Thanks for doing what you do – even if it gets you down

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.Actually, one of the best things about this dodge is how it allows me to visit other people on their jobs. And exciting as it is to spend time with pilots, surgeons and such, I’m always happy that I’m not doing any of those things full time. By the way, my nominee for the hardest work with the longest hours and the least job security is movies, the trades part involving the people you don’t know who make the magic during 16-hour days. Which is a curious observation because movie people fall into the same category as “arts, design, sports and media workers (me)” in the newly released National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Personally, I would have titled it the “Lack of Happiness Report” since it deals with the prevalence of depression in 21 broad fields of endeavor. If you’ve ever suffered from depression or know someone who has, then you know that we’re talking about something serious here, something that can’t be cured by telling someone to cheer up. The survey reports that $30 billion to $44 billion is lost each year in absenteeism because of depression, which they define as an episode lasting two weeks or longer. An episode during which people can lose interest in absolutely everything including staying alive. Topping the list are personal care givers, of which 10.8 percent last year suffered a major depressive episode. Next in line is the 10.3 percent among food preparation and serving workers. And who can’t see why? Face it, helping the sick and feeding the hungry is ceaselessly demanding, nonstop labor. Meanwhile, community and social service workers rank third with 9.6 percent. Health care practitioners and medical technicians rank fourth at 9.5 percent, followed by the already mentioned artists, designers, entertainment and media professionals with a major depressive episode rate of 9.1 percent. All these occupations can, I think, be summed up by something an editor once said about newspapers, “All they want from us is more.” Next come teachers and library workers, which surprises me. I once worked in a library, and I’d do it again. Teaching, on the other hand, is like doing stand-up comedy all day, then going home to grade papers written by drunken hecklers. Office and administrative support ranks seventh with 8.1 percent, followed by building maintenance staff (7.3), financial services (6.7), sales (6.7), legal (6.4), transportation (6.4), computer techs (6.2), production workers (5.9) and management (5.8). Here’s an interesting one. Farming, fishing and forestry ranks 16th with 5.6 percent, followed by police at 5.5, construction work at 4.8, maintenance workers at 4.4 percent and life, physical and social scientists also at 4.4. The least likely to suffer from depression are engineers, architects and surveyors. But why do surveyors suffer less depression than lawyers? More to the point, is it right that lawyers should suffer less depression than reporters, who are understandably far less likely to fall into a funk than those who tend the sick? I asked veteran nurse and Torrance Memorial’s director of emergency management, Judy Retter, about this. Of home care workers she said, “They get rotten wages to supposedly work eight-hour days while actually doing 24. Their work is dirty and unappreciated; their patients are often nasty and irritable and their families worse.” As for health-care workers in general, Retter said the highest rates of depression probably correspond to the areas worked: “Very little depression in happy places like nurseries and more in oncology.” We are, of course, talking about the suffering of millions of Americans and how some of us are more likely to suffer than others because of the often vital things that we do for a buck. But it seems to me, the naive one, that there are some small remedies available even as we all become increasingly irrelevant to an indifferent global economy. Those remedies are human consideration and thanks for jobs well done and thanks for some jobs even being done at all. I want to hear your comments. Connect with me at john.bogert@dailybreeze.com, call 310-543-6681 or send a letter to Daily Breeze/John Bogert, 5215 Torrance Blvd., Torrance, CA 90503-4077. Hear my podcast at www.dailybreeze.com.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! In high school I took one of those tests that was supposed to match me with the work I was best suited for. What I recall are questions like, “Would you rather sit behind a desk under hot lights all day or work unsupervised in a pristine forest?” Naturally, I wanted to be outdoors in a green uniform telling small children about forest fires and ecosystems. In short, I wanted to be exactly what the test said I should be, a forest ranger. Still, I chose a kind of office work over forestry when I realized how much time those good people spend saving forests from idiots and idiots from themselves. last_img read more

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Everton ‘open talks to sign’ World Cup star after impressive displays

first_img Vida is currently catching the eye with some impressive performances at the World Cup Where every Premier League club needs to strengthen in January Vida only joined current club Besiktas in January LATEST Vida is currently representing Croatia at the World Cup, and if he continues his run of good performances Besiktas could bump up the centre-back’s current £13.2m asking price.But it has been suggested that Everton have already got the ball rolling on their move, with Leicester also said to be considering an approach. Arsenal transfer news LIVE: Ndidi bid, targets named, Ozil is ‘skiving little git’ REVEALED LIVING THE DREAM targets Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade The 29-year-old only arrived at Besiktas in January, following five years at Dynamo Kyiv, and made 13 league appearances for his new club. TOP WORK Latest transfer news Cavani ‘agrees’ to join new club and will complete free transfer next summer IN DEMAND Tony Cascarino backs Everton to sign two strikers for Carlo Ancelotti 2 2 The biggest market value losers in 2019, including Bale and ex-Liverpool star Everton have opened talks with Besiktas over a summer swoop for Domagoj Vida, who has also been linked with Leicester.According to Fanatik, Everton are currently negotiating with the Turkish club about landing the defender before the window closes. targets Man United joined by three other clubs in race for Erling Haaland RANKED Kevin De Bruyne ‘loves Man City and wants to keep winning’, reveals father Chelsea confident of beating Man United and Liverpool to Sancho signing moving on Liverpool’s signings under Michael Edwards – will Minamino be the next big hit? three-way race However he could be set to leave just six months later with clubs impressed by Vida’s form for club and country.last_img read more

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Rain continues flooding stops business as usual

first_img National Heritage Month ends Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Rain creates nasty weather and dangerous conditions throughout TCI TCI to renew Storm & Flood insurance Recommended for you Related Items:Bugaloo’s Conch Crawl, enid capron primary school, flooding, rain Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 21 Oct 2015 – The rain continued today across the country with localized flooding still an issue which is impacting business operations. Bugaloo’s Conch Crawl which sits on the beach in Five Cays and reports that rain did force the mainly outdoor eatery to close up early yesterday, but that business is still open.Meanwhile, residents have taken to social media once again to express frustration at the lack of drainage, including in schools where the playground at the Enid Capron Primary, for example, easily resembles a lake. last_img read more

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Pixel 3a series is coming to India same day of launch Flipkart

first_imgThe e-commerce website, Flipkart has teased the most anticipated and cheaper Pixel device from Google. The search giant is expected to launch a new Pixel series – Pixel 3a and 3a XL, on May 7 in San Francisco in PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) time zone. Now, Flipkart has confirmed that the new Pixel series is coming to India on the same day. So, the launch in India is scheduled for 8 May as the time difference with IST (Indian Standard Time) is almost 12 hours.The teaser page has quoted “Help is on the way. Something big is coming to the Pixel universe.” With the launch of the new Pixel 3a series, Google is going to foray into the mid-segment smartphone market. Recently, Google has admitted the pressure in the premium smartphone category and has revealed the sales of Pixel 3 is not as good as Pixel 2. Pixel 3a launch in India confirmedFlipkartPixel 3a is a lite version of the Pixel 3 and will get cheaper price tag than the flagship smartphone. A budget phone from Google can change the fate of Pixel phone series, which is performing very poor in terms of sales.Pixel 3a: What we know so farPixel 3a will sport a 5.6-inch FHD+ OLED screen with a resolution of 2160×1080 pixels, while Pixel 3a XL will feature a 6-inch FHD+ OLED display with a resolution of 1080×2220 pixels. As per the Geekbench listing, this cheaper Pixel device is expected to come with Qualcomm Snapdragon 670 SoC, which will be coupled with 4 GB RAM. Ahead of its official debut, the smartphones have received Bluetooth SIG Certifications, which reveals that the devices will support Bluetooth 5.0. Google Pixel 3a’s design language is similar to the flagship Pixel 3, which was launched in October 2018.Evan Blass (@evleaks)/TwitterGoogle Pixel 3a and Pixel 3a XL were leaked in official press render, divulging a design similar to the Pixel 3 phones. But the smartphone is likely to come with a plastic body instead of glass. Google Pixel 3a is also expected to sport a 12-megapixel rear camera and could be fuelled with 3,000mAh battery.Previously, a Pixel 3a with purple paint job was spotted online. It features a yellow button on the right side. Other than it, it is also rumoured that an Iris colour variant is also in the pipeline. As the launch date draws closer, more info will come about the upcoming Pixel series. So, stay tuned with us to get update swiftly. IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:02/0:37Loaded: 0%0:02Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-0:35?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading … Google Pixel 3 XL leaked photos hint at notch display, wired USB-C budscenter_img Closelast_img read more

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Bangladeshs returning migrants struggle at home

first_imgSurvivors of a boat carrying migrants that sunk in the Mediterranean during the night of 9 and 10 May, gather at a shelter in the Tunisian coastal city of Zarzis on 11 May 2019. AFP File PhotoLike many poor Bangladeshis, Komol Shohlagar thought moving overseas for work would change his life. It did – but not in the way he hoped.Shohlagar, 33, travelled to Libya with people smugglers in the hope of reaching Europe, but when he got there, the smugglers held him captive to extort money from his family.He was only freed after they paid $14,000 to get him back – money they had to borrow from loan sharks. When he finally returned to Bangladesh last year, he was jobless and saddled with huge debts – a situation that left him feeling suicidal.”I was really depressed. My family had borrowed a lot of money to save me,” Shohlagar told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.”The lenders came home every other day and threatened us. There were times when I thought about taking a rope and hanging myself.”Charities in Bangladesh say thousands of returning migrants face such struggles and little official help is available.Many are victims of trafficking, but have little redress for the crimes they have suffered in Bangladesh. The country depends heavily on foreign remittances and has an official policy of encouraging citizens to look for jobs abroad.According to official data, at least 1 million Bangladeshis secured jobs overseas in 2017 – the highest number ever recorded.But the system depends largely on unlicensed brokers working in rural areas and opens the door to trafficking and cheating.Last month, 64 Bangladeshi migrants hoping to get to Europe had to be rescued from a boat off Tunisia. In May, 37 drowned in the same region when their boat capsized.”The state does not have a proper system to support the returnees,” said Shariful Hasan, who heads the migration department of Bangladeshi aid group BRAC.”All our policies are focused on sending people abroad. We don’t even have a system that can count the total number of returnees every year.”Abu Bakar Siddique, the civil servant who leads the home ministry’s anti-trafficking work, acknowledged the government needed to develop a system of support for the returnees.One of the survivors of a boat carrying migrants sunk in the Mediterranean during the night of 9 and 10 May, rests at a shelter in the Tunisian coastal city of Zarzis on 11 May 2019. AFP File Photo”For now, what we do is, we ensure that the victims reach their families,” he said. “With the kind of capacity that we have, this is what’s possible.”We do work with girls who were trafficked to India. We also have shelters for victims. But as far as counselling is concerned, it’s not something that we have not managed to do effectively. We have to develop our system.”False PromiseThere is no official data on how many migrants are defrauded, but charities say thousands return to Bangladesh every year after being cheated abroad.A 2017 study by the Refugee and Migratory Movements Research Unit, a migrants rights group, found 51 per cent of returning migrants had experienced fraud or degrading treatment while abroad.Nearly one in five of those who paid to be taken abroad did not even make it out of the country, it found.Stories like Shohlagar’s are common.The International Organisation for Migration (IOM), which helps repatriate migrants, said many were left with little choice but to go abroad again to try to pay off their debts.”Due to the mounting pressure from the money lenders to pay back the loan, they (migrants) are unable to stay in their house upon return,” said Pravina Gurung, the IOM’s head of migration and development.”The result of an inability to achieve economic self-sufficiency, social re-integration and psychosocial suffering often lead them to another unsafe migration attempt, further debt, and even suicide.”One of a migrants, who were rescued after their boat capsized in the Mediterranean Sea off the Tunisian Coast after they had left Libya, is seen inside a local Red Cresent chapter in Zarzis, Tunisia on 11 May 2019. Reuters File PhotoMohammad Jakir Hossen, 40, worked as a technician in a garment factory before he paid a broker to take him to Italy in search of more lucrative work.Instead he was taken to Libya, where he was made to work by traffickers who took a cut of his salary, holding him there with the false promise that he would eventually make it to Italy.Since he returned to Dhaka he has been running a roadside fruit stall, with little hope of making back the $5,000 he borrowed to pay for the trip. But he said he would do the same again.”You may think that I am crazy, but if I get a chance to go outside, I will take a loan again,” Hossen said. “Five people including my old mother depend upon me right now. And what I earn is clearly not enough.”BRAC, one of the few local organisations that provide support to the returnees, follows a three-fold approach, said Hasan, offering practical help with their return, financial help, and counselling.Kamal Chowdhury, an associate professor at the Department of Clinical Psychology at Dhaka University, has counselled migrant returnees.Some had been raped or sexually harassed and all need help, he said, urging the government to make assessments of returnees mandatory.”Migrant workers return home with dreams that are broken,” he said.last_img read more

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Addressing growing burden of heart diseases

first_imgThe Society for Heart Failure and Transplantation (SfHFT) hosted the midterm meeting to focus on experiencing an unparalleled fest of knowledge and skill enhancement. The theme of the meeting was Primary Graft Dysfunction after Heart Transplantation. The event witnessed an exhilarating scientific program to provide the most imperative information and was customised especially through didactic lectures by the most renowned cardiothoracic surgeons, cardiologists and cardiac anesthesiologists from all over the country. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfStar highlight of the program was the cases discussed by most experienced faculty in the management of primary graft dysfunction (PGD). Dr Yugal K Mishra, Head – Cardiac Sciences and Chief of Cardiovascular Surgery, Manipal Hospital, Dwarka, New Delhi, addressed the audience. The event was also marked by the presence of the eminent Nobel Laureate Dr Kailash Satyarthiji, Indian children’s rights activist and Founder – Bachpan Bachao Andolan and the Guest of Honour gracing the occasion was Dr Vasanti Ramesh, Director, National Organ and Tissue Transplant Organisation (NOTTO). Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveCreating increasing awareness of the growing national burden of heart diseases and the urgent requirement of heart transplants in these patients, the Key Opinion Leaders drew attention on the demand of the current patients registered and the supply of the organ. The speakers also addressed the urgent need for donors and endeavored to bust a few myths, create more awareness on why donors should step forward, think beyond religion, customs, and social bindings to contribute and be a part of this noble cause which can help save innumerable lives. The event witnessed discussions on the entire spectrum of Primary Graft Dysfunction from Epidemiology of PGD, Risk factors, BioMarkers of PGD, clinical findings of PGD to Novel techniques of Graft preservation, Role of donor management after the heart transplant. The cases represented the highlights of the conference and doctors demonstrated several factors that cause PGD and the management of the outcome. Dr Yugal K Mishra, Head – Cardiac Sciences and Chief of Cardiovascular Surgery, Manipal Hospital said, “This is a devastating complication that occurs in the immediate postoperative period following heart transplantation. It manifests as severe ventricular dysfunction of the donor graft and carries significant mortality and morbidity. Over the past decade or so, developments and upgrades in pharmacological treatment and mechanical circulatory support that are devices that support the heart when not working at its best, have improved the outcomes for patients undergoing heart transplants and develop this complication.” Research, however, reveals that PGD still remains a challenge as it is still a leading cause of death in the post-operative stages of a month or so. Eminent Noble Laureate, Kailash Satyarthi said, “Medical Professionals represent hope and therefore, humanity, divinity for the patient. 2, 50, 000 children in India are born with heart diseases and a mere 5% are able to afford treatment for their condition. I request and urge the doctors, cardiologists, and surgeons to see solutions of giving these poor children a reason to live.”last_img read more

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