10 months agoCrystal Palace monitoring Chelsea loanee Abraham

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Crystal Palace monitoring Chelsea loanee Abrahamby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveCrystal Palace are monitoring Chelsea forward Tammy Abraham ahead of a potential move in January. The 21-year-old is currently on loan at Aston Villa, but Chelsea do have an option to recall in January.However, the Blues could recall Abraham and loan him back out again to a Premier League club.The Daily Telegraphclaim Crystal Palace would be keen on signing the Englishman as they continue to struggle in front of goal this season.Abraham has netted 12 times for Villa this season and manager Dean Smith remains hopeful he can retain his services for the second half of the season. last_img read more

See More

Mike Tyson Meets With Bright Future International

first_imgLast week, co-founder of Bright Future International Anthony Melikhov attended a private luncheon hosted by music producer Damon Elliott with former Boxing World Champion now philanthropist Mike Tyson.Mike Tyson and his family have taken on two regional Nevada based organizations as causes to put their time and contributions toward.Bright Future International welcomes the support of volunteers from around the world. Their vision is that they believe in order to create a better world for our children, people must as individuals, realize that they can benefit themselves most by helping others.“We hope to make altruism a modern necessity, so more people become interested in participating in selfless acts – where people volunteer and donate their time not because they have to, but simply because they feel compelled to,” says Anthony Melikhov.Celebrities like Mike Tyson have joined the Bright Future Ambassador (BFA) global worldwide program. Forest Whitaker (Actor), Dionne Warwick (Grammy Award Winning Recording Artist), Damon Elliott (Grammy Award Winning Music Producer) have joined the the Network, which is an alliance of diverse individuals; teachers, mentors, celebrities, philanthropists, who posses virtues that mirror Bright Future’s core values and principles. Participants share in Bright Future’s overarching goal to foster an environment of empathy, love, compassion, and perpetual hope. The program unites individuals regardless of race, sex, creed, and financial status who want to give back to humanity by participating in charitable causes, doing good deeds, volunteering, and working with children so they grow up with the hope of a bright future.Mike Tyson is focused on children that are homeless primarily in the Las Vegas. “There are over 7000 homeless children in Las Vegas, Nevada,” says Kiki Tyson, Mike Tyson’s wife and executive of his charities. Bright Future International works with organizations worldwide. It connects with established organizations throughout Russia, USA and Africa. Organizations that are non-governmental and governmental. “We have connected with good people who are leaders of organizations and efforts around the world. We put our trust into the people who are the leadership of organizations,” says Anthony Melikhov, Bright Future International.“During the two hour luncheon the conversation was about Mike’s Broadway show going on the road to 38 cities. Causes for children and the potential of a venture between Bright Future International and Mike Tyson’s charities,” says Richard Victor Mahee. Bright Future and Mike Tyson are preparing a series of events that will also extend into Moscow Russia.Source:PRWeb.comlast_img read more

See More

Polsat has acquired a significant stake in Eleve

first_imgPolsat has acquired a “significant stake” in Eleven Sports Poland in a deal that values Eleven Sports Network at approximately €80 million.The agreement establishes Polish commercial broadcaster Polsat as a strategic partner in Eleven Sports Poland, with a new management board to feature two members each from Telewizja Polsat and Eleven Sports.Eleven Sports said the transaction will allow it to consolidate its position as the fastest growing sports platform in Poland and enhance its offering for sports fans across the country.It said it also supports Eleven’s global expansion plans with more new markets and several digital projects set to be revealed in the coming weeks and months.“The agreement of this partnership with Telewizja Polsat is testament to our outstanding financial and operational success to date and our potential for further dynamic growth and development,” said Marc Watson, executive chairman and group CEO, Eleven Sports.“This is an extremely exciting time for Eleven Sports and we look forward to working towards the new opportunities that the agreement presents, locally in Poland and internationally on a global scale.”Maciej Stec, member of the management board of Telewizja Polsat and Cyfrowy Polsat said: “Sport has always been extremely important to our Group, our viewers and subscribers…Thanks to the strategic agreement with Eleven Sports we will strengthen our offer, make it even more appealing and continue to provide more real sports emotions.”Stec will now become president of the management board of Eleven Sports Network. Eleven’s current managing director, Krzysztof Świergiel, will become CEO of the company. All senior management of Eleven Sports Network will maintain their current positions.last_img read more

See More

Rice University scientists develop synthetic protein switches to control electron flow

Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 18 2018Scientists at Rice University have developed synthetic protein switches to control the flow of electrons.The proof-of-concept, metal-containing proteins made in the Rice lab of synthetic biologist Joff Silberg are expressed within cells upon the introduction of one chemical and are functionally activated by another chemical. If the proteins have been placed in the cell, they can simply be turned on and off.”This is not a metaphor for a switch, it is a literal electrical switch built from a protein,” Silberg said.The proteins could facilitate next-generation bioelectronics, including complete biological circuits within cells that mimic their electronic counterparts. The possible applications include living sensors, electronically controlled metabolic pathways for chemical synthesis and active pills that sense their environment and release drugs only when needed.The work appears in Nature Chemical Biology. “Biology is really good at sensing molecules,” said Silberg, a professor of biosciences and bioengineering. “That’s an amazing thing. Think about how complex the cell is, and how proteins evolve that can respond to a single prompt in a sea of information. We want to leverage that exquisite ability to build more elaborate biomolecules and use these to develop useful synthetic biology technologies.”The Rice team takes advantage of those innate abilities. “Natural proteins that move electrons more or less act as wires that are always there,” said Systems, Synthetic, and Physical Biology graduate student and lead author Josh Atkinson. “If we can turn these pathways on and off, we can make cells operate more efficiently.”Rice’s metalloprotein switches – so called for their iron content – are quick, Silberg said. Nature typically controls electron flow by using genetic mechanisms to control the production of the protein “wires.””It’s all transcriptional,” he said. “Even in a fast-growing E. coli bacteria, it takes many minutes. By contrast, protein switches function on a time scale of seconds.”To make the switch – which they use in a synthetic electron transfer pathway – the researchers needed a stable protein that could be reliably split along its peptide backbone to allow for the insertion of protein fragments that complete or break the circuit. They based the switch on ferredoxin, a common iron-sulfur protein that mediates electron transfer in all the domains of life.Related StoriesNew study reveals ‘clutch’ proteins responsible for putting T cell activation ‘into gear’Nanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellSlug serves as ‘command central’ for determining breast stem cell healthAtkinson built switches embedded in E. coli that can be turned on in the presence (or off in the absence) of 4-hydroxytamoxifen, an estrogen receptor modulator used to fight breast and other cancers, or by bisphenol A (BPA), a synthetic chemical used in plastics.Their E. coli bacterium is a mutant strain that is programmed to only grow in a sulfate medium when all of the components of the ferredoxin electron transport chain – including electron donor and acceptor proteins – are expressed. That way, the bacteria could only grow if the switches turn on and transfer electrons as planned.Silberg said the discovery should lead to custom-designed switches for many applications, including contact with external electronic devices. “It’s why we’ve been so gung-ho about this idea of bioelectronics, a whole field that’s emerging as synthetic biology gets more control over the design,” he said. “Once you can standardize this, there are all kinds of things we can build with cells.”That could include smart pills that release medications only on demand, or gut biome detectors that report on conditions. Or perhaps electrical circuits contained entirely within cells.”We can already map a lot of what electrical engineers do with capacitors and resistors onto metabolism, but until now, there have been no switches,” Silberg said.He suggested multiple switches could also turn a cell into a biological processor. “Then we could see digital parallel processing in the cell,” he said. “It changes the way we look at biology.”The discovery fits with a new initiative led by Silberg and bioscientist and co-author George Bennett and their colleagues to promote training in the field of bioelectronics. Rice recently received National Science Foundation (NSF) support to start a graduate-level bioelectronics program to be administered by the Institute of Biosciences and Bioengineering. It was also part of the discussion at this year’s bioelectronics-focused De Lange Conference earlier this month at Rice and will be a focus of the Gordon Research Conference co-chaired by Silberg and Rafael Verduzco of the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering department at Rice, in New Hampshire in June 2019.Source: http://news.rice.edu/2018/12/17/switch-in-a-cell-electrifies-life-2/ read more

See More

Social robots can lead to more positive emotions in sick children study

first_imgJoining Breazeal and Logan on the paper are: Sooyeon Jeong, a PhD student in the Personal Robots group; Brianna O’Connell, Duncan Smith-Freedman, and Peter Weinstock, all of Boston Children’s Hospital; and Matthew Goodwin and James Heathers, both of Northeastern University.Boosting moodFirst prototyped in 2006, Huggable is a plush teddy bear with a screen depicting animated eyes. While the eventual goal is to make the robot fully autonomous, it is currently operated remotely by a specialist in the hall outside a child’s room. Through custom software, a specialist can control the robot’s facial expressions and body actions, and direct its gaze. The specialists could also talk through a speaker — with their voice automatically shifted to a higher pitch to sound more childlike — and monitor the participants via camera feed. The tablet-based avatar of the bear had identical gestures and was also remotely operated.Related StoriesPuzzling paralysis affecting healthy children warns CDCWhy Mattresses Could be a Health Threat to Sleeping ChildrenRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaDuring the interventions involving Huggable — involving kids ages 3 to 10 years — a specialist would sing nursery rhymes to younger children through robot and move the arms during the song. Older kids would play the I Spy game, where they have to guess an object in the room described by the specialist through Huggable.Through self-reports and questionnaires, the researchers recorded how much the patients and families liked interacting with Huggable. Additional questionnaires assessed patient’s positive moods, as well as anxiety and perceived pain levels. The researchers also used cameras mounted in the child’s room to capture and analyze speech patterns, characterizing them as joyful or sad, using software.A greater percentage of children and their parents reported that the children enjoyed playing with Huggable more than with the avatar or traditional teddy bear. Speech analysis backed up that result, detecting significantly more joyful expressions among the children during robotic interventions. Additionally, parents noted lower levels of perceived pain among their children.The researchers noted that 93 percent of patients completed the Huggable-based interventions, and found few barriers to practical implementation, as determined by comments from the specialists.A previous paper based on the same study found that the robot also seemed to facilitate greater family involvement in the interventions, compared to the other two methods, which improved the intervention overall. “Those are findings we didn’t necessarily expect in the beginning,” says Jeong, also a co-author on the previous paper. “We didn’t tell family to join any of the play sessions — it just happened naturally. When the robot came in, the child and robot and parents all interacted more, playing games or in introducing the robot.”An automated, take-home botThe study also generated valuable insights for developing a fully autonomous Huggable robot, which is the researchers’ ultimate goal. They were able to determine which physical gestures are used most and least often, and which features specialists may want for future iterations. Huggable, for instance, could introduce doctors before they enter a child’s room or learn a child’s interests and share that information with specialists. The researchers may also equip the robot with computer vision, so it can detect certain objects in a room to talk about those with children.”In these early studies, we capture data … to wrap our heads around an authentic use-case scenario where, if the bear was automated, what does it need to do to provide high-quality standard of care,” Breazeal says.In the future, that automated robot could be used to improve continuity of care. A child would take home a robot after a hospital visit to further support engagement, adherence to care regimens, and monitoring well-being.”We want to continue thinking about how robots can become part of the whole clinical team and help everyone,” Jeong says. “When the robot goes home, we want to see the robot monitor a child’s progress. … If there’s something clinicians need to know earlier, the robot can let the clinicians know, so [they’re not] surprised at the next appointment that the child hasn’t been doing well.”Next, the researchers are hoping to zero in on which specific patient populations may benefit the most from the Huggable interventions. “We want to find the sweet spot for the children who need this type of extra support,” Logan says. Source:Massachusetts Institute of Technology Child life staff provide a lot of human interaction to help normalize the hospital experience, but they can’t be with every kid, all the time. Social robots create a more consistent presence throughout the day. There may also be kids who don’t always want to talk to people, and respond better to having a robotic stuffed animal with them. It’s exciting knowing what types of support we can provide kids who may feel isolated or scared about what they’re going through.”First author Deirdre Logan, a pediatric psychologist at Boston Children’s Hospital Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 26 2019A new study demonstrates, for the first time, that “social robots” used in support sessions held in pediatric units at hospitals can lead to more positive emotions in sick children.Many hospitals host interventions in pediatric units, where child life specialists will provide clinical interventions to hospitalized children for developmental and coping support. This involves play, preparation, education, and behavioral distraction for both routine medical care, as well as before, during, and after difficult procedures. Traditional interventions include therapeutic medical play and normalizing the environment through activities such as arts and crafts, games, and celebrations.For the study, published in the journal Pediatrics, researchers from the MIT Media Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital, and Northeastern University deployed a robotic teddy bear, “Huggable,” across several pediatric units at Boston Children’s Hospital. More than 50 hospitalized children were randomly split into three groups of interventions that involved Huggable, a tablet-based virtual Huggable, or a traditional plush teddy bear. In general, Huggable improved various patient outcomes over those other two options.The study primarily demonstrated the feasibility of integrating Huggable into the interventions. But results also indicated that children playing with Huggable experienced more positive emotions overall. They also got out of bed and moved around more, and emotionally connected with the robot, asking it personal questions and inviting it to come back later to meet their families. “Such improved emotional, physical, and verbal outcomes are all positive factors that could contribute to better and faster recovery in hospitalized children,” the researchers write in their study.Although it is a small study, it is the first to explore social robotics in a real-world inpatient pediatric setting with ill children, the researchers say. Other studies have been conducted in labs, have studied very few children, or were conducted in public settings without any patient identification.But Huggable is designed only to assist health care specialists — not replace them, the researchers stress. “It’s a companion,” says co-author Cynthia Breazeal, an associate professor of media arts and sciences and founding director of the Personal Robots group. “Our group designs technologies with the mindset that they’re teammates. We don’t just look at the child-robot interaction. It’s about [helping] specialists and parents, because we want technology to support everyone who’s invested in the quality care of a child.”last_img read more

See More

Broadcom shareholders approve plan to move back to US

Broadcom CEO Hock Tan visited the White House last November where he told President Donald Trump the chipmaker would be moving back to the US Citation: Broadcom shareholders approve plan to move back to US (2018, March 23) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-broadcom-shareholders.html Explore further Broadcom withdraws Qualcomm offer after Trump blocks bid © 2018 AFP Broadcom said Friday that its shareholders overwhelmingly approved a plan to move the computer chipmaking giant back to the United States from Singapore. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The company, which saw its huge buyout offer for rival Qualcomm blocked this month by President Donald Trump on national security grounds, said that the move will be completed on April 4, subject to approval by the High Court of the Republic of Singapore.Broadcom said more than 99 percent of its shareholders voted in favor of the plan.Earlier this month Trump issued an order barring the proposed $117 billion hostile takeover of Qualcomm, citing credible evidence such a deal “threatens to impair the national security of the United States.”It would have been the biggest-ever deal in the tech sector.Trump’s order made no mention of China, but an earlier letter from the US Treasury Department warned that a takeover might hurt US leadership in 5G, super-fast fifth-generation wireless networks now being deployed, and consequently pose a threat to US security.The presidential action was allowed because Broadcom is a foreign entity, but would not have been possible had it completed its redomiciliation.Broadcom was founded in California but moved its headquarters after a 2015 deal that merged it with Avago Technologies.On March 14, Broadcom said it was withdrawing its offer for Qualcomm. read more

See More

Dutch firm ASML perfecting microchip shrink for tech giants

The light has to be focused in a vacuum to stop it being absorbed by air—a difficult technological feat—and the parameters are so small that the machine is working “to within the size of an atom”.The tiniest speck of dust infiltrating the machine could ruin the design, leaving blank spaces on the chips.ASML now employs about 20,000 people, mostly engineers and most in Veldhoven, but it also has sites in Asia and the United States.And as it grows it is hiring. Some 3,000 new posts were added last year, with a similar number of new jobs expected this year. A former vice-president at French rail giant Alstom, he joined ASML in 2010 and has become increasingly passionate about its innovative technology.Accurate ‘to within an atom’The EUV system works by projecting the light through a blueprint, ASML explains. Using a series of complex optics, made by German company Zeiss, “the pattern is reduced and focused onto a thin slice of silicon coated with a light-sensitive chemical”.”The light interacts with the chemical effectively printing the pattern onto the silicon or wafer. When the unwanted silicon is etched away a three-dimensional structure is created.” This is repeated dozens of times, layer upon layer, leaving a grid of hundreds of chips on one silicon wafer. Citation: Dutch firm ASML perfecting ‘microchip shrink’ for tech giants (2018, May 13) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-dutch-firm-asml-microchip-tech.html ‘Phones are not for calling’Last year after two decades of research and development and billions of euros, ASML shipped its first 12 EUV machines to clients. Each costs about 120 million euros ($145 million). This year it has projected sales of 20 machines—by 2020, it hopes to be selling 35 to 40 a year.It is ironic that these machines, which produce chips of infinitesimally small dimensions, are the size of a bus. Three Boeing 747 aircraft are needed to transport one machine to a client.Long seen as a bellwether of the tech industry, the company is listed on both the Amsterdam bourse, the AEX, and the Nasdaq in New York. And pushing the boundaries of this technology is Dutch company ASML, which since its foundation in 1984 has quietly become a world leader in the semiconductor business.”There is more power in your smartphone today than was used to put man on the moon,” says ASML’s chief operating officer Frederic Schneider-Maunoury, animatedly waving his mobile phone in the air.When you open an app on your phone, the chain allowing you to book a flight, message a friend or check out who’s hot in your neighbourhood arcs all the way back most likely to ASML.Headquartered in Veldhoven, near the Belgian border, it builds sophisticated lithography machines to enable the world’s top chip makers—Intel, Samsung and Apple supplier Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing (TSMC)—to produce the smallest, most powerful, most cost-effective microprocessors on the planet.Its newest machines use highly-focused extreme ultra-violet (EUV) light to imprint designs on the chips, and are at the cutting-edge of what is scientifically and technologically possible in the art of miniaturisation. Dust is the enemy. A speck of dust inside the manufacturing equipment can ruin chips Last year ASML announced profits had almost doubled to 2.12 billion euros Dutch hi-tech group ASML notches up ‘fantastic year’ Last year it announced profits had almost doubled to 2.12 billion euros on record sales of 9.05 billion euros.Only two other companies in the world—the Japanese giants Nikon and Canon—make lithography machines and neither has yet developed EUV technology. They call it “the shrink”—it’s the challenge of how to pack more circuits onto the microchips which power everything from our phones to our computers, even our coffee machines. A lens used in the manufacturing of semiconductors at Dutch company ASML, whose latest systems project blueprints of circuitry onto silicon wafers ASML employs about 20,000 people, mostly engineers © 2018 AFP Explore further “Our problem is not just to find the technologies, we than have to put it into the products in an economical way,” Schneider-Maunoury told AFP, in his office overlooking ASML’s sprawling site.”Why buy a new phone? It’s not to make calls on. I buy a new phone precisely because it allows me to do things that the previous phone didn’t,” he said.But this is a competitive market, and if the new phone “is going to cost me 10 times more, than I’m not going to buy it”. ASML’s chief operating officer Frederic Schneider-Maunoury has become increasingly passionate about the firm’s cutting-edge technology This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

See More

Global collaboration gives rise to 3D printed field test kit

first_imgCredit: Flinders University This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A three-cornered collaboration between South Australia, Texas and Ethiopia is using 3-D printed technology and design innovation to efficiently diagnose a deadly disease that infects a million people every year. The New Venture Institute is located in the Tonsley Innovation Precinct, a former car factory transformed into an advanced manufacturing hub in Adelaide, a sister city of Austin.Salier said the sister city relationship helped start the conversation. 3D-printed test tube and caps that form part of the test kit. Credit: Flinders University Provided by The Lead Clinical trial to find new treatment for visceral leishmaniasis begins in eastern Africa The kit to diagnose leishmaniasis is being trialled this month by the Armauer Hansen Research Institute (AHRI) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, as part of a program to revolutionise the way diseases are tested and treated.Working with Austin-based infectious disease virtual incubator PandemicTech and the New Venture Institute (NVI) at Flinders University in Adelaide, South Australia, Dr. Endalamaw Gadisa has been able to quickly iterate his knowledge of a better way to test for leishmaniasis into a practical and cost-effective design.Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease spread through the bites of sandflies. The World Health Organisation estimates that up to 1 million new cases and 30,000 deaths occur annually, usually among malnourished people living in poverty and or unsanitary conditions. Although it can lead to ulcers and death, leishmanias is curable if diagnosed and treated early.Addis Ababa-based Dr. Gadisa identified several difficulties in testing for the disease in Ethopia, leading to the need for more effective and practical diagnostic equipment. The difficulties with the current system include the cost of a liquid medium (reagent) used for testing, the fragile test tubes used to store the reagent, the challenge of viewing the samples under available microscopes, and the length of time it takes to get results, which can be more than a week.He developed a design for a test tube that requires significantly less reagent (10 microliters versus 25 millilitres) and could provide results in as few as three days, but he lacked the ability to build his prototype in Addis Ababa.Andrew Nerlinger, the director of PandemicTech in Austin, offered to work with Dr. Gadisa as one of the incubator’s original pilot projects, and then brought the problem to Matt Salier, the director of Flinders University’s New Venture Institute in South Australia.”When I eventually described the project to Matt Salier during the South by Southwest conference in March 2017, he offered to collaborate and introduced me to NVI’s Raphael Garcia, who ultimately worked directly with Dr. Gadisa and me on several design iterations resulting in the prototype depicted in the most recent photos,” Nerlinger said. Citation: Global collaboration gives rise to 3-D printed field test kit (2018, July 6) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-07-global-collaboration-d-field-kit.html Explore further “Flinders NVI has had an office presence in our sister city Austin for over four years now with our local partner, Tech Ranch. I met Andrew from Endura Ventures as he was establishing PandemicTech and we saw an opportunity to apply our design and innovative manufacturing expertise at Tonsley,” Salier said.Prototyping the design took less than four months and was done on NVI’s Stratasys Objet Connex 3-D printer. This allowed various solutions to be considered through a Design-Thinking process before picking the most suitable one to be designed on CAD software.Salier said the first prototype was created using a clear liquid resin and was produced in three parts: a main body which will hold the fluid, a cork on top to plug the culture tube, and a bottom plug which is removable to clean the culture tube. The main body has a central hole throughout the unit, which the plugs connect to, a design choice that allows the culture tube to be re-usable and cleanable.The design of the main body was refined several times to increase the clarity and durability of the body, the part responsible for allowing diagnosis through microscopic inspection. Different materials were printed for the top and bottom plugs to ensure they could completely seal the main body while remaining easily removable for cleaning and sterilising.The finished kit, which cost less that A$5,000 to develop, is packed in an off-the-shelf Pelican case with foam laser-cut at the university. The pack also comes with special 3-D printed microscopes that attach to a smart phone camera and convert the phone into a powerful 60x magnification microscope that can collect photos for diagnostic purposes. The microscope is made by South Australian education startup company Go Micro that is also co-located at Flinders University at Tonsley.Despite Austin, Adelaide and Addis Ababa all being more than 10,000km apart, Nerlinger said the cost effective collaboration has created reusable high quality prototypes at a fraction of the typical cost “for a neglected disease that causes immense morbidity and mortality in the most austere and resource limited environments in the world”.”We were also excited that NVI was able to match Dr. Gadisa with one of its own technologies, the microscope attachment used on a smartphone that is able to read the results of the leishmaniasis testing,” he said.”The new testing device will allow more patients to be treated earlier and decrease the amount of time it takes to obtain a diagnosis. It will also potentially allow health workers to provide a diagnosis to patients while conducting medical work in the remote regions often most impacted by leishmaniasis.”If the testing is successful then the opportunity exists to build a financially sustainable social impact company around the testing kit that brings together resources from Ethiopia and Australia.”Salier said projects like these were exactly why Flinders NVI was always endeavouring to demonstrate how new technologies and business models could address large-scale problems facing society.”We don’t need more software to solve problems already solved 10 times over, what we do need is innovation which has impact, that creates value by applying new approaches to global challenges.”last_img read more

See More

Twitter suspended 58 million accounts in 4Q Update

first_imgIn this Feb. 8, 2018 file photo, the logo for Twitter is displayed above a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Twitter suspended at least 58 million user accounts in the final three months of 2017, according to data obtained by The Associated Press. The figure highlights the company’s newly aggressive stance against malicious or suspicious accounts in the wake of Russian disinformation efforts during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File) Citation: Twitter suspended 58 million accounts in 4Q (Update) (2018, July 17) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-07-twitter-million-accounts-4q.html Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Twitter suspended at least 58 million user accounts in the final three months of 2017, according to data obtained by The Associated Press. The figure highlights the company’s newly aggressive stance against malicious or suspicious accounts in the wake of Russian disinformation efforts during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign. Twitter shares fall on worries about user base Last week, Twitter confirmed a Washington Post report that it had suspended 70 million accounts in May and June. The cavalcade of suspensions has raised questions as to whether the crackdown could affect Twitter’s user growth and whether the company should have warned investors earlier. The company has been struggling with user growth compared to rivals like Instagram and Facebook.The number of suspended accounts originated with Twitter’s “firehose,” a data stream it makes available to academics, companies and others willing to pay for it.The new figure sheds light on Twitter’s attempt to improve “information quality” on its service, its term for countering fake accounts, bots, disinformation and other malicious occurrences. Such activity was rampant on Twitter and other social-media networks during the 2016 campaign, much of it originating with the Internet Research Agency, a since-shuttered Russian “troll farm” implicated in election-disruption efforts by the U.S. special counsel and congressional investigations.Suspensions surged over the fourth quarter. Twitter suspended roughly 15 million accounts last October. That number jumped by two-thirds to more than 25 million in December.Twitter declined to comment on the data. But its executives have said that efforts to clean up the platform are a priority, while acknowledging that its crackdown has affected and may continue to affect user numbers.Twitter said in April it had 336 million monthly active users, which it defines as accounts that have logged in at least once during the previous 30 days. The suspended accounts do not appear to have made a large dent in this number, which was up 3 percent from a year earlier. Twitter maintains that most of the suspended accounts had been dormant for at least a month, and thus weren’t included in its active user numbers.Michael Pachter, a stock analyst with Wedbush Securities, said he thinks the purge late last year may have been part of an initial sweep of inactive accounts that had little effect on activity or advertising revenue. But he said he expected advertising revenue to fall 1 to 2 percent due to the more recent purge last week, when Twitter said it was removing frozen accounts from follower counts. He expects the company to be upfront about the impact when it announces quarterly earnings on July 27, and said the cleanup is good for users and advertisers. “They’re certainly doing the right thing,” he said.Scott Kessler, an analyst with CFRA who has a “sell” rating on Twitter stock, said multiple reports and vague clarifications by executives are creating uncertainty about what Twitter’s numbers really mean.The purge activity “adds a level of uncertainty,” he said. “As an analyst, I want a more genuine view of the user base.”Chief Financial Officer Ned Segal said in February that some of the company’s “information quality efforts” that include removing accounts could affect monthly user figures. Segal offered no specifics.Six months later, in late June, Twitter disclosed that its systems found nearly 10 million “potentially spammy or automated accounts per week” in the month of May, and 6.4 million per week in December 2017. That’s up from 3.2 million per week in September. The company didn’t say how many of these identified accounts were actually suspended.Following the Post report, which caused Twitter’s stock to drop sharply, Segal took to Twitter to reassure investors that this number didn’t count in the company’s user metrics. “If we removed 70M accounts from our reported metrics, you would hear directly from us,” he tweeted last Monday .Shares recovered somewhat after that tweet. The stock has largely been on an upswing lately, and more than doubled its value in the past year.Twitter is taking other steps besides account deletions to combat misuse of its service, working to rein in hate and abuse even as it tries to stay true to its roots as a bastion of free expression. Last fall, it vowed to crack down on hate speech and sexual harassment and CEO Jack Dorsey echoed the concerns of critics who said the company hasn’t done enough to curb such abuse. © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.last_img read more

See More

ADVIK HiTech expands presenceADVIK HiTech expands presence

first_imgPune automotive component Hi-Tech, a global automotive component manufacturer held the ground-breaking ceremony for its ninth plant and its third in Pune. With this addition, the Advik Group now has nine production facilities in India, Indonesia, and Vietnam. ADVIK Group, headquartered in Pune is a global manufacturer of automotive components and will be investing ₹85 crore to build the new facility, which will have manufacturing, assembling and testing facilities, creating more than 300 new jobs. The new plant spanning an initial 10,000 sq mt is expected to be operational by August 2019, bringing the total production floor space in Pune to 20,000 sq mt. The company has already started recruitment in manufacturing and related operations, including production, engineering, logistics, and quality. “Our new plant is an important part of our long-term growth strategy of building ahead-of-the-curve technologies and facilities. With stricter emission and safety norms, increased vehicle electrification and hybridization becoming the new growth drivers, our new plant will help us serve our customers better and stay ahead in the evolution of the technology curve,” said Aditya Bhartia, Managing Director, in a press statement. COMMENT COMMENTS Published on SHARE SHARE EMAIL December 18, 2018 SHARElast_img read more

See More