a major milestone for unmanned aviation in the United States.” It will provide “the ability to avoid roadway delays, increase medical delivery efficiency, lower costs and improve the patient experience with potentially life-saving benefits,” the company added.The “quadcopter” drones can carry medical payloads weight up to five pounds (2.3 kilograms) for distances up to 12.5 miles (20 kilometers).Currently, the only option is through traditional courier service.”Drone transport will improve speed of deliveries at a lower cost, enhance access to care and create healthier communities,” WakeMed President Donald Gintzig said.The Federal Aviation Administration and North Carolina’s Department of Transportation both approved and oversee the drone service, following test flights last year. Citation: UPS launches package delivery by drone (2019, March 26) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-ups-package-delivery-drone.htmlcenter_img UPS has launched the first authorized use of unmanned drones to transport packages to recipients Explore further American delivery giant UPS on Tuesday launched the first authorized use of unmanned drones to transport packages to recipients.last_img read more

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