Ocean currents spin a web of interconnected fisheries around the world

first_imgConservation, Environment, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Overfishing, Saltwater Fish Article published by Basten Gokkon Most marine catches are made within a given country’s territorial waters, but the fish most likely originated in spawning grounds in another country’s jurisdiction, a new study shows.The modeling of catch, spawning and ocean current data shows that the dispersal of baby fish caught by ocean currents creates an interconnection between global marine fisheries.The finding highlights the need for greater international cooperation in protecting marine ecosystems everywhere, as an estimated $10 billion worth of fish spawn in one country and are caught in another every year. Chances are the locally caught fish you bought down by the wharf was spawned thousands of miles away, migrating on ocean currents, a new study has found.An estimated 90 percent of marine catches are caught within 200 miles, or 320 kilometers, of countries’ shores, but they most likely originated in spawning grounds under the jurisdiction of a different country, according to the study published June 21 in the journal Science.Analyzing data of catch and known spawning grounds of more than 700 fish species, coupled with ocean current data, the paper’s researchers developed a computer model to show where the various species tended to be born and caught.The simulation then showed that the dispersal of baby fish caught by ocean currents created an interconnection between global marine fisheries, the study said.“Now we have a map of how the world’s fisheries are interconnected, and where international cooperation is needed most urgently to conserve a natural resource that hundreds of millions of people rely on,” said co-author Kimberly Oremus, an assistant professor at the University of Delaware’s School of Marine Science and Policy.The global network of flows of fish spawn across international boundaries. The circles represent ocean territories and the lines indicate flows between them. The lines are curved such that the clockwise direction represents flows from source to sink. Image by Nandini Ramesh/University of California, Berkeley.Any two given countries are connected by an average of five degrees of separation, with effects from fishery disruptions — habitat destruction, overfishing, and sea warming — that take place in one country spreading to other nations, both near and possibly on the other side of the world, according to the researchers.This ripple effect could theoretically look like this: If there’s a decline in a species’ spawning population in Indonesian waters, the catch in Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia, the Philippines, Australia, and India’s Andaman and Nicobar Islands will most likely drop.According to the study, the spawning grounds around Japan, Alaska and China are the three regions that currently contribute the most catch to other countries, through their productive spawning populations. Each contributes about 1 million tons to other countries’ catches.Indonesia has the most landed value attributable to other countries, meaning much of its catch originates from the spawning grounds of its neighbors, such as Singapore, Malaysia, the Philippines and Papua New Guinea, according to the researchers.“This is something of a double-edged sword,” said lead author Nandini Ramesh, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Berkeley.“On one hand, it implies that mismanagement of a fishery can have negative effects that easily propagate to other countries; on the other hand, it implies that multiple countries can benefit by targeting conservation and/or management efforts in just a few regions.”The finding highlights the need for greater international cooperation in protecting marine ecosystems everywhere — such as large marine ecosystems and marine protected area networks — as an estimated $10 billion worth of fish spawn in one country and are caught in another every year, the authors say. Global fisheries production in 2016 was valued at $130 billion, according to the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization.“This allowed us to talk about how vulnerable a nation is to the management of fisheries in neighboring countries,” Oremus said.A spawning aggregation of Nassau groupers. Image by Alexander Tewfik for WCS.According to the study, the risks to nations’ economies and labor forces are generally highest in the tropics. This is due to a combination of factors, such as there being a large number of small, coastal countries close together in regions with relatively fast ocean currents; economies that rely heavily on marine fisheries; and populations with a high percentage of workers employed in fishing-related jobs.“Our hope is that this study will be a stepping stone for policy makers to study their own regions more closely to determine their interdependencies,” Ramesh said. “This is an important first step. This is not something people have examined before at this scale.”Citation:Ramesh, N., Rising, J. A., & Oremus, K. L. (2019). The small world of global marine fisheries: The cross-boundary consequences of larval dispersal. Science, 364(6446), 1192-1196. doi:10.1126/science.aav3409FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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June 2019 was the hottest on record: NOAA

first_imgJune 2019 was the hottest June recorded in the 140 years since the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) began collecting global temperature data, the agency announced yesterday.On land, June’s global average surface temperature was 2.41 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th-century average of 55.9°F, the highest June land temperature on record, beating the previous record set in 2015. At sea, average surface temperatures were 1.46 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th-century monthly average of 61.5 degrees Fahrenheit, tying June 2016 as the highest global average ocean temperature on record for June.2019 also saw the second-smallest Arctic sea ice extent for the month of June in the 41-year record, according to an analysis of NOAA and NASA data by the National Snow and Ice Data Center. For the fourth consecutive June, Antarctic sea ice extent was also lower than average, reaching a mark 425,000 square miles, or 8.5 percent, below the 1981-2010 average. June 2019 was the hottest June recorded in the 140 years since the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) began collecting global temperature data, the agency announced yesterday.Global land and ocean surface temperatures were 1.71 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th-century average of 59.9 degrees Fahrenheit last month, “the highest for June in the 1880-2019 record,” NOAA reported. The month was 0.04 degrees Fahrenheit hotter than the previous record, set in 2016.That makes June 2019 the 43rd consecutive June and the 414th consecutive month with temperatures above the 20th-century average. Year to date, 2019 has been the second warmest January-June ever recorded.According to NOAA data, the biggest departures from average temperatures in June 2019 occurred in central and eastern Europe, north-central Russia, northeastern Canada, and southern parts of South America, where temperatures were 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981-2010 average or higher. Many of those same regions, as well as parts of Asia, Africa, and the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific oceans, experienced record warm temperatures. No land or ocean areas experienced record cold temperatures in June.Credit: NOAA.The most notable cooler-than-average temperatures were found in parts of western Asia and Antarctica, where temperatures were at least 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit below the 1981-2010 average.On land, June’s global average surface temperature was 2.41 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th-century average of 55.9°F, the highest June land temperature on record, beating the previous record set in 2015. At sea, average surface temperatures were 1.46 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th-century monthly average of 61.5 degrees Fahrenheit, tying June 2016 as the highest global average ocean temperature on record for June. The 10 months with the biggest departures from average global ocean monthly temperatures have all occurred since September 2015.2019 also saw the second-smallest Arctic sea ice extent for the month of June in the 41-year record, according to an analysis of NOAA and NASA data by the National Snow and Ice Data Center. At 475,000 square miles, or 10.5 percent, below the 1981-2010 average, June 2019 was the 20th consecutive June with Arctic sea ice extent below average.Credit: NOAA.For the fourth consecutive June, Antarctic sea ice extent was also lower than average, reaching a mark 425,000 square miles, or 8.5 percent, below the 1981-2010 average. That’s the smallest June extent for Antarctic sea ice in the 41-year record, surpassing the previous record, set in 2002, by 62,000 square miles.Nine of the 10 warmest Junes have occurred since 2010. June 1998 is the only entry on the list of the 10 warmest Junes on record that occurred in the previous century.Credit: NOAA.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Climate Change, Environment, Global Warming, Oceans, Oceans And Climate Change, Research, Sea Ice, Temperatures Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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New toolkit identifies multiple species from environmental DNA

first_imgResearchers have developed a DNA analysis toolkit designed to speed the identification of the multiple species in a biological community by analyzing environmental DNA from a sample of water or soil.To confirm the presence of a species at a site, the tool compares its genetic barcode (short DNA sequence) to barcodes of known species in one of several reference databases.The toolkit’s advantage is its ability to quickly process many barcode sequences, at multiple analysis locations on the gene, that enable it to identify the species of the DNA sequences of many organisms at the same time. Researchers from the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and CALeDNA have developed a toolkit designed to quickly identify the species in a biological community by simultaneously analyzing the environmental DNA (eDNA) from multiple species from a single analysis of a sample of water or soil. Their aim is to eliminate the need for researchers to sort and process multiple eDNA sequences independently, thus saving time and money.They published a description of the open-source software tool, called the Anacapa Toolkit, as well as results of a field test in the kelp forests off southern California.Kelp forest at Anacapa Island off southern California. Image by Dana Roeber Murray via Flickr. CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0.eDNA is the genetic material shed by animals and plants into the surrounding ecosystem, usually water or soil, through their skin, scales, feces or pollen. eDNA has proved increasingly useful for identifying particularly aquatic species found at a given site. A single one-liter (one quart) sample of water can contain eDNA for many species and is a non-invasive means of collecting data.The software toolkit is a series of modules that can analyze DNA sequences from multiple locations (loci) on the genes extracted from the eDNA in the sample and compare them to a customized reference database of sequences of known species. It produces a spreadsheet of all the species found in the sample for which it has a known reference sequence.Lead author Emily Curd said the outputs of eDNA research in the Anacapa toolkit are standardized and eliminate many of the human steps and potential missteps that previous tools include. “When you compare our results against previous studies, we do a lot better capturing the biodiversity that’s out there,” Curd said in a statement.Scientists use genetic barcoding, analyses of short DNA sequences from a specific point on the gene, to identify a species by comparing its barcode to a database of known barcodes. Research teams have since developed metabarcording analyses that allow them to analyze the barcodes of many species at the same time and determine which species are present in the sample.A treefish, a California native, at Anacapa Island. eDNA from water samples allow researchers to detect the presence of individual species from the scales or skin they leave behind, even if the animal is no longer in the area. Image by Dana Roeber Murray via Flickr. CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0.In developing the new tool, the researchers recognized three main challenges to accurately and reliably identifying species using eDNA:eDNA studies often sequence multiple loci on the genes of a given sample because plants, fungi, and various animal species are each best detected using different loci, but researchers currently must process each of these independently;a lack of curated reference databases for all of the loci the researchers want to analyze for all the potential species in a water or soil sample of a given site hinders identification;current metabarcode pipelines (a series of steps, or workflow) often discard large portions of sequence data that are potentially useful for identifying the taxon (e.g. species) of a sequence that doesn’t fully align with reference sequences.To use the toolkit, a research team first collects a water or soil sample and extracts DNA from it using standard techniques that produce genetic sequences of the various life forms in the sample.Marine invertebrates of California’s Channel Islands. The toolkit analyzes the eDNA collected in water samples of the multiple organisms that form a biological community. Image by Ed Bierman, CC 2.0.“It’s amazing how sensitive this technique is,” said co-author Zack Gold, referring to the team’s experience that DNA from fewer than a few dozen cells is enough to detect an organism’s presence in a sample.The users upload these genetic sequences of yet-unknown species to the toolkit, which compares them to a genetic reference library of sequences with known identities. This comparison allows the tool to process the barcode sequences from the eDNA in the sample and identify the species associated with each barcode.The tool customizes the reference database for each analysis using information that the research team provides on the organisms that might be in their sample.The researchers do this by inputting primers for species or higher taxa of interest. A primer is a short nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) sequence from a particular location on the gene that provides a starting point for DNA amplification and synthesis. Synthesis of this existing strand of nucleotides primes, or provides a foundation for, synthesizing the DNA collected in the study sample.The toolkit’s Creating Reference libraries Using eXisting tools (CRUX) module generates custom reference databases based on these user-defined primers by querying public databases, such as GenBank and the European Molecular Biology Lab (EMBL) nucleotide database, to find known sequences for the organisms associated with the user’s selected primers.The toolkit, which is freely available, offers access to several reference databases to complement the user-customized reference database, and users can add their own sequences to their database.The toolkit’s advantage is its ability to quickly process the many barcode sequences, at multiple analysis locations on the gene (multiple loci), that allow it to identify the species of the DNA sequences of many organisms at the same time.Environmental DNA is often dilute or partially degraded, so the toolkit trims and processes sequences, eliminating poor-quality sections and separating sequence files from the various loci within each sample. It categorizes the sequence files by quality, and its classifier identifies the species associated with each sequence by comparing them to the sequences with known identities in the reference database. It produces a spreadsheet of sequences and species, plus reports on the identification.The researchers tested the toolkit on 30 samples of seawater from southern California’s kelp forests and found it captured a greater diversity of sequences and species than published reference databases.The taxonomic assignments (identifications) from the research team’s test samples collected from seawater off southern California, highlighting the Anacapa Island kelp forest vertebrate families identified from the 12S metabarcodes (primers). Families in bold are featured in the photographs. Image is Figure 2 of Curd et al (2019).Although all components of the toolkit are open and available to the public, researchers wanting to use the toolkit must have sufficient DNA analysis experience to select appropriate primers for their research site and to use standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques to copy and extract DNA to produce the sequences that they input into the toolkit.Gold called the new tool a “really big game-changer,” though he recognized it has limitations.Using eDNA, it cannot, for example, determine how many individuals of a particular species are in a certain area, just that a species is present. “It’s not going to replace all of the surveys and monitoring efforts,” Gold said, “but doing an eDNA survey is the most sensitive method to find where species are living.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Sue Palminteri Animals, DNA, Fungi, Monitoring, Oceans, Open-source, Plants, Research, Software, surveys, Technology, Wildtech center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Research outlines ‘roadmap’ for land use to slow climate change

first_imgCarbon Emissions, Climate Change, Climate Science, Conservation, Deforestation, Earth Science, Environment, Forest Carbon, Forestry, Forests, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, IPCC, Rainforests, Research, Saving Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests A new study finds that the land sector could account for nearly one-third of the climate mitigation necessary to keep global temperatures below a 1.5-degree-Celsius (2.7-degree-Fahrenheit) rise over pre-industrial levels as referenced in the 2015 Paris climate accords.The research, drawing on other studies looking at the potential for various reforms, puts forth a roadmap for carbon neutrality in the land sector by 2040.In addition to measures such as forest protection and restoration, the paper’s authors also call for human behavior change and investment in carbon capture technologies. Overhauling how humans manage Earth’s surface could account for the equivalent of 15 billion metric tons (16.5 billion tons) of CO2 every year through a combination of lower emissions and higher sequestration, according to a new report.That amount of carbon is almost a third of what we need to mitigate by 2050 to keep the global temperature rise under 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels, scientists say.“Coming on the heels of historically high summertime temperatures, and in the wake of reports sounding alarms about the state of our forests and food system, this report highlights land-based climate solutions — what to do where, and by when — that are feasible now and deliver many other benefits,” Stephanie Roe, an environmental scientist at the University of Virginia and the study’s lead author, said in a statement.Small-scale agriculture in Madagascar. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.In a paper published Oct. 21 in the journal Nature Climate Change, Roe and her colleagues pulled together research on the predicted impacts of various strategies involving the “land sector” aimed at winnowing down emissions and removing existing carbon dioxide from the air. Their recommendations serve as a roadmap for avoiding the dangers of unchecked climate change, they write.Among the most important steps in the next decade or so are cutting deforestation and the loss of peatlands and mangroves by 70 percent, bringing back those ecosystems in places where they’ve been lost, and increasing the use of techniques like agroforestry to integrate trees with food crops. The authors also say that bolstering carbon storage capabilities in agricultural soils and human behavior change — such as eating less meat and cutting food waste — are also priorities.The team figures that putting all of these measures in place would account for up to 30 percent of the contributions necessary to remain below that 1.5-degree threshold laid out in the 2015 Paris climate accords. In particular, moves by just a handful of countries, including the United States, China and the members of the European Union, will go a long way toward meeting this benchmark, as will efforts by Brazil and other tropical countries.A mangrove swamp in Panama. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Following the authors’ prescriptions would make the sector carbon neutral on balance by 2040. And 10 years after that, land uses could be pulling more CO2 from the atmosphere than they put out, the team writes. But these actions aren’t only about slowing changing climate, Pete Smith, a biologist at the U.K.’s University of Aberdeen and one of the co-authors, said in the statement.“Protecting forests, for example, provides cleaner air and water, more food, improved livelihoods, more biodiversity and resilience to climate extremes,” said Smith, who was also a lead author of a recent report released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. “These multiple benefits are a real selling point for land-based climate solutions.”Lately, however, trends haven’t been moving in the right direction, especially on forest protection, Charlotte Streck, who directs the think tank Climate Focus, said in the statement. Deforestation has risen by more than 40 percent in the five years since 200 countries, companies and organizations signed the New York Declaration on Forests in 2014, according to a 2019 report that Streck co-authored.Peatlands in Indonesian Borneo. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.“What’s worrisome is the large gap between where we are and where we need to go to avoid climate chaos,” said Streck, also a co-author of the Nature Climate Change study.Bridging that divide requires limiting emissions along with siphoning some of the CO2 that’s already in the atmosphere, Roe said, which will mean finding technological solutions to complement moves like forest and peatland restoration.“The land can [do] and already does a lot, but it can’t do it all,” Roe said. “Research and investment in negative emissions technologies today will be critical for assisting in their sustainable deployment in the future.”Baobab trees in Madagascar. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.The drastic rebalancing of atmospheric CO2 necessary to avoid a future with average temperatures higher than 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels will likely require methods such as the direct air capture and storage of carbon from the atmosphere and finding ways to implement the controversial bioenergy with carbon capture and storage, or BECCS, approach without causing problems for human health, biodiversity or water supplies.On top of investing in a wide array of strategies, Roe said that acting quickly is also vitally important to keep a lid on climate change.“[T]he window of opportunity is getting smaller,” she added. “The longer we delay action, the lower our chances of achieving Paris Agreement goals, and the higher the burden we put on our natural and food systems.”Banner image of a mix of mangroves and oil palm in Malaysian Borneo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Correction: An earlier version of this article misstated the number of tons of CO2 that the land sector could account for. It is 15 billion metric tons (16.5 billion tons), not 15 million metric tons (16.5 million tons).Citation:Roe, S., Streck, C., Obersteiner, M., Frank, S., Griscom, B., Drouet, L., … Lawrence, D. (2019). Contribution of the land sector to a 1.5 °C world. Nature Climate Change. doi:10.1038/s41558-019-0591-9FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Council providing housing assistance to residents after floods

first_imgDonegal County Council’s Housing Service is currently providing assistance and support to the residents of Donegal Town who were worst affected by the Storm Lorenzo floods.Fourteen homes and four businesses were damaged by flooding as heavy rain struck early on Friday morning.Donegal County Council Fire Service was called to assist householders and business owners in three areas of the town.  One house and four businesses were affected on New Row, five homes in Brookfield and 6-8 homes were affected at Clarendon Drive. A green area at St. John Bosco Centre at Drumrooske in Donegal Town was also flooded.Fire Brigades from Donegal Town, Ballyshannon, Killybegs, Stranorlar, Glenties and Letterkenny responded while Bundoran Fire Brigade responded to a flooding incident in the Bundoran area.  There were also isolated flooding incidents in Ballintra, Laghey and Frosses. Donegal County Council’s Roads crews also responded with two high volume pumps and sandbagging in areas of Donegal Town and were assisted by Donegal Civil Defence.Donegal County Council’s Housing Service is currently engaging with households displaced by this flooding event with a view to providing housing assistance and support where needed. Donegal County Council would like to sincerely thank all members of the community who assisted and supported the response to this flooding incident and would also like to thank the media for their support and co-operation throughout this incident.Donegal County Council can be contacted during normal business hours on 074 91 53900 and in the event of an out of hours emergency the Council can be contacted on 074 91 72288.  For emergencies requiring the assistance of the Fire Service call 999 or 112.You can keep up to date on conditions by signing up for free alerts to your phone by registering at www.mapalerter.com/donegal or by following Donegal County Council on Facebook or on Twitter @DonegalCouncil.Council providing housing assistance to residents after floods was last modified: October 4th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Mixed day for the area’s clubs

first_imgThere was no Christmas cheer at Loftus Road, where QPR were beaten 2-1 by West Brom and returned to the bottom of the Premier League.After Chris Brunt’s long-range strike and keeper Robert Green’s own goal, Djibril Cisse netted for Rangers but they were unable to find an equaliser.There was also disappointment for Fulham at Craven Cottage, where they led Southampton through Dimitar Berbatov’s early goal until Rickie Lambert’s 85th-minute penalty rescued a 1-1 draw for the visitors.But there were wins for Chelsea, who won 1-0 at Norwich, and in-form Brentford, who enjoyed a 3-1 victory at Colchester.Juan Mata scored a first-half winner for the Blues, while Brentford were 2-0 up by the 12th minute courtesy of goals from Marcello Trotta and Adam Forshaw.Colchester had Josh Thompson sent off before pulling a goal back through Drey Wright, and Brentford were themselves reduced to 10 men when Tom Adeyemi was dismissed.But defender Harlee Dean’s late goal sealed another triumph for Uwe Rosler’s side – their fifth consecutive league win.YTo4OntzOjk6IndpZGdldF9pZCI7czoyMDoid3lzaWphLW5sLTEzNTI0NjE4NjkiO3M6NToibGlzdHMiO2E6MTp7aTowO3M6MToiMyI7fXM6MTA6Imxpc3RzX25hbWUiO2E6MTp7aTozO3M6MjI6Ildlc3QgTG9uZG9uIFNwb3J0IGxpc3QiO31zOjEyOiJhdXRvcmVnaXN0ZXIiO3M6MTc6Im5vdF9hdXRvX3JlZ2lzdGVyIjtzOjEyOiJsYWJlbHN3aXRoaW4iO3M6MTM6ImxhYmVsc193aXRoaW4iO3M6Njoic3VibWl0IjtzOjMzOiJTdWJzY3JpYmUgdG8gb3VyIGRhaWx5IG5ld3NsZXR0ZXIiO3M6Nzoic3VjY2VzcyI7czoyODM6IlRoYW5rIHlvdSEgUGxlYXNlIGNoZWNrIHlvdXIgaW5ib3ggaW4gb3JkZXIgdG8gY29uZmlybSB5b3VyIHN1YnNjcmlwdGlvbi4gSWYgeW91IGRvbid0IHNlZSBhbiBlLW1haWwgZnJvbSB1cywgY2hlY2sgeW91ciBzcGFtIGZvbGRlci4gSWYgeW91IHN0aWxsIGhhdmVuJ3QgcmVjZWl2ZWQgYSBjb25maXJtYXRpb24gbWVzc2FnZSwgcGxlYXNlIGUtbWFpbCBmZWVkYmFja0B3ZXN0bG9uZG9uc3BvcnQuY29tIGFuZCB0ZWxsIHVzIHlvdSB3aXNoIHRvIHN1YnNjcmliZSB0byBvdXIgbmV3c2xldHRlci4iO3M6MTI6ImN1c3RvbWZpZWxkcyI7YToxOntzOjU6ImVtYWlsIjthOjE6e3M6NToibGFiZWwiO3M6NToiRW1haWwiO319fQ== Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Nestle to invest R300m in SA

first_img27 July 2006Nestle SA plans to invest a further R300-million in South Africa over the next three years, the local arm of the Swiss-based company announced on the eve of its 90th anniversary in the country.The world’s largest food and beverage firm was registered as a company in South Africa in 1916, 44 years after its first products arrived in 1872. Nestle has 13 factories in the country, employing over 4 000 people.Speaking to reporters in Johannesburg on Wednesday, Nestle SA chairman and managing director Yves Manghardt said the company also planned to extend its business in southern and eastern Africa.At present, about 85% of its R6-billion regional turnover comes from South Africa alone. “We shall start to balance the 85:15 equilibrium to make it 50:50, but not at the cost of South Africa,” Manghardt told the SA Press Association (Sapa).On black economic empowerment (BEE), Manghardt said his company was waiting for the BEE the charter for the food and beverages sector to be finalised.At the same time, he noted that Nestle has long been involved in empowerment-related activities in South Africa, such as setting up small businesses and other social responsibility programmes, especially in agriculture.In its recently published “Nestle Commitment to Africa Report”, the company notes that it supports “a number of major projects in Africa aimed at reducing diseases such as HIV/Aids, also at reducing malnutrition and poverty.“But Nestle’s greatest contribution to Africa is through the impact of our core business, with responsible, sustainable operations that create jobs and catalyse entrepreneurship.”SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Long-awaited, Northey confirmed as Undersecretary at USDA

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By voice vote, the U.S. Senate confirmed the nomination of Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey to the position of USDA Under Secretary for Farm Production and Conservation.Northey has been serving as Secretary of Agriculture for Iowa and the confirmation is generally viewed as a big win for agriculture and renewable fuels.“After a needless four-month delay, farmers across the country will be well-served with Bill Northey finally on the job at USDA,” said Kevin Skunes, president of the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA).The confirmation came at a very critical time for the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) in the ongoing debate over Renewable Identification Numbers (RINs). Renewable fuel opponents have been pushing for capped RIN values, claiming the costs are too high for refineries.  “Today in Washington President Trump, officials from USDA and EPA, and Senators met to discuss issues affecting the RFS. There was no deal cut at this meeting. While no deal was made at this meeting, some participants tried to sell a deal,” Skunes said. “Our farmers cannot afford any deal that undermines demand for ethanol. We continue to believe the elusive win-win solution involves regulatory parity for E15 and higher blends of ethanol, essentially allowing year-round sales of E15, and improved transparency in the RIN marketplace. Parity for higher blends would increase the supply of RINs and lower RIN values, allowing the RFS to work as it is intended. Farmers understand how supply affects price.“A cap on RIN values hurts farmers because it reduces ethanol consumption below current levels. This reduction in corn use will push already low corn prices even lower.”The National Corn Growers Association has made protecting the RFS and the system of RINs a top priority.“Just last November, the EPA concluded RIN values are not causing economic harm to refiners,” Skunes said. “The failings of one company should not be used to destroy a successful energy policy that serves not only millions of farmers who rely on strong market demand created by the RFS, but also the hundreds of ethanol and biodiesel plants and tens of thousands of plant workers.”last_img read more

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NCAA approves tougher violations rules Gene Smith sees improvement in flawed system

The NCAA Board of Directors released a new, more stringent set of rules Tuesday for enforcing athletic programs’ adherence to codes of conduct. The new rules try to simplify and accelerate what has traditionally been a long and complicated rule-enforcing process. The rules also aim to increase the severity of the sanctions and make punishments more uniform instead of treating things on a case-by-case basis, according to the announcement posted on ncaa.org.  Among the most notable changes involve holding head coaches more accountable for the actions of their staff. Now, violations by any member of the staff will reflect on the head coach, unless he or she can prove their personal effort for an “atmosphere of strict compliance.” There was also a change in tiers of violations. Rather than categorizing a violation as “major” or “secondary,” there will now be four levels, with a level one violation being the most “severe breach of conduct.” The NCAA could potentially disqualify a team for multiple years of postseason play and fine the program millions of dollars for a level one violation. Other consequences for various levels of infractions include harsher scholarship reductions, recruiting limits and head coach suspensions. Suspensions for coaches as well as programs can range from 10 percent of the season to a full season. The NCAA Division I Committee on Infractions will expand from 10 members to 24, speeding up the infractions process and handing out violations in a more timely manner. In Ohio State football’s case, this could have meant serving out OSU’s bowl ineligibility during the 2011 season rather than the current season. The last of the most significant changes in the new set of rules includes a more consistent penalty system. Sanctions will no longer be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, and the new standards will ensure equal treatment – and punishment – across the NCAA. NCAA President Mark Emmert said the rules aim to eliminate the temptation for teams to do whatever it takes to win. “We have sought all along to remove the `risk-reward’ analysis that has tempted people — often because of the financial pressures to win at all costs — to break the rules in the hopes that either they won’t be caught or that the consequences won’t be very harsh if they do get caught,” Emmert said. “The new system the board adopted today is the result of a lot of hard work and membership input devoted to protecting the collegiate model.” OSU athletic director Gene Smith said he agrees with the new rules and says they help to solve a “flawed” system. “I am supportive of the new legislation,” Smith said. “It provides clarity and transparency to a system of enforcement and infraction management that was flawed. It also will improve the ability for cases to be handled more expeditiously.” Emmert began the process of establishing a new set of rules in August 2011. The new enforcement structure will take effect on August 1, 2013. Dan Hope contributed to this article
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Commentary Scarlet and Gray Sports Radio reflects on Ohio State footballs season

As members of the student-run Scarlet and Gray Sports Radio, we have been given a tremendous opportunity. Sports broadcasting is a rather exclusive field, and when we graduate from Ohio State, it’s highly unlikely we’ll ever get another chance to broadcast another Ohio State sporting event. It’s even more unlikely that we’ll ever get a chance to broadcast a Buckeyes football game ever again. That’s why this particular weekend is going to be a special one for all of us on the football crew for Scarlet and Gray Sports Radio. The football game against Michigan is always the most important sporting event in Columbus every year, but this weekend it’s about more than just bragging rights. This Saturday marks the end of a long (but not long enough) journey for this OSU football team, as players look to finish off an undefeated regular season against that hated school up north. As Woody Hayes once said with tears in his eyes, “It’s Michigan! It’s Michigan!” There shouldn’t need to be any reason other than that, for this to be the most important game of our lives. This year you can throw in the chance OSU has to be one of just two undefeated programs (depending on what Notre Dame does) and a potential Associated Press national championship. This is easily the most important regular season game we’ve had the privilege to broadcast, and as always with these rivalry games, there is a lot at stake. Not many people get the opportunity to even attend a game this important, let alone broadcast it out to the world. In our time covering this team, we’ve been able to follow them through the highs and lows of the last couple seasons. We were present for Devin Smith’s unbelievable game-winning catch against Wisconsin last year, we were there as the defense nearly collapsed in the final minutes against Indiana, and we were there as backup quarterback Kenny Guiton led the team down the field in the final seconds to force overtime, and ultimately win, against Purdue. It’s been an awesome journey, and this Saturday is sure to be a thrilling climax. As much as we love following the team in this capacity, it can be a humbling job sometimes. Since we broadcast online at our website OhioStateSports.net, we get listeners from all over the world. After the Nebraska game this year, we were lucky enough to receive a couple emails from active military members who listened from the Middle East. It was truly awesome to see. For the three seniors who will be on the call for the game, this is it for football. The one sport we all dream to broadcast and take a little more to heart. We worked hard, competing with other very capable and dedicated broadcasters just to get a chance to call a football game. But as many football fans know, this isn’t just a football game, it’s The Game. It’s up to every listener to decide how good a job we do when we put on the headsets every Saturday, but we do know it’s been nothing but a blast broadcasting OSU football this season, just as it is every season. It’s sure to be an exhilarating atmosphere Saturday in the Horseshoe, and we can’t wait to be there for all the excitement. No matter what happens, we will be able to say that we were the only OSU students that broadcast the Buckeyes’ shot at an undefeated season. That is pretty darn cool. read more

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