In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, September 6, 2019

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon Conservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsMore than two-thirds of the world’s forests are at risk, according to a U.N. report (Down to Earth).Research suggests that we might be expecting trees to carry more of the carbon load than they can handle (Undark).To save Mexican rosewood, China needs to act (Dialogo Chino).Ethiopia is embarking on a quest to boost the cultivation of bamboo (Ezega).Illegal loggers are going after a rare tree in the Democratic Republic of Congo that’s highly valued in China in what one local leader calls an “ecological disaster” (Phys.Org).Tackling deforestation in the Amazon is only part of the solution to climate change, one commentator argues (New Republic).The biggest trees in the forests are the most likely to be felled by drought, pests and lightning (Science Magazine).Other newsA baby Masai giraffe was born at a wild animal park in Ohio in a win for the endangered species (Richland Source).Calls for freshwater protection follow the discovery of eight new species of mussels in Myanmar (Fauna & Flora International).Scientists say they’ve found a new species of beaked whale off the coast of Japan (Science Daily, Gizmodo).The spawning rhythms of coral species in the Red Sea are out of step (The Atlantic).Observers in fish markets could make a difference in protecting sought-after species around the world (Hakai Magazine).Woolly mammoth ivory is filling the gap left by the subsidence of the outlawed elephant ivory trade (Undark).Banner image of a painting of woolly mammoths by Mauricio Antón via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.5).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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Amazon’s Mura indigenous group demands input over giant mining project

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored In 2013, Potássio do Brasil, a subsidiary of the Canadian merchant bank, Forbes & Manhattan, began drilling exploratory wells for a giant potassium mine — a highly profitable venture that would allow transport of potash along the Amazon and Madeira rivers. Potash is a vital fertilizer for Brazil’s rapidly growing soy agribusiness industry.One big problem: the company was reportedly drilling inside the Jauary Indigenous Reserve and directly adjacent to other indigenous reserves and communities. Indigenous people said that the ancestral lands being drilled, though sometimes not demarcated as being within their reserves, were vital for hunting and other livelihoods.The mine was licensed in 2015. However, legal irregularities resulted in the project stalling. Finally, a court settlement was reached in which the Mura communities would be given the legal right of consultation — a democratic process of self-determination guaranteed under international law rarely practiced in the remote Brazilian Amazon.How the Mura will vote — and whether that vote will be respected by municipal, state and federal governments; agribusiness; a transnational mining giant; and international investors — remains to be seen. However, analysts agree that the result could have far reaching consequences for rural traditional settlements across the Amazon. Tuxaua (chief) Aldinelson Pavão stands beside an exploratory well drilled by Potássio do Brasil. Image by Thais Borges.Mongabay sent a reporting team to Brazil’s Amazonas state in 2019 to cover an ongoing conflict between indigenous people and a company that wants to put a gigantic potash mine within and next to their Amazon reserves. This is Part 2 of a 2 part story. Part 1 can be found here.AUTAZES, Amazonas state, Brazil — We travelled first by canoe through flooded forest, then afoot, scrambling to keep up with the tuxaua (chief) of Urucurituba village. Aldinélson Moraes Pavão set a brisk pace along a narrow path through thick vegetation, passing clearings for small-scale cattle ranching. In the distance we saw dense tropical forest, where, Pavão told us, the Mura indigenous people hunt.Then we reached the exploratory wells, deep vertical shafts dug into the earth by a mining company, Potássio do Brasil, on property that the Mura claim as ancestral lands, but which the firm contends is common land held by the government. The wells had been securely sealed, covered with concrete plates, and clearly identified as property of Potássio do Brasil.The Mura’s discovery of the drilling, first made in 2013, sparked years of conflict which continue to reverberate today between indigenous communities, Potássio do Brasil, the Brazilian government, and the municipality of Autazes, which straddles the Madeira and Amazon Rivers 100 kilometers (62 miles) east of Manaus, the capital of Amazonas state.Most of the Mura were outraged at the company’s attempt to occupy the land. “I am 47 years old,” Pavão told Mongabay. “I was born here and brought up here. My parents and grandparents too. So I won’t be told by Potássio, that comes from outside, that this land isn’t ours. It is our land and they are the invaders.” The indigenous people say that they have another reason to be angry: they claim the firm drilled other wells inside the Jauary Indigenous Reserve, in an area occupied by a sacred burial ground.“When the [other] indigenous leaders realized what was going on,” people from surrounding communities rushed to aid the Mura, remembered Gilmara Lelis, the tuxaua from Sampaio village. “We are all one people. If they interfere with one village, they’re interfering with all of us.”The drilling only stopped when the indigenous people threatened to set fire to the company’s machinery.The conflict that has consumed Autazes for the past six years isn’t only local, it’s international: Potássio do Brasil is a subsidiary of the giant Canadian conglomerate, Forbes & Manhattan (F&M), a leading private merchant bank with a global focus on the resource, agriculture, technology and telecommunications sectors.The firm says their mining claim is not on indigenous land. Rather, the rich lode of potash ore — invaluable as fertilizer to Brazilian soy plantations — is located about ten kilometers (6.4 miles) from the Paracuhuba Indigenous Reserve, and eight kilometers (4.2 miles) from the Jauary Indigenous Reserve, both of which have been demarcated and recognized by the Brazilian government. The mining claim also lies near two other indigenous communities, neither as yet demarcated: Urucurituba village, ten kilometers (6.4 miles) away, and, closest of all, Soares village, just two kilometers (1.4 miles) from the mine site.The company argues that the land where they want to put the potash mine, being non-demarcated, is open for their use. Guilherme Jácome, Project Development Director at Potássio do Brasil, told Mongabay: “All of the mine and the area where potash ore will be extracted lies outside indigenous land.”However, Carlos Marés, former president of FUNAI, Brazil’s indigenous affairs agency, and one of the nation’s leading authorities on indigenous rights, has a different understanding.He points out that the 1988 Brazilian Constitution enshrines the principle of the original right of indigenous people, providing them with an inalienable right to ancestral lands. He explains that, if any lands are permanently inhabited by indigenous groups, and are necessary for their physical and cultural survival, then they are indigenous.“Indigenous land is indigenous, whether or not it has been demarcated, which is after all only an administrative act of marking out the limits,” Marés concluded.A map showing the overlap and proximity of indigenous reserves and potash mining claims. Image by Mauricio Torres.A flawed licensing processBefore it drilled the exploratory wells in 2013, Potássio do Brasil registered requests for prospecting rights and received authorization from the National Department of Mining Research (DNPM), the government regulatory body then in charge of mining activities.The company plans to open two wells, each seven or eight meters (23 to 26 feet) across and an underground mine about 800 meters (2,600 feet) deep. It will need to build a potash plant, a port on the Madeira River, and a 130 kilometer (81 mile) transmission line to link the company into the national grid.The mining will produce large quantities of potentially damaging salt. Although the company says measures will be taken to prevent the salt leaching into the ground, aquifers, and rivers, the Mura are concerned that contamination could occur regardless, given the heavy rainfall, extensive annual flooding and heat that occurs each year — especially because the region is located in a floodplain.The company has carried out an Environmental Impact Study (EIS), as required by the licensing process. The EIS projected a “very high” number of impacts: putting pressure on public health and public services, changing the landscape, and creating an alteration in the reference points in the Indians’ social and cultural world. Clearly, such massive effects would be felt not only at the mine site, but for many miles around and inside reserves, while also disrupting indigenous activities and scaring off game.To comply with the legal requirement that it present the EIS results, the company held two public hearings, one in Autazes and the other in Urucurituba, but according to the Catholic Church’s Missionary Council (CIMI), few indigenous people attended. Pavão speculated as to why: “At the public hearing they only spoke about what was going to be good for the community. They said nothing about the negative impacts.”Maria José, a teacher in one of the communities, did attend. She remembers that in the beginning the company’s positive spin evoked “potash fever” in the villages, with young people enthused by the possibility of mining company jobs. “We spoke calmly to them, talking, showing videos, telling them what would happen in the future,” she recalled. “We managed to bring down the fever in the villages, but in the [larger] towns it has been more difficult.”Governor José Melo grants Potássio do Brasil an environmental license in July 2015. Image by Tabajara Moreno / SECOM.Licensing irregularities stall projectThe potash mine is an ambitious undertaking, with the EIS describing it as “exceptionally large” and “with great potential for pollution.” As a result, in accordance with the 2011 Complementary Law 140, the Amazonas Institute for Environmental Protection (IPAAM), a state agency which certifies small mining projects, should have handed the project over to IBAMA, the federal government’s environmental agency.But that didn’t happen. Instead, IPAAM issued a prospecting license to Potássio do Brasil in 2015. It did so, even though FUNAI had not yet analyzed the impacts on indigenous communities, an obligatory step in the process. Remarkably, the license that was approved included the Jauary territory, an already demarcated indigenous reserve, which is illegal.Still, with all the needed approvals in place, it seemed Potássio do Brasil would soon get its project underway. Construction of the mining complex was slated for 2016.But that was not to be.The Public Federal Ministry, a group of independent public prosecutors, asked the courts to cancel the license, arguing that the permits were issued in an irregular manner, and to assure that “a full, prior and informed consultation” was held with indigenous communities, as required under International Labour Organization Convention 169, which Brazil has signed.Prosecutor Fernando Soave. Image by Thais Borges.At pre-trial negotiations, Potássio do Brasil agreed to the license cancelation. It also agreed to fund the consultation. And to carry out that plan, it deposited R$350,000 (US$87,500) in an account held by the Amazon Pact Institute, an NGO based in southern Amazonas state.The inclusion of the Jauary reserve in the EIS proved particularly objectionable. A prosecutor involved in the case, Fernando Soave, declared: “Mining cannot occur on fully established indigenous reserves. That is not in dispute. The consultation we are holding is over whether or not mining should be permitted on land outside the reserves, where nevertheless it will have an impact on indigenous land.”Later, Potássio do Brasil excluded the Jauary reserve from the mine area. Which is why the company can say today that it has no plan to mine on indigenous land. But the indigenous communities suspect that if the project goes ahead the company will move onto disputed territory they regard as indigenous but which the company does not; especially Soares village, which the Indians claim is their territory but which hasn’t been demarcated and probably won’t be in the near future, as President Jair Bolsonaro has declared that he will not demarcate a single centimeter during his administration.The current status of Soares was not confirmed for this story by either the MPF or Potássio do Brasil.A house in Urucurituba village. Local indigenous people worry how the potash mine will impact their lives and livelihoods. Image by Thais Borges.The consultation beginsThe consultation as agreed upon by all parties will include all of the Mura villages in the municipalities of Autazes and Careiro da Várzea, as well as all traditional riverine communities that will be affected by the mine and its operation.Before conducting the consultation, the Mura first had to agree to the form they wished it to take. “Potássio do Brasil wanted a consultation without a protocol [an official procedure with rules] to be carried out at a public hearing,” said prosecutor Soave. “But the Indians decided that they wanted an [officially stipulated] protocol.”Anthropologist Bruno Caporrino advised the indigenous communities in the shaping of the protocol. A central task, he said, was to get the Indians to understand their rights as citizens. “The underlying theme in all the discussions was to differentiate public policies from favors, to get [indigenous people] to grasp that they had the right to have rights.”According to Caporrino, the state has never had a strong presence in Amazonia, so it has been the rural elites who have handed out rudimentary public services. With the state still absent in rural areas, it’s hard to change that mentality, he explained: “There comes a point, after having a third child die from malaria, that an Indian begs a company to at least build a health post in the village.”Anthropologist Bruno Caporrino. Image by Thais Borges.In the early days, Potássio do Brasil tried to win over indigenous people by offering old-style, paternalistic favors. According to a report drawn up by the MPF in support of a formal protocol, the company offered various deals and percs, promising to build schools and to give money to leaders, in exchange for project support.However, indigenous leaders rejected the company’s approach and began carefully, in consultation with their communities, to draw up the kind of protocol they wanted. First the people had to decide who among them had the right to vote. After long discussion, they determined that Indians living in towns would be excluded and only those living in villages — and thus the ones to be directly affected — would be authorized to vote. Polling, they determined, would take place at formal meetings with minutes.The affected area would be divided into six regions with three voting cycles. At each level of voting, the Indians would attempt to reach a consensus, but, if after three rounds of balloting, consensus didn’t emerge, then the Indians would accept a majority vote.But — and this is crucial — they agreed that project approval must gain the support of at least 75 percent of voters. “They decided against a simple majority because they feared that, with [as much as] 49 percent of the population unhappy, the community would be riven in two,” explained Caporrino.“Agreeing on the protocol was in itself a victory,” said Pavão, who noted that the democratic process hammered out by all can be used not just once, but again and again in future on other divisive issues.In July of 2019, the indigenous communities handed over their approved protocol to the Federal Justice in Amazonas State. The consultation is now underway.Francisco, the tuxaua of Taquara village. Image by Mauricio Torres.Democracy at workFrancisco, the tuxaua of Taquara village, urged that the indigenous communities finally get their hands on the facts: “The protocol is going to force both the government and the company to talk about what is good and what is bad about the project. The good part is that it will bring jobs. The bad part is the impact it will have on the environment and on our people, because a lot of outsiders will be coming in, who can bring in illness and prostitution.”No one knows exactly how long the consultation process might take. “It could be decided in the first cycle or take five months or even 15 months. But it will certainly be done within a year and half,” Caporrino predicted. And no one knows what their communities will decide.But Potássio do Brasil’s Jácome is confident: “We believe that, once they know the project and the plans and programs that have been drawn up for the Indians, the Mura people in Autazes and Careiro da Várzea will accept the project.” And, even if they turn it down, he believes there is a way forward. “If the Mura people don’t agree, we are open to finding out why and adapting the project, so that we can find a solution that is viable for everyone: the company, the community and the government.”Tuxaua (chief) Yuaka Mura, also known as José Claudio Mura, a coordinator for the Mura Indigenous Culture. Image by Mauricio Torres.Some indigenous leaders say, however, that they will never be convinced. One indigenous chief, commonly known by his Brazilian name, José Claudio Mura, but who prefers his indigenous name, Yuaka Mura, remains adamantly opposed. Yuaka Mura, a coordinator for the Mura Indigenous Culture, a militant indigenous movement, declared emphatically: “We don’t want mining on our land. We have seen the cost of mining in other parts of Brazil. It doesn’t have a future.”Caporrino explains that the people have three voting options: “Yes, No, or Yes if….” That third option would mean that the Mura want the mine to go ahead, but only after certain conditions are met. For instance, the people could demand that all of their ancestral land be demarcated.One nagging doubt hangs over the process: will the result of the indigenous consultation be binding or can authorities simply ignore it?The jurist Carlos Marés noted that the idea behind the consultation is to reach a mutually acceptable settlement. “If the State decides to push ahead [with the mine] without indigenous agreement, it will have to use an iron fist.”This is the first time that the Mura have been properly consulted about their future and it is a landmark in their attempt to halt the takeover of their land by outsiders. But, even if in the end they vote “no,” the people may still face a fierce struggle in getting the powerful forces supporting the potash mine to accept their final decision — going up against a juggernaut of municipal, state and federal governments; agribusiness; a transnational corporate giant; and international capital investors.How the Mura vote — and what happens after that vote — in this remote Amazonian municipality could have far-reaching consequences well beyond the making of a potash mine. What happens here could set a legal precedent for indigenous and traditional communities across Brazil as they face intensifying development pressures, and help rural peoples gain some control over the many unprecedented challenges to their way of life.Banner image caption: A child preparing fish in a Mura community. Image by Mauricio Torres.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Map showing demarcated indigenous lands and non-demarcated ancestral lands claimed by indigenous peoples, as well as potash exploratory wells and the Potássio do Brasil mine. Image by Mauricio Torres.center_img Agriculture, Agrochemicals, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Mining, Amazon People, Amazon Soy, Conservation, Controversial, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Featured, Forests, Green, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Mining, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Mining, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation last_img read more

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Google’s New Social Search Is A Big Chess Move Against Facebook

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Tags:#Analysis#NYT#search#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Web search, real-time search and social search. That’s a pretty compelling combination and it’s what both Google and Facebook put on the table today in a head-to-head competiton. Google’s Marissa Mayer did a short, surprise demo today of an experimental Google feature called Social Search but don’t mistake the understated announcement to mean this was a small move. The Web 2.0 Summit today has been jam packed with very big search moves.Both companies are hoping you’ll come to their sites to search for what you’re looking for, what people are saying about that topic and what your friends think. Microsoft is very much in the game, too. Here are some things to consider in this search war. It’s a new fight – now including the real-time, social web!The following is our attempt to piece all of this together, but the war rooms of each of these companies are no doubt buzzing trying to put together and understand the same details and more.Google’s new Social Search will allow users to opt-in to having search results from content created by their friends on social networks around the web included in Google search results. Those friend connections could come from any number of sites that you and your friends have listed in your Google Profiles – but it won’t include Facebook. That means it won’t include very much, unless Twitter and Google Profiles become a lot more integrated. Microsoft announced today that Facebook status messages and other content from Facebook users with public profiles will soon appear in Bing search results. That’s a huge change for Facebook. Bing also announced Twitter search integration, which is live now.Google announced a deal with Twitter today as well. So Bing has Facebook and Twitter. Facebook has Bing-powered web search. Google just has Twitter, no Facebook search. Right now Twitter search is probably much bigger than Facebook (unless you’re Facebook serving logged-in users), because only a tiny portion of the much larger number of Facebook users have opted-in to making their Facebook activity public. But Facebook has an explicit agenda to change that. One reason for that is that more public Facebook activity makes deals like the one it made with Bing today much more valuable. More now than ever, Google needs Twitter data to combat Facebook’s social dominance – Facebook is five to ten times as big as Twitter today.Microsoft would rather you did all your searching from Bing but it does own a meaningful portion of Facebook. You can bet it wishes it owned more.No one is set to be the clear winner here, but with far more social activity and a multi-layered partnership with the first qualified web-search challenger to Google in years (Bing) Facebook may in fact have the strongest hand. It’s going to be a wild ride and big moves are being made right now. marshall kirkpatricklast_img read more

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Archers book Final 4 berth; Amid calls for coach’s head, UST drops 11th straight game

first_imgTyphoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Read Next Taguinod, 11, captures 3 gold medals in swimming View comments CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa UE’s Alvin Pasaol (right) didn’t have the same explosion he had against La Salle the first time both schools played.—AUGUST DELA CRUZIn some corner of the UAAP, a storied school is dealing with all the noise from disgruntled students and alumni calling for the resignation of a head coach.Far from all that controversy, La Salle made its presence felt in a more positive way.ADVERTISEMENT Chief Justice Peralta on upcoming UAAP game: UP has no match against UST PLAY LIST 01:00Chief Justice Peralta on upcoming UAAP game: UP has no match against UST00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games LATEST STORIES Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Kin of Misamis Oriental hero cop to get death benefits, award — PNP The defending champion Archers formalized their entry to the Final Four after brushing off University of the East, 99-78, in Season 80 men’s basketball tournament Wednesday at Mall of Asia Arena.La Salle streaked to its fourth straight win to improve to 9-2 while the Red Warriors slipped to 3-8—still mathematically in contention for a semifinals spot.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutUniversity of Santo Tomas was never in the hunt for a Final Four spot at any point in the tournament—even preseason polls had the Tigers finishing last.But the school that has long been a league heavyweight—the Tigers have collected 18 UAAP crowns, including a rare “four-peat”—seems dead set on getting there drenched in historic ignominy. “We shouldn’t think ahead, and we should focus on just one game at a time,” said Rivero in Filipino after filling in for coach Aldin Ayo in the postgame press conference.Ayo, who this season has dealt with rumors about his shaky hold of his post at La Salle, snubbed the media for the sixth time.“Actually our team is a strong unit as long as we follow our system, and we should move as one,” added Rivero.Reigning MVP Ben Mbala led all scorers with 25 points to go along 14 rebounds to lead La Salle while SantiSantillan added 14 point and 11 rebounds.Alvin Pasaol, who put up a career-high 49 points in the first round against La Salle, managed 23 points and nine boards this time to lead UE. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Adamson U dealt UST an 11th straight loss, 75-70, later in the day, pumping the volume up on calls from students and alumni for the resignation of head coach Boy Sablan.The Falcons tightened their grip on the third seed with their seventh win in 11 matches while the Tigers somehow continue justifying an angry mob’s call for a coaching change.La Salle has little to worry about any coaching change—at least for now—especially after mounting a 22-6 run that gave the Green Archers a 40-24 lead in the first half.The lead then ballooned to 27 points with 2:25 left in the third on a Justine Baltazar triple that put La Salle up, 74-47.And with the Archers’ remaining games looking more like mere formalities, Ricci Rivero said they should remain focused on the elimination round.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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Path not easy for Gilas crew

first_imgJohn Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Three nights later, the Filipinos will host the Taiwanese traveling to Manila for the game at Smart Araneta Coliseum in Cubao with Chinese Taipei likely to be reinforced by Quincy Davis III.Davis III had earlier been ruled out because of an injury, but a Fiba.com report on Tuesday said that the 6-foot-10 naturalized center had recovered well enough and was again part of the Taiwanese’s 24-man pool.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutTeam Philippines will be spearheaded by Andray Blatche and reigning four-time PBA MVP June Mar Fajardo and will go into both games slight favorites before clashing with Australia in February. Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort June Mar Fajardo. Photo from Fiba.comGilas Pilipinas’ first two games in the Fiba Asia World Cup Qualifiers will be a tall order, with the Filipinos facing Japan first in front of what could be hostile territory before playing a full-force Chinese Taipei.The 4,000-seat Kamazawa gymnasium in Tokyo has been sold out, guaranteeing that the Filipinos won’t have the hometown support they usually get when Gilas and Team Nippon slug it out on Nov. 24.ADVERTISEMENT Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Read Next Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC View comments LATEST STORIES Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. PSC Children’s Games draw praise from Unesco officiallast_img read more

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18 days agoBrighton goalscorer Neal Maupay says Tottenham heads quickly dropped

first_imgBrighton goalscorer Neal Maupay says Tottenham heads quickly droppedby Paul Vegas18 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveBrighton striker Neal Maupay says Tottenham heads quickly dropped during Saturday’s 3-0 thrashing.Maupay scored Albion’s quickest ever Premier League goal after 150 seconds when the disorientated Hugo Lloris inexplicably dropped the ball before suffering a dislocated elbow when he fell.“We sensed their heads went down after the first goal – that’s why we kept pushing and ­putting pressure on them,” said Maupay. “Losing Lloris and the goal so early was hard for them and they looked worried. We knew they were having a tough time so we wanted to keep going at them. And it worked because they dropped a bit and we got the second goal.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Video: Ohio State Linebackers Joe Burger And Craig Fada Show Off Their Apartment On “OSU Cribs”

first_imgA closeup of an Ohio State football helmet on the field.NEW ORLEANS, LA – JANUARY 01: An Ohio State Buckeye helmet is seen on the sidelines prior to the start of the game during the All State Sugar Bowl at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome on January 1, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)When it comes to college housing, Ohio State football players have it pretty good. Buckeye linebackers Joe Burger and Craig Fada showed off their apartment on the first episode of “OSU Cribs,” and we must say, they have a pretty nice pad. There is plenty of Ohio State-themed memorabilia around, as you’d expect, but they also show off the strobe light and fog machine set up. And of course, like any good episode of Cribs, we get a look at the players’ cars.Playing football at Ohio State looks like a decent time. Not that we didn’t already know it.last_img read more

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Governments argue while more children face risk

first_imgAPTN National NewsJordan’s Principle was named after Jordan River Anderson.Anderson was a five-year-old boy from the Norway House Cree Nation in Northern Manitoba. He died in hospital while governments argued over who should pay his medical bills.As APTN National News reporter Tiar Wilson finds out, governments continue to argue while more kids are at risk.On Friday, APTN InFocus will take a closer look at the issue.last_img

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Frontcourt provides relief in Ohio State womens basketballs 9770 win

OSU forward Alexa Hart (22) looks for space around defending Virginia Cavaliers forward Sydney Umeri (44) on Dec. 21 at the Schottenstein Center. Photo Credit: Greg Bartram | USA TODAY SportsThe Ohio State women’s basketball team has relied heavily on the explosiveness of the nation’s top-scoring duo during the 2015-16 season.That wasn’t the case Thursday evening at the Schottenstein Center against the Indiana Hoosiers.Top Buckeye guards, sophomore Kelsey Mitchell and senior Ameryst Alston, were held in check early on in Columbus, prompting the OSU frontcourt to come alive. The extra effort was definitely needed for the No. 5 Buckeyes (11-3, 3-0) to fend off Indiana (9-6, 1-2) at home, 97-70.“They came out ready to play right off the jump,” OSU junior forward Shayla Cooper said. “We had to match their intensity, and once we matched it we actually took it to another level after that.”The Buckeyes have struggled immensely with their perimeter defense this season, ranking dead last amongst Big Ten teams in 3-point defense. A lack of outside pressure has allowed teams to attack OSU with an onslaught of long-range jumpers from the tip.Matters were no better on Wednesday when Indiana opened up the first quarter of play shooting 4-of-6 from beyond the arc.“I think putting more pressure on the ball, not letting them see the open man,” Cooper said of the team’s solution to Indiana’s hot start.Multiple missed layup opportunities also stymied OSU from overcoming Indiana. However, OSU sophomore Alexa Hart and Cooper continued to work the interior, sparking a 10-3 run that knotted the contest at 18 after one quarter of play. Hart registered a double-double on the night, scoring 18 points and collecting 13 rebounds.Despite breaking out of an early shooting slump, the Buckeyes still could not entirely pull away from the Hoosiers. That’s because OSU’s elite scorers Mitchell and Alston continued to be held in check by Indiana, combining to shoot 4-of-18 from the field in the first half.“The way (Indiana) came out, the way they shot the ball, I think that prevented us from doing things that we usually do,” Mitchell said.Nevertheless, OSU’s presence in the post continued to eat away at Indiana. Cooper provided a 14-point first-half spark off the bench, leading a Buckeye frontcourt that outscored the Hoosiers 32-18 in the paint over the first 20 minutes. Cooper finished the night shooting 10-of-16 from the field, tallying 23 points and eight rebounds.“I like the energy and it gives us a different look when she comes in,” OSU coach Kevin McGuff said of moving Cooper to the bench.The Scarlet and Gray brought a 40-35 advantage into halftime and built some early momentum after the break. OSU’s first 3-point conversion two minutes into the second half from Mitchell brought the Buckeyes’ lead to seven and led to an Indiana timeout.Mitchell, who finished with 23 points on the night, led the team with 15 points in the third quarter on a perfect 5-of-5 shooting from the field, opening up a 12-point lead heading into the final quarter.“Sometimes when you’re not sure about yourself and you have a slow start it can wear on you,” McGuff said. “But I do think we have a lot of confidence about how we’re playing.”OSU continued to pull away via not letting up on the Hoosiers, sustaining an aggressive and pesky press on defense. That tenacity brought the team’s turnover margin to a plus-10 mark by the game’s end, and helped the Buckeyes finish with 16 points off of turnovers and 23 offensive rebounds.The Buckeyes will continue their Big Ten schedule with a matchup against Rutgers (10-4) on Sunday. Tipoff is set for 2 p.m. at the Schottenstein Center. read more

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Charlie Austin banned for two games after abusive gesture

first_imgSouthampton striker Charlie Austin has been handed a two-game ban by the English FA for his gesture during the club’s 3-1 home loss Manchester City, Goal claims.The former Queens Park Rangers striker was booed when he was substituted off in the 68th minute and appeared to make an abusive sign towards the travelling City fans last month.The Football Association charged the 29-year-old with making “an abusive and/or insulting” gesture and he will miss the next Premier League against Leicester City this weekend as well as the FA Cup replay against Derby County on January 16.Premier LeaguePremier League Betting: Match-day 5 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Going into the Premier League’s match-day five with a gap already beginning to form at the top of the league. We will take a…This is not the first time Austin has found himself in disciplinary matters with the FA. In 2016 the striker received a three-match ban for violent conduct following an altercation with Huddersfield goalkeeper Jonas Lossl.Austin also was shown a red card as a QPR player during a 2-0 win against Burnley, after finding the back of the net against his former club.The striker’s suspension leaves Saints boss Ralph Hassenhuttl with only Shane Long, Sam Gallagher and Michael Obafemi as his only options in attack.last_img read more

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