In Your Neighbourhood

first_imgMasters LeagueChristian Ambassadors were one of six winners in the INSPORTS St Catherine FA Masters Football League last Sunday.Christian Ambassadors defeated Flamingo 3-1 in Zone Two, while Maxfield clipped Spanish Town, also in the same zone. DB Basovak tagged Windsor Lion 2-0 and Above Rocks beat McCook’s Pen 2-1 in Zone One, while Eastern Strikers stopped Steadham 2-0 and veteran club Nautica got by Dunbeholden 1-0 in Zone Three. The competition continues tomorrow.Joy for Cedar Grove EstateThe Cedar Grove Estate community is still in a celebratory mood as their football club won its first York Pharmacy-sponsored Portmore Division Two Football League crown at the Dunbeholden playing field last Sunday.Cedar Grove Estate defeated Braeton United 3-0 courtesy of a second half hat-trick from Damion Jackson, that left the Braeton hopefuls in shock. The win saw Cedar Grove collecting one of the most coveted trophy in Portmore football and will now turn their attention to Division One duties next season.”This is pure joy for the community. We had a mini motorcade as we drove back to Cedar Grove Estate,” said Bryan Cunningham, president of Cedar Grove Estate FC.He added that hard work has paid off for his team, noting that Division One will take an extra effort and a high level of commitment for his players and executive body.Church cricket league starts this morningThe Power of Faith Ministries Church Cricket League will officially get under way this morning, after water woes forced its postponement last Saturday.Defending champions Power of Faith International will open their campaign breaking bread with their brother team, Power of Faith Development, in the curtain-raiser of a double-header at the Bridgeport Sports ground this morning, at 10 a.m. Faith Temple New Testament oppose Portmore Gospel Assembly at 2 p.m.The league will be played in a round robin format and the two top teams will advance to the final. Christian Gardens, Greater Portmore in INSPORTS Community League finalChristian Gardens and Greater Portmore Strikers will contest tomorrow’s final of the Portmore leg of the Institute of Sports (INSPORTS) Community Football League at Dunbeholden playing field at 3 p.m.They booked their spot after narrow semi-final victories last weekend at the Cedar Grove community playing field.Christian Gardens came from behind to overcome a stern test from Dunbeholden to win 5-4 on penalties, after playing to 1-1 stalemate after regulation and extra time. Jevonne Munroe (64th) scored for Christian Gardens and Ricardo Boothe (21st) netted for Dunbeholden.It was also another nail-biting battle in the feature game of the afternoon as Greater Portmore Strikers edged East West Strikers 6-5 on penalties, after both sides remained inseparable at 1-1 following full and extra-time. Mario Wilson (49th) equalised for Greater Portmore, after Jevoh Robert (30th) had given East West Strikers the lead.INSPORTS St Catherine FAlast_img read more

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New report reveals northern Ecuadorian region has lost 61 percent of forests

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The Mache-Chindul Ecological Reserve maintains only 61 percent of its original plant cover. The area’s ecological significance is partly due to its sitting in a transition zone between humid tropical forests and seasonally dry forests.In Cotacachi-Cayapas Park, a high level of conservation success represents a source of hope. Now the challenge is to connect the park to private reserves to guarantee protection of the most-threatened lowland forests. Spanning nearly 3 million hectares (7.4 million acres) along the coast, Ecuador’s Chocó region is known as a biodiversity hotspot with high levels of endemism, among the richest region for plants in the western hemisphere. However, this ecosystem is also one of the most threatened in the world. In Ecuador, it has been one of the most affected by deforestation in recent decades.A recent analysis by the Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP), an initiative of the organization Conservación Amazónica (ACCA), reveals just how much forest has been lost. Overall, 61 percent (1.8 million hectares, or 4.4 million acres) of the Ecuadoran Chocó has been deforested; one-fifth of that loss (365,000 hectares, or 902,000 acres) occurred between 2000 and 2018.The threats are many. According to Carmen Josse, scientific director of Fundación EcoCiencia, in Ecuador, these include industrial oil palm plantations as well as legal and illegal logging and mining. “In the highland areas, on the border of the Cotacachi-Cayapas Reserve, above 1,000 meters [3,300 feet], we are talking about very large mining concessions that have caused controversy among the local population, one of them in the Intag region, very close to the border of the Cotacachi-Cayapas Reserve. A few weeks ago, it was announced that abundant reserves of various high-quality minerals existed in this area.”Endangered forests and the Mache-Chindul ReserveEcuadoran Chocó lowland forest experienced the lion’s share of deforestation, losing 68 percent (1.2 million hectares, or 3 million acres) of its forest cover by 2018. Middle- and high-elevation forests together were reduced by 50 percent (611,000 hectares, or 1.5 million acres), according to MAAP. Its analysis used data from Ecuador’s Ministry of the Environment for years before 2017, and the University of Maryland for 2017 and 2018.Comparison of the original forest and the state of the forest in 2018, using data from MAE, Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA.The analysis found 4,600 hectares (11,400 acres) of Ecuadoran Chocó forest were deforested in 2017 and 2018, mostly in low-elevation forest.According to MAAP’s analysis, only 39 percent of Ecuadoran Chocó forest (1.17 million hectares, or 2.89 million acres) remains. For lowland forest, located mainly in the province of Esmeraldas, only 32 percent  (569,000 hectares, or 1.4 million acres) remains.“This is dramatic because although it is a world biodiversity hotspot, it is one of the least appreciated,” Martin Schaefer, executive director of Fundación Jocotoco, told Mongabay Latam.MAAP’s analysis reveals protected areas haven’t been immune, finding only 61 percent of Mache-Chindul Ecological Reserve retains its original forest.Josse attributed this, to a certain extent, to there already being settlements inside this area from the time of its declaration in 1996. These include, on the one hand, indigenous Chachi communities, and on the other, migrants who moved there to work in agriculture.“The declaration was complex, but it made sense, because it is an area that, although located in areas of low elevation near the coast, has a very rugged topography (consisting of a small coastal mountain range) that should not be used for agricultural activities. On the other hand, it also has high levels of endemism, because it is a transition zone between very humid forests, characteristic of the Chocó, and seasonally dry forests,” Josse said.Deforestation at different elevations, using data from MAAP, MAE, Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA.Josse said deforestation in the reserve has increased with the construction of nearby roads, among other things. “According to the evaluation of forest cover carried out by EcoCiencia in 2017, there are only 76,053 hectares [187,931 acres] of native forest left among the 200,000 [494,210 acres] in the area comprised of the district of Muisne and the Mache-Chindul Reserve,” notes the report “Oportunidades y desafíos en el manejo de los bosques y sus servicios ambientales en el cantón Muisne, Esmeraldas” (Opportunities and challenges in the management of forests and their environmental services in the district of Muisne, Esmeraldas), published by EcoCiencia last year. “If current rates of deforestation continue, in just 25 to 30 years the last remaining forests that exist in the area will be lost.”In its report, MAAP highlights two areas significantly affected by deforestation. The first is a location close to the border with Colombia that lost 380 hectares (939 acres) between 2016 and 2018 “directly to the north of an oil palm plantation, possibly for an expansion.”The analysis also reveals the Chachi Indigenous Reserve lost around 50 hectares (124 acres) of its forest cover between 2016 and 2018.Hope in Cotacachi-CayapasDespite the loss of forest in many areas of the Ecuadoran Chocó, MAAP’s report offers optimism and hope in the high level of conservation of the recently named Cotacachi-Cayapas National Park, first declared protected in 1968 as an ecological reserve. MAAP’s data and images show that 99 percent of the park’s forests were in good condition as of 2018.Schaefer from Fundación Jocotoco said Cotacachi-Cayapas remains important because it still has extensive forest coverage. However, he noted that the majority of land in the reserve is above 500 meters (1,640 feet), while the most threatened habitat in the Ecuadoran Chocó is the lowland forest, at elevations of less than 300 meters (980 feet).The patch outlined in red shows the deforestation of 380 hectares just north of an oil palm plantation, using data from Planet, ESA, MAAPThe patches outlined in red show the deforestation of 50 hectares inside the Chachi Indigenous Reserve, using data from Planet, MAAP.“Our intention is to protect this habitat (of lowland forests) and then connect it to Cotacachi-Cayapas, because there is evidence that the species in the western area are moving their range of altitude upwards as a result of increasing temperatures, due to climate change. In order to facilitate this change in altitude we need this connectivity,” Schaefer said, adding that this is why Fundación Jocotoco is interested in expanding its Canandé reserve to connect it to the national park.The aim is to move quickly, since the land in areas of low elevation is increasingly affected by road projects and “very suited to palm oil plantations,” Schaefer said. He added it is important to work with local communities and businesses that have sustainable models of production and that maintain a certain level of vegetation on their land, also providing a home for threatened species. “We want to demonstrate that there are alternatives for working in the forest without destroying its natural resources.”Conservationists say the protection of the Ecuadoran Chocó has become a necessity due to the increasing pressures it faces.“The area has also been affected by selective logging financed by large timber companies, and so these forests, those from which high-quality wood has been extracted, have gradually become degraded and have been converted to other land uses,” Josse said, adding that this is currently still happening.If this loss of forest continues, Schaefer said, it will destroy a place of enormous biodiversity where “we are losing species, often before even discovering them.”Banner image of forests in the highland areas of the Ecuadoran Chocó by Sebastián Crespo/CONDESAN.es.mongabay.com Article published by Genevieve Belmakercenter_img Agriculture, Conservation, data, data collection, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Land Use Change, Mapping, Rainforests, satellite data, Saving Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests last_img read more

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‘Timebomb’: Fires devastate tiger and elephant habitat in Sumatra

first_imgBanner image: Elephant habitat on this peatland is threatened due to fire and land conversion. Photo by Rifky/CIFOR.Editor’s note: This story was powered by Places to Watch, a Global Forest Watch (GFW) initiative designed to quickly identify concerning forest loss around the world and catalyze further investigation of these areas. Places to Watch draws on a combination of near-real-time satellite data, automated algorithms and field intelligence to identify new areas on a monthly basis. In partnership with Mongabay, GFW is supporting data-driven journalism by providing data and maps generated by Places to Watch. Mongabay maintains complete editorial independence over the stories reported using this data.Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Animals, Big Cats, Deforestation, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Featured, Fires, Forest Fires, Forests, Green, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Mammals, National Parks, Oil Palm, Old Growth Forests, Palm Oil, Plantations, Primary Forests, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Tigers, Tropical Forests, wildfires, Wildlife Another heavy fire season in Indonesia has taken a toll on the country’s remaining forest. In Sembilang National Park, on the island of Sumatra, fires raged into primary forest that provides vital habitat for critically endangered Sumatran tigers and elephants.Satellite data and imagery indicate the fires may have had a big impact on tigers in the park. In total, around 30 percent of tiger habitat in Sembilang burned between August and September. The fires also encroached into the park’s elephant habitat.Fires have also reportedly ravaged elephant habitat in Padang Sugihan Sebokor Wildlife Reserve, which lies southeast of Sembilang and serves as a corridor for wild elephants in South Sumatra. One report estimates that half of the reserve has suffered fire damage.Researchers say slash-and-burn clearing techniques likely started most of fires in the area, which were then exacerbated by drier-than-usual conditions and underground peat stores left unprotected by policy rollbacks.s Recent dry-season fires that raged across Indonesia in September and October have taken a toll on forests, even in protected areas. Fires were particularly destructive in southern Sumatra, burning around 8 percent of Sembilang National Park, according to satellite data and local observers.The fires, along with illegal logging in the area and the conversion of secondary forest and shrub land to oil palm plantations, continue to threaten critically endangered wildlife such as the Sumatran elephant, a subspecies of the Asian elephant, and the Sumatran tiger. Endangered Malay tapir, as well as several common primate species, are also known to inhabit the park area.Until recently no known elephant populations existed in Sembilang National Park, but a study published in May in the journal Biovalentia: Biological Research uncovered four individual elephants in the park over six days of observation early early 2019.The study estimates that there are between six and 10 individual elephants in the park area, ranging from north of the Sembilang River to south of the Bungin River and inland toward the west where the park borders the PT Raja Palma oil palm plantation.Wild elephant group in Sebokor Village Forest, part of Padang Sugihan Wildlife Reserve – Sebokor, which is located near Sembilang National Forest. Photo by Faizal Abdul Aziz/CIFOR.Donny Gunaryadi, secretary of the Indonesia Elephant Forum, told Mongabay that the government is currently in the process of finalizing a new 10-year action plan for Sumatran elephant protection that is expected to start next year.The plan will likely concentrate on preserving populations in the provinces of Aceh at the northern tip of Sumatra, Riau in the island’s center, and Jambi, which lies south of Riau and north of the South Sumatra province that is home to Sembilang National Park.“The population is decreasing,” said Gunaryadi, who has been advising on the draft of the policy, estimating that there are now 1,400 elephants in Sumatra, down from 2,400 a decade ago.In the 1980s, when Indonesia launched its massive transmigration program to resettle people from more populous areas of Java to other islands in the archipelago such as Sumatra, there were estimated to be as many as 4,000 elephants still on the island. However, conflicts between humans and elephants over land increased with the influx of settlers, and elephants have been on the decline ever since.“This is a very serious decrease within 10 years,” Gunaryadi said. “Some of the problems are from poaching, but also [the elephant] doesn’t have a secure habitat in many areas.”Tiger, elephant habitat likely affected by recent firesJust how Sembilang’s tiger populations fared during the fires is not exactly known just yet. The Zoological Society of London has staff that follow tiger populations in the region, but they were not prepared to accept an interview at this time.“Though we work on the ground and were impacted by the forest fires like many others, [the staff there] haven’t conducted any specific analysis or monitoring on the forest fires in Berbak Sembilang,” Emma Ackerley, a press officer with ZSL, told Mongabay.However, satellite data and imagery indicate the fires may have had a big impact on tigers in the park. In total, approximately 20,000 hectares (49,400 acres) — around 30 percent — of tiger habitat in Sembilang burned between August and September, according to data from the University of Maryland, NASA, and NGOs WWF and RESOLVE, and imagery from Planet Labs.Satellite data show large areas of fire-caused deforestation at either end of Sembilang National Park. The northern fires have wiped out a portion of its remaining primary forest, which is habitat for critically endangered Sumatran tigers and elephants. Source: GLAD/UMD, accessed through Global Forest WatchSatellite imagery shows fires had advanced well into primary forest as of late October. Source: Planet Labs.The Berbak Sembilang National Park Authority did not respond to several requests to comment on the situation.Yoga Travolindra, one of the researchers for the study that identified elephants in the park from the conservation group Forum Konservasi Gajah, has been on the ground near the park in recent weeks. He told Mongabay that the fires were unlikely to have killed any elephants since they mostly occurred in mangrove areas, which is not the elephants’ primary habitat.Travolindra said that while tigers did use the mangrove area there was no evidence of deaths in recent field observations of that animal either.“The [primary] problem for the Sumatran elephant today is that their habitat and ecosystems are disturbed from the conversion of land from secondary forests and shrubs into oil palm plantations by several companies located around the national park,” Travolindra said.“At the moment the problems in the national park are mainly area encroachment, illegal logging, and use of large trawlers in fishing,” he said.However, satellite data show that while fires were concentrated in and around mangroves earlier in the year, later burns moved into inland forests — including an area that the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations considers elephant habitat.Drier than usual and getting drier stillTravolindra said the fires likely stemmed from fires set intentionally to open up land for farming. Propelled by a drier-than-usual dry season and underground peat reserves, these fires spread out of control, affecting areas much larger than was intended.“In general this year had been much drier compared to the past few years,” Arief Wijaya from World Resources Institute Indonesia told Mongabay. “These areas in South Sumatra host a vast amount of peatlands and are very susceptible to fires, and both [Sembilang and Berbak National Park to the north] are quite dominated by peatlands.”Part of South Sumatra’s Padang Sugihan wildlife reserve area has been damaged by illegal logging and forest fires. Photo by Faizal Abdul Aziz/CIFORIndonesia has vast unground stores of peat, which have built up over hundreds to thousands of years as vegetation died. Normally waterlogged and restricted to swamps, countrywide efforts to drain swamps and make them suitable for farming and logging has dried out many of Indonesia’s peatlands. And when it’s dry, peat is extremely combustible — and peat fires are very hard to control. Indonesia’s 2015 fire crisis that contributed to the premature deaths of more than 100,000 people is largely blamed on wildfires on drained peatlands caused by slash-and-burn agriculture.Bukti Bagja, a land-use accountability manager at World Resources Institute Indonesia, said there was a strong correlation between the recent fires and illegal deforestation activity in and near Sembilang National Park.“The pattern for these fire cases in that area is that it usually happens one or two months before the peak rainy season comes,” Bagja said. “To me this shows that people are preparing the land for the rainy season [when it wouldn’t be possible to clear].”Bagja said the government had been trying to restore those peatlands after the devastating 2015 fires that burned throughout Indonesia, but that restoration has proven difficult. Blocking of drainage canals that had been dug throughout the area had not restored water levels sufficiently due to the particularly intense dry season, and some peatlands had already been claimed and cleared by locals for agriculture and other uses, Bagja said.Fewer than 1,000 Sumatran tigers are living on Sumatra today, with estimates as low as 330. Photo by Steve Wilson via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0).“The main problem is that during the dry season, from what we understand, there is a continuous decrease in the water table,” Bagja said. “When the area faces a long dry season, then the water table decreases 1 or 2 cm per day, and with the current canal system, the question is how to keep the peat area and the cultivation area moist.”Vital habitat corridors under threatFires have also reportedly ravaged elephant habitat in Padang Sugihan Sebokor Wildlife Reserve, which lies southeast of Sembilang and serves as a corridor for wild elephants in South Sumatra.One report estimates that half of the reserve has suffered fire damage. Since elephants in South Sumatra have such wide ranges it can be difficult to determine exactly how populations were impacted by the most recent fires.As with Sembilang, Padang Sugihan is experiencing issues related to peatland draining and forest encroachment by industry and communities. In the past it has been well protected for the most part, even with limited budgets for conservation, according to Michael Allen Brady, principal scientist at the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).This elephant is named Ken. He was born in Padang Sugihan Wildlife Reserve and enjoys swimming in peat swamps, which are threatened due to fire and land conversion. Photo by Rifky/CIFOR.This protection, however, has not helped prevent this year’s damaging fires.“We’re able to confirm there has been a lot of burning in the [Padang Sugihan] reserve the past two months,” Brady said.“One of the reasons it is burning frequently is that they dug canals through it, seven major canals, and hundreds of tertiary canals,” he said. “It was logged over in the 70s and converted to transmigration lands and then they decided not to develop it and turned it back to the forestry ministry. Unfortunately they drained it but they had not cleared the forest, so it was essentially a timebomb, a standing peat forest that had been drained.”Once the area was designated a wildlife reserve, the military herded elephants into the area in the early 1980s and the government recognized the reserve as elephant habitat. Brady said that following this, the government designated an elephant management unit, built an office complex on the border of the park and encouraged public visitation, but the situation “has deteriorated” in recent years to the point where the unit is non-functioning.“Unfortunately there’s been no systematic monitoring of the [elephant] population in the reserve, but clearly it has gone from a population of about 400 to around a dozen,” Brady said.Yusuf Samsudin, an elephant specialist with CIFOR, agrees: “Local rangers say there are only 12 left now.”Two potential steps forward, one definite step backRegulations enacted after the 2015 fire crisis broadly protected carbon-rich peatlands in the hopes of stopping it from happening again. But these were revised in April this year, limiting protection to “peat domes,” or areas where peat layers protrude higher topographically than the edges of the surrounding peatland. Sources say peatland exploitation and fires intensified after the policy rollback.Morning view of South Sumatra’s Sebokor River, sheathed in mist and trees. Photo by Faizal Abdul Aziz/CIFOR.According to Wijaya, longer-term land-use governance issues need to be addressed in areas affected by fires, including increasing clarity about access to protected lands, resolving issues involving overlapping claims, and strengthening spatial planning policies.Bagja recommends educational outreach. He says local communities and law enforcement have been slow to adapt to changing conditions, and need to be more aware that the peatlands are much drier now than they were just two or three years ago.“Our hope in Indonesia is to bring awareness and knowledge about avoiding fires, to bring it to every household all over the country,” Bagja said. “They should understand it and the cost of using fires is much higher than the intangible cost, the externalities are much higher. The fact is that there are still big gaps in that understanding and knowledge.“They think they can control it but this statement is not valid because the situation has changed.” Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davislast_img read more

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Works on water pipe replacements to begin in Lifford

first_imgA new project is set to begin this month to replace over 3 kilometres of old and damaged water mains in Tamnawood, Lifford.The works along the N14 and onto L-2414-1 will commence in early July and will be carried out on behalf of Irish Water by Farrans Construction.  The project is expected to be completed by late September 2019.The works will involve laying new water service connections from the public water main in the road to customers’ property boundaries and connecting it to the customers’ water supply. Where the existing service connections on the public side are lead these will be replaced as part of this improvement work. Customers in these areas will benefit from a more reliable water supply due to reduced leakage and bursts.Irish Water, working in partnership with Donegal County Council, has said this project may involve some short-term water shut offs and reductions in water pressure.  The project team will ensure that customers are given a minimum of 48 hours’ notice prior to any planned water shut offs. Following these improvement works water supply may take 2-3 hours to return as water refills the network.Explaining further what’s involved, Irish Water’s Leakage Reduction Programme Regional Lead Declan Cawley said: “The replacement of water mains will include laying water service connections from the public water main in the road to customer’s property boundaries and connecting them to the customer’s water supply.  We will try to minimise the impact on customers by having short section of works at a time. Traffic management may be in place during this time, but local and emergency traffic will be maintained at all times.”  Works on water pipe replacements to begin in Lifford was last modified: July 9th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Irish WaterLiffordlast_img read more

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Council providing housing assistance to residents after floods

first_imgDonegal County Council’s Housing Service is currently providing assistance and support to the residents of Donegal Town who were worst affected by the Storm Lorenzo floods.Fourteen homes and four businesses were damaged by flooding as heavy rain struck early on Friday morning.Donegal County Council Fire Service was called to assist householders and business owners in three areas of the town.  One house and four businesses were affected on New Row, five homes in Brookfield and 6-8 homes were affected at Clarendon Drive. A green area at St. John Bosco Centre at Drumrooske in Donegal Town was also flooded.Fire Brigades from Donegal Town, Ballyshannon, Killybegs, Stranorlar, Glenties and Letterkenny responded while Bundoran Fire Brigade responded to a flooding incident in the Bundoran area.  There were also isolated flooding incidents in Ballintra, Laghey and Frosses. Donegal County Council’s Roads crews also responded with two high volume pumps and sandbagging in areas of Donegal Town and were assisted by Donegal Civil Defence.Donegal County Council’s Housing Service is currently engaging with households displaced by this flooding event with a view to providing housing assistance and support where needed. Donegal County Council would like to sincerely thank all members of the community who assisted and supported the response to this flooding incident and would also like to thank the media for their support and co-operation throughout this incident.Donegal County Council can be contacted during normal business hours on 074 91 53900 and in the event of an out of hours emergency the Council can be contacted on 074 91 72288.  For emergencies requiring the assistance of the Fire Service call 999 or 112.You can keep up to date on conditions by signing up for free alerts to your phone by registering at www.mapalerter.com/donegal or by following Donegal County Council on Facebook or on Twitter @DonegalCouncil.Council providing housing assistance to residents after floods was last modified: October 4th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Cashing in on 2010 (within the law)

first_img27 August 2009The appointment of a new Chief Justice, the ongoing saga around Western Cape Judge President John Hlophe, and a number of other high-profile court cases may have dominated the legal headlines in South Africa in recent weeks, but a dispute over a keyring has served notice of things to come in the build-up to the 2010 Fifa World Cup. Fifa is threatening to take a local businessman to court over an item he has legally registered. The Cape Town entrepreneur registered a soccer-themed keyholder design with the Department of Trade and Industry, which affords him the sole right to use the design for 15 years.However, global soccer’s governing body has accused him of ambush marketing, and is insisting that the registration be cancelled.It’s not the first case of its kind. Fifa has also tackled local retail giant Metcash, which distributed lollipops labelled “Astor 2010 pops”, while Eastwoods Tavern, a Pretoria pub close to Loftus Versfeld Stadium, was warned for displaying signs bearing the phrase “World Cup 2010”.Fifa argues that around the world, major tournaments have been magnets for “ambush marketing”, with companies and individuals exploiting sponsored events without paying for the right to do so, either by suggesting an official association or by deliberately intruding on an event.Examples include handing out product samples to spectators at stadiums, using official logos in marketing, or dressing spectators in the clothing brands of sponsors’ rivals.This was a major issue during the 2006 Fifa World Cup in Germany. About 3 700 attempts at ambush marketing were reported in the build-up to the tournament. Of those it prosecuted, Fifa was successful in more than 90% of the cases.In one memorable incident, Lufthansa painted soccer ball markings on the nose cones of its aircraft, and added a new fleet code, LH06. There was no outright mention of the World Cup, but Fifa took the case to court to represent its official airline, Emirates. And, not surprisingly, it won.South Africa has declared the tournament as an event protected by ambush marketing laws, meaning that the tough provisions of this Act are now in force until December 2010 (six months after the event).Paul Bannister, the acting CEO of the International Marketing Council of South Africa, concedes that some people are shying away from 2010 business opportunities because they are concerned about Fifa and ambush marketing.However, he says there is still plenty of scope to benefit from the event.“For example, I’ve had South African scarves made as promotional items, particularly as this is a winter World Cup. Scarves are not Fifa property, so it’s fair game,” says Bannister. “We need to be creative in order to benefit as much as we can within the boundaries.”Urquhart is a former Fifa World Cup media officer and the current editor of Project 2010last_img read more

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Six things we are looking forward to at the 2016 National Touch League

first_imgIt’s officially National Touch League week and we can’t wait for all of the action to commence on Wednesday! We thought we’d compile a list of what we’re looking forward to most at the event. 1.     The return to the home of Touch Football, Coffs Harbour!The last time we were here was last year’s World Cup in May, so we are excited to be back at C.ex Coffs International Stadium for this year’s event. 2.     The return of elite level competition It feels like a long time between National Touch League events, so we can’t wait to see the best of the best take to the field in Coffs Harbour this week, including the Elite Eight series. 3.     The new-look Queensland Elite Eight teamsThe Queensland Elite Eight teams recently announced that they have aligned with the Queensland NRL Clubs, the Broncos (formerly Chiefs), Cowboys (formerly Outlaws) and Titans (formerly Stingrays). We look forward to seeing them take the field this week in their new look colours on Wednesday! 4.     Touch Football on TV!Last week we announced that Power Productions will be live streaming our grand finals on Saturday and they will appear on Fox Sports 1 in early April. Read more here and stay tuned for the links for Saturday’s finals. 5.     Hopefully lots of sunshine! We all know that Touch Football events and rain go hand in hand, but we are hoping that this time we can break the tradition with four beautiful days of Coffs Harbour sunshine. Our fingers are crossed! 6.     Plenty of live Touch FootballFor the first time, every single game on field one at the 2016 National Touch League will be live streamed to the TFA YouTube channel, so if you can’t make it to Coffs Harbour for the event, you won’t miss out. You can see all the links here. What are you looking forward to most? Let us know on your social media pages. Keep up-to-date with all of the latest news, information and results from the 2016 National Touch League:Website – www.touchfootball.com.au and www.ntl.mytouchfooty.comFacebook – www.facebook.com/touchfootballaustraliaTwitter – www.twitter.com/touchfootyaus (#NTL2016)Instagram – www.instagram.com/touchfootballaustralia (#NTL2016)YouTube – www.youtube.com/touchfootballausRelated Links2016 NTLlast_img read more

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