Bringing back extinct plants to life: Q&A with ‘plant messiah’ Carlos Magdalena

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta Carlos Magdalena, a botanical horticulturalist at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, U.K., who’s been labeled the “plant messiah” by the media, has figured out how to get some of the world’s rarest plant species to grow.Magdalena travels around the world collecting seeds and cuttings of extremely rare plant species, then brings them back to the Royal Botanic Gardens, where, together with his colleagues, he sets about trying to propagate them.But the clock is ticking, he tells Mongabay. Tropical forests with high biodiversity are being razed around the world and plants are going extinct by the hour.Mongabay chatted with Magdalena over the phone about what it takes to save rare plants and what drives him. Carlos Magdalena lives and breathes plants. He’s obsessed with them. But he also understands why many people aren’t.“Plants are not as obvious as animals,” he tells Mongabay. “You see an animal and it’s very easy for you to feel empathy for the animal because you’re an animal too. But you cannot see a plant truly until you know it well, until you know the facts surrounding it, what pollinates it, what magic tricks it can do.”Magdalena, a botanical horticulturalist at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, U.K., has figured out many of these tricks. He’s especially drawn to plants that are extremely endangered and down to their last or just a handful of individuals in the wild. He travels around the world collecting seeds and cuttings of such extremely rare plant species, then brings them back to the Royal Botanic Gardens, where, together with his colleagues, he sets about trying to unravel the plants’ mysteries. Take Nymphaea thermarum, the world’s smallest known water lily, for example. After the species went extinct in its only habitat in Rwanda in 2008, Magdalena managed to crack the code and germinate the plant’s seeds at Kew after several failed attempts.As in the case of the lily, sometimes making a rare species grow is a struggle that can span decades. Other times it’s surprisingly easy. So there’s hope, Magdalena says, that some of the plants that we are losing could be very easily propagated and saved.For his efforts to give life to near-extinct and extinct plant species, Magdalena, born in Gijón, Asturias, in northern Spain, was labeled “El Mesias de las Plantas” (The Messiah of Plants) in a Spanish newspaper in 2010. That label has stuck.“I suspect the name was partly inspired by my post-biblical (though pre-hipster) beard and long hair, and also because I was spending a lot of my time trying to save plants on the brink of extinction,” he writes in his book, The Plant Messiah: Adventures in Search of the World’s Rarest Species.He doesn’t have a messiah complex, he quickly adds in the book. What he does want to be, though, is a messenger who makes people aware of how important plants are, and how critical they are for our survival.But the clock is ticking, he tells Mongabay. Tropical forests with high biodiversity are being razed around the world and plants are going extinct every hour. In fact, one in five plant species in the world is estimated to be threatened with extinction.“None of us has the authority or the right to destroy the forests at this scale,” he says. “Who owns the oxygen we breathe? Nobody does, and it is only produced in a few places like the oceans and rainforests of our precious planet.”Mongabay chatted with Magdalena over the phone about what it takes to save rare plants and what drives him.Carlos Magdalena. Image courtesy of Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.Mongabay: How did you get interested in plants and what excites you about them the most?Carlos Magdalena: I was always interested in wildlife and nature. From a very early age I was helping my mother who had some flower shops and liked to grow lots of different things — some because they were beautiful, others because they were strange. But as I got older, I started liking plants more and more because I think plants are not as obvious as animals. You see an animal and it’s very easy for you to feel empathy for the animal because you’re an animal too. But you need to know plants. You cannot see a plant truly until you know it well, until you know the facts surrounding it, what pollinates it, what magic tricks it can do.Plants do things on a different scale of time. Even if you see a plant doing nothing, it is doing something very deep and at many levels: at the soil level, at the root level, at the stem level, at the flower level. I will say that many of us don’t love plants because we don’t know them.What kind of work do you do at Kew?I work with Kew’s living collections of plants, more precisely in the glasshouse department where we cultivate tropical plants like tropical trees, shrubs, climbers and aquatics like water lilies. We also work with a huge variety of species from tropical crops to plants that have interesting biology or an economic value, plants that are simply beautiful and fascinating. We work with many different countries. We have many examples of flora from islands because islands are fragile ecosystems and they have their own sets of plants that are very unique. For example, I work with lots of species from the Mascarene archipelago in the Indian Ocean. We also have plants from other islands such as Hawaii and the Canary Islands.The work sits on different levels, both saving individual species but also understanding the genes of different species because taxonomy is key to protect species. You can only protect what you know exists. If you don’t understand that, you don’t know whether it’s endangered or not.At Kew there are more than 27,000 plant species, and more than 68,000 accessions [different plant materials collected from the same species, or the same species collected from different places] and the nursery where I work has 8,000 to 9,000 species. It’s currently estimated that there are about 400,000 plant species in the world, and one in five species is threatened with extinction. That means that over 70,000 species are threatened with extinction. There are more plant species threatened with extinction than all threatened bird and mammal species put together. It’s a huge problem.Could you give an example of a rare plant species that you’re working on now?We are trying to work with a plant in the family Podostemaceae, which is a group of plants that grows in fast-moving rivers. Trying to figure out the conditions in which it grows has been very difficult.How do you decide which plant species is worth saving, since there are so many of them?I try to work with whatever I can. A plant species may be endangered but if you don’t have any links with the country where it grows, and you don’t have any funding, then it’s difficult to work on that species. Sometimes I try to chase planet alignment, where I know that there is a case, and I know that somebody is willing to help and where I can justify the use of resources for them. Of course the more endangered a plant is, the more desperate the situation is and the more interested I become. For example, for animals, if I tell you that there are 300 specimens left, people will be like “Oh my god, this is terrible.” In Mauritius, plants species that have 300 specimens will be considered of least concern.There are 70 species of plants that we know of that have less than 10 individuals left. In some cases, there is just the last individual plant left, or there are the last three individuals left, those will probably be more of a priority because the clock is ticking, and these specimens might have only few minutes left. These last individuals could disappear by the end of this week. Maybe the individuals could disappear with the next cyclone, or when the next pest gets introduced.Nymphaea thermarum, the world’s smallest known water lily, went extinct in the wild in 2008. Image courtesy of Carlos Magdalena/Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.Once you zero in on a species, how do you go about looking for them in the wild?It’s important to have someone help you at the other end. If I go to Mauritius by myself, it will take me forever to find the plant I want. But if you work with people who are on the island and know where the plants are, in one day I can take cuttings from maybe 30 to 40 species. Rather than reinvent the wheel you need to work with whatever help you can get. Local knowledge is key.Also, we all have specialties and I step in only when people are having difficulty. For example, if there is a plant species that’s threatened and if people within the country are already growing it from seeds, it’s not relevant for me to help. But if they have tried to grow it and don’t know what to do next, that is when I usually try to step in, when there’s some kind of difficulty.How hard is it to navigate permits and bureaucracy in order to take seeds or cuttings back to Kew?It depends. Kew works in partnerships in over 100 countries worldwide. Seeds, for example, can be relatively easy to bring in provided we comply with global conventions and protocols. We seek approvals from the countries of origin, and a copy of all seeds we collect for the Millennium Seed Bank are stored in their country of origin too so we don’t do anything against the will of any government and always make sure everyone is benefiting equally.When you bring materials like cuttings, or living plants, then you need more permits and documentation as well as a period of quarantine. Even at Kew, to save our collection, anything we bring from abroad, we put in quarantine.Once you’ve brought the seeds or cuttings, what’s your process in trying to figure out how to grow them?Sometimes it can be very tricky to grow these rare plants. But amazingly, sometimes it can be very easy too. So there is hope.Sometimes there is a single tree in the world, and maybe it’s not growing in the country, and I bring a cutting, and then it roots using normal techniques that you use for any plant without much drama. So in a way, some of the plants that we are losing could be very easily propagated and saved.Sometimes, though, it gets more complicated. The more endangered a plant is the more specialized it is. When they are very specialized to a particular type of soil, particular type of climate, that is when there is a challenge. Then you spend a lot of time thinking about what you could do.It’s like working in a hospital. A patient might come in, but you don’t know what happened to that person, you don’t know much about the history of that person. All you know is that he is sick, and he can’t speak to you. How do you go about it? You try to react to what you’re seeing. For example, if the person has low blood pressure, then you try to raise the pressure. If he has signs of infection, you may try some general antibiotics. If that doesn’t work, you think about what you can do next. With plants, you need to think similarly, often think out of the box, and use your sixth sense, if you like.  It can become very personalized for every plant.If your memory is good, you can look at a plant and realize that yesterday the plant was a little greener or was facing up. And that enables you to react quicker than if you don’t notice anything.Sometimes things can also work differently in cultivation. You could try to replicate the conditions in which a plant species grows in the wild, and sometimes that doesn’t work. That’s because in cultivation they may like something different. For example, a plant that lives in running water, you may think it would like to sit in water. But actually, it’s different. In the wild, the water is flowing, the water has higher oxygen. In cultivation, it may do better out of the water. Then sometimes you think that because you collected your specimen from a place that was very, very hot, that’s what your plant likes. But maybe it was hot at midday and at night the temperature drops, so in cultivation it grows in a cooler temperature than you think it’s going to be.Hyophorbe amaricaulis is only known from a single, so far impossible to reproduce specimen, in Curepipe, Mauritius. Image courtesy of Carlos Magdalena/Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.You mentioned that some species are surprisingly easy to grow. Could you give an example?There is a plant in Mauritius called Elaeocarpus bojeri. There were only two trees left, and they told me that they tried to propagate it but it didn’t grow. I took some cuttings and seeds. The seeds didn’t germinate straight away, but I did something called nicking, which is cutting a bit of the outer hard shell of the seed, which it allows some water to go in, and all the seeds germinated.In 2014, a rare water lily was stolen from Kew. You have so many rare species there. Is theft a big concern?It depends on how you look at it. While it happens and while we take it seriously, it doesn’t happen that often. We all try to balance the line between protecting our collections and also allowing people to see plants up close. We don’t want to keep the plants out of public eye all the time or put them in glass boxes or put CCTV cameras in every single corner. So it is a concern, but 99 percent of the people are really well behaved.What do you think of the current rate of forest loss across the tropics and the rate at which plants are going extinct?Plants are going extinct every single day, probably every single hour. It’s like killing all your golden-egg hens systematically. It is so nonsensical. We really need to realize that protecting the forests is not optional. This is not something that’s just idealistic. This is at the very core of our survival.We cannot stabilize the planet’s climate if there is no tropical forest. We cannot ensure that we will have resources to support humankind in terms of medicines, food, water and more without protecting these forests. Sometimes we destroy tropical forests for unnecessary reasons like palm oil production in parts of tropical Asia, for example.Being Spanish, I cannot think of any single traditional food recipe that has been used for last maybe 30 years that has used palm oil as an ingredient. Then why do we have palm oil in nearly every single piece of food we eat now? Many farmers rely on this production for their livelihoods and at the end of the day people need feeding too, so it’s important to find more sustainable uses for the land that still support local communities.We’re also destroying tropical forests of very high diversity to produce very low quality meat. You need to think on a deeper timescale. What annoys me the most about tropical forest destruction is how unnecessary much of it has been. We also need to learn from the mistakes of past generations so that we don’t replicate those mistakes.None of us has the authority or the right to destroy the forests at this scale. Who owns the oxygen we breathe? Nobody does, and it is only produced in a few places like the oceans and rainforests of our precious planet.Is there anything else that you would like to add?I want to finally repeat that many of us don’t like plants only because we don’t know them well. One of the things I find most fascinating about plants is that the more I know about them, the less I know about them. I never get bored observing a plant. Everyday there’s something new that I learn. And every day I find yet another plant that’s even more interesting than the previous one.All you have to do is just keep watching them, understand them. That’s a very healthy thing to do.Banner image of Carlos Magdalena courtesy of Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Biodiversity, Climate Change, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Green, Plants, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Research, Threats To Rainforests, Trees, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

See More

Mongabay editor has now been detained 6 weeks in Indonesia

first_imgMongabay editor Philip Jacobson was detained in Indonesia on December 17, 2019 over an alleged issue with his business visa.Jacobson was formally arrested on January 21 and was incarcerated in Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan through January 24.Jacobson is currently under ‘city arrest’ without his passport and is prevented from leaving Palangkaraya.This is a press release from Mongabay about a developing situation and may be updated. Mongabay editor Philip Jacobson has now been detained for 42 days in Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan over an alleged violation of his business visa.“Phil is still under ‘city arrest’ in Palangkaraya, six weeks after immigration authorities seized his passport,” said Mongabay Founder and CEO Rhett A. Butler. “We’re eager to see this issue resolved and Phil allowed to leave the city.”Jacobson, 30, was first detained on December 17, 2019 after attending a hearing between the Central Kalimantan parliament and the local chapter of the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN), Indonesia’s largest indigenous rights advocacy group.He had travelled to the city shortly after entering Indonesia on a business visa for a series of meetings. The day he was due to leave, immigration authorities seized his passport, interrogated him for four hours and ordered him to remain in the city pending their investigation.On January 21, more than a month later, Jacobson was formally arrested and taken into custody. He was informed that he faces charges of violating the 2011 immigration law and a prison sentence of up to five years. Jacobson was held at Palangkaraya Class II detention center in a cell with six inmates for four days before being transferred back to ‘city detention’, allowing him to leave prison. He’s been prevented from leaving Palanglaraya until further notice.Philip Jacobson.The transfer from prison to city detention came after U.S. Ambassador to Indonesia Joseph R. Donovan met with the Indonesian Coordinating Minister for Political, Legal, and Security Affairs (Kemenko Polhukam) Mohammad Mahfud MD, and a delegation from the U.S. embassy did a welfare check on Jacobson. Minister Mahfud MD was subsequently quoted in Indonesian media as saying he would order Jacobson to be deported from Indonesia “immediately.”“We are grateful that authorities have made this accommodation,” said Butler. “We have seen the media reports and stand ready to move forward on the appropriate next steps.”“We’re amazed by the outpouring of support we received from the public on Phil’s case,” added Butler. “Beyond the thousands of messages via social media, people ranging from top business leaders in Singapore and Europe to Indonesian-American investors and entrepreneurs to members of U.S. Congress have reached out to express their concern.”Sampling of some of the protest art that has emerged on social media since Jacobson’s arrest.Chronology of Jacobson’s caseSummary: Philip Jacobson is an employee of Mongabay, a non-profit environmental science and conservation news organization. Jacobson is an editor for Mongabay and splits his time between Indonesia and his native U.S. This document outlines events culminating in Jacobson’s detention in the Indonesian city of Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan on the island of Borneo.December 14: Jacobson, traveling on a multiple-entry business visa, arrived in Palangkaraya, the capital city of Central Kalimantan province, to meet with the local chapter of the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN), an indigenous rights advocacy group.December 16: Jacobson attended a dialogue at the parliament building between the Central Kalimantan parliament and the local chapter of AMAN.December 17: Jacobson was scheduled on a flight out of Palangkaraya, but before he could leave for the airport, immigration officers went to his guesthouse and confiscated his passport. The officials ordered Jacobson to come in the next day for questioning. It later became clear that someone had photographed Jacobson at the parliament building and reported him to immigration.December 18: Jacobson was interrogated at the immigration office about his activities. Authorities took an official statement, known as a BAP, and ordered Jacobson to remain in Palangkaraya while they continued their investigation.December 24: Jacobson missed his international flight out of Indonesia.January 9: Jacobson was summoned to the immigration office, where he received a formal letter saying he was suspected of committing a visa violation and was being investigated. Authorities stated that as long as Jacobson remained cooperative, he would remain under city arrest, rather than detained in an immigration cell.January 21: Immigration officers appeared at Jacobson’s guesthouse room and instructed him to pack his belongings and come with them. Following another round of questioning, he was taken into custody and transferred to a detention center.January 22: Jacobson and his colleagues were honored with the Fetisov Journalism Award for their work on an investigative report, produced in collaboration with Indonesia’s Tempo magazine, Malaysiakini and The Gecko Project, about a plan to create the world’s largest oil palm plantation on the island of New Guinea. Jacobson had been expected to attend the awards ceremony in Switzerland before he was barred from leaving Palangkaraya.January 24: Coordinating Minister for Political, Legal and Security Affairs Mahfud MD told reporters in Jakarta that he would order Jacobson to be deported from Indonesia “immediately.” Later that day, Jacobson’s local lawyers negotiated his transfer from prison back to “city arrest,” and he was allowed to return to a guesthouse.January 26: Jacobson, still prevented from leaving Palangkaraya, turns 31.Statements from Journalism NGOsCommittee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) [January 22]:  “The longer journalist Philip Jacobson remains held in detention, the more damage Indonesia does to its reputation as a democracy with a free press,” said Shawn Crispin, CPJ’s senior Southeast Asia representative. “Indonesian authorities should release Jacobson immediately and cease pursuing a criminal case against him.”Reporters Without Borders (RSF) [January 22]: “Phillip Jacobson’s totally disproportionate arrest clearly amounts to intimidation,” said Daniel Bastard, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk. “The Central Kalimantan immigration officials have massively overstepped their powers. We call on the Ministry of Law and Human Rights, which oversees the Directorate General of Immigration, to ensure that this journalist is immediately released in accordance with the rule of law.”The International Press Institute (IPI) [January 22]: “Indonesia should immediately release Philip Jacobson and drop any travel restrictions against him”, IPI Director of Advocacy Ravi R. Prasad said. “The harassment of journalists is unacceptable in Indonesia, which claims to be a democracy that respects press freedom.”Society of Environmental Journalists (SEJ) [January 22]  “Employees of the news media should be free to work in Indonesia without fear of arbitrary detention,” SEJ President Meera Subramanian said. “Actions like those taken against Mr. Jacobson harm the health of Indonesian democracy and the country’s global reputation.”Komite Keselamatan Jurnalis [January 22]: Komite Keselamatan Jurnalis mengecam penahanan dan pemidanaan Philip Jacobson, editor Mongabay, atas masalah administrasi … Komite Keselamatan Jurnalis menilai penahanan dan penetapan status tersangka Philip Jacobson sangat berlebihan dan mencoreng demokrasi di Indonesia.Alliance of Independent Journalists (AJI) [January 23]: “The criminalisation of Jacobson is an excessive action . . . The immigration office had no authority to detain and treat him like a criminal offender following the allegation of violating an administrative matter.”International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) [January 23]: “The detention of Jacobson is unjust and excessive. This appears to be a retaliatory attempt to silence media reporting on sensitive topics. Journalism is not a crime and we strongly condemn attempts to criminalise journalists in Indonesia.”PEN America [January 25]: “While we are relieved that Philip has been temporarily released, we remain concerned that he is being targeted for his work in an attempt to send a warning signal to those journalists and news outlets who undertake investigative reporting on sensitive topics in Indonesia,” said Karin Karlekar, director of Free Expression at Risk Programs at PEN America. “Even if there is evidence of a visa-related violation, it should be handled as an administrative rather than a criminal matter and be resolved as quickly as possible, and we call on the authorities to allow both Indonesian and foreign journalists to work freely and without fear of retaliation.” Environment, Environmental Journalism, press release Article published by Rhett Butlercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

See More

Bayern consider bid for Ousmane Dembele

first_img0Shares0000Ousmane Dembele joined Barcelona in 2017 for a Bundesliga record fee of 125 million euros © AFP / PAU BARRENABERLIN, Germany, Jun 26 – Bayern Munich will consider a move for Barcelona winger Ousmane Dembele if they fail to sign Leroy Sane from Manchester City, Bild newspaper reported on Wednesday.With veteran wingers Arjen Robben and Franck Ribery leaving the club, Bayern had targeted Germany international Sane as they look to bolster their attack ahead of next season. “If the Sane transfer fails, Bayern also have Ousmane Dembele on their list,” wrote Bild.France international Dembele, 22, was linked to Bayern before joining Borussia Dortmund from Rennes for 15 million euros ($17m) in 2016.A year later, he became the most expensive outgoing or incoming transfer in Bundesliga history when Dortmund sold him to Barcelona for 125 million euros.With his current contract set to expire in 2022, questions remain over whether Bayern could afford to sign the French international.Bayern broke their own transfer record with the 80-million-euro signing of French defender Lucas Hernandez earlier this year, as they look to rejuvenate their squad in what club president Uli Hoeness has called “the biggest investment programme in our history”.Yet their recruitment drive has stalled in recent weeks, with Hoeness openly admitting that first-choice target Sane may prove to be too expensive.The Bayern president also insisted last month that the club would not break the 100-million-euro mark for a single player this year.0Shares0000(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

See More

Mourinho linked with Chelsea keeper

first_imgJose Mourinho may take Chelsea’s promising keeper Thibaut Courtois to Real Madrid, the Daily Mirror say.Courtois joined Atletico Madrid on loan after joining the Blues from Genk and it is claimed Mourinho is interested in signing him as back-up for Iker Casillis.The Mirror also say Fulham boss Martin Jol plans to give midfielder Mahamadou Diarra a one-year contract when his short-term deal expires soon.Meanwhile, The Sun declare that Chelsea, Manchester United and Arsenal have been alerted to the possible availablity of Athletic Bilbao star Markel Susaeta.The winger, 24, has only a year of his contract left to run, prompting speculation that he could be sold for £6m.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

See More

Manik Sarkar flays Centre for ‘failing’ to meet poll promises

first_imgFormer Tripura Chief Minister Manik Sarkar has flayed the NDA government at the Centre for allegedly failing to keep its poll promises and “misleading” the people on many issues like GST and demonetisation.“Before coming to power four years ago, it (BJP) had promised that Rs.15 lakh will be deposited in everyone’s bank account … the government has even failed to release the list of black money holders,” the senior CPI(M) leader said while delivering a lecture on “Manifestation of Perfection: Idealism in Politics” here yesterday. Slamming the Narendra Modi government over demonetisation and GST, Mr.Sarkar said the demonetisation move was a myopic one, while the implementation of GST had shattered the backbone of small businesses in the country. Accusing the Centre of failing to keep the promise of providing employment to two crore people in a year, the veteran leftist leader said it was unable to provide even two lakh jobs. While price rise has become a serious problem, the government has failed to deal with suicide by farmers who are not getting remunerative prices for their produces, he said.Mr.Sarkar also alleged that there was an attempt to divide the people of the country on the basis of religion, language and even castes. Health and education are not getting adequate attention though these two key sectors are essential for developing human resources, he said.last_img read more

See More

Magic rally past Celtics, earn 1st playoff berth in 7 years

first_imgMOST READ So when the horn sounded on their 116-108 win over the Celtics on Sunday night to clinch the Magic’s first postseason berth since 2012, they took some extra time to celebrate.Terrence Ross had 26 points, Nikola Vucevic finished with 25 points and 12 rebounds and Evan Fournier added 24 points for Orlando (41-40). The victory also gave the Magic their first regular-season sweep over Boston since 1996-97.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logistics“It’s an amazing feeling. Nobody knows what I’ve been through in the last six years here, just through all the losing, the struggling, the doubting,” Vucevic said. “It’s been very difficult for me at times. It paid off in a great way, man, just to come in here in this building and beat a great Celtics team and to make it.”Cheers could be heard outside Orlando’s locker room postgame and Vucevic and others were wearing black Magic “Clinched” T-shirts with “Southeast Division Champions” on them. Coach Steve Clifford was doused with water by his players. Giannis Antetokounmpo leads Bucks to 60th win DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:29Giannis Antetokounmpo powers Bucks in bounce back win over Celtics00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles View comments Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power gridcenter_img Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Philippine Arena Interchange inaugurated “It’s fun to see,” Clifford said. “Anybody that doesn’t think there’s purity in the NBA should have seen this scene in the locker room because they’re deserving, but it’s enjoyable.”Even with the loss, the Celtics (48-33) clinched the fourth seed and home-court advantage in the first round of the playoffs just before tip-off. That came courtesy of Brooklyn’s win over Indiana. The Pacers are locked in as Boston’s first-round opponent as the fifth seed.Kyrie Irving had 23 points for Boston. Al Horford finished with 18 points and Gordon Hayward added 16 off the bench.The Magic erased a 13-point first-half deficit and took an 83-78 lead into the fourth quarter. They kept it going, starting the final period on an 11-2 run, which included nine points by Ross.Boston responded with run of its own and tied the game at 106 on a 3-pointer by Irving with 2:50 remaining.ADVERTISEMENT Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting But the Magic kept attacking.Fournier got free in the lane and dunked over Terry Rozier to put the Magic back in front. The Celtics turned it over on their next possession. That was followed by an Aaron Gordon layup on the other end that made it 110-106.“We were definitely trying to win the game,” Hayward said. “We wanted to go into the playoffs playing our best basketball. They hit some tough shots tonight. You could definitely tell they were playing for something.”TIP-INSMagic: Vucevic had his 60th double-double of the season.Celtics: Hayward has now scored in double-figures in eight consecutive games.INJURIESCeltics coach Brad Stevens said before the game that the Brooklyn-Indiana outcome wouldn’t affect how much he played his starters against Orlando.He was true to his word and played his starters their normal minutes.It proved costly. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Jayson Tatum limped off the court at the six-minute mark of the first quarter with a left shin contusion and did not return.Marcus Smart left with 6:15 remaining in the third, helped off by trainers and holding his left side after banging hips with Vucevic. The team initially said it was a left hip contusion. After the game Stevens said he was told it was an oblique bruise. Smart could still be seen limping as he left the arena after the game.Stevens said he’ll play his starters “a lot less on Tuesday, if at all” in Boston’s regular-season finale at Washington.EYES ON INDIANANow that the Celtics first-round opponent is set, Irving said their focus has shifted to the Pacers.“I’m just happy that we get to prepare for a team for multiple days,” Irving said. “It’s nothing really surprising in the playoffs. Just go out there and get a good feel for the Pacers. Game 1 is a feel-out game and then we go from there.”UP NEXTMagic: Regular-season finale at Charlotte Tuesday.Celtics: Regular-season finale at Washington Wednesday. Orlando Magic’s D.J. Augustin shoots in front of Boston Celtics’ Kyrie Irving (11) during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Boston, Sunday, April 7, 2019. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)BOSTON — Nothing has come easy for the Orlando Magic over the last seven years.They endured four different head coaches, five seasons with 50-plus losses and took many turns in the NBA draft lottery.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

See More

10 months agoNewcastle boss Rafa Benitez hopes for busy transfer market

first_imgNewcastle boss Rafa Benitez hopes for busy transfer marketby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveNewcastle United boss Rafa Benitez hopes to be busy during the January market.But he doesn’t expect a bumper transfer budget from owner Mike Ashley.”I am used to wheeling and dealing all my life,” he said. “I don’t think I was breaking the record in transfer windows, never, ever, with any of my teams. “We had to sell players to buy players. I don’t have any problem with that if you do things in time and find the right players. The main thing is to find the right players.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

See More

Thad Matta earns 300th win in Ohio State mens basketball season opener

OSU freshman forward Jae’Sean Tate in action during a game against Marquette on Nov. 18 in Columbus. Credit: Lantern File PhotoOhio State men’s basketball coach Thad Matta notched his 300th win as the Buckeyes defeated Mount St. Mary’s 76-54 in the team’s first game of the season.Matta, who is in his 12th season with the team, became OSU’s all-time winningest coach during last season’s Big Ten tournament. His OSU teams now have a record of 300-94.“I’ve always said that I’m very fortunate to have the opportunity to be here at Ohio State,” Matta said. “It goes back to (Alex Haley’s) old saying, ‘When you see a turtle on the fence post, you know it didn’t get there by itself.’ That’s definitely me on that fence post.”Sophomore forward Jae’Sean Tate said Matta is deserving of his record.“That’s just another stat to add to his résumé, he’s a wonderful coach, he’s a wonderful guy and hopefully we have many to come this year,” Tate said.Tate, who missed the Buckeyes’ exhibition game against Walsh with a sprained ankle, helped lead the Buckeyes to victory with an impressive offensive showing. His 21 points were one shy of tying his career-high, and his two 3-point field goals nearly equaled his season total from his freshman campaign (three). “It definitely boosts my confidence. I’m still not where I want to be, so I have to continue to work, I can’t rest on that,” Tate said.Matta said as a coach it was rewarding to see Tate’s hard work pay off.“Jae’Sean was good. It was so exciting when he let his first three go, to see it go down. I’ve seen that kid, how diligent he’s been in terms of his work ethic and developing that,” Matta said.Two of the more veteran players on the roster, junior forward Marc Loving and sophomore forward Keita Bates-Diop, led the team in minutes with 35 and 38, respectively, but it was freshman center/forward Daniel Giddens who made one of the biggest impacts of the afternoon.The 6-foot-9 Mableton, Georgia, native made his presence known with 11 points in 26 minutes of hard play.“For myself individually, I just have to build on what I did today and just want to make this season a successful one,” Giddens said.Matta said he was impressed with Giddens’ play.“Daniel was everywhere. He was showing his chest, helping, getting back to his man,” Matta said. “The thing I love about Daniel is that effort is never going to be a problem for him. He’s a kid who cares, he is starving for extra work, he’s starving for finding ways to improve his game.” Giddens appeared to be calm on the court, but the freshman said he was “freaking out”  internally.“I’m not going to lie, I was nervous. I’m still nervous. This is new to me,” Giddens said.Other freshmen members of the Scarlet and Gray also made their presences known. Guard JaQuan Lyle put up 12 points, the third-highest of the team, and guard A.J. Harris came off the bench, showing off his publicized speed and energy. Meanwhile, guard Austin Grandstaff nailed a 3-point attempt, his first and only shot of his young career. The Buckeyes started the game strong going into the half with a 42-21 lead and a team field-goal percentage of 56.3 percent. The Mountaineers tried to mount a comeback in the second half, at one point cutting the deficit to 13 points.“I painted the picture at halftime, I said this is what could happen and it did. We got a little bit complacent,” Matta said. “We didn’t have the pace we needed in the second half.”Turnovers were an issue for the Buckeyes throughout the game, something Tate said will get better as the season goes along.“Having such a young team, being the first game I think that played a role in that. With two freshman point guards and so many young guys, we’ll mature as the season goes on,” Tate said.Matta said the turnovers were due to not making the simple play, and there’s still a lot of teaching needed for a young Buckeye team that has games both Tuesday and Friday. “I just told them after the game, ‘You guys want to play in the NBA? Well, you’ve got an NBA schedule this week,’” Matta said. “We’ve got to prepare for Grambling, but we also got to look at what we need to get better at.”The Buckeyes are set to take the court again at the Schottenstein Center on Tuesday at 7 p.m. against Grambling State. read more

See More

Crew enters home playoff contest in need of goals

An unmistakable confidence has pervaded Columbus Crew training sessions in the week leading up to this Saturday’s home-leg playoff match against the Colorado Rapids, despite trailing 1-0 in total goals scored. “We are very confident that we can overcome this deficit,” said Columbus head coach Robert Warzycha on Thursday. Warzycha’s assertiveness has rubbed off on Crew players. Andy Gruenebaum, who will be the Crew’s starting goalkeeper Saturday, is relishing the pressure. “We’re all very confident, it is true,” Gruenebaum said. “No one is freaking out, there’s no frantic behavior. This is what we play for, to be the higher seed and to have this game at home.” The Rapids were aggressive and took advantage of defensive miscues by Columbus en route to a 1-0 win at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park in the opening leg of the series on Oct. 28. Gruenebaum hopes to guide the Crew to a stronger defensive showing Saturday. “As a defensive unit, we need to keep a high line and maintain pressure on the ball and their big playmakers like Conor Casey and [Omar] Cummings,” Gruenebaum said. Robbie Rogers started in the midfield for the Crew in the first leg match at Colorado and provided insight into Saturday night’s must-win contest. “It’s positive in the locker room right now, we’ll be keeping the ball better and we’ll tighten it up on defense,” he said. With the Crew organization expecting a sizable turn-out for Saturday’s match, Rogers sees the loyal Columbus fan base as the final piece of the winning equation. “Just being here at home with all the fan groups is special,” Rogers said. “We have a close connection with all the people in this stadium. They’re the best in the MLS, so the atmosphere is going to be in our favor. This is in our hands.” read more

See More

UNC head football coach Everett Withers joins Ohio State football staff

Everett Withers, the current interim head coach of the University of North Carolina football team, was hired Wednesday to join new Ohio State football coach Urban Meyer’s staff. Withers will be the assistant head coach, as well as co-defensive coordinator under Meyer, according to a press release. Withers will split defensive coordinator duties with current OSU head coach Luke Fickell. However, Meyer previously said Fickell will call plays for the unit. In his fourth season at UNC and his first as its head coach, Withers led the team to a 7-5 overall record and an appearance in the Dec. 26 Independence Bowl against Missouri. Withers will stay with the Tar Heels to coach its bowl game. A UNC football team spokesman declined to comment to The Lantern regarding Withers’ departure from the university. OSU did not immediately make Withers’ contract details available. Withers is currently in his 24th season as football coach of both NFL and college teams. Withers began his coaching career as defensive coordinator at Austin Peay in 1988 and would eventually hold other collegiate coaching position at Tulane (1991), Southern Mississippi (1992-93), Louisville (1995-97), Texas (1998-2000) and Minnesota (2007) before becoming UNC’s defensive coordinator and secondary coach in 2008. Withers has also served as defensive backs coach for the NFL’s Tennesee Titans from 2001-2006 and oversaw defensive quality control for the New Orleans Saints in 1994. The Independence Bowl Dec. 26 is scheduled for 5:00 p.m. kickoff while Fickell will coach OSU in Jacksonville, Fla., Jan. 2 when the Buckeyes play Florida in the Gator Bowl. read more

See More