In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, August 30, 2019

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Conservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsCôte d’Ivoire is trying to increase its vegetation cover by planting trees (Ecofin).Indonesia plans to move its capital to Borneo, which could damage rainforests (Fast Company).The Amazon is reaching a tipping point for its weather system (The New York Times).Other newsResearchers are working to protect a species of bat that lives in a single cave in Cuba (BBC News).U.S. President Trump is trying to allow further logging of the country’s largest temperate forest (The Washington Post).Young climate activist Greta Thunberg has reached New York for the U.N. climate summit after sailing across the Atlantic (The Washington Post).Sea otters in California are dying after contracting parasites from cats (The New York Times).Companies in the United States won’t have to check pipelines for methane leaks if a proposal to relax methane regulations is accepted by the Environmental Protection Agency (The New York Times, The Washington Post).Kenya is cracking down on illegal fishing in its waters (Hakai Magazine).The Atlantic Ocean may soon have the world’s largest marine protected area (National Geographic).The food giant Nestlé wants to take 1.1 million gallons of water from a river in Florida, but environmentalists say that will damage the river’s ecosystem (The Guardian).Climate change, overfishing and land clearing are damaging the Great Barrier Reef, an Australian agency says (Reuters).Banner image of a sea otter by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by John Cannonlast_img read more

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Amazon primates face barriers in responding to climate change

first_imgClimate change will make the current ranges of most Amazon primates uninhabitable in the coming decades, forcing them to move.But primates face barriers to dispersal, such as rivers and deforestation, which can limit their ability to migrate.If species aren’t able to find new habitats, the populations, as well as the habitat they support, will suffer. New research shows that without healthy forest corridors that allow animals to find new habitat, primates native to the Amazon basin will suffer as the impacts of climate change worsen.Brazilian ecologists focused on 80 species of primates found only in the Amazon. They modeled the ability of these primates to move among habitats under different forest management conditions. Their results highlighted how important it is to preserve migration routes to ensure the survival of these species.“Even if we start taking actions now to mitigate, prevent or avoid climate change, species will still need to move,” said Lilian Sales, an ecologist at the University of Campinas in Brazil and lead author of the study, published recently in Ecography.Goeldi’s monkeys (Callimico goeldii) are among the primates that will lose a large amount of habitat without policy intervention. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerThe Amazon rainforest supports an astounding amount of biodiversity, and primates help maintain the species richness. By spreading the seeds of trees, primates facilitate the growth of forests that affect global processes like carbon storage and temperature regulation.For decades, deforestation for cattle ranches and soya plantations has threatened the Amazon. Now, the added pressures of climate change endangers the existence of several Amazon primates. “It’s a deadly mixture,” said Sales.A few of the species most at risk include Roosmalens’ dwarf marmosets (Callibella humilis), pied tamarins (Saguinus bicolor) and Maués marmosets (Mico mauesi).To understand how the ranges of these species might shift, Sales and her colleagues created a model combining several factors: the current IUCN ranges of 80 primate species; predictions of habitat shifts from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; the ability of each species to migrate; and two Amazon basin land-management scenarios.The team modeled four different dispersal scenarios. The first scenario assumed that primates could migrate freely without barriers. The second assumed that large rivers block certain species, especially smaller primates, from accessing new areas. The third and most realistic scenario combined the limitations of rivers with the barriers of deforestation. The fourth showed how the ranges of primates would grow or shrink if they were prevented from moving at all.Deforestation for soy plantations and cattle ranches endanger the habitats of Amazon primates and prevent their movement to new locations. Rivers further limit the ability of small primates to move. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerFor each of these projections, the researchers modeled two outcomes that depend heavily on conservation policy: a “mitigation” development plan, in which deforestation halts and protected areas grow; and a “business-as-usual” plan, in which current development trends continue.Without the ability to migrate, the current ranges of all 80 primate species shrank in both the mitigation and the business-as-usual models. When limited by both rivers and deforestation, the business-as-usual scenario led to decreased habitat ranges for 65 of the 80 species. In the mitigation scenario, the habitats of 47 species would still shrink.Not all species will necessarily suffer, however. A few, such as Bolivian red howler monkeys (Alouatta sara) and Peruvian night monkeys (Aotus miconax), might actually increase their current ranges if allowed to move. Sales said the finding surprised her, “but also gave me a feeling of hope that maybe not everything is lost.”A white-nosed saki (Chiropotes albinasus) in the Amazon rainforest canopy. Climate change will shrink the habitat of these endangered primates and deforestation may limit their ability to find new homes, a new study reports. Photo by João Paulo Krajewski.Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, an ecologist at El Colegio de la Frontera Sur in Campeche, Mexico, who was not involved in the research, called the study “a great contribution.” The team’s modeling makes assumptions, Reyna said, but he thinks it points to an important conservation lesson. “Many times we are concerned with the species and conserving the species,” he said, “but we also need to preserve their ability to disperse.”Most of the regions that primates will need to move through to reach suitable habitats are not protected. With deforestation rates accelerating and plans for wildlife corridors nearly nonexistent, the projected fates of Amazonian primates range from unclear to grim.Sales urged decision makers to take climate change and habitat loss into account when discussing how best to conserve these rainforest residents. “The main message of this paper,” she said, “is that we need to think of landscapes that allow species to move.”Citation:Sales, L. P., Ribeiro, B. R., Pires, M. M., Chapman, C. A., & Loyola, R. (2019). Recalculating route: dispersal constraints will drive the redistribution of Amazon primates in the Anthropocene. Ecography, 42(10), 1789-1801.Erin Malsbury (@erinmalsbury) is a graduate student in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Other Mongabay stories produced by UCSC students can be found at https://news.mongabay.com/list/ucsc/. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rhett Butlercenter_img Animal Behavior, Animals, Biodiversity, Forest Fragmentation, Impact Of Climate Change, Mammals, Monkeys, Primates, Rainforests, UCSC, Wildlife last_img read more

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Whitetip sharks declared critically endangered, but gain no protections in Pacific

first_imgThis week, the International Union for Conservation of Nature classified oceanic whitetip sharks (Carcharhinus longimanus) as “critically endangered,” citing “steep population declines” in all oceans.The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission, a multilateral body, manages fisheries in a vast swath of the Pacific Ocean, including the large and lucrative tuna fishery that accidentally kills tens of thousands of whitetips each year.Whitetip sharks are predicted to become extinct in the western and central Pacific under current management practices, their numbers having declined there by around 95% since 1995.The commission met this month in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. It adopted several conservation measures, but took no new steps to protect whitetip sharks, as many scientists and conservationists had hoped. This week, the oceanic whitetip shark was reclassified as “critically endangered” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), citing “steep population declines” in all oceans. That represents two big steps toward extinction from the shark’s previous classification as “vulnerable,” which it had held since 2006.However, that wasn’t enough to convince countries that fish for tuna in the western and central Pacific Ocean to step up protections for the species in that region, where scientists predict the sharks will disappear if current management practices don’t change.Many scientists and conservation advocates were hopeful that the 16th meeting of the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC), held from December 5 to 11 in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, would commit to new steps to boost the region’s population of whitetips (Carcharhinus longimanus). The multilateral body manages fisheries in the vast region, including the large and lucrative tuna fishery that accidentally kills tens of thousands of whitetips each year.At the meeting, delegates finalized and adopted a new conservation and management measure for sharks, which may help other species. But the measure doesn’t offer any new protections for whitetips, and their particular plight in the region didn’t make it onto the agenda.“The Commission’s annual meeting was the first real opportunity for the member states to act on these alarming findings,” said a statement issued by the NGO WWF after the meeting. “Unfortunately, they did not rise up to the challenge. The tragic situation of the oceanic whitetip shark was not substantially addressed during the meeting, with no opportunity to even consider a much-needed recovery plan as a solution.”Oceanic whitetip shark (Carcharhinus longimanus). Image by Andy Mann.Dramatic declineOceanic whitetips were once among the most common pelagic shark species in the tropics. As apex predators, they play a crucial regulatory role in marine ecosystems, maintaining balance and diversity in the species below them in the food web. Sharks are also culturally important for many Pacific peoples, often seen as manifestations of ancestors, deities or guides for ocean-goers.But a recent stock assessment commissioned by the WCPFC revealed that the oceanic whitetip population in the western and central Pacific Ocean has declined by about 95%. The assessment concluded that if new measures aren’t taken to protect the sharks, the population will become regionally extinct.Why? The region’s oceanic whitetips are “overfished and undergoing overfishing,” according to the assessment. And it’s mostly by accident.Whitetips are often caught by longliner boats fishing for tuna, because they swim close to the surface and are attracted to the longliners’ lures. Less commonly, they’re caught by purse seiners, which enclose all the fish in an area in a large net that’s drawn tight at the top and bottom. Whitetips are considered bycatch, a term for species that are caught accidentally, and to date there are no catch limits in place for them.Like most sharks, whitetips take a long time to reach sexual maturity and have small litters of pups every year or two, so they are vulnerable to overfishing. “It’s very, very simple, we’re taking them out faster than they can replenish themselves,” Demian Chapman, a shark conservation expert at Florida International University, told Mongabay.Demand for whitetips’ large fins, which fetch high prices as an ingredient in shark-fin soup, a prized dish in many East Asian countries, has also contributed to whitetips’ decline. To mitigate this, in 2011 the WCPFC enacted a “catch and retention” ban, making it illegal for fishers to intentionally catch whitetips and requiring them to immediately release any they catch accidentally — with their fins still attached. Then, in 2013, parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) passed restrictions that severely limited the legal trade of whitetip fins.The stock assessment found no evidence that fisheries are currently targeting whitetips in the region. “But we know that there is still a fin trade of this species, for sure,” said Chapman, who has researched the trade in Hong Kong and China, “and probably a good amount of it is illegal.” This suggests that some fishers are still opportunistically selling the fins of the sharks they catch.Keeping whitetips off the lines According to the assessment’s authors, the WCPFC’s existing measures “may have had a positive impact on stock status by decreasing fishing mortality.” But they also acknowledged that some fishers and observers had not updated their identification, recording, and surveillance practices since the 2011 catch and retention ban took effect, so some whitetip catches may have gone unrecorded or been incorrectly identified, compromising the data used in the assessment.Keeping more whitetips alive remains a “pretty major conundrum,” said Chapman, even for researchers at the forefront of the issue. “The problem is that a decent proportion of the whitetips still die when they’re caught,” he said.He identified three ways to boost the survival rate of the species. The first is keeping sharks from getting stuck on longlines. Discouraging them from taking the bait, for example by attaching magnets to the hooks, which sharks find irritating, is one option. Ensuring that lines are made from material that sharks can bite through to free themselves, such as nylon rather than wire, is another.The second is to maximize the survival of whitetips that do get hooked by training fishers to free them safely. Chapman said that steps such as keeping sharks in the water while they’re being released and cutting the line right at the hook so they don’t swim off trailing gear have made a big difference for whitetips in Atlantic tuna fisheries. Leaving longlines in the water for shorter time periods is also effective, he said.“Whitetips are quite tough,” said Chapman, “so when they get hooked, they can handle struggling on the line for a while. There’s definitely a relationship between how long the longline was soaked and how many whitetips come up dead or in very poor condition.” The downside is that shorter soak times entail more work for fishers and may also reduce tuna catches.The third and most radical method Chapman identified is to simply avoid setting longlines in places where whitetips are relatively common. That’s also a challenging prospect for tuna-fishing nations, he said, “because the whitetips are pretty closely correlated with the oceanographic features that would also attract tuna.”But economic impacts like these are no reason not to act, said Chapman.“We’ve left it so long with these species that now it’s pretty drastic. This is the problem: we tend not to act until the grim reaper is on the doorstep, and that’s where we find ourselves with the whitetip in this region,” he said. “These measures are going to hurt, probably, but this is because we kicked the can too far and let them drop and drop and drop, and now it’s critical.”Andy Cornish, who leads WWF’s global shark and ray conservation program, also emphasized the urgency of the situation. “With the population pushed to the brink of extinction, there is no time to waste,” he said in the organization’s closing statement. “WCPFC nations will not have another chance to introduce new measures to start recovering the population until the next Commission meeting in a year’s time.”At the meeting, WCPFC took a number of new measures to better manage fisheries in the region, such as adopting voluntary guidelines for how fishers should safely free seabirds caught on longline hooks; adopting a work plan to boost albacore stocks; banning the catch and retention of manta and other mobula rays; and adopting a resolution to consider the impact of climate change on its work.Oceanic whitetip shark (Carcharhinus longimanus). Image by Alexander Vasenin via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0).Banner image: Oceanic whitetip shark (Carcharhinus longimanus). Image by Cvf-ps via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 1.0).Monica Evans is a freelance writer based in Aotearoa, New Zealand, who specializes in environmental and community development issues. She has a master’s degree in development studies from Victoria University of Wellington. Find her at monicaevans.org. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Rebecca Kessler Animals, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Governance, Illegal Fishing, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Overfishing, Sharks, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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The role of sustainable finance in Forest Landscape Restoration (commentary)

first_imgCarbon Emissions, Climate Change And Forests, Commentary, Conservation Finance, Deforestation, Ecological Restoration, Ecosystem Restoration, Editorials, Environment, Finance, forest degradation, Forest Regeneration, Forests, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Landscape Restoration, Researcher Perspective Series, Restoration To finance the major investments in Forest Landscape Restoration, help from the private and financial sector is needed.To increase investors’ willingness to write checks, public- funded grants play a crucial role. To get institutional investors on board, sustainable finance must mature, providing proven track records so investors can better understand risk.If the ambitious goals of Initiative 20×20 or the Sustainable Development Goals are to be met, all capital must be engaged, whether it’s private, public, or philanthropic.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. The recent forest fires in Brazil and Bolivia showed once more that traditional approaches to sustainable development and nature conservation are not sufficient to reduce carbon emissions from land use and stop the ongoing destruction of natural resources.Innovative solutions are needed and Forest Landscape Restoration (FLR) has emerged as a promising alternative holistic concept to improve rural livelihoods and at the same time halt and reverse forest and land degradation, thereby storing additional carbon in trees and soil.Thanks to these outcomes, FLR is also an appropriate approach to achieve certain UN Sustainable Development Goals, in particular those related to Goal 13 – Climate action: “Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts by regulating emissions and promoting developments in renewable energy”; and Goal 15 – Life on land: “Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss.”“Governments acknowledge the nexus between climate change, land degradation, decreased agricultural production, conflicts and migration, and have started to implement FLR,” says Dr. Paola Agostini from the World Bank, “which is reflected in a sharp increase of the forest and landscape portfolio from $1.8 billion in 2016 to $2.5 billion in 2018.”But Forest Landscape Restoration requires major investments that exceed the budgets of national governments, international donors, and multilateral development banks. To address these investment gaps, help from the private and financial sector is needed, and this is where sustainable finance comes into play. Sustainable finance includes a variety of financial mechanisms, instruments, and products that aim to deliver environmental and social benefits combined with a financial return.An example of sustainable finance in FLR is the country-led Initiative 20×20, which strives to restore 50 million hectares (about 124 million acres) of degraded lands in Latin America and the Caribbean. A group of impact investors, private companies, investment advisors, and private funds have pledged over $2 billion for projects in support of Initiative 20×20 countries’ restoration commitments. Despite this large sum, little progress has been made on the ground and FLR projects are not reaching scale. To get a better understanding of how sustainable finance works in practice, various financial and technical partners of the initiative and two multilateral development banks were interviewed by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) and asked about the bottlenecks they encounter and how they respond to them. (Full disclosure: I helped conduct the interviews when I worked at CIAT. The results have not been published elsewhere.)A major bottleneck among investors in Initiative 20×20 is project design and management. Not all participating countries have adequate capacity to develop a landscape plan with an investment component and find the different flavors of capital — equity, working capital, loans, grants – needed to support it, and to implement projects at scale.“It is all about partnerships,” comments Eduardo Tugendhat of Palladium, an investment platform that triangulates producers, buyers and the financial sector. “Help farmers that need to collaborate by developing a business plan. Link these cooperatives with local players that are interested in the products, but that do not have sufficient capital. Then find funds or financial instruments to finance the partnership.”However, “there is a lot of mistrust among the private sector, government and communities, which hinders the building of coalitions. To create a public-private-civic partnership requires time and is a process with many steps,” says Shaun Paul of Ejido Verde, a triple bottom line, sustainable pine resin company.Other bottlenecks, according to Kaspar Wansleben of the Forest and Climate Change Fund, are that “the concept of impact investment in landscape restoration is still in its infancy. There are no successful business models and, at the moment, it is mainly trial and error. The sums that impact investors want to invest are too big and the producers cannot offer an attractive financial product.”Moreover, “both public and private investors want to know what to expect and want to see results in the short-term, which is not always feasible with natural assets that will only start generating revenues in the long-term,” says Bruno Mariani of Symbiosis Investimentos. “This means that,” Camile Rebelo of Ecoplanet Bamboo argues, “most financial institutes perceive these investments as too risky and although everybody agrees that innovative solutions are needed, nobody wants to invest in a new product that has not established a market price yet.” Elizabeth Teague of Root Capital adds that “due diligence entails high costs in emerging markets, meaning impact investors often must accept below-market returns to reach their target borrowers.”To increase investors’ willingness to write checks, public-funded grants play a crucial role: first, by funding accelerators that finance the setup and costs of raising capital to get to the first close, i.e. when a fund has sufficient legal commitments to start investing and making deals; second, by funding technical assistance facilities to improve investment readiness; and third, and most importantly, by providing financial guarantees with public capital that is willing to share the risks and take first loss. Other ways for companies to overcome investor reticence are through self-financing or the use of hybrid models where investment capital is merged with philanthropy, but both strategies limit the ability to scale the investment.“The business model of multilateral development banks is based on their triple-A rating, which causes them to operate risk averse. Therefore, they are not willing to offer financial guarantees for impact investors in FLR,” says Martin Berg of the European Investment Bank. “Instead, governments should provide these by converting their grants into financial instruments.” However, a reallocation of public funds in favor of the private and financial sector will certainly induce the indignation of traditional recipients of funding and will face opposition from donors, many of whom believe that the private sector must take care of itself and should not be supported with public money to make a profit.The Global Impact Investing Network (GIIN) estimates that less than 4 percent of assets under management worldwide are related to sustainable finance. Institutional investors have access to the largely untapped traditional capital markets, but to get them on board, sustainable finance must mature, providing proven track records and creating recognizable patterns so investors can better understand and price risk.Eventually, if the ambitious goals of Initiative 20×20 or the Sustainable Development Goals are to be met, all capital must be engaged, whether it’s private, public, or philanthropic.Forest restoration demo plot in Doi Suthep-Pui National Park, Thailand, 12 years after planting 29 framework tree species. Photo via Wikimedia Commons, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.Ruben Coppus is an independent consultant, formally scientist at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Inishowen group plans second protest against telecoms upgrade

first_imgAnother protest has been planned in opposition to the installation of 3G and 4G technologies on a mast at Buncrana Garda Station.Concerned Inishowen residents turned out last week to protest against the move, as they fear the antennas could be upgraded to 5G in the future.The issue, according to James Quigley from Buncrana Garda Mast Action and 5G Inishowen Awareness, is the lack of communication received by residents after the Mobile Telecommunications licence was granted. Buncrana Garda Mast Action ProtestMr Quigley along with other residents started up the Buncrana Garda Mast Action group to highlight their issue with the Garda mast and wireless EMF technology. Members of the group have expressed fears over increased exposure to radiation if 5G is rolled out.When asked by Pearse Doherty TD on the matter, Minister of State Kevin Moran has said the Commissioners of Public Works do not currently propose to install 5G technology at the mast.The Buncrana Garda Mast Action group are set to continue their protest on Saturday 18th May at 12noon.Inishowen group plans second protest against telecoms upgrade was last modified: May 14th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:5G Inishowen AwarenessbuncranaBuncrana Garda Mast Actionlast_img read more

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Elections 2019: Mac Giolla Easbuig elected on first count in Glenties

first_imgIndependent Councillor Micheál Choilm Mac Giolla Easbuig has retained his seat on the first count for Glenties.The Glenties LEA Councillor secured 2007 first preference votes, sailing comfortably over the quota of 1875.Mac Giolla Easbuig has almost doubled his amount of votes since the last Local Election in 2014. In 2014, he achieved 1,100 – while today he was elected with 2,007 first preferences. Mac Giolla Easbuig, a Socialist Republican, is delighted to be elected on the first count.“First and foremost I’d like to thank everybody who has been out helping me; between posters, knocking on doors, and fundraising. A special thanks goes to my father who was out day and night for the past couple of months canvassing.”“I look forward to the next five years to use my seat, not just in day to day work, but to highlight social injustice in both our country as a whole and throughout the world.”Wearing a t-shirt in support of the Craigavon Two campaign, Mac Giolla Easbuig discussed the importance of showing international solidarity with the oppressed in Palestine, the Basque country, and Catalonia. “I will continue advocating for political prisoners, against the ongoing occupation of the six counties, and the military oppression against the working class communities in the six counties,” he told Donegal Daily.Following his landslide re-election, Mac Giolla Easbuig is looking forward to getting back to business.“I don’t take this vote for granted, I need to work for the next five years for the community I serve,” he concluded.More notes on the first count Sinn Féin candidates John Sheamuis Ó’Fearraigh polled highly with 1429 first preferences, as did Marie Therese Gallagher (1089).Noreen McGarvey (FF) and Michael McClafferty (FG) both achieved over 1,000 votes; achieving 1018 and 1012 first preferences respectively. From an electorate of 23,165 and a total poll of 12,851, 147 votes were spoiled.Full results of the first count:Enda Bonner (FF) 893Brian Carr (SF) 922Marie Therese Gallagher (SF) 1089Micheal Choilm Mac Giolla Easbuig (Independent) 2007Michael McClafferty (FG) 1012Noreen McGarvey (FF) 1018Anthony Molloy (FF) 916Liam Mulligan (Aontú) 349Seamus O’Domhnaill (FF) 979John Sheamuis Ó’Fearraigh (SF) 1429Seamus Rodgers (Labour) 544Evelyn Sweeney (FG) 724Liam Whyte (Independent) 822As the lowest scoring candidate, Liam Mulligan’s votes will be distributed. Concerns regarding the accuracy of yesterday’s tallies were voiced this morning in the Highlands Hotel, so the first count has provided a vital indication for how the rest of the day will go for the candidates.For live updates as they happen across the county, follow this link:LIVE: Donegal Daily Local Elections 2019 – follow our updatesElections 2019: Mac Giolla Easbuig elected on first count in Glenties was last modified: May 26th, 2019 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Donegal County Councildonegal election resultsle19donegallocal electionlocal elections 2019mac giolla easbuigMichael Choilm Mac Giolla Easbuigvoteslast_img read more

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Council providing housing assistance to residents after floods

first_imgDonegal County Council’s Housing Service is currently providing assistance and support to the residents of Donegal Town who were worst affected by the Storm Lorenzo floods.Fourteen homes and four businesses were damaged by flooding as heavy rain struck early on Friday morning.Donegal County Council Fire Service was called to assist householders and business owners in three areas of the town.  One house and four businesses were affected on New Row, five homes in Brookfield and 6-8 homes were affected at Clarendon Drive. A green area at St. John Bosco Centre at Drumrooske in Donegal Town was also flooded.Fire Brigades from Donegal Town, Ballyshannon, Killybegs, Stranorlar, Glenties and Letterkenny responded while Bundoran Fire Brigade responded to a flooding incident in the Bundoran area.  There were also isolated flooding incidents in Ballintra, Laghey and Frosses. Donegal County Council’s Roads crews also responded with two high volume pumps and sandbagging in areas of Donegal Town and were assisted by Donegal Civil Defence.Donegal County Council’s Housing Service is currently engaging with households displaced by this flooding event with a view to providing housing assistance and support where needed. Donegal County Council would like to sincerely thank all members of the community who assisted and supported the response to this flooding incident and would also like to thank the media for their support and co-operation throughout this incident.Donegal County Council can be contacted during normal business hours on 074 91 53900 and in the event of an out of hours emergency the Council can be contacted on 074 91 72288.  For emergencies requiring the assistance of the Fire Service call 999 or 112.You can keep up to date on conditions by signing up for free alerts to your phone by registering at www.mapalerter.com/donegal or by following Donegal County Council on Facebook or on Twitter @DonegalCouncil.Council providing housing assistance to residents after floods was last modified: October 4th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Zach Profit, July 23

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest We are pretty happy. We got about an inch over the weekend here at our farm. West of here we have some farms and they got anywhere from 3.5 to 4 inches. They had a storm system that set over top of them for three or four hours.We were just starting to get dry. We were scared that we were going to see what seemed like a perfect crop burn up right in front of us, but I don’t think that is going to be the case. We could probably use another shot of rain this week. I think tomorrow there is another chance, but we are looking pretty good and it is pretty hard to complain right now.If we wouldn’t have gotten this rain, I think things would have gotten pretty ugly pretty fast. We were pulling ears and we didn’t see too much to be concerned about. We did see a little tip back but I don’t think it will be anything to be too fired up about. The biggest thing we noticed was that we found quite a few ears of corn 20 around or more.The last couple of weeks of dry, hot sunshine have really brought the soybeans around. Some of our fields that were not the greatest are even looking pretty good now. They have gotten rid of that Mountain Dew yellow and are looking much, much better. We did a micronutrient application earlier to try to perk them up and then we hit them again. They have really come a long ways.There is a little bit of gray leaf spot here and there but it is not out of the norm. I can’t say we have any real pressure out there.I have seen more fungicide application than I have seen in quite some time. This year it is hard to find someone around here who didn’t spray fungicide on their crop. There were a lot of airplanes out this year. There is a good corn population in this area and I think we stand a pretty good chance to have a good crop here.I can’t believe how the corn came back from the tornado. You can tell it is goose-necked but it has been pretty amazing. You would never be able to tell that half the field went from shoulder high to two feet off the ground. It is going to make something. It went through pollination fine.last_img read more

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Meghalaya Cabinet approves draft water policy

first_imgThe Meghalaya Cabinet has approved a draft water policy to address water usages, issues of conservation and protection of water sources in the State on July 12.Deputy Chief Minister Prestone Tynsong said, the Cabinet chaired by Chief Minister Conrad K. Sangma discussed the various aspects of the draft policy at length before approving it.“All issues related to utilization of water and livelihood and how to preserve water bodies have been outlined in this policy including community participation in the implementation of this policy by constituting a water sanitation village council at the village level,” Mr. Tynsong said.The policy was drafted by the state Water Resources department in consultation with experts in water conservation and protection of water bodies.The deputy chief minister said that Meghalaya, being a hilly State, receives a lot of rainfall but the same water cannot be retained and all of the water reaches Bangladesh in no time.Among the other issues discussed on the policy was the need to optimise usage and conservation of water, steps needed to protect water bodies and water sources including ground water, and protection of catchment and springshed areas.Recently, the State government has launched the Jal Shakti mission to address the problems related to water.The State cabinet has also approved the proposal of the Finance department to hike the salary of chairman and members of the Meghalaya Public Service Commission based on the recommendations of the fifth Meghalaya Pay Commission.last_img read more

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Yusuf to marry soon but I will wait: Irfan Pathan

first_imgIndia discard Irfan Pathan on Friday said his elder brother Yusuf, who recently bagged a whopping deal of USD 2.1 million with IPL Franchisee Kolkata Knight riders for season-IV, will soon tie the nuptial knot.Asked about his own marraige plans, Irfan said his priority is winning back his place in the national side.”I want to make a comeback in the Indian team. You know, marriage is going to come with time. First my brother has to get married and it is going to be soon,” Irfan said.”Hopefully the new bride is coming. We are just about to select a girl for him. But for me, it is going to take some time. For me, I just want to make a comeback for the team then everything’s going to follow,” he told a TV channel.Yusuf, whose stellar performance in the first edition of IPL had helped Rajasthan Royals lift the title, was bought by the Shah Rukh Khan co-owned KKR for Rs 9.66 crore.On the other hand, Irfan, who earned Rs 3.7 crore at Kings XI Punjab, will now play for Delhi Daredevils with a Rs 8.74 crore contract.last_img read more

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