Ocean currents spin a web of interconnected fisheries around the world

first_imgConservation, Environment, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Overfishing, Saltwater Fish Article published by Basten Gokkon Most marine catches are made within a given country’s territorial waters, but the fish most likely originated in spawning grounds in another country’s jurisdiction, a new study shows.The modeling of catch, spawning and ocean current data shows that the dispersal of baby fish caught by ocean currents creates an interconnection between global marine fisheries.The finding highlights the need for greater international cooperation in protecting marine ecosystems everywhere, as an estimated $10 billion worth of fish spawn in one country and are caught in another every year. Chances are the locally caught fish you bought down by the wharf was spawned thousands of miles away, migrating on ocean currents, a new study has found.An estimated 90 percent of marine catches are caught within 200 miles, or 320 kilometers, of countries’ shores, but they most likely originated in spawning grounds under the jurisdiction of a different country, according to the study published June 21 in the journal Science.Analyzing data of catch and known spawning grounds of more than 700 fish species, coupled with ocean current data, the paper’s researchers developed a computer model to show where the various species tended to be born and caught.The simulation then showed that the dispersal of baby fish caught by ocean currents created an interconnection between global marine fisheries, the study said.“Now we have a map of how the world’s fisheries are interconnected, and where international cooperation is needed most urgently to conserve a natural resource that hundreds of millions of people rely on,” said co-author Kimberly Oremus, an assistant professor at the University of Delaware’s School of Marine Science and Policy.The global network of flows of fish spawn across international boundaries. The circles represent ocean territories and the lines indicate flows between them. The lines are curved such that the clockwise direction represents flows from source to sink. Image by Nandini Ramesh/University of California, Berkeley.Any two given countries are connected by an average of five degrees of separation, with effects from fishery disruptions — habitat destruction, overfishing, and sea warming — that take place in one country spreading to other nations, both near and possibly on the other side of the world, according to the researchers.This ripple effect could theoretically look like this: If there’s a decline in a species’ spawning population in Indonesian waters, the catch in Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia, the Philippines, Australia, and India’s Andaman and Nicobar Islands will most likely drop.According to the study, the spawning grounds around Japan, Alaska and China are the three regions that currently contribute the most catch to other countries, through their productive spawning populations. Each contributes about 1 million tons to other countries’ catches.Indonesia has the most landed value attributable to other countries, meaning much of its catch originates from the spawning grounds of its neighbors, such as Singapore, Malaysia, the Philippines and Papua New Guinea, according to the researchers.“This is something of a double-edged sword,” said lead author Nandini Ramesh, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Berkeley.“On one hand, it implies that mismanagement of a fishery can have negative effects that easily propagate to other countries; on the other hand, it implies that multiple countries can benefit by targeting conservation and/or management efforts in just a few regions.”The finding highlights the need for greater international cooperation in protecting marine ecosystems everywhere — such as large marine ecosystems and marine protected area networks — as an estimated $10 billion worth of fish spawn in one country and are caught in another every year, the authors say. Global fisheries production in 2016 was valued at $130 billion, according to the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization.“This allowed us to talk about how vulnerable a nation is to the management of fisheries in neighboring countries,” Oremus said.A spawning aggregation of Nassau groupers. Image by Alexander Tewfik for WCS.According to the study, the risks to nations’ economies and labor forces are generally highest in the tropics. This is due to a combination of factors, such as there being a large number of small, coastal countries close together in regions with relatively fast ocean currents; economies that rely heavily on marine fisheries; and populations with a high percentage of workers employed in fishing-related jobs.“Our hope is that this study will be a stepping stone for policy makers to study their own regions more closely to determine their interdependencies,” Ramesh said. “This is an important first step. This is not something people have examined before at this scale.”Citation:Ramesh, N., Rising, J. A., & Oremus, K. L. (2019). The small world of global marine fisheries: The cross-boundary consequences of larval dispersal. Science, 364(6446), 1192-1196. doi:10.1126/science.aav3409FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Toxic river: Mining, mercury and murder continue to plague Colombia’s Atrato

first_imgArticle published by daniel Biodiversity, Conflict, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Environmentalists, Endangered Species, Environment, Fish, Indigenous Peoples, Logging, Mining, Pollution, Protected Areas, Rainforest Conservation, Rivers, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Rivers, Water Pollution Decades of internal conflict have fueled an unprecedented surge in illegal mining in Colombia’s Choco region, decimating the Atrato River basin and provoking an environmental and humanitarian crisis.In a landmark ruling in 2016, Colombia’s Constitutional Court granted the Atrato environmental personhood rights just as the country signed historic peace accords, but three years on a new era of conflict is plaguing the Choco region.Choco is home to one of the most diverse ecosystems in the world, with an estimated 54,850 animal species living in its dense jungle. But open-pit mining operations and large-scale deforestation are a constant threat.Mercury and cyanide contamination from industrial mining activities make it the most polluted river in Colombia and a clean-up operation promised back in 2016 has yet to materialize. Snaking its way through Colombia’s northwestern department of Choco, for centuries the Atrato River has been the lifeblood for Afro-Colombian and indigenous communities living along its banks. But decades of internal conflict have fueled an unprecedented surge in illegal mining, decimating the river basin and provoking an environmental and humanitarian crisis in one of the most biodiverse regions on Earth.In a landmark ruling in 2016, Colombia’s Constitutional Court granted the Atrato environmental personhood rights which bound the state to implement “protection, conservation, maintenance and restoration” of the river and its communities. The ruling came just as the country signed historic peace accords between the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and the state, ostensibly ending more than half a century of war and insurgency.Yet three years on, a new era of conflict is plaguing the Choco region. Violence and displacement continue to afflict river communities along the Atrato, who remain the poorest in the country. Sporadic fighting between paramilitary groups such as the Gaintanist Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AGC) and the country’s largest remaining guerilla group, the National Liberation Army (ELN), continue to fill the void left by the FARC. Environmental defenders tasked with overseeing the implementation of the court ruling complain of a complete lack of state action and protection. With intimidation and fears of assassination for carrying out their work a constant threat, they despair of achieving even modest improvements.Mercury and cyanide contamination from industrial mining activities make Colombia’s Atrato River the most polluted in the country. Photo by Frederick Gillingham.Choco is home to one of the most diverse ecosystems in the world. An estimated 54,850 animal species live in Choco’s dense jungle. However, open-pit mining operations and large-scale deforestation are threatening this unique and precious habitat. Mercury and cyanide contamination from industrial mining activities make it the most polluted river in Colombia, but a clean-up operation promised back in 2016 has yet to materialize.One the many tributaries to the Atrato that snakes through Chocó. Photo by Bram Ebus for Mongabay.Toxic River offers us rare insight into Choco’s environmental conflict, one of Latin America’s most underreported and yet most urgent issues, through the experiences of three witnesses – a miner, a fisherman and a river guardian. New generations now face an existential threat as the state fails to fulfil its legal obligations and the ethnic communities along Choco’s main waterway fight for a river that remains central to their culture, identity and survival.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Indonesian official at center of licensing scandal charged in new case

first_imgCorruption, Crime, Development, Environment, Environmental Crime, Forests, Governance, Infrastructure, Law, Law Enforcement, Palm Oil, Plantations Indonesia’s anti-corruption agency has charged a former district head from Borneo in connection with a port development project.Darwan Ali, who was the head of Seruyan district in Central Kalimantan province from 2003 to 2013, is accused of conspiring to inflate the budget to build the Segintung seaport, allegedly causing losses to the state of $1.48 million.Investigators also allege that Darwan steered the contract for the project to a developer in exchange for the company’s support for his election campaign.Environmental activists say they hope the investigation will lead the way to probing other, more serious allegations against Darwan, who was the subject of a 2017 investigative report by Mongabay and The Gecko Project into a massive scheme to flip permits for oil palm plantations to multinational firms. JAKARTA — Indonesia’s anti-corruption agency has charged a former politician from Borneo in connection with a port development project, in a move that could shed light on an earlier scandal involving permits for oil palm plantations.Darwan Ali, who was the head of Seruyan district in Central Kalimantan province from 2003 to 2013, is accused of conspiring to inflate the budget for a seaport in Segintung Bay between 2007 and 2012. Investigators at the country’s Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) said the scheme incurred 20.84 billion rupiah ($1.48 million) in losses to the state during that period.Indonesia’s Seruyan district on the island of Borneo.The KPK also alleges that Darwan steered the contract for the project to developer PT Swa Karya Jaya, in exchange for the company backing his 2003 election bid. “It’s believed that the director at PT SKJ is a close friend of [Darwan’s],” Febri Diansyah, a spokesman for the KPK, told reporters in Jakarta on Oct. 14.Febri said the decision to charge Darwan was made after investigators questioned 32 witnesses and raided his home in Jakarta. The KPK has also applied for a travel ban to prevent Darwan leaving the country.Environmental activists have called on the agency to expand its investigation and root out other individuals involved in the project. “The KPK must also go after those that benefited from this project,” said Zenzi Suhadi, the head of advocacy at the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi).Zenzi added that this case could also be a stepping stone to probe other, more serious corruption allegations against Darwan.The politician was the subject of an extensive investigative report by Mongabay and the Gecko Project in 2017. Part of the award-winning “Indonesia for Sale” series, the report uncovered how Darwan, while head of Seruyan district, presided over an elaborate scheme to use shell companies as vehicles for selling oil palm plantation permits to firms owned by the billionaire Kuok and Rachmat families for millions of dollars.The scheme threatened to turn the southern reaches of Seruyan into a sea of oil palm. Local activists reported Darwan to the KPK in this case, and the agency investigated him but never pressed charges.Darwan Ali provided licenses to 18 companies owned by his family and cronies. Almost all of them were sold to Triputra Agro Persada and to the Kuok Group’s oil palm arm, PPB Oil Palms, which was later merged with Wilmar International. Source: Bursa Malaysia, Ditjen AHU, Nordin Abah, Marianto Sumarto and others.Below is a promotional video from the Segintung seaport agency in Seruyan district.Correction 10/18/19: A previous version of this story said Darwan took office in 2005, rather than in 2003.This story was first reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and published here on our Indonesian site on Oct. 15, 2019.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Can camera traps diagnose the severity of a mystery giraffe skin disease?

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Diseases, Endangered Species, Environment, Giraffes, Green, Infectious Wildlife Disease, Mammals, Protected Areas, Research, Technology, Wildlife center_img Giraffe skin disease, a mystery condition that inflicts crusty lesions on the world’s tallest animal, has been recorded in 13 giraffe populations in seven African countries. It is particularly widespread in Tanzania.Researchers used camera trap images to quantify how severe the disease was among giraffe populations in Tanzania’s Serengeti and Ruaha national parks.They found that most cases of the infections that the camera traps detected were “mild” or “moderate” according to a scale they devised, suggesting that the disease, although widespread, is likely not life-threatening at the moment.The researchers have, however, observed that giraffes with more severe infections tend to move with difficulty, which could make them more vulnerable to lion predation — a hypothesis they are now investigating with data from Ruaha National Park. Giraffes have many problems to deal with. There’s habitat loss and poaching. Then there’s a mysterious skin disease that’s been recorded in 13 giraffe populations in seven African countries.The condition, termed simply the giraffe skin disease, starts off as small nodules on the animal’s skin. The nodules can develop into dry, scaly patches, which then turn into large crusty, grayish-brown lesions filled with blood or pus. Researchers are only beginning to wrap their heads around the little-understood disease. Arthur Muneza, a doctoral student at Michigan State University and East Africa coordinator of the Giraffe Conservation Foundation, is one of them.Giraffe skin disease can start off as small nodules on the skin that turn into large crusty lesions. Images by Michael Brown, courtesy of Arthur Muneza.Muneza has been studying the disease in Tanzania, where it’s widespread, affecting the giraffe’s long limbs. About a quarter of the giraffes in Serengeti National Park show signs of the disease. In Tarangire National Park, some 63 percent of giraffes suffer from it, while in Ruaha National Park, around 86 percent of the giraffe population sport the characteristic skin lesions.“To go to an area and see almost all the animals with signs of this disease is quite surprising,” Muneza told Mongabay.The high prevalence of the disease in Tanzania sparked a question in Muneza’s mind. How severe is the infection among Tanzania’s giraffes?A few studies have tried to answer this question in the past, but their classifications of giraffe skin disease severity were very subjective, Muneza said. “There is no standard way of defining what a mild giraffe skin disease is, what moderate giraffe skin disease is, and what constitutes severe giraffe skin disease.”To develop a classification that’s less arbitrary, Muneza and his colleagues turned to camera traps in a new study published in the Journal of Wildlife Diseases.The researchers selected all giraffe photos that had been captured during extensive camera trap surveys in Ruaha and Serengeti, then whittled down the list to those that showed the full extent of all four legs of the giraffes, from shoulder joints to hooves.The team then used photogrammetry techniques on the final 405 photos to quantify giraffe skin disease in the animals. They measured the vertical length of both the lesions and the legs visible in the photos, determined the proportion of the leg that was affected by the lesions, then statistically grouped these numbers to get three different categories of lesion severity.Giraffes with less than 16 percent of their legs covered by lesions were classified as having mild giraffe skin disease, those with 16 to 25 percent of the legs covered had a moderate form of the disease, and individuals with more than a quarter of their leg covered by lesions had severe skin disease, according to the study.“At the moment, we know very little about the disease, so our assumption is that the external and physical manifestation of the disease is the indicator we can use to categorise the severity of the disease,” Muneza told Mongabay.While the cameras usually captured photos of giraffe limbs, it’s the animals’ upper bodies that have unique coat patterns. This meant that the researchers couldn’t identify individual animals from the camera trap photos alone. This could potentially bring in bias if the disease severity classifications had been estimated from multiple photos of just a few giraffes. To see if this was the case, the researchers compared the severity rates estimated by the camera trap images with those obtained from another technique: photographs of 305 individually recognized giraffes that the researchers had taken using digital cameras during vehicle-based surveys in both parks. Both techniques produced similar results.Giraffe with skin disease in Ruaha National Park. Image courtesy of Arthur Muneza.The photos revealed that lesions of giraffe skin disease were, in general, more common on the front legs of the animals than the back legs. Moreover, most cases of the disease that the camera traps in Ruaha and Serengeti detected were considered “mild,” followed by “moderate” forms.“What this means is that there’s no need to overreact at the moment, and that the disease is not as severe as we would like to think,” Muneza said. “Externally it looks uncomfortable, it looks bad. But it’s still the mild and moderate forms of the disease.”Previously, researchers relied on close observations of the animals to describe the severity of giraffe skin disease. But such a technique is not only laborious, it also limits the spatial extent one can cover, Muneza and his colleagues write in the paper. Camera traps, on the other hand, are “noninvasive, can be rapidly deployable, and are applicable to a variety of species,” they add.Miranda Sadar, an assistant professor at Colorado State University, who’s been investigating the cause of giraffe skin disease and was not involved in the study, said that photogrammetry is indeed becoming a more widely used tool “to monitor the size of injuries in animals in a non-invasive way.”Not everyone is convinced, however.“This was a laudable attempt to use camera trap images to quantify giraffe skin disease, but the method is significantly less useful than active observations,” Monica Bond, a wildlife biologist at the U.S.-based Wild Nature Institute who studies giraffes in Tanzania and was not involved in the study, told Mongabay.Observing giraffes directly is easy, she said, because the animals are calm and vehicles can drive up close to them, allowing easy examination using binoculars. This way, researchers can also identify giraffes individually, and inspect the animals’ bodies from multiple angles to understand how and where the disease has spread, Bond added. The camera trap images at the moment don’t allow for both individual identification and a thorough whole-body examination of the giraffes, she said.Muneza agreed that camera trap images have some challenges. For example, the data set would be more useful had the cameras been placed higher. “We could have used the camera trap data to identify individual giraffes, and that could have given us a more robust dataset to quantify the categories of giraffe skin disease,” he said. “We were able to use only use photos of the legs.”The lesions also don’t always appear on the legs. In Uganda, for example, giraffes more commonly get infections on their neck and shoulders.In Uganda, giraffe skin disease lesions more commonly appear on neck and shoulder, while in Tanzania, the disease mostly affects the animals’ legs. Image courtesy of Arthur Muneza.Muneza’s study, however, adds to the growing evidence that giraffe skin disease is probably not life-threatening for the animals in the studied parks — at least for now. Bond, too, in a study published in 2016, found that giraffes with lesions in Tanzania’s Tarangire National Park had similar survival rates as those without lesions.That doesn’t mean that researchers should stop studying the disease, Muneza said.His team has observed, for instance, that giraffes with more severe infections tend to move with difficulty, which could make them more vulnerable to lion predation. The researchers are now investigating this hypothesis with data from Ruaha National Park.Muneza’s team is also working with Tanzanian authorities to figure out what exactly causes giraffe skin disease. Some preliminary studies suggest that a filarial worm could be transmitting the disease, with secondary fungal infections worsening it. But researchers are yet to pin down the actual causative agent and how the disease spreads.“One of the biggest concerns is that if it is a filarial worm, then we need to see if it crosses over to cattle,” Muneza said. “Given that you have communities that live near parks, and some of them graze their cattle near and around the giraffe areas, there is potential for the disease to cross over to livestock. And if it does, that will then affect the perceptions that people have towards sharing landscapes with wildlife, which is a big challenge in East Africa.”Citation:Muneza, A. B., Ortiz-Calo, W., Packer, C., Cusack, J. J., Jones, T., Palmer, M. S., … Montgomery, R. A. (2019). Quantifying the severity of giraffe skin disease via photogrammetry analysis of camera trap data. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 55(4), 770-781. doi:10.7589/2018-06-149last_img read more

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Madagascar’s bold reforestation goal lacks a coherent plan, experts say

first_imgAfforestation, Agroforestry, Community Forestry, Drones, Forestry, Invasive Species, Lemurs, Reforestation, Sustainable Forest Management, Trees, Tropical Forests Article published by malavikavyawahare Madagascar’s president is pushing an ambitious plan to plant trees on 40,000 hectares (99,000 acres) of land every year for the next five years.But conservation experts point to shortcomings in the plan, including the use of disincentives and imposition of targets to compel NGOs and other organizations to get on board.There’s also the very real risk that in racing to meet the target, fast-growing non-native species will be prioritized, including acacia and pine, over slow-growing endemic species.Conservationists have called for a more collaborative approach to the replanting initiative to seek community buy-in and ensure the long-term effectiveness of the program. RANOMAFANA and ANTANANARIVO, Madagascar — While many U.S. travelers dream of the fabled forests of Madagascar, for Malagasy conservationist Mahandry Hugues Andrianarisoa, 28, it was the verdant landscape of upstate New York that took his breath away.“That is what I want for my country,” Andrianarisoa said on a July afternoon, eyeing a balding patch of woodland near Ranomafana National Park, one of the last refuges for Madagascar’s astonishing biodiversity.His vision for a greener Madagascar appears to be shared by the country’s president, Andry Rajoelina, even if they don’t quite see greening the same way. About half of the country’s forests vanished between 1953 and 2014, much of it to make way for farmland and to produce charcoal, baring its rusty red earth and raising fears that the world’s oldest island could be stripped of all its natural forests within decades.This March, Rajoelina declared that Madagascar will reforest at least 40,000 hectares (99,000 acres), an area about the size of Ranomafana, every year for the next five years. “If we called Madagascar the red island, now it will be the green island thanks to our national reforestation plan,” he said in March at the One Planet summit in Nairobi. To mark Madagascar’s 60th year of independence next year, the president announced in October that the country will plant 60 million seedlings in one day on January 19th.But stakeholders say that the lofty ambition is not underpinned by a considered plan. To outpace the runaway deforestation, planting drives must beget forests. Instead, forest experts told Mongabay, there is a risk of the vast island, spanning 59 million hectares (146 million acres), being overrun by fast-growing invasive tree species like pine, eucalyptus and acacia that are planted to be harvested.Rajoelina has launched a highly publicized campaign, but a top-down approach with a singular focus on meeting the 40,000-hectare will by itself not ensure the return of forests, the experts said. Yet the president, they recognized, is faced with the unenviable task of steering the Malagasy people onto a path of development not dependent on devouring wood while at the same time meeting their most pressing needs. Racing to plant trees Andrianarisoa, who hails from Kiranomena town in central Madagascar, has observed the destruction of forests firsthand. His grandparents, early settlers in the area, would narrate stories of lemurs that lived there, but these creatures remained almost mythical for him until he came to work at Ranomafana in the southeastern part of the country. The park hosts 13 lemur species, primates that are found only in Madagascar, and more than 370 plant species. On every return home Andrianarisoa saw the forests surrounding his hometown recede, a fate he hopes the moist evergreen forests of Ranomafana will escape.Though the pace of forest loss across the country is uneven, following the president’s declaration the environment ministry asked all 22 regions, the second tier of administration in Madagascar, to reforest 2,000 hectares (4,900 acres) per year. Regions are relying on local governments, schools, NGOs and the private sector to meet their goal. When asked where the government intended to plant the trees, environment minister Alexandre Georget told Mongabay “everywhere” in July, suggesting that the plantings would happen on public as well as private lands. Although the minister said that these would all be endemic species, it appears that agroforestry projects and monoculture plantations using non-native and even invasive food and timber species are being included. The minister did not respond to recent attempts to clarify the government’s position.What is evident is that the campaign is hurtling along at breakneck speed. Madagascar allocated about $684,000 in its budget for the drive this year and is actively seeking foreign aid. It is rounding up seeds on a war footing, distributing seedlings free of cost to people, and planning to bombard remote areas with seeds using drones and planes. By year-end, 85 percent of 2019’s 40,000-hectare target will be achieved, Georget told Mongabay in July.Pushing for forests with sticks The seed of a ramy tree. Image by Malavika Vyawahare/MongabayTo achieve their planting targets, regions are leaning heavily on NGOs that collect seeds, maintain nurseries and organize transplantation drives. One of these is the Centre ValBio (CVB) research station at Ranomafana National Park, where Andrianarisoa works. CVB helps Madagascar National Parks, a quasi-governmental agency, manage Ranomafana, a common arrangement for overseeing the country’s protected areas.One of the sticks the government wields is linking permissions to reforestation targets. As part of the greening campaign, the environment ministry has asked NGOs that manage protected areas to reforest 1 percent of the area they manage every year or risk losing their management contracts. In his July interview with Mongabay, Georget suggested that government authorization for NGOs to accept foreign funding could hinge on their achieving their reforestation targets as well, though the government has not issued any directive to that effect.“The president said we are going to do this, but there is no plan,” Nicolas Naina Rasolonjatovo, 31, who heads the reforestation program at CVB, told Mongabay. “We do not want a perfect plan, but we want something.” Other conservation-focused NGOs echoed the view that they are seeking a clear roadmap, not threats.In the Mongabay interview, the environment minister alleged that NGOs are misusing their funds, and this has not helped matters. “Managing a protected area is itself challenging, and we don’t have enough resources for that,” said Nanie Ratsifandrihamanana, country director at WWF-Madagascar, which manages four protected areas. “The budget we have for reforestation we use it to train villagers, help them maintain nurseries and monitor plants.”For the private sector, too, the government is making permissions contingent on meeting reforestation targets. Gaëtan Etancelin, president of Syndicat Malgache de l’Agriculture Biologique (SYMABIO), a trade group representing producers of organic products, told Mongabay that companies were struggling to meet their reforestation requirements. Etancelin said private players are looking for better incentives. “They don’t have time, it is not their job,” he said, referring to the reforestry efforts. Companies that do have experience planting trees are looking to meet their requirements in ways that contribute to their business goals. A representative of Imperial Tobacco Madagascar, which participated in a recent reforestation event in northwest Madagascar, told Mongabay that the company’s planting target is determined by its demand for wood, which it burns to cure tobacco. The company, part of U.K.-headquartered Imperial Brands plc., already plants trees on its own land but will expand onto 100 hectares (247 acres) of land identified by the government in 2020 where it plans to plant both exotic and indigenous species. “Although it is challenging, it is a business requirement,” the representative said in an emailed response.Mahandry Hugues Andrianarisoa at one of CVB’s reforestation sites near Ranomafana National Park. Image by Malavika Vyawahare/ MongabayTrees: Slow-growing capitalAndrianarisoa attends to the young plants in his care with the watchfulness of a guardian. At Akopa, a reforestation site bordering Ranomafana, he pinpointed individual plants from a messy green spread, cautiously avoiding treading on saplings, including a ramy plant that barely reached his knee. Ramy refers to 33 tree species in the genus Canarium, all endemic to Madagascar.Last year, CVB planted 26,000 saplings around the park as part of its long-standing reforestation program. The saplings spend about eight months at nurseries managed by CVB and local villagers before being transplanted to designated reforestation sites.To reforest 40,000 hectares per year, the Rajoelina government estimates that 40 million saplings will have to be planted annually by 6 million people. Even those massive numbers might not be enough, though, so the government is looking at dropping seed balls from planes and drones. Nurturing and then transplanting seedlings from nurseries appears tedious in comparison, but evidence about the success of aerial reforestation is meager. At nurseries, bad seeds and weak seedlings are weeded out, ensuring higher odds of survival.Ramy plants in the background at the Tanamboa nursery. Image by Malavika Vyawahare/MongabayThe CVB team knows from experience that tree planting involves more than just dropping seeds and watching beanstalks rise. The survival rate of plants, even from a nursery, can be as low as 40 percent. If it persists, the puny ramy sapling in Akopa could grow into a billowing deciduous tree reaching heights of 20 meters (66 feet), or three giraffes tall. To do so it must stand its ground in the face of natural calamities, humans and foraging animals, and compete with banana and pine trees that are sprouting all around. It will be at least two decades before it starts bearing fruit.Once it does, the ramy tree could attract aye-aye lemurs (Daubentonia madagascariensis), the largest nocturnal primate in the world. It could, that is, if there are any left in the wild; aye-aye, whose diet includes insect larvae and ramy seeds, are one step away from being declared critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN).One of the peculiarities of this elfin lemur is an elongated middle finger, with which it knocks rapidly on dead wood in search of cavities that hold insect larvae. If its flappy ears pick up a hollow, it gnaws an opening in the bark, inserts its long, skeletal third digit, and then impales and extracts its prey. Its sharp, rodent-like incisors also help bore into the fruit of the ramy tree to feed on its fleshy seed. However, in degraded forests in and around Ranomafana these trees are few and far between. The reforestation campaign could change this, but slow-growing ramy are not the trees of choice for villagers living around the park.An aye-aye feeding on a coconut. Image by Rhett A. Butler/MongabayThe fruits of reforestationAt a village-managed nursery in Tanambao village near Ranomafana, fledging ramy seedlings shared space with invasive acacia trees (Acacia mangium) that are native to Australia, New Guinea and Indonesia. “I don’t know why they are here,” Andrianarisoa said, concern sweeping his youthful face. “We did not ask them to plant these.”He may have been concerned, but he was not entirely surprised. The nursery sits atop a knoll, with mud-and-wood houses scattered around, interspersed by muddy rice fields. Like more than three-quarters of the Malagasy population, villagers here don’t have access to electricity. Wood pervades life; it builds homes, warms hearths, cooks meals. Acacias grow quickly; in favorable conditions young ones can grow 5 meters (16 feet) every year, making them an ideal source of fuelwood and building material.Clerizia Andre, 17, the daughter of the nursery owner, had never heard of the president’s reforestation campaign, but she was enthusiastic about planting trees. “From trees we get clean air, water, they help prevent erosion,” she said, “and they are used for building houses.” When asked which trees should be planted, she replied promptly: “Eucalyptus and pine trees.”Clerizia Andre, 17, who helps her father manage the nursery. Image by Malavika Vyawahare/MongabayThe aspiration for a green Madagascar is not new. The French, who colonized the country from 1896 until its independence in 1960, undertook a zealous tree-planting program that installed large plantations of fast-growing non-native species like eucalyptus and pine. Since independence, every year during the November-to-April rainy season, the country embarks on a tree-planting campaign launched in the capital, Antananarivo.The Rajoelina government has tried to re-energize and scale up existing efforts, laying down targets for regions and districts and focusing on reporting, which hasn’t happened before. But the shadow of past planting drives hangs over the current campaign, according to Christian Kull, a professor with the Institute of Geography and Sustainability at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland, who has worked on forestry issues in Madagascar for more than 20 years.“The reforestation drive in my opinion is problematic,” he said, explaining that regional and local government offices and NGOs implement tree-planting drives in ways that are “easy and familiar” to them. “What species do plant nurseries have available? What species do people have 100 years of experience how to plant? Eucalypts and acacias and pines,” he said.“Even the ministry uses these [non-native] species; we have to explain the importance of endemic species to them,” said Andrianarisoa, who also organizes workshops for government officials. A ministry publication seen by Mongabay talks about how pinède restoration, using pine species, would be part of the reforestation effort. At a recent reforestation event in Mahajanga province in northwest Madagascar attended by the president, seeds from various trees species including Acacia mangium were on display.Nurturing forestsA fully-grown ramy tree near Ranomafana National Park. Image by Malavika Vyawahare/MongabayTo scale up reforestation efforts, plantings are happening on both public and private lands, but each comes with its own set of problems. On public lands, trees fare poorly without supervision, which is impractical, if not impossible, at the scale at which the Rajoelina government is planning reforestation. On private lands, people need incentives to plant trees that don’t immediately benefit them.A pilot project launched by Seneca Park Zoo in upstate New York to monitor trees using satellites, GPS and blockchain technology brought Andrianarisoa to the U.S. in 2017. While he sees the value of technology to track trees, he acknowledged that people’s cooperation in securing trees is key to the success of any reforestation project. Money goes a long way in a country where about three-quarters of the population lives below the poverty line — something he can attest to because CVB regularly monitors the progress of its reforestation sites on both private and public lands. “What I see in the village is that once you have money to pay to take care of the trees, it works,” he said.In Madagascar, NGOs use their own funds for reforestation, and appear unwilling to channel more resources into the government’s campaign without having a bigger say in it. Imposing targets is not the way, according to Rasolonjatovo at CVB. “First, discuss with the local community about where we will do the reforestation, why we do it there, and who owns the tree?” he said. “That is a good start.”The collaborative approach has met with some success elsewhere. A recent report assessing progress made on the New York Declaration on Forests commended El Salvador for developing restoration and sustainable development plans with the help of local communities, the private sector, NGOs, small farmers, local governments, and indigenous peoples.Tree survival is not the only concern. Such large-scale plantings alter landscapes and could have unintended consequences, like skewing the risk of forest fires. “If the reforestation drive were to focus on areas where forests used to grow, for example recently deforested areas in the east and west rather than in the fire-adapted open grasslands,” Kull said, “then the reforestation drive would make sense and be worthy of strong support.”Not everybody sees the absence of a fleshed-out plan as a hurdle. “The details are still being worked out, but sometimes that is the way politics works and it is not necessarily a bad thing,” said Tim Christophersen, a senior U.N. Environment Programme official and chair of the Global Partnership on Forest and Landscape Restoration. “What is positive in Madagascar is that it is linked to the head of state which has a lot of advantages. One of them being that all the ministries who are involved need to pull in the same direction.”Food being cooked in a household in Anosy region of Madagascar. Image by Malavika Vyawahare/MongabayThe government is also supporting its reforestation campaign with efforts to reduce the country’s reliance on wood. During his March announcement Rajoelina said the government would provide a million cooking stoves each year for the next five years to reduce dependence on firewood. He has also pushed for a shift toward ethanol, a biofuel, in place of charcoal for cooking, and the government is developing a policy promoting renewable energy sources as part of a multi-sectoral effort called Initiative Emergence Madagascar.“What it takes is three things: political will and leadership, good planning, and money,” Christophersen said of a successful reforestation campaign. “We should welcome this new enthusiasm [for planting trees] and help guide it in the right direction instead of saying: it is complicated leave it to the experts.”At the time of publishing, the president’s office and Madagascar’s ministry of environment had not responded to requests for comments.Editor’s note: Mongabay founder and CEO Rhett Butler is a member of Centre ValBio’s advisory board.Malavika Vyawahare is the Madagascar staff writer for Mongabay. Find her on Twitter: @MalavikaVyFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.(Editor’s note: The article has been updated to clarify that Madagascar will be hosting a large-scale planting drive on January 19, 2020 to mark 60 years of independence, not on its independence day in June.)center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Sharks on Game 6 vs. Avalanche: “We’re a confident group heading in there”

first_imgSAN JOSE — The Sharks experienced enough drama in the seventh game of their first round playoff series against the Vegas Golden Knights to last them for quite a while. There’s really no desire to have to be in that position again.“As much as I enjoyed my first Game 7, I’d like to forego it maybe this series,” forward Evander Kane said Sunday of the Sharks’ 5-4 overtime win in Game 7 over the Golden Knights, their third straight victory that gave them a 4-3 series win. “Anytime you get an …last_img read more

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Don’t Feed These Daisies

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Pamela SmithDTN Progressive Farmer Crops Technology EditorDECATUR, Ill. (DTN) — Those yellow flowers filling fields across the Midwest aren’t buttercups, baby. They are weeds and consumed in enough quantities, cressleaf groundsel, also called butterweed, can be toxic to livestock.Ohio State University weed specialist Mark Loux said the winter annual weed is being found in fairly high numbers because the weather has held back herbicide treatments this spring.Butterweed is common in no-till corn and soybean fields, and burndown herbicides are typically used to control it early in the spring when the plants are smaller and more susceptible. However, that didn’t happen in many areas this year due to wet weather. It’s also not an option in forage and wheat crops.Native to the United States, butterweed can be found from Texas east to Florida, northward along the Atlantic Coast to Virginia, and west to Nebraska. The plant is poisonous to grazing animals such as cattle, horses, goats, sheep and to humans, Loux said.There are several other weeds that send out yellow flowers this time of year, noted Aaron Hager, University of Illinois weed scientist. “Growers should take the time to look because wild mustard and yellow rocket can sometimes be mistaken for butterweed,” he told DTN.Butterweed is easy to distinguish because it has daisy-like petals with a pincushion-like center. It is a member of the aster family. Leaves alternate on the stem, are deeply divided and lobed. Lobes have round, serrated margins. Stems are hollow and grooved with purplish streaks. Most plants have one stem, but there may be more.Loux said applying herbicides to hay fields isn’t likely to reduce the risk of toxicity in animals. It’s also too late for wheat growers to apply any herbicide to their wheat crops.How much of the weed it takes to harm livestock has not been well documented, Hager said. The plants contain compounds called pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). The PAs are found in the plant throughout the growing season but appear to be at their highest levels when the plant is in the bud to flower stage.“Drying or ensiling the plants during the hay- or straw-making process doesn’t reduce the toxicity of cressleaf groundsel,” Loux said.Loux recommended producers avoid harvesting areas of the field that have high concentrations of cressleaf groundsel (butterweed).Mowing before the weed is in the bud to flower stage will most effectively prevent seed production, but that doesn’t minimize the risk of poisoning. Loux stressed that it is important to prevent including those mowed plants in hay or straw — or to discard bales that contain it. The groundsel is not likely to regrow after the first cutting of hay in the spring. The goal of control strategies should be to prevent it from contaminating the first cutting.It was also noted that using unplanted acres for grazing could be risky if butterweed populations are high.Hager said his research has shown that up to 98% of cressleaf groundsel plants emerge in the fall. “Most of those you see in the field today are already going to seed. If you had a big problem with them or other winter annuals this spring, fall controls are something to consider,” he said.“Butterweed is easy to control with fall or early spring burndown in crop field settings and you’ll be taking care of marestail problems at the same time,” he noted. “We haven’t seen big problems in hayfields, but it’s certainly something to be watching for.”More information on cressleaf groundsel, including how to identify it and manage it, can be found on Ohio State’s weed science website at http://bit.ly/….Find a video about butterweed from Aaron Hager here: http://bit.ly/….Pamela Smith can be reached at Pamela.smith@dtn.comFollow her on Twitter @PamSmithDTN(AG/CZ)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Archers book Final 4 berth; Amid calls for coach’s head, UST drops 11th straight game

first_imgTyphoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Read Next Taguinod, 11, captures 3 gold medals in swimming View comments CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa UE’s Alvin Pasaol (right) didn’t have the same explosion he had against La Salle the first time both schools played.—AUGUST DELA CRUZIn some corner of the UAAP, a storied school is dealing with all the noise from disgruntled students and alumni calling for the resignation of a head coach.Far from all that controversy, La Salle made its presence felt in a more positive way.ADVERTISEMENT Chief Justice Peralta on upcoming UAAP game: UP has no match against UST PLAY LIST 01:00Chief Justice Peralta on upcoming UAAP game: UP has no match against UST00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games LATEST STORIES Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Kin of Misamis Oriental hero cop to get death benefits, award — PNP The defending champion Archers formalized their entry to the Final Four after brushing off University of the East, 99-78, in Season 80 men’s basketball tournament Wednesday at Mall of Asia Arena.La Salle streaked to its fourth straight win to improve to 9-2 while the Red Warriors slipped to 3-8—still mathematically in contention for a semifinals spot.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutUniversity of Santo Tomas was never in the hunt for a Final Four spot at any point in the tournament—even preseason polls had the Tigers finishing last.But the school that has long been a league heavyweight—the Tigers have collected 18 UAAP crowns, including a rare “four-peat”—seems dead set on getting there drenched in historic ignominy. “We shouldn’t think ahead, and we should focus on just one game at a time,” said Rivero in Filipino after filling in for coach Aldin Ayo in the postgame press conference.Ayo, who this season has dealt with rumors about his shaky hold of his post at La Salle, snubbed the media for the sixth time.“Actually our team is a strong unit as long as we follow our system, and we should move as one,” added Rivero.Reigning MVP Ben Mbala led all scorers with 25 points to go along 14 rebounds to lead La Salle while SantiSantillan added 14 point and 11 rebounds.Alvin Pasaol, who put up a career-high 49 points in the first round against La Salle, managed 23 points and nine boards this time to lead UE. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Adamson U dealt UST an 11th straight loss, 75-70, later in the day, pumping the volume up on calls from students and alumni for the resignation of head coach Boy Sablan.The Falcons tightened their grip on the third seed with their seventh win in 11 matches while the Tigers somehow continue justifying an angry mob’s call for a coaching change.La Salle has little to worry about any coaching change—at least for now—especially after mounting a 22-6 run that gave the Green Archers a 40-24 lead in the first half.The lead then ballooned to 27 points with 2:25 left in the third on a Justine Baltazar triple that put La Salle up, 74-47.And with the Archers’ remaining games looking more like mere formalities, Ricci Rivero said they should remain focused on the elimination round.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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Video: Ohio State Linebackers Joe Burger And Craig Fada Show Off Their Apartment On “OSU Cribs”

first_imgA closeup of an Ohio State football helmet on the field.NEW ORLEANS, LA – JANUARY 01: An Ohio State Buckeye helmet is seen on the sidelines prior to the start of the game during the All State Sugar Bowl at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome on January 1, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)When it comes to college housing, Ohio State football players have it pretty good. Buckeye linebackers Joe Burger and Craig Fada showed off their apartment on the first episode of “OSU Cribs,” and we must say, they have a pretty nice pad. There is plenty of Ohio State-themed memorabilia around, as you’d expect, but they also show off the strobe light and fog machine set up. And of course, like any good episode of Cribs, we get a look at the players’ cars.Playing football at Ohio State looks like a decent time. Not that we didn’t already know it.last_img read more

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Electronic Monitoring of Persons with Restraining Orders

first_imgStory Highlights The Minister explained that once the Restraining Order is executed against a perpetrator, that person will be fitted with the electronic bracelet, while the victim will be given a transponder. National Security Minister, Hon. Robert Montague, says electronic monitoring is to be introduced for persons who are the subject of Restraining Orders.Mr. Montague informed that his Ministry is in discussion with a supplier to procure the equipment.The Minister explained that once the Restraining Order is executed against a perpetrator, that person will be fitted with the electronic bracelet, while the victim will be given a transponder.“If that person comes within the limit of 100 yards from (the victim), the transponder will go off and beep and it will send off a signal to the (monitoring) centre, which will call the perpetrator and tell him to step back,” he said.Mr. Montague was addressing the recent signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) by his Ministry, the Jamaica Constabulary Force and the University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona campus, to have more police recruits trained by the institution.The same technology will also be used for those persons who are on bail and those on early release from prison.“Up to March this year, some 143 persons who were on bail were also charged for murder while being on bail. We’re going to enter into some discussions with the Ministry of Justice that, for some categories of crimes, the persons on bail should wear an electronic bracelet as a condition of their bail,” he said.The Minister also indicated that some 400 members of the JCF have been trained in domestic-violence prevention.center_img National Security Minister, Hon. Robert Montague, says electronic monitoring is to be introduced for persons who are the subject of Restraining Orders. last_img read more

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