Audio: Environmental justice and urban rat infestations

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Today we speak with Dawn Biehler, an associate professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, whose research focuses on the history and public health impacts of rats and other pest species in Baltimore.The issue of urban pests like rats in Baltimore has been in the news lately due to tweets sent by US President Donald Trump about the city being “rat and rodent infested.” Trump isn’t the first American politician to use this kind of rhetoric to target communities that are predominantly made up of people of color, while ignoring the fact that policies deliberately designed to marginalize communities of color are at the root of the pest problems in many cities.Biehler, who is also the author of the 2013 book Pests in the City: Flies, Bedbugs, Cockroaches, and Rats, joins us on this episode of the Mongabay Newscast to discuss how rat infestations in cities are actually an environmental justice issue and how they can be dealt with in an environmentally sustainable manner. Today we speak with Dawn Biehler, an associate professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, whose research focuses on the history and public health impacts of rats and other pest species in Baltimore.Listen here: Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Environment, environmental justice, Interviews, Pesticides, Podcast, Rodents, Urban Planning, Urbanization The issue of urban pests like rats in Baltimore has been in the news lately due to tweets sent by US President Donald Trump about the city being “rat and rodent infested.” Trump isn’t the first American politician to use this kind of rhetoric to demean communities that are predominantly made up of people of color while ignoring the fact that policies deliberately designed to marginalize communities of color are at the root of the pest problems in many cities.Unlike Trump, Dawn Biehler actually knows what she’s talking about when it comes to the root causes of rodent infestations in cities like Baltimore. She has just penned an op-ed in the Baltimore Sun newspaper that looks at how racial segregation and inequitable funding for urban housing and infrastructure contributes to rat infestations.Biehler, who is also the author of the 2013 book Pests in the City: Flies, Bedbugs, Cockroaches, and Rats, joins us on this episode of the Mongabay Newscast to discuss how rat infestations in cities are actually an environmental justice issue and how they can be dealt with in an environmentally sustainable manner.Here’s this episode’s top news:July 2019 was the hottest month ever recorded on EarthAs Amazon deforestation in Brazil rises, Bolsonaro administration attacks the messenger (commentary)In Indonesia, a court victory for Bali’s ban on single-use plasticsWould you like to hear how Mongabay grew out of its founder’s childhood adventures in rainforests and a fascination with frogs? Or how a Mongabay editor reacted to meeting one of the world’s last Bornean rhinos? We now offer Insider Content that delivers behind-the-scenes reporting and stories like these from our team. For a small monthly donation, you’ll get exclusive access and support our work in a new way. Visit mongabay.com/insider to learn more and join the growing community of Mongabay readers on the inside track.If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.The brown rat (Rattus norvegicus), also known as the common rat, street rat, sewer rat, Hanover rat, Norway rat, Norwegian rat, Parisian rat, water rat, or wharf rat, is one of the most common rats found in urban environments. Photo by Jean-Jacques Boujot, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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Newly described giant extinct penguin and parrot once lived in New Zealand

first_imgAnimals, Birds, Environment, Extinction, Forests, Fossils, Green, Research, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Shreya Dasguptacenter_img Paleontologists have found fossils of two extinct giant birds in New Zealand: an enormous penguin that would have been nearly as tall as an average adult human, and the largest parrot ever known to have existed.The new species of extinct giant penguin, formally named Crossvallia waiparensis, was described from leg bones found at the Waipara Greensand fossil site in the North Canterbury region in 2018.The extinct parrot, Heracles inexpectatus, was likely double the size of the previously largest known parrot species, the kakapo. The fossils of the parrot were first recovered from near St. Bathans in Central Otago in 2008. Millions of years ago, giant birds roamed ancient New Zealand. There was the moa, an extinct flightless bird, thought to weigh up to 230 kilogram (510 pounds). Then there was the now-extinct Haast’s eagle, the largest eagle known to have ever lived, as well as several species of extinct giant penguins like the Kumimanu biceae.Now, paleontologists have found fossils of two more extinct giant birds in New Zealand: an enormous penguin that would have been nearly as tall as an average adult human, and a parrot that would have been the largest known parrot to have ever existed. Researchers have described both species in two separate studies published this month.Giant penguinThe new species of extinct giant penguin, formally named Crossvallia waiparensis, was described from leg bones found at the Waipara Greensand fossil site in the North Canterbury region in 2018. The penguin would have lived during the Paleocene epoch, or between 66 million and 56 million years ago, the researchers say in a new study.From the length of the leg bones, they also conclude that the bird would have been 1.6 meters (5 feet, 3 inches) tall and would have weighed around 80 kilograms (176 pounds). For comparison, an emperor penguin, the tallest and heaviest of living penguin species, can reach heights of up to 1.3 meters (4 feet, 3 inches) and weigh up to 45 kilograms (99 pounds).The extinct species of giant penguin Crossvallia waiparensis would have been nearly as tall as an average adult human. Image courtesy of Canterbury Museum.The closest relative of C. waiparensis is not another penguin from New Zealand, but a Paleocene penguin species C. unienwillia, described from a fossilized partial skeleton recovered from the Cross Valley in Antarctica in 2000, the researchers conclude.“When the Crossvallia species were alive, New Zealand and Antarctica were very different from today — Antarctica was covered in forest and both had much warmer climates,” Paul Scofield, co-author of the study and senior curator at Canterbury Museum, said in a statement.The Waipara Greensand site has been a gold mine for extinct penguin fossils. C. waiparensis is the fifth ancient penguin species to be described from fossils found there, and “there’s more to come, too,” said Gerald Mayr, co-author of the study and a paleontologist at the Senckenberg Natural History Museum in Frankfurt. “More fossils which we think represent new species are still awaiting description.”World’s largest known parrotUntil recently, the kakapo, a flightless, critically endangered parrot in New Zealand, was the largest known parrot in the world. But the newly described species of extinct parrot Heracles inexpectatus, named after the hero of Greek mythology, was likely double its size, researchers say in another study published earlier this month.H. inexpectatus would have weighed around 7 kilograms (15 pounds) and reached a height of about 1 meter (3 feet, 3 inches). It also likely had a massive beak that it may have used to “crack wide open anything it fancied … perhaps even other parrots,” Michael Archer, co-author of the study and paleontologist at the University of New South Wales in Australia, said in a statement.An artist’s rendering of the extinct species of giant parrot Heracles inexpectatus. Image by Brian Choo/Flinders University.The fossils of the giant parrot were first recovered from near St. Bathans in Central Otago, New Zealand, in 2008. For a long time, the researchers thought the bones belonged to an extinct species of eagle. But after further analysis, they concluded that the fossils were from a parrot species that had lived around 19 million years ago.“New Zealand is well known for its giant birds,” said Trevor Worthy, lead author of the study and an associate professor at Flinders University in Adelaide. “Not only moa dominated avifaunas, but giant geese and adzebills shared the forest floor, while a giant eagle ruled the skies. But until now, no-one has ever found an extinct giant parrot — anywhere.”Graphic showing the Heracles inexpectatus, right, in silhouette next to an average-height person and a common magpie. Image by Paul Scofield/Canterbury Museum.Citations:Mayr, G., De Pietri V. L., Love, L., Mannering, A., & Scofield, R. P. (2019) Leg bones of a new penguin species from the Waipara Greensand add to the diversity of very large-sized Sphenisciformes in the Paleocene of New Zealand. Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology. doi: 10.1080/03115518.2019.1641619Worthy, T. H., Hand, S. J., Archer, M., Scofield, R. P., & De Pietri, V. L. (2019). Evidence for a giant parrot from the Early Miocene of New Zealand. Biology letters, 15(8), 20190467. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2019.0467last_img read more

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In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, August 9, 2019

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannon There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsAn anthropologist tried to fight off poachers’ dogs going after chimpanzees in Uganda (The Atlantic).Agri-giant Chiquita says it will take steps to protect biodiversity (Produce News).Lawmakers in California are considering a rule that would penalize companies for not standing in the way of forest destruction (ProPublica).Forest communities and conservation efforts stand to lose if India’s Forest Rights Act isn’t passed, says wildlife biologist Ravi Chellam (The Hindu).Rainforests can only hold so much carbon dioxide, new research shows (UPI).Mozambique’s Gorongosa has African wild dogs once again (The New York Times).Other newsA water shortage is devastating herders in western India (Al Jazeera).The combination of fire and destructive elephants may not be as harmful to savanna trees as once thought, scientists have found (The Economist).Sixteen black rhinos were successfully moved to Swaziland in July from South Africa (The Maravi Post).Canada has two new ocean sanctuaries aimed at protecting sea ice and wildlife in the Arctic (Mother Nature Network).The new report from the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warns about the dangers of climate change to water and food security (The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Economist, The Atlantic, The Guardian).More young conservatives in the U.S. see climate change as a priority (The New York Times).Climate change could cause a global financial meltdown (The Atlantic).Fires in Siberia were set by illegal loggers, authorities say (The Irish Times, Reuters, The Moscow Times).Mercury concentrations in fish are rising, despite decades of emissions reductions through regulation (The Atlantic).Banner image of a chimpanzee in Uganda by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Conservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update last_img read more

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Thursday’s QPR quiz

first_imgTest your knowledge by seeing how many of these five QPR-related questions you can answer correctly.[wp-simple-survey-84]YTo4OntzOjk6IndpZGdldF9pZCI7czoyMDoid3lzaWphLW5sLTEzNTI0NjE4NjkiO3M6NToibGlzdHMiO2E6MTp7aTowO3M6MToiMyI7fXM6MTA6Imxpc3RzX25hbWUiO2E6MTp7aTozO3M6MjI6Ildlc3QgTG9uZG9uIFNwb3J0IGxpc3QiO31zOjEyOiJhdXRvcmVnaXN0ZXIiO3M6MTc6Im5vdF9hdXRvX3JlZ2lzdGVyIjtzOjEyOiJsYWJlbHN3aXRoaW4iO3M6MTM6ImxhYmVsc193aXRoaW4iO3M6Njoic3VibWl0IjtzOjMzOiJTdWJzY3JpYmUgdG8gb3VyIGRhaWx5IG5ld3NsZXR0ZXIiO3M6Nzoic3VjY2VzcyI7czoyODM6IlRoYW5rIHlvdSEgUGxlYXNlIGNoZWNrIHlvdXIgaW5ib3ggaW4gb3JkZXIgdG8gY29uZmlybSB5b3VyIHN1YnNjcmlwdGlvbi4gSWYgeW91IGRvbid0IHNlZSBhbiBlLW1haWwgZnJvbSB1cywgY2hlY2sgeW91ciBzcGFtIGZvbGRlci4gSWYgeW91IHN0aWxsIGhhdmVuJ3QgcmVjZWl2ZWQgYSBjb25maXJtYXRpb24gbWVzc2FnZSwgcGxlYXNlIGUtbWFpbCBmZWVkYmFja0B3ZXN0bG9uZG9uc3BvcnQuY29tIGFuZCB0ZWxsIHVzIHlvdSB3aXNoIHRvIHN1YnNjcmliZSB0byBvdXIgbmV3c2xldHRlci4iO3M6MTI6ImN1c3RvbWZpZWxkcyI7YToxOntzOjU6ImVtYWlsIjthOjE6e3M6NToibGFiZWwiO3M6NToiRW1haWwiO319fQ== Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Springboks honour Breyton, Os

first_img22 July 2005Os du Randt and Breyton Paulse have both been honoured for their outstanding services to Springbok rugby. It happened on Thursday evening, during a live broadcast of Supersport’s popular Boots and All rugby programme.In recognition of their contribution, both players were presented with unique Tag Heuer watches.Paulse, who has joined French club Clermont on a two-year contract, will be playing in his fifty-second test when he faces the Wallabies at Ellis Park on Saturday in the return leg of the Nelson Mandela Challenge Shield.It is the first test of the year for the nippy winger because a knee injury forced him to miss the Springboks’ previous four matches.Paulse’s last test?There is the very real possibility that it might also be Paulse’s last game in the green and gold. His contract doesn’t include an agreement that he be released for Springbok matches if selected.Coach Jake White reckons he wants the winger in his squad for the 2007 World Cup, but the possibility of Paulse playing home tests looks bleak at best. Would White be willing to accommodate him given the nature of his contract in France? The answer to that question will become clear soon enough.Paulse’s superb test career began in November 1997 against Italy, a match that South Africa won 62-31. The Bok side that day included Os du Randt at loosehead prop.The Free State stalwart won’t be playing on Saturday. He is out of the test due to injury.World Cup winnerDu Randt’s test career began even before Paulse’s did, in October 1994, when South Africa beat Argentina 42-22 in Port Elizabeth. The following year he was an integral part of the Springboks’ World Cup winning effort on home soil.Later, Du Randt spent almost four-and-a-half years out of international rugby after at one stage retiring from the game. Bok coach Jake White recalled him in June 2004 for a two-match series against Ireland and he was immediately rewarded as Du Randt showed he could still compete with the best.As a result, he won the Players’ Player of the Year Award in 2004 and also appeared in all 13 of South Africa’s tests.He won his fiftieth test cap at Twickenham last year and has played in 54 tests in all. That is a record for a Springbok prop.Jake White is a big fan of both Paulse and Du Randt.“The gifts, he said, “are only a small gesture of appreciation to remind them of their service and loyalty to their country and the team. Os and Breyton are two exceptional individuals and I am extremely lucky to be able to call on their services.” Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Cape bones add new chapter to human history

first_imgThe skeleton found at St Helena Bay is said to come from earliest group of humans to diverge from “Mitochondrial Eve”, our common ancestor. The diagram above shows how female lineage can be traced to Mitochondrial Eve through random selection. The black colour lineage represents matrilineal line descended from mitochondrial DNA of the most recent common ancestor and the other colours are of extinct matrilineal lines. (Image: Wikimedia Commons)Shamin ChibbaJust 150 kilometres north of Cape Town, in the idyllic settlement of St Helena Bay, lived a fisherman. He led a simple life, foraging and hunting for seafood to feed his family. So many of his days were spent in the water, that he developed surfer’s ear, an abnormal bone growth in the ear canal which could decrease hearing and lead to infections.But this was not an ordinary Cape fisherman. This ancient Khoisan man existed 2 330 years ago and the discovery of his skeleton in the coastal village is opening a new chapter in the history of mankind.An international group of researchers recently released their findings based on mitochondrial DNA extracted from the inner canal of a single tooth and ribs from the skeleton. They found he belonged to the earliest group of humans to diverge from “Mitochondrial Eve“, our common ancestor. Before he was unearthed, no genetic data of people who had lived before the arrival of pastoralists in the southern coast of Africa had been recovered.Mitochondrial DNA, otherwise known as maternal DNA, provided the first evidence that we all came from Africa. It helps us map a figurative genetic tree, with all its branches leading to a common Mitochondrial Eve. The closest surviving lineage to this skeleton is the click-speaking foragers largely found in the semi-desert regions of Namibia and Botswana. (Image: Chris Bennet Photography)After noting that the man had osteoarthritis and tooth wear, Prof Alan Morris, a biological anthropologist from the University of Cape Town (UCT), judged him to be in his fifties when he died. Furthermore, when Morris discovered a bony growth in the skeleton’s ear canal, known as surfer’s ear, he realised the man was a “marine forager” who hunted and gathered seafood. “This suggests that he spent some time diving for food in the cold coastal waters, while shells carbon-dated to the same period and found near his grave, confirmed his seafood diet,” Morris said.Vanessa Hayes, a world-renowned expert in African genomics at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Sydney, Australia, said the man existed before pastoralists migrated into the region about 2 000 years ago. “Pastoralists made their way down the coast from Angola, bringing herds of sheep. We could demonstrate that our marine hunter-gatherer carried a different maternal lineage to these early migrants – containing a DNA variant that we have never seen before.” DiscoveryUCT archaeologist Professor Andrew Smith discovered the skeleton in June 2010, just 50 kilometres from the site where 117 000-year-old human footprints, known as Eve’s Footprints, were found in Langebaan 19 years ago. He immediately contacted Hayes.Because of the acidity of the soil, extracting DNA from the skeleton posed a problem, prompting the team to take the samples to paleogeneticist Prof Svante Pääbo at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. The institute is a world-leading laboratory in ancient DNA research, and Pääbo is best known for successfully sequencing a Neanderthal. World renowned genomics professor, Vanessa Hayes, was instrumental in piecing together the lineage of the skeleton found at St Helena Bay. (Image: Garvan Institute of Medical Research)Hayes, who is known for sequencing Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s DNA, said the findings presented evidence that this man and other coastal dwellers came from a lineage most closely related to Mitochondrial Eve and thought to be extinct. “In this study, I believe we may have found an individual from a lineage that broke off early in modern human evolution and remained geographically isolated,” said Hayes. “That would contribute significantly to refining the human reference genome.”The closest surviving lineage to this skeleton is the click-speaking foragers largely found in the semi-desert regions of Namibia and Botswana. Archaeological, historical and genetic evidence shows there once was a broader southerly scattering of click-speaking peoples, including pastoralists who migrated southwards and indigenous marine-foragers. “Because of this, the study gives a baseline against which historic herders at the Cape can now be compared,” said Hayes.The team believes that with further testing of the southern African archaeological record, even more diverse human genomes will be discovered.last_img read more

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Yusuf to marry soon but I will wait: Irfan Pathan

first_imgIndia discard Irfan Pathan on Friday said his elder brother Yusuf, who recently bagged a whopping deal of USD 2.1 million with IPL Franchisee Kolkata Knight riders for season-IV, will soon tie the nuptial knot.Asked about his own marraige plans, Irfan said his priority is winning back his place in the national side.”I want to make a comeback in the Indian team. You know, marriage is going to come with time. First my brother has to get married and it is going to be soon,” Irfan said.”Hopefully the new bride is coming. We are just about to select a girl for him. But for me, it is going to take some time. For me, I just want to make a comeback for the team then everything’s going to follow,” he told a TV channel.Yusuf, whose stellar performance in the first edition of IPL had helped Rajasthan Royals lift the title, was bought by the Shah Rukh Khan co-owned KKR for Rs 9.66 crore.On the other hand, Irfan, who earned Rs 3.7 crore at Kings XI Punjab, will now play for Delhi Daredevils with a Rs 8.74 crore contract.last_img read more

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18 days agoBrighton goalscorer Neal Maupay says Tottenham heads quickly dropped

first_imgBrighton goalscorer Neal Maupay says Tottenham heads quickly droppedby Paul Vegas18 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveBrighton striker Neal Maupay says Tottenham heads quickly dropped during Saturday’s 3-0 thrashing.Maupay scored Albion’s quickest ever Premier League goal after 150 seconds when the disorientated Hugo Lloris inexplicably dropped the ball before suffering a dislocated elbow when he fell.“We sensed their heads went down after the first goal – that’s why we kept pushing and ­putting pressure on them,” said Maupay. “Losing Lloris and the goal so early was hard for them and they looked worried. We knew they were having a tough time so we wanted to keep going at them. And it worked because they dropped a bit and we got the second goal.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Video: Ohio State Linebackers Joe Burger And Craig Fada Show Off Their Apartment On “OSU Cribs”

first_imgA closeup of an Ohio State football helmet on the field.NEW ORLEANS, LA – JANUARY 01: An Ohio State Buckeye helmet is seen on the sidelines prior to the start of the game during the All State Sugar Bowl at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome on January 1, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)When it comes to college housing, Ohio State football players have it pretty good. Buckeye linebackers Joe Burger and Craig Fada showed off their apartment on the first episode of “OSU Cribs,” and we must say, they have a pretty nice pad. There is plenty of Ohio State-themed memorabilia around, as you’d expect, but they also show off the strobe light and fog machine set up. And of course, like any good episode of Cribs, we get a look at the players’ cars.Playing football at Ohio State looks like a decent time. Not that we didn’t already know it.last_img read more

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